Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry

  1. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  2. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Carbonyls and Alcohols With Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Levitt, N.; Zhang, R.

    2006-12-01

    Recent environmental chamber studies have suggested that acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions of organic carbonyls lead to multifold increases in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and acid-catalyzed reactions between alcohols and aldehydes in the condensed phase lead to the formation of hemiacetals and acetals, also enhancing secondary organic aerosol growth. The kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous chemistry of carbonyls and alcohols with sulfuric acid, however, remain largely uncertain. In this talk, we present measurements of heterogeneous uptake of several carbonyls and alcohols on liquid H2SO4 in a wide range of acid concentrations and temperatures. The results indicate that uptake of larger carbonyls is explained by aldol condensation. For small dicarbonyls, heterogeneous reactions are shown to decrease with acidity and involve negligible formation of sulfate esters. Hydration and polymerization likely explain the measured uptake of such small dicarbonyls on H2SO4 and the measurements do not support an acid- catalyzed uptake. Atmospheric implications from our findings will be discussed.

  3. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  4. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  5. Heterogeneous oxidation reactions relevant to tropospheric aerosol chemistry studied by sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Grace; Buchbinder, Avram; Gibbs-Davis, Julianne; Scheidt, Karl; Geiger, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Unsaturated organic molecules (terpenes) that commonly form molecular films on tropospheric aerosols can be oxidized by ozone, influencing the microphysics of cloud formation and thus the earth's climate. Using a laboratory approach that combines organic synthesis with surface spectroscopy, we track the ozone oxidation reactions of tropospherically relevant terpenes bound to glass surfaces that serve as mimics for mineral dust. Specifically, vibrational broadband sum frequency generation (SFG) is used to study a number of tailor-made terpene-modified glass surfaces and to track their interactions with ozone in real time. Exposure of these surfaces to ppm levels of ozone at 1 atm and 300 K yield initial reaction probabilities that are significantly higher than corresponding gas phase reactions. SFG spectra help elucidate the molecular orientations of the surface-bound terpenes and the accessibility of reactive C=C bonds. Our work shows the successful use of SFG spectroscopy to determine heterogeneous atmospheric reaction probabilities and bridges the gap between atmospheric aerosol science and surface spectroscopy.

  6. Stochastic methods for aerosol chemistry: a compact molecular description of functionalization and fragmentation in the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane aerosol by OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, A A; Wilson, K R; Hinsberg, W D; Houle, F A

    2015-02-14

    The heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol by hydroxyl radicals (OH) can proceed through two general pathways: functionalization, in which oxygen functional groups are added to the carbon skeleton, and fragmentation, in which carbon-carbon bonds are broken, producing higher volatility, lower molecular weight products. An ongoing challenge is to develop a quantitative molecular description of these pathways that connects the oxidative evolution of the average aerosol properties (e.g. size and hygroscopicity) to the transformation of free radical intermediates. In order to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of aerosol oxidation, a relatively compact kinetics model is developed for the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane particles by OH using free radical intermediates that convert reactive hydrogen sites into oxygen functional groups. Stochastic simulation techniques are used to compare calculated system properties over ten oxidation lifetimes with the same properties measured in experiment. The time-dependent average squalane aerosol mass, volume, density, carbon number distribution of scission products, and the average elemental composition are predicted using known rate coefficients. For functionalization, the calculations reveal that the distribution of alcohol and carbonyl groups is controlled primarily by the initial OH abstraction rate and to lesser extent by the branching ratio between secondary peroxy radical product channels. For fragmentation, the calculations reveal that the formation of activated alkoxy radicals with neighboring functional groups controls the molecular decomposition, particularly at high O/C ratios. This kinetic scheme provides a framework for understanding the oxidation chemistry of a model organic aerosol and informs parameterizations of more complex systems. PMID:25578323

  7. Triple Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Carbonates: A Novel Technique to Identify Heterogeneous Chemistry on Aerosol Surfaces in Polluted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Masterson, A.; Ivanov, A. V.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    In the ambient atmosphere, the physical and chemical properties of aerosol vary greatly between location and time due to various heterogeneous and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. In polluted urban environments, the aerosol and gaseous mixtures interact to produce new compounds and particulates; consequently humans are exposed to many as yet undetected species. Studies of actual chemically-active, airborne particulates can better address the interaction of complex particulate and gaseous pollutant mixtures, however, it is notoriously difficult to measure chemical transformations of aerosols. Here we describe a new technique that can be used to understand the chemical transformation occurring on the surface of aerosols and thus to quantify the interaction of gaseous species and aerosol in the atmosphere. Fine and coarse aerosol samples were collected on filter papers in La Jolla, CA, USA for one week. The aerosol samples were digested with phosphoric acid and CO2 released was purified chromatographically and analyzed for 13 C. To obtain independent measurements of oxygen isotopes, the CO2 was fluorinated and oxygen gas obtained was analyzed using Mat253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The data indicated an excess 17O (0.6 to 4‰) in atmospheric carbonates. The oxygen isotope anomaly in atmospheric carbonates has been observed for the first time and it showed a highly significant correlation (r2 = 0.90) with urban index; an indirect measure of ozone chemistry. The δ13C in atmospheric carbonates was found to vary from -18 to -40‰. Controlled laboratory experiments to understand the origin and variation in the C and O isotopic composition of atmospheric carbonates were conducted using various mineral surfaces. Isotopic measurements of in-situ formed carbonated on CaOH, CaO, MgO, SiO2,Cu, CuO, Ni and Fe2O3 due to chemisorbed CO2 in the presence of thin water films were performed and we found that the δ13C in these carbonates ranged from -12 to -24

  8. Heterogeneous Chemistry in Global Chemistry Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtler, Scarlet; Simpson, David; Schultz, Martin; Bott, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The impact of six tropospheric heterogeneous reactions on ozone and nitrogen species was studied using two chemical transport models EMEP MSC-W and ECHAM6-HAMMOZ. Since heterogeneous reactions depend on reactant concentrations (in this study these are N_2O_5, NO_3, NO_2, O_3, HNO_3, HO_2) and aerosol surface area S_a, the modeled surface area of both models was compared to a satellite product retrieving the surface area. This comparison shows a good agreement in global pattern and especially the capability of both models to capture the extreme aerosol loadings in East Asia. Further, the impact of the heterogeneous reactions was evaluated by the simulation of a reference run containing all heterogeneous reactions and several sensitivity runs. One reaction was turned off in each sensitivity run to compare it with the reference run. As previously shown, the analysis of the sensitivity runs shows that the globally most important heterogeneous reaction is the one of N_2O_5. Nevertheless, NO_2, NO_3, HNO3 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions gain relevance particular in East China due to presence of high NOx concentrations and high Sa in the same region. The heterogeneous reaction of O3 itself on dust is compared to the other heterogeneous reactions of minor relevance. Evaluation of the models with northern hemispheric ozone surface observations yields a better agreement of the models with observations when the heterogeneous reactions are incorporated. Impacts of emission changes on the importance of the heterogeneous chemistry will be discussed.

  9. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  10. The impacts of volcanic aerosol on stratospheric ozone and the Northern Hemisphere polar vortex: separating radiative-dynamical changes from direct effects due to enhanced aerosol heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Raible, C. C.; Rozanov, E.

    2015-10-01

    After major volcanic eruptions the enhanced aerosol causes ozone changes due to greater heterogeneous chemistry on the particle surfaces (HET-AER) and from dynamical effects related to the radiative heating of the lower stratosphere (RAD-DYN). We carry out a series of experiments with an atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model to assess how these two processes change stratospheric ozone and Northern Hemispheric (NH) polar vortex dynamics. Ensemble simulations are performed under present day and preindustrial conditions, and with aerosol forcings representative of different eruption strength, to investigate changes in the response behaviour. We show that the halogen component of the HET-AER effect dominates under present-day conditions with a global reduction of ozone (-21 DU for the strongest eruption) particularly at high latitudes, whereas the HET-AER effect increases stratospheric ozone due to N2O5 hydrolysis in a preindustrial atmosphere (maximum anomalies +4 DU). The halogen-induced ozone changes in the present-day atmosphere offset part of the strengthening of the NH polar vortex during mid-winter (reduction of up to -16 m s-1 in January) and slightly amplify the dynamical changes in the polar stratosphere in late winter (+11 m s-1 in March). The RAD-DYN mechanism leads to positive column ozone anomalies which are reduced in a present-day atmosphere by amplified polar ozone depletion (maximum anomalies +12 and +18 DU for present day and preindustrial, respectively). For preindustrial conditions, the ozone response is consequently dominated by RAD-DYN processes, while under present-day conditions, HET-AER effects dominate. The dynamical response of the stratosphere is dominated by the RAD-DYN mechanism showing an intensification of the NH polar vortex in winter (up to +10 m s-1 in January). Ozone changes due to the RAD-DYN mechanism slightly reduce the response of the polar vortex after the eruption under present-day conditions.

  11. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  12. AEROSOL EXPOSURE, PHYSICS, AND CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A brief review is given of the "Knowledge" and the "Gaps in Knowledge" of aerosol exposure, physics and chemistry relevant to health effects of aerosols, and presented or discussed in platform or poster presentations at the Symposium on Particulate Air Pollution - Associations wi...

  13. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  14. Ambient measurements of chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols: Insights into formation, growth, and heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Luke D.

    Organic aerosols are a ubiquitous component of the troposphere, from heavily polluted cities to the remote Arctic. In Chapters II, III, and V of this dissertation, the formation of organic aerosol through observations of ambient size distributions is addressed. Chapter IV presents a new pathway for the formation of nitrous acid (HONO) in the urban atmosphere. In Chapter II, the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micron aerosol was measured at a suburban forested site in North Carolina. Two events were identified in which particle growth, presumably by gas-to-particle conversion, was dominated by accumulation of organic aerosol mass. Growth rates between 1.2 nm hr-1 and 4.9 nm hr-1 were observed. Using a mass-spectral deconvolution method coupled with linear regression analysis, the sub-micron organic aerosol mass observed during the campaign, and during events, was determined to have been influenced by both local and regional secondary processes with only a minor influence from combustion sources. In Chapter III, the chemical characteristics of sub-10-micron aerosol were explored as a function of ambient particle size at a coastal and inland site in New England. Average organic carbon (OC) concentrations of 4.9 microg C m-3 and 3.4 microg C m-3 were observed at the coastal site at the Isles of Shoals (IOS) and at the slightly inland site at Thompson Farm (TF), respectively. An average of 84 and 72% of OC was found to be water-soluble at IOS and TF, respectively. Size distributions indicate that the formation of dicarboxylic acids, especially oxalic acid, is driven by aqueous-phase reactions. A chemical fingerprint analysis suggests that all water-soluble OC at IOS resembles secondary organic aerosol (SOA), while WSOC at TF appears to result from mixed sources. In Chapter IV, a newly identified formation pathway for nitrous acid (HONO) is presented. HONO is an important precursor to hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere and thus contributes to the oxidative

  15. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  16. Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a power plant plume: Implications for secondary organic nitrate and organosulfate aerosol formation, NO3 radical chemistry, and N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, R.A.; Kleinman, L.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Brechtel, F. J.; Gilles, M. K.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Laskin, A.; Madronich, S.; Onasch, T. B.; Pekour, M. S.; Springston, S. R.; Thornton, J. A.; Tivanski, A. V.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-06-01

    Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a coal-fired power plant plume was monitored with the Department of Energy Grumman Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study field campaign. Quasi-Lagrangian sampling in the plume at increasing downwind distances and processing times was guided by a constant-volume balloon that was released near the power plant at sunset. While no evidence of fly ash particles was found, concentrations of particulate organics, sulfate, and nitrate were higher in the plume than in the background air. The enhanced sulfate concentrations were attributed to direct emissions of gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, some of which had formed new particles as evidenced by enhanced concentrations of nucleation-mode particles in the plume. The aerosol species were internally mixed and the particles were acidic, suggesting that particulate nitrate was in the form of organic nitrate. The enhanced particulate organic and nitrate masses in the plume were inferred as secondary organic aerosol, which was possibly formed from NO{sub 3} radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and other trace organic gases in the presence of acidic sulfate particles. Microspectroscopic analysis of particle samples suggested that some sulfate was in the form of organosulfates. Microspectroscopy also revealed the presence of sp{sup 2} hybridized C = C bonds, which decreased with increasing processing time in the plume, possibly because of heterogeneous chemistry on particulate organics. Constrained plume modeling analysis of the aircraft and tetroon observations showed that heterogeneous hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} was negligibly slow. These results have significant implications for several issues related to the impacts of power plant emissions on air quality and climate.

  17. Heterogeneous chemistry: a mechanism missing in current models to explain secondary inorganic aerosol formation during the January 2013 haze episode in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; He, K. B.; Wang, K.; Zheng, G. J.; Duan, F. K.; Ma, Y. L.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-06-01

    Severe regional haze pollution events occurred in eastern and central China in January 2013, which had adverse effects on the environment and public health. Extremely high levels of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5) with dominant components of sulfate and nitrate are responsible for the haze pollution. Although heterogeneous chemistry is thought to play an important role in the production of sulfate and nitrate during haze episodes, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of heterogeneous chemistry on haze formation in China by using the 3-D models due to of a lack of treatments for heterogeneous reactions in most climate and chemical transport models. In this work, the offline-coupled WRF-CMAQ model with newly added heterogeneous reactions is applied to East Asia to evaluate the impacts of heterogeneous chemistry and the meteorological anomaly during January 2013 on regional haze formation. The revised CMAQ with heterogeneous chemistry not only captures the magnitude and temporal variation of sulfate and nitrate, but also reproduces the enhancement of relative contribution of sulfate and nitrate to PM2.5 mass from clean days to polluted haze days. These results indicate the significant role of heterogeneous chemistry in regional haze formation and improve the understanding of the haze formation mechanisms during the January 2013 episode.

  18. Heterogeneous chemistry: a mechanism missing in current models to explain secondary inorganic aerosol formation during the January 2013 haze episode in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; He, K. B.; Wang, K.; Zheng, G. J.; Duan, F. K.; Ma, Y. L.; Kimoto, T.

    2015-02-01

    Severe regional haze pollution events occurred in eastern and central China in January 2013, which had adverse effects on the environment and public health. Extremely high levels of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5) with dominant components of sulfate and nitrate are responsible for the haze pollution. Although heterogeneous chemistry is thought to play an important role in the production of sulfate and nitrate during haze episodes, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of heterogeneous chemistry on haze formation in China by using the 3-D models due to of a lack of treatments for heterogeneous reactions in most climate and chemical transport models. In this work, the WRF-CMAQ model with newly added heterogeneous reactions is applied to East Asia to evaluate the impacts of heterogeneous chemistry and the meteorological anomaly during January 2013 on regional haze formation. As the parameterization of heterogeneous reactions on different types of particles is not well established yet, we arbitrarily selected the uptake coefficients from reactions on dust particles and then conducted several sensitivity runs to find the value that can best match observations. The revised CMAQ with heterogeneous chemistry not only captures the magnitude and temporal variation of sulfate and nitrate, but also reproduces the enhancement of relative contribution of sulfate and nitrate to PM2.5 mass from clean days to polluted haze days. These results indicate the significant role of heterogeneous chemistry in regional haze formation and improve the understanding of the haze formation mechanisms during the January 2013 episode.

  19. Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a power plant plume: Implications for secondary organic nitrate and organosulfate aerosol formation, NO₃ radical chemistry, and N₂O₅ heterogeneous hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Gilles, Marry K.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Laskin, Alexander; Madronich, Sasha; Onasch, Timothy B.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Springston, Stephen R.; Thornton, Joel A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-06-22

    Chemical evolution of aerosols and trace gases in the Salem Harbor power plant plume was monitored with the DOE G-1 aircraft on the night of July 30-31, 2002. Quasi-Lagrangian sampling in the plume at increasing downwind distances/processing times was guided by a constant-volume tetroon that was released near the power plant at sunset. While no evidence of fly ash particles was found, concentrations of particulate organics, sulfate, and nitrate were higher in the plume than in the nearby background air. These species were internally mixed and the particles were acidic, suggesting that particulate nitrate was in the form of organic nitrate. The enhanced particulate organic and nitrate masses in the plume were inferred to be as secondary organic aerosol, possibly formed from the NO3 radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and other trace organic gases in the presence of acidic sulfate particles. The enhanced particulate sulfate concentrations observed in the plume were attributed to direct emissions of gaseous SO3/H2SO4 from the power plant. Furthermore, concentration of nucleation mode particles was significantly higher in the plume than in background air, suggesting that some of the emitted H2SO4 had nucleated to form new particles. Spectromicroscopic analyses of particle samples suggested that some sulfate was likely in the form of organosulfates. Constrained Lagrangian model analysis of the aircraft and tetroon observations showed that heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 was negligibly slow. These results have significant implications for several scientific and regulatory issues related to the impacts of power plant emissions on atmospheric chemistry, air quality, visibility, and climate.

  20. Impacts of Anthropogenic Emissions in the Southeastern U.S. on Heterogeneous Chemistry of Isoprene-Derived Epoxides Leading to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Pye, H.; Lin, Y.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Zhang, H.; Marth, W.; Cui, T.; Arashiro, M.; Chu, K.; Zhang, Z.; Sexton, K.; Piletic, I.; Xie, Y.; Capps, S. L.; Luecken, D.; Hutzell, W. T.; Jaoui, M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Offenberg, J.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E.; Pinder, R. W.; Bartolotti, L.; Gold, A.

    2013-12-01

    extent with aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ m-3, r2 = 0.3). Altogether, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model is updated to predict isoprene aerosol from IEPOX and MAE. The new aqueous aerosol pathways allow for explicit predictions of IEPOX- and MAE-derived SOA tracers that are more consistent with observations than estimates based on semivolatile partitioning, supporting the role of acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions leading to SOA formation.

  1. Heterogeneous Photochemistry and Optical Properties of Mineral Dust Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassian, Vicki

    2012-02-01

    It is now widely recognized that heterogeneous reactions of mineral dust aerosol with trace atmospheric gases impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere and the physicochemical properties of these particles. Field studies using single particle analysis, have now shown that the chemistry is mineralogy specific and follows the trends expected from laboratory studies. These laboratory studies, which were initiated over a decade ago, have focused on the nighttime chemistry of mineral dust aerosol which is really only ``half'' the story. This talk will focus on two aspects of solar light interaction with mineral dust aerosol. First, the heterogeneous photochemistry of adsorbed chromophores (e.g. nitrate ion) and light absorbing components of mineral dust (iron oxides and titanium dioxide) is discussed. These heterogeneous photochemical reactions are poorly understood and laboratory studies to better quantify these reactions in order to determine the impact on the chemical balance of the atmosphere are needed, as will be discussed. Second, the optical properties of mineral dust aerosol measured by extinction infrared spectroscopy and visible light scattering show that shape effects are extremely important for mineral dust aerosol.

  2. Heterogeneous oxidation of unsaturated organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Kessler, S. H.; Daumit, K. E.; Kroll, J. H.; Leone, S.; Wilson, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This work explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1E11 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). Kinetic measurements, done by tracking the decay of the alkenoic acid parent ion with increasing OH exposure, show that the reactive uptake coefficient, which is defined as the fraction of gas-phase collisions that result in a reaction, is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chain chemistry occurring within the aerosol. The reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 and H2O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 and H2O2 play roles as propagators and terminators in the secondary chain reactions. Elemental analysis and mechanistic pathways will also be presented herein.

  3. Global simulation of chemistry and radiative forcing of mineral aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Easter, R.C.; Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Mineral aerosols are increasingly gaining attention because of their roles in atmospheric chemistry and climate system. A global three-dimensional aerosol/chemistry model (GChM) coupled with a general circulation model (GCM) is used to simulate the sources/sinks, chemistry and radiative forcing of mineral aerosols. Regional and seasonal variations in distribution of mineral aerosols are predicted based on vegetation types, threshold wind velocities and soil moisture data. The role of mineral aerosols as a reactive surface available for heterogeneous uptake of gas-phase species in the global atmosphere is investigated along with their impact on the tropospheric sulfur cycle and the photochemical oxidant cycle. In particular, the heterogeneous surface reactions of SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, NO{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, HNO{sub 3}, O{sub 3}, OH, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} on mineral aerosols are simulated. The direct radiative forcing by mineral aerosols and the indirect forcing through influencing droplet number concentration are further estimated. The model simulation results are analyzed and compared against the available observational data.

  4. Ozone loss in the lower stratosphere over the United States in 1992-1993: Evidence for heterogeneous chemistry on the Pinatubo aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Harris, J. M.; Lathrop, J. A.; Langford, A. O.; Deshler, T.; Johnson, B. J.; Torres, A.; Matthews, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained at Boulder, Colorado and Wallops Island, Virginia indicate that ozone was about 25% below normal during the winter and spring of 1992-93 in the 12-22 km region. This large ozone reduction in the lower stratosphere, though sometimes partially compensated by higher than normal ozone above 24 km, was responsible for the low total column ozone values observed across the United States during this period. Normal temperatures throughout the low ozone region suggest that transport-related effects are probably not the most important cause of the ozone deficits. This region of low ozone at Boulder corresponds closely with the location of the enhanced H2SO4/H2O aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption of 1991 as measured near Boulder and at Laramie, Wyoming. Trajectory analyses suggest that except at low altitudes in spring, air parcels on the days of the ozone measurements generally arrived at Boulder from higher latitude, although seldom higher than 60 deg N, and hence may have been subjected to heterogeneous chemical processing on the surface of Pinatubo aerosol droplets resulting in chlorine-catalyzed ozone destruction, a process which is believed to be more effective under the lower winter temperatures and sunlight levels of higher latitudes.

  5. Ozone loss in the lower stratosphere over the United States in 1992-1993: Evidence for heterogeneous chemistry on the Pinatubo aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J.; Harris, J.M.; Lathrop, J.A. ); Komhyr, W.D. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO ); Langford, A.O. ); Deshler, T.; Johnson, B.J. ); Torres, A. ); Matthews, W.A. )

    1994-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained at Boulder, Colorado and Wallops Island, Virginia indicate that ozone was about 25% below normal during the winter and spring of 1992-93 in the 12-22 km region. This large ozone reduction in the lower stratosphere, though sometimes partially compensated by higher than normal ozone above 24 km, was responsible for the low total column ozone values observed across the United States during this period. Normal temperatures throughout the low ozone region suggest that transport-related effects are probably not the most important cause of the ozone deficits. The region of low ozone at Boulder corresponds closely with the location of the enhanced H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]/H[sub 2]O aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption of 1991 as measured near Boulder and at Laramie, Wyoming. Trajectory analyses suggest that except at low altitudes in spring, air parcels on the days of the ozone measurements generally arrived at Boulder from higher latitude, although seldom higher than 60[degrees]N, and hence may have been subjected to heterogeneous chemical processing on the surface of Pinatubo aerosol droplets resulting in chlorine-catalyzed ozone destruction, a process which is believed to be more effective under the lower winter temperatures and sunlight levels of higher latitudes. 21 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. ozone loss in the lower stratosphere over the United States in 1992-1993: Evidence for heterogeneous chemistry on the Pinatubo aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Harris, J. M.; Lathrop, J. A.; Langford, A. O.; Deshler, T.; Johnson, B. J.; Torres, A.; Matthews, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained at Boulder, Colorado and Wallops Island, Virginia indicate that ozone was about 25% below normal during the winter and spring of 1992-93 in the 12-22 km region. This large ozone reduction in the lower stratosphere, though sometimes partially compensated by higher than normal ozone above 24 km, was responsible for the low total column ozone values observed across the United States during this period. Normal temperatures throughout the low ozone region suggest that transport-related effects are probably not the most important cause of the ozone deficits. The region of low ozone at Boulder corresponds closely with the location of the enhanced H2SO4/H2O aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption of 1991 as measured near Boulder and at Laramie, Wyoming. Trajectory analyses suggest that except at low altitudes in spring, air parcels on the days of the ozone measurements generally arrived at Boulder from higher latitude, although seldom higher than 60°N, and hence may have been subjected to heterogeneous chemical processing on the surface of Pinatubo aerosol droplets resulting in chlorine-catalyzed ozone destruction, a process which is believed to be more effective under the lower winter temperatures and sunlight levels of higher latitudes.

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  8. The Transformation of Solid Atmospheric Particles into Liquid Droplets Through Heterogeneous Chemistry: Laboratory Insights into the Processing of Calcium Containing Mineral Dust Aerosol in the Troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.

    2003-02-15

    [1] Individual calcium carbonate particles reacted with gas- phase nitric acid at 293 K have been followed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis as a function of time and relative humidity (RH). The rate of calcium carbonate to calcium nitrate conversion is significantly enhanced in the presence of water vapor. The SEM images clearly show that solid CaCO3 particles are converted to spherical droplets as the reaction proceeds. The process occurs through a two-step mechanism involving the conversion of calcium carbonate into calcium nitrate followed by the deliquescence of the calcium nitrate product. The change in phase of the particles and the significant reactivity of nitric acid and CaCO3 at low RH are a direct result of the deliquescence of the product at low RH. This is the first laboratory study to show the phase transformation of solid particles into liquid droplets through heterogeneous chemistry.

  9. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  10. Stratospheric Heterogeneous Chemistry and Microphysics: Model Development, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: define the chemical and physical processes leading to stratospheric ozone change that involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCS) and the reactions occurring on the surfaces of PSC particles; study the formation processes, and the physical and chemical properties of PSCS, that are relevant to atmospheric chemistry and to the interpretation of field measurements taken during polar stratosphere missions; develop quantitative models describing PSC microphysics and heterogeneous chemical processes; assimilate laboratory and field data into these models; and calculate the extent of chemical processing on PSCs and the impact of specific microphysical processes on polar composition and ozone depletion. During the course of the project, a new coupled microphysics/physical-chemistry/ photochemistry model for stratospheric sulfate aerosols and nitric acid and ice PSCs was developed and applied to analyze data collected during NASA's Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition-II (AASE-II) and other missions. In this model, detailed treatments of multicomponent sulfate aerosol physical chemistry, sulfate aerosol microphysics, polar stratospheric cloud microphysics, PSC ice surface chemistry, as well as homogeneous gas-phase chemistry were included for the first time. In recent studies focusing on AASE measurements, the PSC model was used to analyze specific measurements from an aircraft deployment of an aerosol impactor, FSSP, and NO(y) detector. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observations for particle volumes as well as NO(y) concentrations, thus confirming the importance of supercooled sulfate/nitrate droplets in PSC formation. The same model has been applied to perform a statistical study of PSC properties in the Northern Hemisphere using several hundred high-latitude air parcel trajectories obtained from Goddard. The rates of ozone depletion along trajectories with different meteorological histories are presently

  11. Heterogeneous chemistry in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemminger, John C.

    There is an increasing amount of evidence that points to the importance of halogen chemistry in the troposphere in addition to the well known important chemistry in the stratosphere. Likely sources of halogens in the troposphere include reactions of gas phase pollutants with particles containing alkali halide salts such as sea salt particles. In this article we describe how modern ultra-high vacuum surface science experiments can provide significant new insight into the detailed mechanisms of reactions that are important to the chemistry of particles in the atmosphere. An introduction to what is known about the surface chemistry of NaCl is provided followed by a description of the experimental techniques. Studies from our laboratory that are described here have shown that the reaction of dry nitric acid with NaCl is self-limiting leading to a chemically inert surface that is covered with a layer of sodium nitrate. Our experiments also show that very low vapour pressures of water provide enhanced ionic mobility on the surface leading to a recrystallization of the nitrate layer and phase separation from the NaCl. This results in open areas of clean NaCl that are then available for further reaction. The reaction of water with NaCl surfaces which have been previously 'corroded' by reaction with nitric acid and water leads to the dissociative adsorption of water to form surface OH+/- species. This is in stark contrast to the completely reversible adsorption of water on defect free NaCl surfaces. A model is also presented that is consistent with the information provided by the detailed ultra-high vacuum surface science experiments and explains the dependence of the reaction of nitric acid with NaCl on the nitric acid pressure.

  12. Heterogeneous Chemistry Involving Methanol in Tropospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Yokelson, R. J.; Singh, H. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Crawford, J. H.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this report we analyze airborne measurements to suggest that methanol in biomass burning smoke is lost heterogeneously in clouds. When a smoke plume intersected a cumulus cloud during the SAFARI 2000 field project, the observed methanol gas phase concentration rapidly declined. Current understanding of gas and aqueous phase chemistry cannot explain the loss of methanol documented by these measurements. Two plausible heterogeneous reactions are proposed to explain the observed simultaneous loss and production of methanol and formaldehyde, respectively. If the rapid heterogeneous processing of methanol, seen in a cloud impacted by smoke, occurs in more pristine clouds, it could affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere on a global scale.

  13. Heterogeneous Chemistry Related to Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Emissions from stratospheric aircraft that may directly or indirectly affect ozone include NO(y), H2O, soot and sulfuric acid. To fully assess the impact of such emissions, it is necessary to have a full understanding of both the homogeneous and heterogeneous transformations that may occur in the stratosphere. Heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric particles play a key role in partitioning ozone-destroying species between their active and reservoir forms. In particular, heterogeneous reactions tend to activate odd chlorine while deactivating odd nitrogen. Accurate modeling of the net atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft requires a thorough understanding of the competing effects of this activation/deactivation. In addition, a full understanding of the potential aircraft impacts requires that the abundance, composition and formation mechanisms of the particles themselves be established. Over the last three years with support from the High Speed Research Program, we have performed laboratory experiments to determine the chemical composition, formation mechanism, and reactivity of stratospheric aerosols.

  14. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  15. Heterogeneous chemistry of HBr and HF

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Ravishankara, A.R.

    1992-11-12

    The authors present information on heterogeneous chemistry of HF and HBr on glass and ice surfaces at a temperature of 200K. Their objective is to study whether heterogeneous reactions of these species could be important in the atmospheric chemistry occuring on NAT particles or cloud condensation nuclei, and be a contributor to ozone depletion. HF showed no significant uptake or reactions with ClONO{sub 2} or HOCl. HBr was found to adsorb on these surfaces, and did not exhibit saturation for even relative high concentrations. In addition it showed reactivity with ClONO{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on ice surfaces.

  16. Recent Rainfall and Aerosol Chemistry From Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R.; Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This project was devoted to testing the use of Be-7 as a tracer for quantifying trace element fluxes from the atmosphere to the oceans. Rainfall and aerosol samples were collected between June 15, 2011 and July 27, 2013 at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) located near the eastern end of the island of Bermuda. Collectors were situated near ground level, clear of surrounding vegetation, at a meteorological monitoring station in front of the BIOS laboratory, about 10 m above sea level. This is a Bermuda Air Quality Program site used for ambient air quality monitoring. To quantify the atmospheric deposition of Be-7, plastic buckets were deployed for collection of fallout over ~3 week periods. Wet deposition was collected for trace element analysis using a specially modified "GEOTRACES" N-CON automated wet deposition collector. Aerosol samples were collected with a Tisch TE-5170V-BL high volume aerosol sampler, modified to collect 12 replicate samples on acid-washed 47mm diameter Whatman-41 filters, using procedures identical to those used for the US GEOTRACES aerosol program (Morton et al., 2013). Aerosol and rainfall samples were analyzed for total Na, Mg, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, and U using ICPMS. Confirming earlier data from Bermuda, strong seasonality in rainfall and aerosol loading and chemistry was observed, particularly for aerosol and rainfall Fe concentrations when Saharan dust arrives in July/August with SE trajectories.

  17. Studies of the formation, chemical reactivity, and properties of small clusters: Application to an understanding of aerosol formation and heterogeneous chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The small cluster program involves (1) studies of reactions related to formation and growth of heteromolecular clusters and their thermochemical properties, (2) studies of photoinitiated processes in clusters, (3) investigations related to heterogeneous reactions including the influence of reaction centers on the interconversion, and (4) theoretical calculations of properties, dynamics, and structure. A major thrust of the work during the past year has been devoted to a study of the role of ionization and the presence of ions on reactions and energetics. During the past few months, particular attention has been paid to systems having varying proton affinities. From the data, we can determine the influence of these values on the nature of the reactions and ascertain the ultimate chemical nature of the ionization center formed as a result of the reactions. 83 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Heterogeneous conversion of N2O5 to HNO3 on background stratospheric aerosols - Comparisons of model results with data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of heterogeneous processing by a parameterized lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer on model calculations were examined using a 2D photochemical model. Model results were compared with zonally averaged LIMS data on HNO3 and NO2 and in situ measurements of NO, NO(y), and ClO, taken by the ER-2 aircraft. The results obtained are contradictory: some comparisons favor heterogeneous chemistry, and some do not. It is suggested that the assumptions made to parameterize the sulfate aerosol chemistry result in a rate of heterogeneous processing that is too vigorous.

  19. Laboratory studies of stratospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of the two sets of projects funded by the NASA grant NAG2-632, namely investigations of various thermodynamic and nucleation properties of the aqueous acid system which makes up stratospheric aerosols, and measurements of reaction probabilities directly on ice aerosols with sizes corresponding to those of polar stratospheric cloud particles. The results of these investigations are of importance for the assessment of the potential stratospheric effects of future fleets of supersonic aircraft. In particular, the results permit to better estimate the effects of increased amounts of water vapor and nitric acid (which forms from nitrogen oxides) on polar stratospheric clouds and on the chemistry induced by these clouds.

  20. Jupiter: Aerosol Chemistry in the Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wong; Lee; Yung; Ajello

    2000-05-10

    Aromatic compounds have been considered a likely candidate for enhanced aerosol formation in the polar region of Jupiter. We develop a new chemical model for aromatic compounds in the Jovian auroral thermosphere/ionosphere. The model is based on a previous model for hydrocarbon chemistry in the Jovian atmosphere and is constrained by observations from Voyager, Galileo, and the Infrared Space Observatory. Precipitation of energetic electrons provides the major energy source for the production of benzene and other heavier aromatic hydrocarbons. The maximum mixing ratio of benzene in the polar model is 2x10-9, a value that can be compared with the observed value of 2+2-1x10-9 in the north polar auroral region. Sufficient quantities of the higher ring species are produced so that their saturated vapor pressures are exceeded. Condensation of these molecules is expected to lead to aerosol formation. PMID:10813686

  1. Study of Heterogeneouse Processes Related to the Chemistry of Tropospheric Oxidants and Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, D R; Jayne, J T; Colb, C E

    2013-02-13

    The objective of the studies was to elucidate the heterogeneous chemistry of tropospheric aerosols. Experiments were designed to measure both specifically needed parameters, and to obtain systematic data required to build a fundamental understanding of the nature of gas-surface physical and chemical interactions

  2. Heterogeneous oxidation of pesticides on aerosol condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, Joanna; Durand, Amandine; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Ravier, Sylvain; Gligorovski, Sasho; Wortham, Henri; Quivet, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world. It is known that they exhibit adverse health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. They are distributed in the atmosphere, an important vector of dissemination, over long distances away from the target area. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences their atmospheric fate. Most of the pesticides are semi-volatile compounds, emphasizing the importance of assessing their heterogeneous reactivity towards atmospheric oxidants. These reactions are important because they are involved in, among others, direct and indirect climate changes, adverse health effects from inhaled particles, effects on cloud chemistry and ozone production. In this work, the importance of atmospheric degradation of pesticides is evaluated on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles. The photolysis processing and heterogeneous reactivity towards O3 and OH, was evaluated of eight commonly used pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole) adsorbed on silica particles. Silicate particles are present in air-borne mineral dust in atmospheric aerosols, and heterogeneous reactions can be different in the presence of these mineral particles. Depending on their origin and conditioning, aerosol particles containing pesticides can have complex and highly porous microstructures, which are influenced by electric charge effects and interaction with water vapour. Therefore, the kinetic experiments and consecutive product studies were performed at atmospherically relevant relative humidity (RH) of 55 %. The identification of surface bound products was performed using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-ToF)-MS/MS and the gas-phase products were on-line monitored by PTR-ToF-MS. Based on the detected and identified reaction products, it was observed that water plays a crucial

  3. Chemistry of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Lindsay Diana

    The photooxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), a major component of fine particulate matter. Improvements to air quality require insight into the many reactive intermediates that lead to SOA formation, of which only a small fraction have been measured at the molecular level. This thesis describes the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from several atmospherically relevant hydrocarbon precursors. Photooxidation experiments of methoxyphenol and phenolic compounds and C12 alkanes were conducted in the Caltech Environmental Chamber. These experiments include the first photooxidation studies of these precursors run under sufficiently low NOx levels, such that RO2 + HO2 chemistry dominates, an important chemical regime in the atmosphere. Using online Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometery (CIMS), key gas-phase intermediates that lead to SOA formation in these systems were identified. With complementary particle-phase analyses, chemical mechanisms elucidating the SOA formation from these compounds are proposed. Three methoxyphenol species (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol) were studied to model potential photooxidation schemes of biomass burning intermediates. SOA yields (ratio of mass of SOA formed to mass of primary organic reacted) exceeding 25% are observed. Aerosol growth is rapid and linear with the organic conversion, consistent with the formation of essentially non-volatile products. Gas and aerosol-phase oxidation products from the guaiacol system show that the chemical mechanism consists of highly oxidized aromatic species in the particle phase. Syringol SOA yields are lower than that of phenol and guaiacol, likely due to unique chemistry dependent on methoxy group position. The photooxidation of several C12 alkanes of varying structure n-dodecane, 2-methylundecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane) were run under extended OH exposure to investigate the

  4. Climate Implications of the Heterogeneity of Anthropogenic Aerosol Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, Geeta Gayatri

    Short-lived anthropogenic aerosols are concentrated in regions of high human activity, where they interact with radiation and clouds, causing horizontally heterogeneous radiative forcing between polluted and unpolluted regions. Aerosols can absorb shortwave energy in the atmosphere, but deplete it at the surface, producing opposite radiative perturbations between the surface and atmosphere. This thesis investigates climate and policy implications of this horizontal and vertical heterogeneity of anthropogenic aerosol forcing, employing the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's AM2.1 and AM3 models, both at a global scale and using East Asia as a regional case study. The degree of difference between spatial patterns of climate change due to heterogeneous aerosol forcing versus homogeneous greenhouse gas forcing deeply impacts the detection, attribution, and prediction of regional climate change. This dissertation addresses a gap in current understanding of these two forcings' response pattern development, using AM2.1 historical forcing simulations. The results indicate that fast atmospheric and land-surface processes alone substantially homogenize the global pattern of surface energy flux response to heterogeneous aerosol forcing. Aerosols' vertical redistribution of energy significantly impacts regional climate, but is incompletely understood. It is newly identified here, via observations and historical and idealized forcing simulations, that increased aerosol-driven atmospheric absorption may explain half of East Asia's recent surface insolation decline. Further, aerosols' surface and atmospheric effects counteract each other regionally---atmospheric heating enhances summer monsoon circulation, while surface dimming suppresses it---but absorbing aerosols' combined effects reduce summer monsoon rainfall. This thesis constitutes the first vertical decomposition of aerosols' impacts in this high-emissions region and elucidates the monsoonal response to aerosols

  5. Trace Element Chemistry in Urban Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhana, B.; Husain, L.

    2006-12-01

    Unlike in the United States, the concentration of trace elements in urban air is still high enough in South Asian cities to study the impact of trace elements on climate and human health. Hence, continuous sampling of PM2.5 (particulate matter of <2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter)was carried out using low volume sampler in winter (2005-2006) in Lahore, the second largest city of Pakistan, which is highly impacted by urban and agricultural emissions and has remained unexplored in terms of atmospheric chemistry. Aerosols collected on this campaign are likely to carry the signatures of emissions from Afghanistan, North and Central Pakistan, North India in addition to the local pollution sources. During sampling from December 2005 to January 2006, it was possible to collect several samples during brief fog episodes. Samples were analyzed for 25 elements (Be, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Tl and Pb) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. High pollutant concentrations were observed throughout the study, for instance, Cr concentrations up to 1.4 μgm-3, As, 135 ngm-3, Cd, 93 ngm-3, Sn, 988 ngm-3 and Sb, 157 ngm-3. Pb and Zn concentrations respectively up to 12 and 48 μgm-3 were observed. Calculation of enrichment factor and crustal correction illustrate the attribution of Cr, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag Cd, Sn, Sb, Tl and Pb to non-crustal sources. Air parcel back trajectories, interelemental relationships and meteorological observations have been used to explain the sources and the impacts of fog chemistry and mixing heights on atmospheric processing of trace elements in PM2.5. Atmospheric stagnation appeared to be one of factors causing episodic high concentrations. Crustal correction and interelemental relationships apparently suggest the emissions from coal and oil combustion, industrial processes, building construction sites and biomass burning as the prime role players in the atmospheric pollution in

  6. Heterogeneous Reactions in Atmospheric Aerosols Observed Using ATOFMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Sullivan

    2005-03-01

    The heterogeneous aging of natural atmospheric particles by reactive gases in the troposphere has been investigated in a flow-tube reactor using Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) to monitor changes in the particle composition in real-time. Sea- salt and mineral dust aerosols were introduced into the flow tube simultaneously and reacted with nitric acid in a relative rate experiment. ATOFMS is a single-particle technique and thus enables us to distinguish which particle type accumulates more nitric acid. This allows us to determine if the differing surface area or kinetics is driving the partitioning of nitric acid between the sea salt and dust. The results of these and other aerosol flow-tube kinetics experiments will be presented. The atmospheric implications will be emphasized, particularly in relation to observations made by ATOFMS of heterogeneous reactions occurring in particles over the Pacific Ocean during ACE-Asia.

  7. Heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric aerosol particles by gas-phase radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2010-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play pivotal roles in climate and air quality. Just as chemically reduced gases experience oxidation in the atmosphere, it is now apparent that solid and liquid atmospheric particulates are also subject to similar oxidative processes. The most reactive atmospheric gas-phase radicals, in particular the hydroxyl radical, readily promote such chemistry through surficial interactions. This Review looks at progress made in this field, discussing the radical-initiated heterogeneous oxidation of organic and inorganic constituents of atmospheric aerosols. We focus on the kinetics and reaction mechanisms of such processes as well as how they can affect the physico-chemical properties of particles, such as their composition, size, density and hygroscopicity. Potential impacts on the atmosphere include the release of chemically reactive gases such as halogens, aldehydes and organic acids, reactive loss of particle-borne molecular tracer and toxic species, and enhanced hygroscopic properties of aerosols that may improve their ability to form cloud droplets.

  8. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  9. Aerosol Chemistry of Furfural and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srithawirat, T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2008-12-01

    Furfural and sugars (as levoglucosan equivalent) are derived from biomass burning and contribute to aerosol composition. This study examined the potential of furfural and levoglucosan to be tracers of biomass burning. Furfural is likely to be oxidized quickly so comparison with levoglucosan may give a sense of the age of the aerosols in forest fire smoke. However, few furfural emissions are available for biomass combustion. Furfural and sugars were determined in coarse aerosols (>2.4μm aerodynamic diameter) and fine aerosols (<2.4μm aerodynamic diameter) collected in 24 hour periods during different seasons in the United Kingdom and PM10 collected from Thailand and Malaysia including haze episodes. Also total suspended particulate matter (TSP) samples were collected from Taiwan. Furfural and sugars dominated in fine fractions, especially in the UK autumn. Sugars were found at 5.96-18.37 nmol m-3 in fine mode and 1.36-5.75 nmol m-3 in coarse mode aerosols in the UK. Furfural was found at 0.18-0.91 nmol m-3 and 0.05-0.51 nmol m-3 respectively in the same aerosols. Sugars were a dominant contributor to aerosol derived from biomass burning. Sugars and furfural were about 10 and 20 times higher during haze episodes in Malaysia. Laboratory experimental simulation suggested furfural is more rapid destroyed by UV and sunlight than levoglucosan.

  10. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Lipopolysaccharides with Gas-Phase Nitric Acid: Reactive Sites and Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jonathan V; Estillore, Armando D; Lee, Christopher; Dowling, Jacqueline A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-08-18

    Recent studies have shown that sea spray aerosol (SSA) has a size-dependent, complex composition consisting of biomolecules and biologically derived organic compounds in addition to salts. This additional chemical complexity most likely influences the heterogeneous reactivity of SSA, as these other components will have different reactive sites and reaction pathways. In this study, we focus on the reactivity of a class of particles derived from some of the biological components of sea spray aerosol including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that undergo heterogeneous chemistry within the reactive sites of the biological molecule. Examples of these reactions and the relevant reactive sites are proposed as follows: R-COONa(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-COOH and R-HPO4Na(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-H2PO4. These reactions may be a heterogeneous pathway not only for sea spray aerosol but also for a variety of other types of atmospheric aerosol as well. PMID:27445084

  11. Global Impacts of Gas-Phase Chemistry-Aerosol Interactions on Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-01-01

    We present here a first global modeling study on the influence of gas-phase chemistry/aerosol interactions on estimates of anthropogenic forcing by tropospheric O3 and aerosols. Concentrations of gas-phase species and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols in the preindustrial, present-day, and year 2100 (IPCC SRES A2) atmospheres are simulated online in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II' (GISS GCM II'). With fully coupled chemistry and aerosols, the preindustrial, presentday, and year 2100 global burdens of tropospheric ozone are predicted to be 190, 319, and 519 Tg, respectively. The burdens of sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted respectively to be 0.32. 0.18, 0.01, 0.33 Tg in preindustrial time, 1.40, 0.48, 0.23, 1.60 Tg in presentday, and 1.37, 1.97, 0.54, 3.31 Tg in year 2100. Anthropogenic O3 is predicted to have a globally and annually averaged present-day forcing of +0.22 W m(sup -2) and year 2100 forcing of +0.57 W m(sup -2) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Net anthropogenic TOA forcing by internally mixed sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols is estimated to be virtually zero in the present-day and +0.34 W m(sup -2) in year 2100, whereas it is predicted to be -0.39 W m(sup -2) in present-day and -0.61 W m(sup -2) in year 2100 if the aerosols are externally mixed. Heterogeneous reactions are shown to be important in affecting anthropogenic forcing. When reactions of N2O5, NO3, NO2, and HO2 on aerosols are accounted for, TOA anthropogenic O3 forcing is less by 20-45% in present-day and by 20-32% in year 2100 at mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, as compared with values predicted in the absence of heterogeneous gas aerosol reactions. Mineral dust uptake of HNO3 and O3 is shown to have practically no influence on anthropogenic O3 forcing. Heterogeneous reactions of N2Os

  12. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are: (1) Development of an aerosol chemistry model; (2) Utilization of satellite measurements of trace gases along with analysis of temperatures and dynamic conditions to understand ice cloud formation, dehydration and sedimentation in the winter polar regions; (3) Comparison of the HALOE and SAGE II time dependencies of the Pinatubo aerosol decay. The publications are attached.

  13. Heterogeneous processes at the intersection of chemistry and biology: A computational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J

    2008-02-11

    Heterogeneous processes hold the key to understanding many problems in biology and atmospheric science. In particular, recent experiments have shown that heterogeneous chemistry at the surface of sea-salt aerosols plays a large role in important atmospheric processes with far reaching implications towards understanding of the fate and transport of aerosolized chemical weapons (i.e. organophosphates such as sarin and VX). Unfortunately, the precise mechanistic details of the simplest surface enhanced chemical reactions remain unknown. Understanding heterogeneous processes also has implications in the biological sciences. Traditionally, it is accepted that enzymes catalyze reactions by stabilizing the transition state, thereby lowering the free energy barrier. However, recent findings have shown that a multitude of phenomena likely contribute to the efficiency of enzymes, such as coupled protein motion, quantum mechanical tunneling, or strong electrostatic binding. The objective of this project was to develop and validate a single computational framework based on first principles simulations using tera-scale computational resources to answer fundamental scientific questions about heterogeneous chemical processes relevant to atmospheric chemistry and biological sciences.

  14. Heterogeneous reactions in sulfuric acid aerosols: A framework for model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Ravishankara, A.R.; Solomon, S. |

    1994-02-20

    A framework for applying rates of heterogeneous chemical reactions measured in the laboratory to small sulfuric acid aerosols found in the stratosphere is presented. The procedure for calculating the applicable reactive uptake coefficients using laboratory-measured parameters is developed, the necessary laboratory-measured quantities are discussed, and a set of equations for use in models are presented. This approach is demonstrated to be essential for obtaining uptake coefficients for the HOCl+HCl and ClONO{sub 2}+HCl reactions applicable to the stratosphere. In these cases the laboratory-measured uptake coefficients have to be substantially corrected for the small size of the atmospheric aerosol droplets. The measured uptake coefficients for N{sub 2}O{sub 5}+H{sub 2}O and ClONO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O as well as those for other heterogeneous reactions are discussed in the context of this model. Finally, the derived uptake coefficients were incorporated in two-dimensional dynamical and photochemical model. Thus for the first time the HCl reactions in sulfuric acid have been included. Substantial direct chlorine activation and consequent ozone destruction is shown to occur due to heterogeneous reactions involving HCl for volcanically perturbed aerosol conditions at high latitudes. Smaller but significant chlorine activation also is predicted for background sulfuric acid aerosol in these regions. The coupling between homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry is shown to lead to important changes in the concentrations of various reactive species. The basic physical and chemical quantities needed to better constrain the model input parameters are identified. 39 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, Sasha

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  16. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day- and nighttime chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Li, Shao-Meng; Sjostedt, Steve J.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Liggio, John; Macdonald, Anne Marie

    2016-06-01

    Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region in Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA-2), which were primarily generated by gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes and perhaps sesquiterpenes. The temporal variations of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 can be explained by gas-particle partitioning in response to ambient temperature and the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms between day and night. While BSOA-1 arises from gas-phase ozonolysis and nitrate radical chemistry at night, BSOA-2 is likely less volatile than BSOA-1 and consists of products formed via gas-phase oxidation by OH radical and ozone during the day. Organic nitrates produced through nitrate radical chemistry can account for 22-33 % of BSOA-1 mass at night. The mass spectra of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 have higher values of the mass fraction of m/z 91 (f91) compared to the background organic aerosol. Using f91 to evaluate BSOA formation pathways in this unpolluted, forested region, heterogeneous oxidation of BSOA-1 is a minor production pathway of BSOA-2.

  17. Bromine heterogenous chemistry in the troposhere

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatt, J.P.D.

    1996-10-01

    Motivated by the observations of boundary layer ozone loss which is correlated with high levels of bromine in the Arctic springtime, we have studied a number of heterogeneous interactions of tropospheric bromine species. The goal of this work is both to better define the source of inorganic bromine during this time of year and to determine the primary mechanism which keeps bromine in a photochemically active form.

  18. OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Sean H.; Nah, Theodora; Daumit, Kelly E.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-12-05

    The oxidative evolution (“aging”) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter, but remains poorly understood, particularly for the most oxidized fraction of the aerosol. Here we measure the kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of highly oxidized organic aerosol, with an aim of better constraining such atmospheric aging processes. Submicron particles composed of model oxidized organics—1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}O{sub 8}), citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}), tartaric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and Suwannee River fulvic acid—were oxidized by gas-phase OH in a flow reactor, and the masses and elemental composition of the particles were monitored as a function of OH exposure. In contrast to our previous studies of less-oxidized model systems (squalane, erythritol, and levoglucosan), particle mass did not decrease significantly with heterogeneous oxidation. Carbon content of the aerosol always decreased somewhat, but this mass loss was approximately balanced by an increase in oxygen content. The estimated reactive uptake coefficients of the reactions range from 0.37 to 0.51 and indicate that such transformations occur at rates corresponding to 1-2 weeks in the atmosphere, suggesting their importance in the atmospheric lifecycle of organic particulate matter.

  19. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  20. Modeling global impacts of heterogeneous loss of HO2 on cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, V.; Williams, J. E.; Flemming, J.

    2014-03-01

    The abundance and spatial variability of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the troposphere strongly affects atmospheric composition through tropospheric ozone production and associated HOx chemistry. One of the largest uncertainties in the chemical HO2 budget is its heterogeneous loss on the surface of cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols. We quantify the importance of the heterogeneous HO2 loss at global scale using the latest recommendations on the scavenging efficiency on various surfaces. For this we included the simultaneous loss on cloud droplets and ice particles as well as aerosol in the Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS). We show that cloud surface area density (SAD) is typically an order of magnitude larger than aerosol SAD, using assimilated satellite retrievals to constrain both meteorology and global aerosol distributions. Depending on the assumed uptake coefficients, loss on liquid water droplets and ice particles accounts for ∼53-70% of the total heterogeneous loss of HO2, due to the ubiquitous presence of cloud droplets. This indicates that HO2 uptake on cloud should be included in chemistry transport models that already include uptake on aerosol. Our simulations suggest that the zonal mean mixing ratios of HO2 are reduced by ∼25% in the tropics and up to ∼50% elsewhere. The subsequent decrease in oxidative capacity leads to a global increase of the tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) burden of up to 7%, and an increase in the ozone tropospheric lifetime of ∼6%. This increase results in an improvement in the global distribution when compared against CO surface observations over the Northern Hemisphere, although it does not fully resolve the wintertime bias in the C-IFS. There is a simultaneous increase in the high bias in C-IFS for tropospheric CO over the Southern Hemisphere, which constrains on the assumptions regarding HO2 uptake on a global scale. We show that enhanced HO2 uptake on aerosol types associated with

  1. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chapleski, Robert C; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, researchers are developing an understanding for how surface structure and functionality affect interfacial chemistry with this class of highly oxidizing pollutants. Together with future research initiatives, these studies will provide a more complete description of atmospheric chemistry and help others more accurately predict the properties of aerosols, the environmental impact of interfacial oxidation, and the concentrations of tropospheric gases. PMID:26555710

  2. Surface Chemistry in Heterogeneous Catalysis: An Emerging Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, J. M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Provides background data on surface chemistry as an emerging discipline. Highlights the important role which surfaces play in catalysis by focusing on the catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Provides a demonstration of how surfaces exert their influences in heterogeneous phenomena and illustrates how experimental problems in this field are…

  3. Impact Of Geo-engineered Aerosols On Stratospheric Chemistry And Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, S.; Garcia, R. R.; Kinnison, D. E.; Gettelman, A.; Rasch, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    Geo-engineering schemes have been proposed to alleviate the consequences of global warming; one proposed scheme is to inject sulfur into the stratosphere so as to mimic the effects of large volcanic eruptions. Past volcanic eruptions have shown that strongly enhanced sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere result in a higher planetary albedo, leading to surface cooling. However, the increase of sulfate aerosol surface area enhances heterogeneous reactions in the stratosphere that lead to ozone loss. The potential for high Arctic ozone depletion in the context of geo-engineering is known. On the other hand, halogen compounds are now decreasing in the atmosphere as a result of the enforcement of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, and this is expected to bring about the recovery of the ozone layer and to lessen the potential impact of aerosols. In this study we present results of calculations made with NCAR's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), focusing on the impact of Geo-engineering on stratospheric chemistry and dynamics. Aside from changes in heterogeneous reactions, changes in stratospheric dynamics have a significant impact on ozone. On average, changes of both chemistry and dynamics result in a slowdown of the recovery of ozone for mid- and high latitudes. An increase of ozone depletion as a result of geo-engineering was found in both polar regions for the period between 2040-2050.

  4. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  5. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed with a brief comment as to the research performed. The publications titles are: The effects of particle size and nitric acid uptake on the homogenous freezing of sulfate aerosols; Parameterization of an aerosol physical chemistry model (APCM) for the NH3/H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system at cold temperatures; and The onset, extent and duration of dehydration in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex.

  6. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  7. Heterogeneous atmospheric reactions - Sulfuric acid aerosols as tropospheric sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, A. C.; Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction probabilities of various atmospheric species incident on a bulk sulfuric acid surface are measured in order to determine the role of sulfuric acid aerosols as pollutant sinks. Reaction products and unreacted starting materials leaving a Knudsen cell flow reactor after collision at 300 K with a H2SO4 surface or a soot surface were detected by mass spectrometry. Significant collision reaction probabilities are observed on a H2SO4 surface for H2O2, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, N2O5, H2O and NH3, and on soot for NH3. Estimates of the contribution of heterogeneous reactions to pollutant removal under atmospheric conditions indicate that while aerosol removal in the stratosphere is insignificant (loss rate constants approximately 10 to the -10th/sec), heterogeneous reactions may be the dominant loss process for several tropospheric species (loss rate constant approximately 10 to the -5th/sec, comparable to photolysis rate constants).

  8. A Chamber Investigation of Nitric Acid-Soot Aerosol Chemistry at 298 K

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Cowin, James P.

    2000-10-02

    Long-pathlength infrared absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate nitric acid-soot aerosol chemistry at 298 K and 0.5 % relative humidity. Experiments were performed by introducing nitric acid vapor (PHNO3~3 Pa, Ptotal~40 kPa) into a teflon-coated chamber and initiating acquisition of infrared spectra at 3 minute time intervals. After 36 minutes of data collection, soot powder was rapidly expanded into nitric acid contained in the chamber to generate a soot-HNO3 aerosol. Infrared spectra collected before, and after, soot introduction to the chamber were used to characterize chamber wall reaction processes and soot aerosol chemistry, respectively. Three soot types were investigated (Degussa FW2, Cabot Monarch 1000, and crystalline graphite), each yielding similar chemistry. Upon soot introduction to the chamber both HNO3 uptake and NO2 production occurred, with the molar ratio of HNO3 uptake to NO2 production varying from 1.2 to 2.9 for the three soot types studied. Unreacted HNO3 was present at the conclusion of each of the aerosol experiments, indicating incomplete conversion of HNO3 into NO2. This observation suggested that "active" sites at the soot surface responsible for the reduction of HNO3 are not regenerated (i.e., formed) in the reaction process. In essence, a titration occurred between these active sites and HNO3. The NO2 concentrations produced, the soot mass concentrations used, and the BET measured specific surface area of the powders allowed computation of the surface density of active sites of ~4.0x10-18 m2/active site (describing all three powders studied). This is the first reported measurement of surface density of active sites for nitric acid chemistry on soot. Since atmospheric heterogeneous reactions that exhibit surface deactivation may, in principle, affect trace gas concentration, we perform an assessment in this regard.

  9. Modification of heterogeneous chemistry by complex substrate morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, B.F.; Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Chemistry in many environmental systems is determined at some stage by heterogeneous reaction with a surface. Typically the surface exists as a dispersion or matrix of particulate matter or pores, and a determination of the heterogeneous chemistry of the system must address the extent to which the complexity of the environmental surface affects the reaction rates. Reactions that are of current interest are the series of chlorine nitrate reactions important in polar ozone depletion. The authors have applied surface spectroscopic techniques developed at LANL to address the chemistry of chlorine nitrate reactions on porous nitric and sulfuric acid ice surfaces as a model study of the measurement of complex, heterogeneous reaction rates. The result of the study is an experimental determination of the surface coverage of one adsorbed reagent and a mechanism of reactivity based on the dependence of this coverage on temperature and vapor pressure. The resulting mechanism allows the first comprehensive modeling of chlorine nitrate reaction probability data from several laboratories.

  10. Accounting for Heterogeneous-Phase Chemistry in Air Quality Models - Research Needs and Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the extent to which heterogeneous chemical reactions affect the burden and distribution of atmospheric pollutants is important because heterogeneous surfaces are ubiquitous throughout our environment. They include materials such as aerosol particles, clouds and fog,...

  11. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sodium Halide and Hydrogen Halide Aqueous Solutions: Application to Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levering, L. M.; Liu, D.; Allen, H. C.

    2003-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on the surfaces of atmospheric aerosols play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. These reactions are capable of converting alkyl and hydrogen halides (common constituents of marine boundary aerosols) into active halogen compounds. Fundamental questions still remain concerning surface species and reaction mechanisms pertaining to marine boundary aerosols. The first step in beginning to understand these heterogeneous reactions is to determine how ions in solution affect the structure of water at the interface. Vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy is used to examine the air-liquid interface of sodium halide and hydrogen halide (i.e. strong acid) solutions. In addition, comparison of the bulk water structure to that of the interface is accomplished using Raman spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bonding environment at the surface of NaCl is found to be similar to that of the air-water interface. In contrast, the interfacial water structure of NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions is significantly altered from that of neat water. In the bulk, NaCl, NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions disturb the hydrogen-bonding network of neat water. A comparison between the corresponding salts and acids show that the salts produce greater disorder (i.e. less coupling of the water symmetric stretching modes) in the bulk water structure.

  12. Simulation of Aerosols and Chemistry with a Unified Global Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2004-01-01

    This project is to continue the development of the global simulation capabilities of tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry and aerosols in a unified global model. This is a part of our overall investigation of aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction. In the past year, we have enabled the tropospheric chemistry simulations based on the GEOS-CHEM model, and added stratospheric chemical reactions into the GEOS-CHEM such that a globally unified troposphere-stratosphere chemistry and transport can be simulated consistently without any simplifications. The tropospheric chemical mechanism in the GEOS-CHEM includes 80 species and 150 reactions. 24 tracers are transported, including O3, NOx, total nitrogen (NOy), H2O2, CO, and several types of hydrocarbon. The chemical solver used in the GEOS-CHEM model is a highly accurate sparse-matrix vectorized Gear solver (SMVGEAR). The stratospheric chemical mechanism includes an additional approximately 100 reactions and photolysis processes. Because of the large number of total chemical reactions and photolysis processes and very different photochemical regimes involved in the unified simulation, the model demands significant computer resources that are currently not practical. Therefore, several improvements will be taken, such as massive parallelization, code optimization, or selecting a faster solver. We have also continued aerosol simulation (including sulfate, dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea-salt) in the global model to cover most of year 2002. These results have been made available to many groups worldwide and accessible from the website http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov/People/Chin/aot.html.

  13. Challenges to producing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology for chemistry and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Bourassa, Adam; Rieger, Landon; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Arfeuille, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol data sets are key inputs for climate models (GCMs, CCMs) particularly for understanding the role of volcanoes on climate and as a surrogate for understanding the potential of human-derived stratospheric aerosol as mitigation for global warming. In addition to supporting activities of individual climate models, the data sets also act as a historical input to the activities of SPARC's Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) and the World Climate Research Programme's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). One such data set was produced in 2004 as a part of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP), extending from 1979 and 2004. It was primarily constructed from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment series of instruments but supplemented by data from other space-based sources and a number of ground-based and airborne instruments. Updates to this data set have expanded the timeframe to span from 1850 through 2014 through the inclusion of data from additional sources, such as photometer data and ice core analyses. Fundamentally, there are limitations to the reliability of the optical properties of aerosol inferred from even the most complete single instrument data sets. At the same time, the heterogeneous nature of the underlying data to this historical data set produces considerable challenges to the production of a climate data set which is both homogeneous and reliable throughout its timespan. In this presentation, we will discuss the impact of this heterogeneity showing specific examples such as the SAGE II to OSIRIS/CALIPSO transition in 2005. Potential solutions to these issues will also be discussed.

  14. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data

  15. Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Peters, Len K.

    2008-07-03

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a new Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC), with a special focus on addressing the long-standing issues associated with solving the dynamic partitioning of semi-volatile inorganic gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) to size-distributed atmospheric aerosol particles. The coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE) for dynamic gas-particle mass transfer are extremely stiff, and the available numerical techniques are either too expensive or produce oscillatory and/or inaccurate steady-state solutions. These limitations are overcome in MOSAIC, which couples an accurate and computationally efficient thermodynamic module [Zaveri et al., 2005a,b] with a new dynamic gas-particle partitioning module described here. The algorithm involves time-split integrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile species, and a new concept of “dynamic pH” and an adaptive time-stepping scheme hold the key to smooth, accurate, and efficient solutions over the entire relative humidity range. MOSAIC is found to be in excellent agreement with a benchmark version of the model that uses LSODES (a Gear solver) for rigorously integrating the stiff ODEs. The steady-state MOSAIC results for monodisperse aerosol test cases are also in excellent agreement with those obtained with the benchmark equilibrium model AIM. MOSAIC is also evaluated within a 3-D model, and the average CPU speed is estimated to be over 100 times faster than the dynamic aerosol model MADM [Pilinis et al., 2000]. These results suggest that MOSAIC is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol and air quality models in which both accuracy and efficiency are critically important.

  16. Heterogeneous chemistry of octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal with sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Levitt, Nicholas P.; Zhang, Renyi

    2005-05-01

    Recent experimental studies using the environmental chamber have suggested that acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions of organic carbonyls lead to multifold increases in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass, but the kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous chemistry of carbonyls with sulfuric acid remain largely uncertain. We report the first measurements of heterogeneous uptake of octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal on liquid H2SO4 in the acid range of 60 to 85 wt % and between 250 and 298 K. Octanal was physically absorbed by sulfuric acid without undergoing irreversible reaction. From the time-dependent uptake the effective Henry's law solubility constant (H*) was determined. Irreversible reactive uptake was observed for 2, 4-hexadienal, and the uptake coefficient decreased with decreasing acid concentrations. The uptake of octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal on liquid H2SO4 is explained by aldol condensation, dependent on acidity. The results suggest that aldol condensation of the aldehydes can be important in the upper troposphere, but may not significantly contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation in the lower troposphere.

  17. Homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry along air parcel trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. L.; Poole, L. R.; Solomon, S.

    1990-01-01

    The study of coupled heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry due to polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) using Lagrangian parcel trajectories for interpretation of the Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Experiment (AASE) is discussed. This approach represents an attempt to quantitatively model the physical and chemical perturbation to stratospheric composition due to formation of PSC's using the fullest possible representation of the relevant processes. Further, the meteorological fields from the United Kingdom Meteorological office global model were used to deduce potential vorticity and inferred regions of PSC's as an input to flight planning during AASE.

  18. Influences of dust aerosols on regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of dust aerosols on the regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season (April-June) dust storm event in northern India are analyzed. The MOZCART chemical mechanism of WRF-Chem is extended to simulate heterogeneous chemistry on dust surface and F-TUV photolysis scheme is updated to account for effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates. The dust storm event lasted from 17 to 22 April 2010 and large changes (>50%) in local to regional scale aerosol optical properties are observed in both AERONET and satellite observations during this period. The extended version of WRF-Chem model captured several important features of the spatio-temporal distributions of dust plumes, aerosol optical properties and trace gases during the dust storm. Model results show that dust particles cool the surface and the top of the atmosphere, and warm the atmosphere. The regionally averaged radiative perturbation due to dust aerosols is estimated as -2.0×3.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 2.3×1.8 W m-2 in the atmosphere and -4.4×3.1 W m-2 at the surface. The impact of these radiative perturbations on the surface energy budget is estimated to be small on a regional scale but significant locally. The dust storm acted as a sink for many key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde, and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-99% and more than 80% of this reduction came from the heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of reactive uptake coefficient is found to have a significant impact on the distributions of trace gases. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging can play an important role in heterogeneous chemistry. Model experiments based on laboratory measurements of changes in the uptake of ozone by dust with aging showed that dust aging can lead to

  19. Heterogeneous processing of {sup 13}NO{sub 2} at zero concentration by monodisperse carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, K.; Kalberer, M.; Parrat, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The heterogeneous chemical processing of atmospheric cases by both natural and anthropogenic aerosols plays a key role in the regional as well as global environment. The oxides of nitrogen in the presence of soot present a particularly interesting and relevant topic covering a wide range of such diverse phenomena as acid rain and stratospheric ozone depletion. Detailed investigations of such systems is difficult due to low aerosol and gas species concentrations and, to date, most studies have investigated the chemistry using bulk samples. Nitrogen dioxide is known to be the most important reactive species in this system proceeding as, NO{sub 2} + (C) {r_arrow} (NO{sub 2}{lg_bullet} C){r_arrow} NO + (O {lg_bullet} C). In our current study, we have used {sup 13}N(T{sub 1/2} = 9.96 min) radioisotope labeling techniques to investigate the uptake and chemical conversion of NO{sub 2} in the presence of monodisperse carbon aerosols under real atmospheric conditions, which represents a significant improvement over earlier studies in our lab. {sup 13}N was produced using 14 MeV protons from the PSI Philips cyclotron and a gas target of 2% O{sub 2} in He for the reaction {sup 16}O(p,{alpha}) {sup 13}N. The resulting {sup 13}NO{sub y} were reduced to {sup 13}NO over molybdenum and subsequently oxidized to {sup 13}NO{sub 2} over CrO{sub 3}. Carbon aerosol was generated by spark discharge between graphite rods in argon. Mono-disperse size cuts were selected with a differential mobility analyzer operated with synthetic air. The NO{sub 2} and aerosol streams were admixed and passed through a reaction volume for a reaction time of 10s. A series of selective traps and one filter were used to separate products and reactants: (1) triethanolamine (TEA) denuder to remove unreacted gas phase NO{sub 2}, (2) TEA impregnated class fiber filter to remove aerosol fraction and NO{sub 2} released after uptake, and (3) Co{sub x}O{sub y} trap to remove all residual NO{sub x}.

  20. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  1. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform

  2. Heterogenous uptake of gaseous N(sub 2)O(sub 5) by sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. -T.; Kane, S. M.; Caloz, F.

    2001-01-01

    The heterogeneous uptake of gaseous N sub 2 O sub 5 by ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid aerosols as a function of relative humididty has been investigated at room temperature and atmsopheric pressure.

  3. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  4. Importance of Unimolecular HO2 Elimination in the Heterogeneous OH Reaction of Highly Oxygenated Tartaric Acid Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu Tung; Chan, Man Nin; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-07-28

    Oxygenated organic molecules are abundant in atmospheric aerosols and are transformed by oxidation reactions near the aerosol surface by gas-phase oxidants such as hydroxyl (OH) radicals. To gain better insights into how the structure of an organic molecule, particularly in the presence of hydroxyl groups, controls the heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of oxygenated organic compounds, this study investigates the OH-radical initiated oxidation of aqueous tartaric acid (C4H6O6) droplets using an aerosol flow tube reactor. The molecular composition of the aerosols before and after reaction is characterized by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time) coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer. The aerosol mass spectra reveal that four major reaction products are formed: a single C4 functionalization product (C4H4O6) and three C3 fragmentation products (C3H4O4, C3H2O4, and C3H2O5). The C4 functionalization product does not appear to originate from peroxy radical self-reactions but instead forms via an α-hydroxylperoxy radical produced by a hydrogen atom abstraction by OH at the tertiary carbon site. The proximity of a hydroxyl group to peroxy group enhances the unimolecular HO2 elimination from the α-hydroxylperoxy intermediate. This alcohol-to-ketone conversion yields 2-hydroxy-3-oxosuccinic acid (C4H4O6), the major reaction product. While in general, C-C bond scission reactions are expected to dominate the chemistry of organic compounds with high average carbon oxidation states (OSC), our results show that molecular structure can play a larger role in the heterogeneous transformation of tartaric acid (OSC = 1.5). These results are also compared with two structurally related dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid) to elucidate how the identity and location of functional groups (methyl and hydroxyl groups) alter heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. PMID:27397411

  5. Modeling aerosol surface chemistry and gas-particle interaction kinetics with K2-SURF: PAH oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. They have the ability to impact cloud properties, radiative balance and provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions. The uptake of gaseous species on aerosol surfaces impacts both the aerosol particles and the atmospheric budget of trace gases. These subsequent changes to the aerosol can in turn impact the aerosol chemical and physical properties. However, this uptake, as well as the impact on the aerosol, is not fully understood. This uncertainty is due not only to limited measurement data, but also a dearth of comprehensive and applicable modeling formalizations used for the analysis, interpretation and description of these heterogeneous processes. Without a common model framework, comparing and extrapolating experimental data is difficult. In this study, a novel kinetic surface model (K2-SURF) [Ammann & Pöschl, 2007; Pöschl et al., 2007] was used to describe the oxidation of a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Integrated into this consistent and universally applicable kinetic and thermodynamic process model are the concepts, terminologies and mathematical formalizations essential to the description of atmospherically relevant physicochemical processes involving organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosols. Within this process model framework, a detailed master mechanism, simplified mechanism and parameterizations of atmospheric aerosol chemistry are being developed and integrated in analogy to existing mechanisms and parameterizations of atmospheric gas-phase chemistry. One of the key aspects to this model is the defining of a clear distinction between various layers of the particle and surrounding gas phase. The processes occurring at each layer can be fully described using known fluxes and kinetic parameters. Using this system there is a clear separation of gas phase, gas-surface and surface bulk transport and reactions. The partitioning of compounds can be calculated using the flux

  6. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic

  7. Gaseous chemistry and aerosol mechanism developments for version 3.5.1 of the online regional model, WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Utembe, S.; Allan, J.; Zaveri, R. A.; Fast, J. D.; Hodnebrog, Ø.; Denier van der Gon, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2014-11-01

    We have made a number of developments to the Weather, Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), with the aim of improving model prediction of trace atmospheric gas-phase chemical and aerosol composition, and of interactions between air quality and weather. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been added, using the Kinetic Pre-Processor (KPP) interface, to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas-phase schemes. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of nighttime chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments are illustrated, using a modified version of WRF-Chem 3.4.1, in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the Northwest European domain. These developments are publicly available in WRF-Chem from version 3.5.1 onwards.

  8. Laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry relevant to the polar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeau, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The heterogeneous interactions of the stratospheric reservoir species HCl, ClONO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5} with water-rich, polar stratospheric particle mimics represent key, initial steps in the chemistry associated with Antarctic ozone depletion. Using both FTIR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques, we have demonstrated the crucial role of solvated ionic species in the process and shown that the mechanisms can procede by an S{sub N}2-type nucleophilic attack of the oxygen atom from the surface water molecule upon the most accessible electrophilic site of the adsorbing reactant. In contrast to the ozone {open_quotes}hole{close_quotes}, the detailed chemical mechanisms of other polar phenomena, such as {open_quotes}sudden{close_quotes} tropospheric ozone loss over the Arctic and the OH radical {open_quotes}morning burst{close_quotes} measured in the lower Antarctic stratosphere, are little understood. However, cold, condensed matter from a variety of origins is known to exist in both regions. Therefore we shall also report our recent photochemical results pertinent to low-temperature heterogeneous aspects of both issues.

  9. Laboratory Investigations of Heterogeneous Chemistry Important to Ozone Depletion in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyi

    Results of laboratory investigations of heterogeneous chemistry important to ozone depletion in the stratosphere are presented. Thermodynamic properties (such as melting points, enthalpies of fusion, etc.) for acids which are present in the stratosphere (HCl, HNO_3 , and H_2SO_4 ) are studied using laboratory-assembled apparatus of electrical conductivity and differential thermal analysis and using a commercial differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Vapor pressures and infrared spectra of liquid and supercooled solutions, and of liquid-solid and solid -solid coexistence mixtures for the HCl/H_2 O and H_2SO_4 /H_2O binary systems are investigated. Equilibrium constants and standard enthalpies of formation for the pure crystalline hydrates of those acids as well as their corresponding liquid compositions are determined from the vapor pressure and calorimetric data. A theoretical approach, which allows determination of vapor pressures for two adjacent hydrates in thermodynamic equilibrium and for the coexistence systems involving a hydrate and ice in a binary system, is presented in terms of chemical equilibrium principles and compared with the experimental data for thermodynamic consistence. Vapor pressures of HNO_3 and HCl over H_2SO_4 /HNO_3/H_2 O and H_2SO_4 /HCl/H_2O solutions as well as over H_2SO_4/HNO _3/HCl/H_2O solutions are also measured in order to predict incorporation of stratospheric acids into the background sulfate aerosols. From the data, the Henry's law solubility constants for those systems are determined and the equilibrium compositions of aqueous stratospheric aerosols are predicted as a function of ambient temperature and mixing ratios of H_2 O and HNO_3. The results indicate that at the low temperatures characteristic of the stratosphere at high latitudes in the winter and spring, the HNO_3 content reaches levels of the order of 10% wt in the background sulfate aerosols. The results also reveal that the amount of dissolved HCl in the

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols modifies TTL cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. W.; Murray, B. J.; Dobbie, S.; Al-Jumur, S. M.; Cui, Z.; Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Schnaiter, M.; Benz, S.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Skrotzki, J.; Ebert, V.; Wagner, S.; Karcher, B.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments at the AIDA chamber, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, have shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol can nucleate ice at temperatures relevant to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)(1). Modelling suggests this new route to the formation of TTL cirrus can provide an explanation for the very low ice particle number density observed in cirrus clouds in this region and may lead to high in-cloud supersaturations(1). Nucleation of ice on glassy aerosol is consistent with the absence of traditional ice nuclei in sampled TTL cirrus residue(2). In addition, we will present new data from experiments performed in July 2010 at the AIDA chamber using glassy aerosols composed of other atmospherically relevant compounds (levoglucosan, raffinose) and an internal mixture of five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (raffinose/M5AS)(3). All four systems tested nucleate ice when in a glassy state. This indicates that heterogeneous ice nucleation is a general property of glassy aerosols and that natural aerosols which are composed of similar molecules will also nucleate ice if glassy. Glassy aqueous levoglucosan and raffinose/M5AS aerosol nucleated ice at temperatures similar to those found for glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol (<202 K). Whereas raffinose, which forms a glass at much higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at up to ~220 K. This activity at higher temperatures suggests that ice nucleation by glassy aerosol may also play a role in the formation of warmer ice clouds. (1)B. J. Murray et al., Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols under cirrus conditions, Nature Geosci, 2010, 3, 233-237. (2)K. D. Froyd et al., Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2010, 10, 209-218. (3)B. Zobrist et al., Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2008, 8, 5221-5244.

  11. Aircraft(ER-2) and Balloon In-Situ Measurements of HC1, NO(sub 2), HNO(sub 3), N(sub 2)o, and CH(sub 4) for Testing Heterogeneous Chemistry on PSC's and Sulfate Aerosols in the 1991/92 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C.; May, R.; Scott, D.; Hu, H.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrations of HC1 measured in the 1991/3 northern hemisphere lower stratosphere from the ER-2 aircraft are significantly lower than model predictions using both gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry, but are in much better agreement with model predictions for the 1994 southern hemisphere.

  12. Heterogeneous chemistry in the troposphere: The nitric acid "renoxification"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Figueroa, Armando M.

    2005-07-01

    The current observed discrepancy between the field and modeled NO x/HNO3 ratios suggests that chemistry that may affect the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere remains unidentified. We studied several heterogeneous reactions involving HNO3 and various atmospheric species (NO, CO, CH4 and SO2) proposed to reconcile these ratios. The BET surface area of several atmospherically available natural and anthropogenic surfaces was determined to evaluate the potential role in heterogeneous chemistry. The BET surface area of these surfaces was 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher than the geometric surface area of the samples. Silica was chosen as the proxy surface of atmospherically available surfaces, and its interaction with water using a combination of FTIR and BET theory was studied. Hydroxylated silica absorbs ˜1.6 monolayers of water under ambient conditions (296 K, ˜50% RH). Using transmission FTIR, we monitored the reaction of surface-adsorbed HNO3 with gaseous CO, SO2, CH4 and NO. No reaction between HNO3 and CO, CH4 or SO2 was observed. Upper limits to the reaction probabilities (gammarxn ) were derived: ≤10-10 for CO and SO 2, and ≤10-12 for CH4. Therefore, these reactions are not expected to participate in "renoxification" in the boundary layer. However, the reaction of HNO3(ads) with NO does occur, producing gaseous NO2, with a lower limit for the reaction probability of gammaNO > (7 +/- 1) x 10-8 (2s) when only the surface area covered by HNO 3 was used. Molecular HNO3 was shown to be the reactive species instead of NO3-. This chemistry requires the presence of a thin water film on the surface. Recent studies by Kleffmann et al. (2004) reported to have an upper limit for the reaction probability for the HNO3-NO reaction of gamma NO→NO2 < 2.5 x 10-9. However, it is not clear whether the HNO3 was dissociated or the molecular form under their experimental conditions. The HNO3-NO reaction could be a significant means of "renoxification" of HNO3 on surfaces

  13. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-09-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (< 30 %) in response to the projected changes in the emissions of SO2 (-40 %) and ammonia (+38 %) from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  14. Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

    Mineral dust particles are a major component of tropospheric aerosol mass and affect regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Dust particles experience heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric gases that alter the gas and particle-phase chemistry. These in turn influence the warm and cold cloud nucleation ability and optical properties of the dust particles. This dissertation investigates the atmospheric chemistry of mineral dust particles and their role in warm cloud nucleation through a combination of synergistic field measurements, laboratory experiments, and theoretical modeling. In-situ measurements made with a single-particle mass spectrometer during the ACE-Asia field campaign in 2001 provide the motivation for this work. The observed mixing state of the individual ambient particles with secondary organic and inorganic components is described in Chapter 2. A large Asian dust storm occurred during the campaign and produced dramatic changes in the aerosol's composition and mixing state. The effect of particle size and mineralogy on the atmospheric processing of individual dust particles is explored in Chapters 3 & 4. Sulfate was found to accumulate preferentially in submicron iron and aluminosilicate-rich dust particles, while nitrate and chloride were enriched in supermicron calcite-rich dust. The mineral dust (and sea salt particles) were also enriched in oxalic acid, the dominant component of water soluble organic carbon. Chapter 5 explores the roles of gas-phase photochemistry and partitioning of the diacids to the alkaline particles in producing this unique behavior. The effect of the dust's mixing state with secondary organic and inorganic components on the dust particles' solubility, hygroscopicity, and thus warm cloud nucleation properties is explored experimentally and theoretically in Chapter 6. Cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activation curves revealed that while calcium nitrate and calcium chloride particles were very hygroscopic

  15. New directions: Mineral dust and ozone - Heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols, the tiny solid or liquid particles suspended in air and produced from natural sources and anthropogenic activities, continue to contribute the largest uncertainty to radiative forcing (IPCC, 2013). Aerosol particles give rise to radiative forcing directly through scattering and absorption of solar and infrared radiation in the atmosphere. Aerosols also give rise to indirect radiative forcing by modifying the cloud optical properties and lifetimes. Among the aerosol species mineral dust and black carbon cause a warming (positive forcing) while sulphate and sea salt cause a cooling (negative forcing) of the Earth-atmosphere system. In tropics and sub-tropics mineral dust is a major contributor to aerosol loading and optical thickness. The global source strength of dust aerosol varies significantly on spatial and temporal scales. The source regions of dust are mainly deserts, dry lake beds, and semi-arid regions, in addition to drier regions where vegetation has been reduced or soil surfaces that are disturbed by man made activities. Anthropogenic activities mainly related to agriculture such as harvesting, ploughing, overgrazing, and cement production and transport also produce mineral dust. An estimated 2500 terragram (Tg, 1012 g) of mineral dust is emitted into the atmosphere per year, and dominates the aerosol mass over continental regions in south Asia and China accounting for ∼35% of the total aerosol mass (IPCC, 2013). In India, dust is prevalent throughout the north and western India during the year and peaks during premonsoon season.

  16. Global atmospheric sulfur budget under volcanically quiescent conditions: Aerosol-chemistry-climate model predictions and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian-Xiong; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Rozanov, Eugene; Stenke, Andrea; Anet, Julien; Bingemer, Heinz; Peter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The global atmospheric sulfur budget and its emission dependence have been investigated using the coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate model SOCOL-AER. The aerosol module comprises gaseous and aqueous sulfur chemistry and comprehensive microphysics. The particle distribution is resolved by 40 size bins spanning radii from 0.39 nm to 3.2 μm, including size-dependent particle composition. Aerosol radiative properties required by the climate model are calculated online from the aerosol module. The model successfully reproduces main features of stratospheric aerosols under nonvolcanic conditions, including aerosol extinctions compared to Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and Halogen Occultation Experiment, and size distributions compared to in situ measurements. The calculated stratospheric aerosol burden is 109 Gg of sulfur, matching the SAGE II-based estimate (112 Gg). In terms of fluxes through the tropopause, the stratospheric aerosol layer is due to about 43% primary tropospheric aerosol, 28% SO2, 23% carbonyl sulfide (OCS), 4% H2S, and 2% dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Turning off emissions of the short-lived species SO2, H2S, and DMS shows that OCS alone still establishes about 56% of the original stratospheric aerosol burden. Further sensitivity simulations reveal that anticipated increases in anthropogenic SO2 emissions in China and India have a larger influence on stratospheric aerosols than the same increase in Western Europe or the U.S., due to deep convection in the western Pacific region. However, even a doubling of Chinese and Indian emissions is predicted to increase the stratospheric background aerosol burden only by 9%. In contrast, small to moderate volcanic eruptions, such as that of Nabro in 2011, may easily double the stratospheric aerosol loading.

  17. HETEROGENEOUS SOOT NANOSTRUCTURE IN ATMOSPHERIC AND COMBUSTION SOURCE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microscopic images of soot emissions from wildfire and a wide range of anthropogenic combustion sources show that the nanostructures of individual particles in these emissions are predominantly heterogeneous, decidedly influenced by the fuel composition and by the particular comb...

  18. Heterogeneous Reduction Pathways for Hg(II) Species on Dry Aerosols: A First-Principles Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Tacey, Sean A; Xu, Lang; Mavrikakis, Manos; Schauer, James J

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric lifetime of mercury is greatly impacted by redox chemistry resulting from the high deposition rate of reactive mercury (Hg(II)) compared to elemental mercury (Hg(0)). Recent laboratory and field studies have observed the reduction of Hg(II), but the chemical mechanism for this reaction has not been identified. Recent experimental work has shown that the reduction reaction is heterogeneous and can occur on iron and sodium chloride aerosol surfaces. This study explores the use of density functional theory calculations to discern the reduction pathways of HgCl2, HgBr2, Hg(NO3)2, and HgSO4 on clean Fe(110), NaCl(100), and NaCl(111)(Na) surfaces. Potential energy surfaces were prepared for the various reduction pathways, indicating that the reduction pathway leading to the production of gas-phase elemental mercury is highly favorable on Fe(110) and NaCl(111)(Na). Moreover, the Fe(110) surface requires an external energy source of ∼0.5 eV to desorb the reduced mercury, whereas the NaCl(111)(Na) surface requires no energy input. The results indicate that a number of mercury species can be reduced on metallic iron and sodium chloride surfaces, which are known aerosol components, and that a photochemical reaction involving the aerosol surface is likely needed for the reaction to be catalytic. PMID:27014805

  19. Addition of Tropospheric Chemistry and Aerosols to the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Lamarque, J; Connell, P; Chuang, C; Rotman, D; Taylor, J

    2005-11-14

    Atmospheric chemistry and aerosols have several important roles in climate change. They affect the Earth's radiative balance directly: cooling the earth by scattering sunlight (aerosols) and warming the Earth by trapping the Earth's thermal radiation (methane, ozone, nitrous oxide, and CFCs are greenhouse gases). Atmospheric chemistry and aerosols also impact many other parts of the climate system: modifying cloud properties (aerosols can be cloud condensation nuclei), fertilizing the biosphere (nitrogen species and soil dust), and damaging the biosphere (acid rain and ozone damage). In order to understand and quantify the effects of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols on the climate and the biosphere in the future, it is necessary to incorporate atmospheric chemistry and aerosols into state-of-the-art climate system models. We have taken several important strides down that path. Working with the latest NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM), we have incorporated a state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry model to simulate tropospheric ozone. Ozone is not just a greenhouse gas, it damages biological systems including lungs, tires, and crops. Ozone chemistry is also central to the oxidizing power of the atmosphere, which destroys a lot of pollutants in the atmosphere (which is a good thing). We have also implemented a fast chemical mechanism that has high fidelity with the full mechanism, for significantly reduced computational cost (to facilitate millennium scale simulations). Sulfate aerosols have a strong effect on climate by reflecting sunlight and modifying cloud properties. So in order to simulate the sulfur cycle more fully in CCSM simulations, we have linked the formation of sulfate aerosols to the oxidizing power of the atmosphere calculated by the ozone mechanisms, and to dimethyl sulfide emissions from the ocean ecosystem in the model. Since the impact of sulfate aerosols depends on the relative abundance of other aerosols in the atmosphere, we also

  20. Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; H. Denier van der Gon; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-11-08

    We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

  1. Effects of Chemical Aging on the Heterogeneous Freezing of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, K.; Brooks, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosols are emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources and display a wide range of effectiveness in promoting the nucleation of ice in clouds. Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) arise from incomplete combustion and other pollutant sources. Hydrocarbon compounds in diesel motor oil and other fuel blends include compounds such as octacosane (a straight saturated alkane), squalane (a branched saturated alkane) and squalene (an unsaturated branched alkene). At temperatures above -36°C, the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere is facilitated by heterogeneous freezing processes in which atmospheric aerosols act as ice nuclei (IN). The variability in ability of organic particles to facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation causes major uncertainties in predictions of aerosol effects on climate. Further, atmospheric aerosol composition and ice nucleation ability can be altered via chemical aging and reactions with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone. In this study, we take a closer look at the role of chemical oxidation on the efficiency of specific IN during contact freezing laboratory experiments. The freezing temperatures of droplets in contact with representative organic aerosols are determined through the use of an optical microscope apparatus equipped with a cooling stage and a digital camera. Chemical changes at the surface of aerosols due to ozone exposure are characterized using Raman Microspectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance. Our results indicate that oxidation of certain atmospheric organics (soot and PAHS) enhances their ice nucleation ability. In this presentation, results of heterogeneous nucleation on various types of organic aerosols will be presented, and the role of structure in promoting freezing will be discussed.

  2. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  3. Chemistry of organic aerosol formation in urban atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1994-04-04

    Aerosol formation from the photooxidation of A-pinene/NOx and B-pinene/NOx mixtures has been investigated in a series of outdoor smog chamber experiments. Both hydrocarbons are potent aerosol formers and in areas containing significant vegetation, terpenes are estimated to be a significant contributor to secondary organic aerosol formation. To model organic aerosol formation, estimates of the vapor pressures of the condensable species are needed. To measure the vapor pressures of the low volatility species characteristic of organic aerosols the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) method introduced by Liu and McMurray has been further developed for this task. Initial experiments with compounds of known vapor pressure confirm the usefulness of the method.

  4. Aerosol chemistry during the wet season in central Amazonia - The influence of long-range transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Artaxo, P.; Garstang, M.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal variation in the concentration and chemistry of the atmospheric aerosol over central Amazonia, Brazil, during the 1987 wet season is discussed based on ground and aircraft collected data obtained during the NASA GTE ABLE 2B expedition conducted in April/May 1987. It is found that wet-season aerosol concentrations and composition are variable in contrast to the more uniform biogenic aerosol observed during the 1985 dry season; four distinct intervals of enhanced aerosol concentration coincided with short periods (3 to 5 d) of extensive rainfall. It is hypothesized that aerosol chemistry in Amazonia during the wet season is strongly influenced by long-range transport of soil dust, marine aerosol, and possibly biomass combustion products advected into the central Basin by large-scale tropospheric circulation, producing periodic pulses of material input to local boundary layer air. The resultant wet-season aerosol regime is dynamic, in contrast to the uniformity of natural biogenic aerosols during the dry season.

  5. Ion Chemistry and Dust Aerosols in the Martian Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheel, Varun; Haider, Syed A.

    2012-07-01

    Models of the daytime upper ionosphere and nighttime models have been able to explain some of the observations of the Martian atmosphere. However, not much attention has been paid to the ionosphere below 100 km. We have developed a detailed chemistry model of 35 ions and 12 neutral species with galactic cosmic rays as the primary source of ionization to calculate the densities of ions in the daytime lower atmosphere of Mars (Haider et al., 2008). The chemical model couples various processes through 101 chemical reactions. We do a quantitative comparison between various production and loss processes, in order to tag each of them with their relative importance in determining the ion densities. Impact of galactic cosmic rays initially produces CO_{2}^{+} and O_{2}^{+} ions, but the ion chemistry eventually leads to the dominance of hydrated positive and negative ions with maximum densities of about 10^{3} cm^{-3}. It is found that out of all the processes included in the model, the most important process is the ion-neutral collisions wherein the reaction of H_{3}O^{+}(H_{2}O)_{2,3} with water and air molecules having the highest rates of ˜10^5 cm^{-3} s^{-1} (Sheel et al., PSS, in press). These ions can charge dust aerosols in the lower ionosphere of Mars. Periodical massive dust storms with high surface winds disturb surface sediments and lift large amounts of dust into the atmosphere. We have extended the ion model to study the effect of dust on ions in the troposphere of Mars. The dust vertical profile, used as an input to our model, is calculated using the Conrath parametrisation and constrained with dust opacities observed by THEMIS onboard the Mars Odyssey. We observe that the major positive and negative hydrated ions decrease by upto two orders of magnitude in the presence of dust (Haider at al, 2010). These results will be presented and dust variability observed by MGS and Mars Odyssey will also be discussed in the talk. Our calculations provide an initial

  6. Stratospheric ion and aerosol chemistry and possible links with cirrus cloud microphysics - A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of stratospheric ion chemistry and physics are assessed as they relate to aerosol formation and the transport of aerosols to upper tropospheric regions to create conditions favorable for cirrus cloud formation. It is found that ion-induced nucleation and other known phase transitions involving ions and sulfuric acid vapor are probably not efficient processes for stratospheric aerosol formation, and cannot compete with condensation of sulfuric acid on preexisting particles of volcanic or meteoritic origin which are larger than about 0.15 micron in radius. Thus, galactic cosmic rays cannot have a significant impact on stratospheric aerosol population. Changes in the stratospheric aerosol burden due to volcanos are up to two orders of magnitude larger than changes in ion densities. Thus, volcanic activity may modulate the radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  7. Investigations of Global Chemistry-Climate Interactions and Organic Aerosol Using Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala Olson Taylor

    Aerosol, or particulate matter (PM), is an important component of the atmosphere responsible for negative health impacts, environmental degradation, reductions in visibility, and climate change. In this work, the global chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, is used as a tool to examine chemistry-climate interactions and organic aerosols. GEOS-Chem is used to simulate present-day (year 2000) and future (year 2050) sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium aerosols and investigate the potential effects of changes in climate and emissions on global budgets and U.S. air quality. Changes in a number of meteorological parameters, such as temperature and precipitation, are potentially important for aerosols and could lead to increases or decreases in PM concentrations. Although projected changes in sulfate and nitrate precursor emissions favor lower PM concentrations over the U.S., projected increases in ammonia emissions could result in higher nitrate concentrations. The organic aerosol simulation in GEOS-Chem is updated to include aerosol from primary semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCS), intermediate volatility compounds (IVOCs), NOx dependent terpene aerosol, and aerosol from isoprene + NO3 reaction. SVOCs are identified as the largest global source of organic aerosol even though their atmospheric transformation is highly uncertain and emissions are probably underestimated. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbons reacting with the nitrate radical are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, approximately 22 to 24 Tg/yr of which is from biogenic hydrocarbons.

  8. Complex Coupling of Air Quality and Climate-Relevant Aerosols in a Chemistry-Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C.; Mann, G.

    2013-12-01

    Controlling emissions of aerosols and their precursors to improve air quality will impact the climate through direct and indirect radiative forcing. We have investigated the impacts of changes in a range of aerosol and gas-phase emission fluxes and changes in temperature on air quality and climate change metrics using a global aerosol microphysics and chemistry model, GLOMAP. We investigate how the responses of PM2.5 and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are coupled, and how attempts to improve air quality could have inadvertent effects on CCN, clouds and climate. The parameter perturbations considered are a 5°C increase in global temperature, increased or decreased precursor emissions of anthropogenic SO2, NH3, and NOx, and biogenic monoterpenes, and increased or decreased primary emissions of organic and black carbon aerosols from wildfire, fossil fuel, and biofuel. To quantify the interactions, we define a new sensitivity metric in terms of the response of CCN divided by the response of PM in different regions. .Our results show that the coupled chemistry and aerosol processes cause complex responses that will make any co-benefit policy decision problematic. In particular, we show that reducing SO2 emissions effectively reduces surface-level PM2.5 over continental regions in summer when background PM2.5 is high, with a relatively small reduction in marine CCN (and hence indirect radiative cooling over ocean), which is beneficial for near-term climate. Reducing NOx emissions does not improve summertime air quality very effectively but leads to a relatively high reduction of marine CCN. Reducing NH3 emissions has moderate effects on both PM2.5 and CCN. These three species are strongly coupled chemically and microphysically and the effects of changing emissions of one species on mass and size distributions of aerosols are very complex and spatially and temporally variable. For example, reducing SO2 emissions leads to reductions in sulphate and ammonium mass

  9. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles from Different Dust Source Regions: The Importance of Particle Mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J; Grassian, Vicki H; Cowin, James P; Laskin, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four different dust source regions is investigated on a particle-by-particle basis using state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy techniques including computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/computer-controlled X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid are observed. Clear differences in the reactivity of mineral dusts from these four different dust regions with nitric acid could be observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, such as those found in parts of China and Saudi Arabia, are found to react to the greatest extent. Calcium containing minerals, such as calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), react to form nitrate salt whereas other calcium containing minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) do not react. The importance of particle chemical composition and mineralogy in the heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust aerosols is definitively borne out in this study of individual dust particles.

  10. Heterogeneous Catalytic Chemistry by Example of Industrial Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heveling, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 85% of all chemical products are manufactured with the help of catalysts. Virtually all transition metals of the periodic table are active as catalysts or catalyst promoters. Catalysts are divided into homogeneous catalysts, which are soluble in the reaction medium, and heterogeneous catalysts, which remain in the solid state.…

  11. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  12. Tropospheric aerosols: size-differentiated chemistry and large-scale spatial distributions.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M; Mohnen, Volker; Blanchard, Charles L

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide interest in atmospheric aerosols has emerged since the late 20th century as a part of concerns for air pollution and radiative forcing of the earth's climate. The use of aircraft and balloons for sampling and the use of remote sensing have dramatically expanded knowledge about tropospheric aerosols. Our survey gives an overview of contemporary tropospheric aerosol chemistry based mainly on in situ measurements. It focuses on fine particles less than 1-2.5 microm in diameter. The physical properties of particles by region and altitude are exemplified by particle size distributions, total number and volume concentration, and optical parameters such as extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth. Particle chemical characterization is size dependent, differentiated by ubiquitous sulfate, and carbon, partially from anthropogenic activity. Large-scale particle distributions extend to intra- and intercontinental proportions involving plumes from population centers to natural disturbances such as dust storms and vegetation fires. In the marine environment, sea salt adds an important component to aerosols. Generally, aerosol components, most of whose sources are at the earth's surface, tend to dilute and decrease in concentration with height, but often show different (layered) profiles depending on meteorological conditions. Key microscopic processes include new particle formation aloft and cloud interactions, both cloud initiation and cloud evaporation. Measurement campaigns aloft are short term, giving snapshots of inherently transient phenomena in the troposphere. Nevertheless, these data, combined with long-term data at the surface and optical depth and transmission observations, yield a unique picture of global tropospheric particle chemistry. PMID:23687724

  13. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  14. LES simulation of cloud-aerosols-chemistry interactions in Western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, M.; Brosse, F.; Mari, C. H.; Couvreux, F.

    2014-12-01

    Low clouds have a major impact on the radiative balance of the earth, in particular in tropical areas. The Southern West Africa (SWA) area encounters during boreal summer frequent formations of stratus and/or cumulus clouds over a large extent. These cloud bands, still badly represented in climatic models, can lead to large errors in the estimation of the cloud radiative forcing. Moreover, these cloud bands can evolve or not in cumulus congestus clouds leading to precipitations. The SWA area is characterized by a large diversity of natural and anthropic emissions of gaseous chemical species and aerosol particles. These emissions have a potential large impact on the number concentration and chemical composition of aerosol particles over the SWA zone. This impact is direct through emissions of primary particles, and indirect through the formation of secondary particles from gaseous precursors. A part of these particles will act as cloud condensation nuclei, thus, influencing the cloud microphysics characteristics. In order to improve our understanding of these complex processes, an airborne campaign is planed in summer 2015 over SWA zone in the framework of the European project DACCIWA (Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa). To prepare the campaign and begin to investigate the cloud-chemistry-aerosols interactions, a LES simulation on a case study designed from an AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) case has been performed with the 3D online-chemistry Meso-NH model. The LES simulation captures the chemical segregation due to thermals in the rising convective boundary layer. Comparing simulation with or without cloud chemistry highlights the effect of aqueous phase chemistry on gaseous precursors of aerosol particles.

  15. Model development of dust emission and heterogeneous chemistry within the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and its application over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Fu, J. S.; Huang, K.; Tong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been further developed in terms of simulating natural wind-blown dust in this study, with a series of modifications aimed at improving the model's capability to predict the emission, transport, and chemical reactions of dust aerosols. The default parameterization of threshold friction velocity constants in the CMAQ are revised to avoid double counting of the impact of soil moisture based on the re-analysis of field experiment data; source-dependent speciation profiles for dust emission are derived based on local measurements for the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts in East Asia; and dust heterogeneous chemistry is implemented to simulate the reactions involving dust aerosol. The improved dust module in the CMAQ was applied over East Asia for March and April from 2006 to 2010. Evaluation against observations has demonstrated that simulation bias of PM10 and aerosol optical depth (AOD) is reduced from -55.42 and -31.97 % in the original CMAQ to -16.05 and -22.1 % in the revised CMAQ, respectively. Comparison with observations at the nearby Gobi stations of Duolun and Yulin indicates that applying a source-dependent profile helps reduce simulation bias for trace metals. Implementing heterogeneous chemistry is also found to result in better agreement with observations for sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfate (SO42-), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous oxides (NOx), and nitrate (NO3-). Investigation of a severe dust storm episode from 19 to 21 March 2010 suggests that the revised CMAQ is capable of capturing the spatial distribution and temporal variations of dust aerosols. Model evaluation indicates potential uncertainties within the excessive soil moisture fraction used by meteorological simulation. The mass contribution of fine mode aerosol in dust emission may be underestimated by 50 %. The revised revised CMAQ provides a useful tool for future studies to investigate the emission, transport, and impact of wind-blown dust over East

  16. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly

  17. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the

  18. Aerosol and Precipitation Chemistry Climatology for Bermuda: the Long View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. L.; Keene, W. C.; Galloway, J. N.; Prospero, J. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Eckhardt, S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol and precipitation ionic composition have been measured on Bermuda from 1988 through 2009. Data for the period July 1988 to July 1998, and June 2006 to July 2009 were collected during two field campaigns supported by NSF. Wet-only precipitation and flow-sectored aerosol chemical composition have been sampled from the top of a walk-up tower and virtually identical sampling, handling and analytical protocols were used for both programs. A source-receptor climatology has been developed based on daily Flexpart trajectory retroplumes which characterize the residence time as a percentage of transport arriving from different source regions. This paper compares the composition and trends in composition by dominant source region comparing flow from the Eastern North America, the North Atlantic Ocean, and from locations off/downwind of North Africa. Transport from Eastern North America is further segregated into source regions in the NE US and the SE US/Gulf of Mexico. Annual volume weighted averages in non-seasalt sulfate illustrate a distinct secular decline since 1989, and the influence of transport as a controlling influence on this temporal trend will be quantified. The long term average composition will be compared with the more recent data record on Bermuda where the radiative characteristics of different types of aerosols were simultaneously measured.

  19. Heterogeneity in pre-monsoon aerosol characteristics over the Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2013-10-01

    Heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics was studied at five different locations over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) region during the pre-monsoon period (April-June 2011) using concurrent measurements from sun/sky radiometer, which is hypothesized to affect the Indian monsoon circulation and also the global climate system. Based on the measured aerosol products, distribution of aerosols and the associated optical properties were examined over the entire region. The pre-monsoon mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to be maximum at Lahore (0.78) and Kanpur (0.68); however, a minimum AOD (∼0.6) was observed at Karachi, Jaipur and Gandhi College, with relatively high variability at Karachi and low at Gandhi College. On the other hand, a significant gradient in Angstrom exponent (AE) from Karachi (0.30) in the west to Gandhi College (0.98) in the east IGB region suggests relative dominance of coarse particles over the western part and fine particles at the eastern part of the IGB. Results are confirmed with the aerosol size distribution and the air mass back-trajectory analysis at all the stations. The corresponding pre-monsoon mean single scattering albedo (SSA) shows relatively higher value at Karachi (0.94), suggests relative dominance of scattering type particles. On the other hand, lower SSA, ranging from 0.85 to 0.92, was observed at the other stations, with the lowest value at Gandhi College (0.85), which suggests absorbing aerosol distributions over the region.

  20. Importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry - Studies with a one-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Keesee, R. G.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model of tropospheric air composition is developed which incorporates several heterogeneous physical and chemical processes. The model includes the interaction of gases, aerosols, and hydrometeors through the physical mechanisms of nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation, coalescence, and deliquescence. Precipitation, sedimentation, and dry deposition act to remove material from the atmosphere, while chemical transformations occur both in the vapor and the condensed phases. The model also incorporates the sources and vertical diffusion of gases and particles, as well as changes in the solar intensity caused by light-scattering from aerosols and clouds. Preliminary simulations made using this model indicate that rainout and washout processes strongly influence the distributions of tropospheric gases and aerosols under certain conditions.

  1. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  2. Investigating the Chemical Pathways to PAH- and PANH-Based Aerosols in Titan's Atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella Marion; Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, Claire Louise; Salama, Farid

    2011-01-01

    A complex organic chemistry between Titan's two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. These aerosols are at the origin of the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. In situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini have revealed the presence of large amounts of neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan. In particular, benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3), which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, have been detected, suggesting that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan s aerosols. Moreover, results from numerical models as well as laboratory simulations of Titan s atmospheric chemistry are also suggesting chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN ...) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols.

  3. Effects of dust aerosols on tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G. G.; Knote, C.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the effect of a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm on tropospheric chemistry through a case study in northern India. Dust can alter photolysis rates by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and provide surface area for heterogeneous reactions. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to simulate the dust storm that occurred during 17-22 April 2010 and investigate the contribution of different processes on mixing ratios of several key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde. We revised the Fast Troposphere Ultraviolet Visible (F-TUV) photolysis scheme to include effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates in a manner consistent with the calculations of aerosol optical properties for feedback to the meteorology radiation schemes. In addition, we added 12 heterogeneous reactions on the dust surface, for which 6 reactions have relative-humidity-dependent reactive uptake coefficients (γ). The inclusion of these processes in WRF-Chem is found to reduce the difference between observed and modeled O3 from 16 ± 9 to 2 ± 8 ppbv and that in NOy from 2129 ± 1425 to 372 ± 1225 pptv compared to measurements at the high-altitude site Nainital in the central Himalayas, and reduce biases by up to 30% in tropospheric column NO2 compared to OMI retrievals. The simulated dust storm acted as a sink for all the trace gases examined here and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-100%, and more than 80% of this reduction was due to heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of γ is also found to have substantial impact on the distribution of trace gases, with changes of up to 20-25% in O3 and HO2, 50% in H2O2 and 100% in HNO3. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging could change H2O2 and CH3COOH levels by up to 50% but has a relatively small impact on other gases.

  4. Effects of dust aerosols on tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G. G.; Knote, C.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm on tropospheric chemistry through a case study in northern India. Dust can alter photolysis rates by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and provide surface area for heterogeneous reactions. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to simulate the dust storm that occurred during 17-22 April 2010 and investigate the contribution of different processes on mixing ratios of several key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde. We revised the Fast Troposphere Ultraviolet Visible (F-TUV) photolysis scheme to include effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates in a manner consistent with the calculations of aerosol optical properties for feedback to the meteorology radiation schemes. In addition, we added twelve heterogeneous reactions on the dust surface, for which six reactions have relative humidity dependent reactive uptake coefficients (γ). The inclusion of these processes in WRF-Chem is found to reduce difference between observed and modeled ozone from 16 ± 9 to 2 ± 8 ppbv and that in NOy from 2129 ± 1425 to 372 ± 1225 pptv compared to measurements at the high altitude site Nainital in the central Himalayas, and reduce biases by up to 30% in tropospheric column NO2 compared to OMI retrievals. The simulated dust storm acted as a sink for all the trace gases examined here and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-100% and more than 80% of this reduction was due to heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of γ is also found to have substantial impact on the distribution of trace gases, with changes of up to 20-25% in ozone and HO2, 50% in H2O2 and 100% in HNO3. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging can reduce the uptake of trace gases (especially of H2O2 and acetic acid) by up to 50% in

  5. Markers of heterogeneous reaction products in α-pinene ozone secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoschke, Nadine M.; Jang, Myoseon

    A gas chromatograph iontrap mass spectrometer (GC-ITMS) was used to analyze the gas-and particle-phase products of α-pinene ozone oxidation in the presence of three different inorganic seed aerosols: sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate only, and ammonium sulfate with sulfuric acid. Products of α-pinene ozone oxidation common to the literature showed little difference in gas or particle-phase concentrations between seed types within the precision of the measurements even though significantly different aerosol yields were found between seed types. Small amounts of ring-opening products of four-membered cyclic oxygenates and markers of aldol condensation products were tentatively identified in the particle-phase for all seed types. These tentatively identified products are thought to be the result of acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions in the particle-phase or during sampling processes or analysis. The mechanisms for their formation are also proposed in this study.

  6. OH- Initiated Heterogeneous Oxidation of Saturated Organic Aerosols in the Presence of SO2: Uptake Kinetics and Product Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Ward, M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase oxidation mechanisms for organic gases are often used as a starting point to understand heterogeneous oxidation. The reaction of a simple alkane hydrocarbon by OH proceeds through hydrogen abstraction and under ambient conditions leads to peroxy radical (RO2) formation. RO2 can further react to form: (1) smaller molecular weight products (i.e. fragmentation) via alkoxy radical formation and dissociation and/or (2) higher molecular weight products with oxygenated functional groups (i.e. functionalization). The ability to perturb these two pathways (functionalization vs. fragmentation) is critical for understanding the detailed reaction mechanism that control atmospheric aging chemistry of particles. At high temperatures the presence of sulfur dioxide (SO2) during organic-OH gas-phase oxidation enhances the fragmentation pathway leading to increased alkoxy formation. It is unknown if a comparative affect occurs at room temperature during a heterogeneous reaction. We used the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles in the presence and absence of SO2 as a model system to explore changes in individual mechanistic pathways. Detailed kinetic measurements were made in a flow tube reactor using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and oxidation products are identified from samples collected on quartz filters using thermal desorption two-dimensional chromatographic separation and ionization by either VUV (10.5 eV) or electron impact (70 eV), with detection by high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS). In the presence of SO2 the yields of alcohols were enhanced compared to without SO2, suggesting that the alkoxy formation pathway was dominant. The results from this work will provide an experimentally-confirmed kinetic framework that could be used to model atmospheric aging mechanisms.

  7. "Sizing" Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Conversion of Gaseous Dimethyl Sulfide to Atmospheric Particles.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hara, Keiichiro; Osada, Kazuo; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2016-02-16

    The oxidation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions is a global source of cloud condensation nuclei. The amounts of the nucleating H2SO4(g) species produced in such process, however, remain uncertain. Hydrophobic DMS is mostly oxidized in the gas phase into H2SO4(g) + DMSO(g) (dimethyl sulfoxide), whereas water-soluble DMSO is oxidized into H2SO4(g) in the gas phase and into SO4(2-) + MeSO3(-) (methanesulfonate) on water surfaces. R = MeSO3(-)/(non-sea-salt SO4(2-)) ratios would therefore gauge both the strength of DMS sources and the extent of DMSO heterogeneous oxidation if Rhet = MeSO3(-)/SO4(2-) for DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) were known. Here, we report that Rhet = 2.7, a value obtained from online electrospray mass spectra of DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) reaction products that quantifies the MeSO3(-) produced in DMSO heterogeneous oxidation on aqueous aerosols for the first time. On this basis, the inverse R dependence on particle radius in size-segregated aerosol collected over Syowa station and Southern oceans is shown to be consistent with the competition between DMSO gas-phase oxidation and its mass accommodation followed by oxidation on aqueous droplets. Geographical R variations are thus associated with variable contributions of the heterogeneous pathway to DMSO atmospheric oxidation, which increase with the specific surface area of local aerosols. PMID:26761399

  8. Impact of heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric chemistry of the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, A.R ); Stolarski, R.S. )

    1989-02-01

    The possible depletion of ozone due to heterogeneous reactions occurring in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) is fundamentally different from the Antarctic situation. PSC's in the Arctic are relatively short-lived and occur over limited regions of the Arctic stratosphere. The authors have examined the Arctic situation using a model which calculates photochemical processes as a function of longitude in air calculating with fixed velocity around the pole at fixed pressure level and latitude. The model allows sunlight to vary diurnally and PSC's to occur in specified subregions of the domain. Measurements of chemical species including HCl, ClO, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3} downwind from a PSC should show obvious changes compared to measurements in air unaffected by clouds. These species concentrations are found to be sensitive to sticking coefficients, cloud characteristics including particle number density and surface area, and to the PSC exposure time.

  9. Aerosol Chemistry over a High Altitude Station at Northeastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Srivastava, Manoj K.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Tiwari, Suresh; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for an improved understanding of the sources, distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosol in order to control the atmospheric pollution over northeastern Himalayas where rising anthropogenic interferences from rapid urbanization and development is becoming an increasing concern. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive aerosol sampling program was conducted in Darjeeling (altitude ∼2200 meter above sea level (masl), latitude 27°01′N and longitude 88°15′E), a high altitude station in northeastern Himalayas, during January–December 2005. Samples were collected using a respirable dust sampler and a fine dust sampler simultaneously. Ion chromatograph was used to analyze the water soluble ionic species of aerosol. The average concentrations of fine and coarse mode aerosol were found to be 29.5±20.8 µg m−3 and 19.6±11.1 µg m−3 respectively. Fine mode aerosol dominated during dry seasons and coarse mode aerosol dominated during monsoon. Nitrate existed as NH4NO3 in fine mode aerosol during winter and as NaNO3 in coarse mode aerosol during monsoon. Gas phase photochemical oxidation of SO2 during premonsoon and aqueous phase oxidation during winter and postmonsoon were the major pathways for the formation of SO42− in the atmosphere. Long range transport of dust aerosol from arid regions of western India was observed during premonsoon. The acidity of fine mode aerosol was higher in dry seasons compared to monsoon whereas the coarse mode acidity was higher in monsoon compared to dry seasons. Biomass burning, vehicular emissions and dust particles were the major types of aerosol from local and continental regions whereas sea salt particles were the major types of aerosol from marine source regions. Conclusions/Significance The year-long data presented in this paper provide substantial improvements to the heretofore poor knowledge regarding aerosol chemistry over northeastern Himalayas, and should be useful to

  10. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Huisman, Andrew J.; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass-transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterized by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different data sets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed. Reference: Berkemeier, T., Huisman, A. J., Ammann, M., Shiraiwa, M

  11. The Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Precipitation and Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Forcing Uncertainty in Climatically Important Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regayre, L.; Pringle, K.; Lee, L.; Booth, B.; Browse, J.; Mann, G.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Reddington, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Rap, A.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud radiative forcing and precipitation sensitivities are quantified within climatically important regions, where surface temperatures and moisture availability are thought to influence large-scale climatic effects. The sensitivity of precipitation and the balance of incoming and outgoing radiation to uncertain historical aerosol emission fluxes and aerosol-cloud parametrisations are quantified and their climatic importance considered. The predictability of monsoon onset and intensity, position of the inter-tropical convergence zone, tropical storm frequency and intensity, heat transport to the Arctic and changes in the mode of the El Niño Southern Oscillation are all limited by the parametric uncertainties examined here. Precipitation and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing sensitivities are found to be both spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Statistical analysis highlights aspects of aerosol-climate research and model development that should be prioritised in order to reduce the impact of uncertainty in regional precipitation and aerosol-cloud forcing on near-term climate projections.

  12. Role of Topological Heterogeneity on the Fate of Inhaled Aerosols in the Pulmonary Acinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Koshiyama, Kenichiro; Wada, Shigeo; Sznitman, Josue

    2015-11-01

    Particle transport, and ultimately deposition outcomes, in the acinar region of the lungs are intrinsically coupled with local the shape and morphology of the airways and alveolar cavities (Hofemeier and Sznitman, 2015). Thus, it is paramount to capture the complexity and heterogeneity of the acinar environment in order to predict realistic aerosol dynamics. Recently, Koshiyama and Wada (2015) introduced an algorithm to generate acinar models with space-filling heterogeneous alveolar structures to mimic realistic in vivo environments. Their model is able to reproduce the characteristic polyhedral shape and size of alveolar cavities as well as the length and branching angles of the connecting airways. Here, we utilize for the first time such acinar models as the basis for numerical simulations of respiratory acinar flows and particle transport. By generating and modeling various heterogeneous multi-generation acinar models, we aim to shed light on the role of spatial acinar heterogeneity on particle deposition fate, as a function of inhaled particle size and breathing maneuvers. The present studies are a first step towards predicting realistic acinar deposition patterns indicative for whole lung statistics as well as inter-acinar differences.

  13. Tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V. A.; Chameides, W.; Demerjian, K. L.; Lenschow, D. H.; Logan, J. A.; Mcneal, R. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Platt, U.; Schurath, U.; Dias, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of the background troposphere, the source region, and the transition regions are discussed. The troposphere is governed by heterogeneous chemistry far more so than the stratosphere. Heterogeneous processes of interest involve scavenging of trace gases by aerosols, cloud and precipitation elements leading to aqueous phase chemical reactions and to temporary and permanent removal of material from the gas phase. Dry deposition is a major removal process for ozone, as well as for other gases of importance in tropospheric photochemistry. These processes are also discussed.

  14. On the physics, chemistry and toxicology of ultrafine anthropogenic, atmospheric aerosols (UAAA): new advances.

    PubMed

    Spurny, K R

    1998-08-01

    The existing data about the epidemiology, toxicology, physics and chemistry of atmospheric particulate pollutants were recently essentially completed and extended. They do support the hypothesis that the fine and very fine dispersed fraction of the atmospheric anthropogenic aerosols (UAAA) are responsible for the aggravation of the health risk potential of the polluted atmosphere during the last decade. The recently published data dealing primarily with the physics, chemistry, sampling and analysis of these highly dispersed particulate air pollutants are reviewed, summarized and critically evaluated. PMID:9820675

  15. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Shiraiwa, M.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-07-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterised by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different datasets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone in order to demonstrate utility and highlight potential issues. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed.

  16. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Shiraiwa, M.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass-transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterized by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different data sets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed.

  17. Simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols with the climate model EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noije, T. P. C.; Le Sager, P.; Segers, A. J.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Krol, M. C.; Hazeleger, W.

    2014-03-01

    We have integrated the atmospheric chemistry and transport model TM5 into the global climate model EC-Earth version 2.4. We present an overview of the TM5 model and the two-way data exchange between TM5 and the integrated forecasting system (IFS) model from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the atmospheric general circulation model of EC-Earth. In this paper we evaluate the simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in a one-way coupled configuration. We have carried out a decadal simulation for present-day conditions and calculated chemical budgets and climatologies of tracer concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For comparison we have also performed offline simulations driven by meteorological fields from ECMWF's ERA-Interim reanalysis and output from the EC-Earth model itself. Compared to the offline simulations, the online-coupled system produces more efficient vertical mixing in the troposphere, which likely reflects an improvement of the treatment of cumulus convection. The chemistry in the EC-Earth simulations is affected by the fact that the current version of EC-Earth produces a cold bias with too dry air in large parts of the troposphere. Compared to the ERA-Interim driven simulation, the oxidizing capacity in EC-Earth is lower in the tropics and higher in the extratropics. The methane lifetime is 7% higher in EC-Earth, but remains well within the range reported in the literature. We evaluate the model by comparing the simulated climatologies of surface carbon monoxide, tropospheric and surface ozone, and aerosol optical depth against observational data. The work presented in this study is the first step in the development of EC-Earth into an Earth system model with fully interactive atmospheric chemistry and aerosols.

  18. Simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols with the climate model EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noije, T. P. C.; Le Sager, P.; Segers, A. J.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Krol, M. C.; Hazeleger, W.; Williams, A. G.; Chambers, S. D.

    2014-10-01

    We have integrated the atmospheric chemistry and transport model TM5 into the global climate model EC-Earth version 2.4. We present an overview of the TM5 model and the two-way data exchange between TM5 and the IFS model from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the atmospheric general circulation model of EC-Earth. In this paper we evaluate the simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in a one-way coupled configuration. We have carried out a decadal simulation for present-day conditions and calculated chemical budgets and climatologies of tracer concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For comparison we have also performed offline simulations driven by meteorological fields from ECMWF's ERA-Interim reanalysis and output from the EC-Earth model itself. Compared to the offline simulations, the online-coupled system produces more efficient vertical mixing in the troposphere, which reflects an improvement of the treatment of cumulus convection. The chemistry in the EC-Earth simulations is affected by the fact that the current version of EC-Earth produces a cold bias with too dry air in large parts of the troposphere. Compared to the ERA-Interim driven simulation, the oxidizing capacity in EC-Earth is lower in the tropics and higher in the extratropics. The atmospheric lifetime of methane in EC-Earth is 9.4 years, which is 7% longer than the lifetime obtained with ERA-Interim but remains well within the range reported in the literature. We further evaluate the model by comparing the simulated climatologies of surface radon-222 and carbon monoxide, tropospheric and surface ozone, and aerosol optical depth against observational data. The work presented in this study is the first step in the development of EC-Earth into an Earth system model with fully interactive atmospheric chemistry and aerosols.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Garimella, Sarvesh; Dias, Antonio; Frege, Carla; Höppel, Niko; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Amorim, Antonio; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -39.0 and -37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  20. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  1. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    likely due to evaporation. BB does not appear to be a strong source of nitrate despite its high emissions of nitrogen oxides, presumably due to low ammonia emissions. NR-chloride often correlates with HCN indicating a fire source, although other sources likely contribute as well. This is the first aircraft study of the regional evolution of aerosol chemistry from a tropical megacity.

  2. A thermoluminescent method for aerosol characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A thermoluminescent method has been used to study the interactions of aerosols with ozone. The preliminary results show that ozone reacts with many compounds found in aerosols, and that the thermoluminescence curves obtained from ozonated aerosols are characteristic of the aerosol. The results suggest several important applications of the thermoluminescent method: development of a detector for identification of effluent sources; a sensitive experimental tool for study of heterogeneous chemistry; evaluation of importance of aerosols in atmospheric chemistry; and study of formation of toxic, electronically excited species in airborne particles.

  3. Large enhancement in the heterogeneous oxidation rate of organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-10-27

    In this paper we report an unexpectedly large acceleration in the effective heterogeneous OH reaction rate in the presence of NO. This 10–50 fold acceleration originates from free radical chain reactions, propagated by alkoxy radicals that form inside the aerosol by the reaction of NO with peroxy radicals, which do not appear to produce chain terminating products (e.g., alkyl nitrates), unlike gas phase mechanisms. Lastly, a kinetic model, constrained by experiments, suggests that in polluted regions heterogeneous oxidation plays a much more prominent role in the daily chemical evolution of organic aerosol than previously believed.

  4. Carbonaceous aerosol over semi-arid region of western India: Heterogeneity in sources and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, A. K.; Aslam, M. Y.; Upadhyay, M.; Rengarajan, R.; Bhushan, R.; Rathore, J. S.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC)) and water-soluble inorganic species (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -) in PM10 and PM2.5 from Ahmedabad and Jodhpur (urban and semi-urban locations, respectively) in western India were measured during May-September, 2011. Stable isotope composition of carbonaceous aerosol (δ13C of TC) in PM10 samples was also determined. Average EC concentration in PM10 at Ahmedabad was 1 μg m- 3 (range: 0.34 to 3.4 μg m- 3), almost 80% of which remained in PM2.5. Similarly, 70% of EC in PM10 (average: 0.9 μg m- 3) resided in PM2.5 at Jodhpur. Average OC concentration at Ahmedabad was 6.4 μg m- 3 and ~ 52% of this was found in PM2.5. On the contrary, OC concentration at Jodhpur was 40 μg m- 3, 80% of which was found in coarse particles contributing substantially to aerosol mass. δ13C of TC (average: - 27.5‰, range: - 29.6 to - 25.8‰) along with WSOC/EC ratio shows an increasing trend at Jodhpur suggesting the possibility of aging of aerosol, since aging results in enrichment of heavier isotope. OC and WSOC show significant correlations with K+ and not with EC, indicating biogenic origin of OC. Different size distributions are also exhibited by WSOC at the two stations. On the other hand, δ13C exhibits an inverse trend with sea-salt constituents at Ahmedabad, indicating the influence of air masses transported from the western/south-western region on carbonaceous aerosol. These results suggest that a strong heterogeneity exists in the sources of carbonaceous aerosol over this region and potential sources of non-combustion emissions such as bio-aerosol that need further investigation.

  5. Evaluating the importance of innovative heterogeneous chemistry to explain observed stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1996-02-27

    Currently, there is a widespread search for additional heterogeneous reactions or combination of heterogeneous and homogeneous (gas-phase) reactions that could catalytically reduce ozone to observed levels. In 1992, Burley and Johnston proposed that nitrosyl sulfuric acid (NSA) NOHSO{sub 4}, is a promising heterogeneous reactant for activating HCl in sulfuric acid particles. They list several sources for producing it in the stratosphere and they carried out thermodynamic and chemical kinetic calculations at one stratospheric altitude and at one latitude. NSA has been overlooked in all previous stratospheric model calculations, even though it has been observed in stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This study makes large scale atmospheric model calculations to test the proposal by Burley and Johnston that a promising heterogeneous process for activating HCl in sulfuric acid particles is a catalytic coupled based on nitrosyl sulfuric acid (NSA). This mechanism is examined under non-volcanic and volcanic conditions representative of the recent eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The calculations set firm limits on the range of kinetic parameters over which this heterogeneous processes would be important in the global ozone balance, and thus is a guide for where laboratory work is needed. In addition, they have derived a preliminary time-dependent integration (1980--1994) to represent the observed trend in ozone. Comparison between model-derived and the observed ozone trend will be compared.

  6. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  7. Using WRF-Chem to investigate the impact of night time nitrate radical chemistry and N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry on the chemical composition of the UK troposphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Utembe, S.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-04-01

    It is believed that NO3 is the primary oxidant at night time, significantly impacting ozone formation, rain acidification and the formation and transformation of aerosols, particularly through the formation of the ammonium nitrate particulate (Allan et. al., 2000). However, many of the basic chemical processes controlling the formation and removal of NO3, in particular, the N2O5 heterogeneous reactions, are often not represented in models, although general parameterisations have been developed (c.f. Bertram & Thornton, 2009). The ROle of Night time chemistry in controlling the Oxidising Capacity of the atmOsphere (RONOCO) campaign is a project being funded by NERC and being carried out by a collaboration of UK Universities. It aims to better understand the role of the NO3 radical on the chemistry of the night time atmosphere, its oxidation capacity and thus its overall effects on the composition of the troposphere. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is a state of the art regional climate model with fully coupled online air quality and meteorological components allowing for better resolution of aerosol and gas-phase chemistry (Grell et. al., 2005). It has been extended to include the Common Representative Intermediates scheme (CRIv2-R5) (Watson et. al., 2008), a reduced chemical scheme designed to simulate the atmospheric degradation of 220 species of hydrocarbons and VOCs. The MOSAIC aerosol scheme (Zaveri et. al., 2008), has been extended to include a reduced complexity condensed organic phase consisting of 13 semi-volatile and 2 involatile species (Topping et. al., 2012), as well as the N2O5 heterogeneous reaction scheme of Bertram & Thornton (2009). We aim to use WRF-Chem to compare the oxidation capacity of nighttime NO3 chemistry with that of daytime OH chemistry. The model was run using two nested grids: a 15km resolution domain over western Europe, containing a 5km resolution domain over the UK. The RONOCO campaign consisted

  8. Proceedings of a Workshop on Research Needs in Heterogeneous Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The role of heterogeneous reactions and processes in the troposphere is critically assessed. The results of this assessment, including identification and prioritization of a number of important and scientifically tractable processes, as well as recommendations of ways in which they can be incorporated into the existing NASA tropospheric chemistry program are presented. Also presented is a detailed summary of the considerations that led to the group's recommendations.

  9. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  10. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-30

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  11. Heterogeneous reactions of TiO2 aerosol particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 and their implications for stratospheric particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Keeble, James; Telford, Paul; Pope, Francis; Rkiouak, Laylla; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John; Mcgregor, James; Watson, Matt; Cox, Tony; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Injection of aerosol particles (or their precursors) into the stratosphere to scatter solar radiation back into space has been suggested as a solar radiation management scheme for climate engineering. Several minerals, including TiO2, have been as possible candidate particles (instead of sulfuric acid) to be injected into the stratosphere, due to their high refractive indices. However, their heterogeneous reactivity towards important reactive trace gases in the stratosphere has seldom been investigated, impeding us from a reliable assessment of their impact on stratospheric O3. In this work, the heterogeneous reactions of airborne TiO2 particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 have been studied at room temperature and at different RH, using an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube. The uptake coefficient of N2O5, γ(N2O5), increased from ~1.8E-3 at 5% RH to 4.5E-3 at ~60% RH for TiO2, significantly smaller than that for sulfuric acid particles in the stratosphere. The uptake of ClONO2 onto TiO2 aerosols particles have been found to be quite inefficient, with γ(ClONO2) not larger than 1E-3. Therefore, compared to stratospheric sulfuric acid particles, TiO2 particles show similar reactivity towards ClONO2 and much less reactivity towards N2O5. The UKCA chemistry-climate model has been used to assess the impact of TiO2 particles on stratospheric chemistry. A few scenarios have been constructed for TiO2 particle injection to have the same radiative effect as the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. We find that the impact of TiO2 injection on stratospheric N2O5 is much smaller than the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The heterogeneous reaction of ClONO2 with TiO2 particles is being included in the model, and a comprehensive assessment of the effect of TiO2 injection on stratospheric chemistry will be presented.

  12. The "Parade Blue": effects of short-term emission control on aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Qiang; Duan, Fengkui; Zheng, Bo; He, Kebin

    2016-07-18

    The strict control on emissions implemented in Beijing, China, during the 2015 China Victory Day Parade (V-day Parade) to commemorate the 70(th) Anniversary of Victory in World War II, provided a good opportunity to investigate the relationship between emission sources and aerosol chemistry in a heavily polluted megacity. From August 11 to September 3, 2015, an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor was deployed in urban Beijing, together with other collocated instruments, for the real-time measurement of submicron aerosol characteristics. The average PM1 mass concentration was 11.3 (±6.7) μg m(-3) during the V-day Parade, 63.5% lower than that before the V-day Parade. Differently to the relatively smaller decrease of organics (53%), secondary inorganic aerosols (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium) showed significant reductions of 65-78% during the V-day Parade. According to the positive matrix factorization results, primary organic aerosol (POA) from traffic and cooking emissions decreased by 41.5% during the parade, whereas secondary organic aerosol (SOA) presented a much greater reduction (59%). The net effectiveness of emission control measures was investigated further under comparable weather conditions before and during the parade. By excluding the effects of meteorological parameters, the total PM1 mass was reduced by 52-57% because of the emission controls. Although the mass concentrations of aerosol species were reduced substantially, the PM1 bulk composition was similar before and during the control period as a consequence of synergetic control of various precursors. The emission restrictions also suppressed the secondary formation processes of sulfate and nitrate, indicated by the substantially reduced SOR and NOR (molar ratios of sulfate or nitrate to the sums of the sulfate and SO2 or nitrate and NO2) during the event. The study also explored the influence of emission controls on the evolution of organic aerosol using the mass ratios of SOA/POA and oxygen

  13. Evolution of Ozone, Particulates, and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Vicinity of Houston Using a Fully Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry-Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg; Peckham, S. E.

    2006-11-11

    A new fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban to regional scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a five day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still under-estimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  14. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore » with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 μg kg−1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 μg kg−1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for

  15. A Study on Aerosol Chemistry and Climate change at an Indo Gangetic Plain in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Srivastava, S. S.; Kumari, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    Major irritants of the environment are global warming, climate change, ozone depletion, acid rain, visibility impairment etc. Aerosol and its constituents play an important role in climate change, and deposition of atmospheric components to the earth surfaces. Knowledge of chemistry of aerosols is required for the assessment of its role in the total deposition of acidity at the earth's surface and size distribution to estimate aerosol optical and radiative properties, deposition rates, formation of cloud droplets and cloud droplet size distributions and cloud radiative properties. This paper discuss the atmospheric load of SPM, chemical characterization, precursors gases, role of meteorology and source interpretation at a site in Indo Gangetic plain. The mean TSPM load was higher than the NAAQS value for residential areas. The SPM value is in the reported range while the mean SPM value is slightly higher than earlier reported studies. It was highest in summer followed by monsoon and winter. The sum of major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and NH4+ )is higher than sum of major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-) indicates alkaline nature of aerosol in this region. Source analysis has identified three major sources viz., soil for Ca2+ and Mg2+, industries for SO42-, NO3-, Cl- and biogenic combustions for K+ and NH4+ indicates.

  16. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  17. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Järvinen, E.; Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Gordon, H.; Herenz, P.; Hoyle, C. R.; Duplissy, J.; Garimella, S.; Dias, A.; Frege, C.; Höppel, N.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, R.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2015-12-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nuclei (IN) budget.

  18. Measurement of fragmentation and functionalization pathways in the multistep heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Jesse H.; Smith, Jared D.; Che, Dung L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-03-10

    The competition between the addition of polar, oxygen-containing functional groups (functionalization) and the cleavage of C-C bonds (fragmentation) has a governing influence on the change in volatility of organic species upon atmospheric oxidation, and hence on the loading of tropospheric organic aerosol. However the branching between these two channels is generally poorly constrained for oxidized organics. Here we determine functionalization/fragmentation branching ratios for organics spanning a range of oxidation levels, using the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane (C30H62) as a model system. Squalane particles are exposed to high concentrations of OH in a flow reactor, and measurements of particle mass and elemental ratios enable the determination of absolute elemental composition (number of oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen atoms) of the oxidized particles. At low OH exposures, the oxygen content of the organics increases, indicating that functionalization dominates, whereas at higher exposures the amount of carbon in the particles decreases, indicating the increasing importance of fragmentation processes. Once the organics are moderately oxidized (O/C~;;0.4), fragmentation completely dominates, and the increase in O/C ratio upon further oxidation is due to the loss of carbon rather than the addition of oxygen. These results suggest that fragmentation reactions may be key steps in the atmospheric formation and evolution of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA).

  19. Ubiquity of organic nitrates from nighttime chemistry in the European submicron aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Friese, E.; Topping, D.; Nemitz, E.; Prevot, A. S. H.; ńijälä, M.; Allan, J.; Canonaco, F.; Canagaratna, M.; Carbone, S.; Crippa, M.; Dall Osto, M.; Day, D. A.; De Carlo, P.; Di Marco, C. F.; Elbern, H.; Eriksson, A.; Freney, E.; Hao, L.; Herrmann, H.; Hildebrandt, L.; Hillamo, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Laaksonen, A.; McFiggans, G.; Mohr, C.; O'Dowd, C.; Otjes, R.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Pandis, S. N.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Sellegri, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Tiitta, P.; Vermeulen, A.; Wahner, A.; Worsnop, D.; Wu, H.-C.

    2016-07-01

    In the atmosphere nighttime removal of volatile organic compounds is initiated to a large extent by reaction with the nitrate radical (NO3) forming organic nitrates which partition between gas and particulate phase. Here we show based on particle phase measurements performed at a suburban site in the Netherlands that organic nitrates contribute substantially to particulate nitrate and organic mass. Comparisons with a chemistry transport model indicate that most of the measured particulate organic nitrates are formed by NO3 oxidation. Using aerosol composition data from three intensive observation periods at numerous measurement sites across Europe, we conclude that organic nitrates are a considerable fraction of fine particulate matter (PM1) at the continental scale. Organic nitrates represent 34% to 44% of measured submicron aerosol nitrate and are found at all urban and rural sites, implying a substantial potential of PM reduction by NOx emission control.

  20. Platinum-based heterogeneous nanomaterials via wet-chemistry approaches toward electrocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianglan; Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Feng, Yan; Yao, Qiaofeng; Liu, Hui; Xie, Jianping; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneously structured nanomaterials usually exhibit enhanced catalytic properties in comparison with each one of the constituent materials due to the synergistic effect among their different domains. Within the last decade, the development of wet-chemistry methods leads to the blossom of research in materials with heterogeneous nanostructures, which creates great opportunities also a tremendous challenge to apply these materials for highly efficient energy conversion. We herein would systematically introduce the latest research developments in Pt-based nanomaterials with heterogeneous structures, e.g. core-shell, hollow interiors, stellated/dendritic morphologies, dimeric, or composite construction, and their potential applications as electrocatalysts toward direct methanol fuel cell reactions, including methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction in acidic conditions, aiming at the summarization of the fundamentals and technical approaches in synthesis, fabrication and processing of heterogeneous nanomaterials so as to provide the readers a systematic and coherent picture of the filed. This review will focus on the intrinsic relationship between the catalytic properties and the physical or/and chemical effects in the heterogeneous nanomaterials, providing for technical bases for effectively developing novel electrocatalyts with low cost, enhanced activity and high selectivity. PMID:26821984

  1. A Computational Approach to Understanding Aerosol Formation and Oxidant Chemistry in the Troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco, Joseph S.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Du, Shiyu; Dixon, David A.; Bianco, Roberto; Wang, Shuzhi; Hynes, James T.; Morita, Akihiro; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-04-18

    An understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of aerosol formation and ozone production in the troposphere is currently a high priority because these phenomena are recognized as two major effects of energy-related air pollution. Atmospheric aerosols are of concern because of their effect on visibility, climate, and human health. Equally important, aerosols can change the chemistry of the atmosphere, in dramatic fashion, by providing new chemical pathways (in the condensed phase) unavailable in the gas phase. The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and inorganic compounds (e.g., sulfuric acid, ammonia, nitric acid, ions, and mineral) can produce precursor molecules that act as nucleation seeds. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) has identified the need to evaluate the causes of variations in tropospheric aerosol chemical composition and concentrations, including determining the sources of aerosol particles and the fraction of such that are of primary and secondary origin. In particular, the ACP has called for a deeper understanding into aerosol formation because nucleation creates substantial concentrations of fresh particles that, via growth and coagulation, influence the Earth's radiation budget. Tropospheric ozone is also of concern primarily because of its impact on human health. Ozone levels are controlled by NOx and by VOCs in the lower troposphere. The VOCs can be either from natural emissions from such sources as vegetation and phytoplankton or from anthropogenic sources such as automobiles and oil-fueled power production plants. The major oxidant for VOCs in the atmosphere is the OH radical. With the increase in VOC emissions, there is rising concern regarding the available abundance of HOx species needed to initiate oxidation. Over the last five years, there have been four field studies aimed at initial measurements of HOx species (OH and HO? radicals). These measurements revealed HOx levels that are two to

  2. Aerosol-cloud interactions studied with the chemistry-climate model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Tost, H.; Steil, B.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-08-01

    This study uses the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model to simulate cloud properties and estimate cloud radiative effects induced by aerosols. We have tested two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation parameterizations, i.e., the standard STN (osmotic coefficient model) and hybrid (HYB, replacing the osmotic coefficient by the κ hygroscopicity parameter) schemes to calculate aerosol hygroscopicity and critical supersaturation, and consider aerosol-cloud feedbacks with a focus on warm clouds. Both prognostic schemes (STN and HYB) account for aerosol number, size and composition effects on droplet nucleation, and are tested in combination with two different cloud cover parameterizations, i.e., a relative humidity threshold and a statistical cloud cover scheme (RH-CLC and ST-CLC). The use of either STN and HYB leads to very different cloud radiative effects, particularly over the continents. The STN scheme predicts highly effective CCN activation in warm clouds and hazes/fogs near the surface. The enhanced CCN activity increases the cloud albedo effect of aerosols and cools the Earth's surface. The cooler surface enhances the hydrostatic stability of the lower continental troposphere and thereby reduces convection and convective precipitation. In contrast, the HYB simulations calculate lower, more realistic CCN activation and consequent cloud albedo effect, leading to relatively stronger convection and high cloud formation. The enhanced high clouds increase greenhouse warming and moderate the cooling effect of the low clouds. With respect to the cloud radiative effects, the statistical ST-CLC scheme shows much higher sensitivity to aerosol-cloud coupling for all continental regions than the RH-CLC threshold scheme, most pronounced for low clouds but also for high clouds. Simulations of the short wave cloud radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere in ST-CLC are a factor of 2-8 more sensitive to aerosol coupling than the RH-CLC configurations. The long wave

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and phase transition of viscous α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Virtanen, Annele; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. Global model simulations of monoterpene SOA particles suggest that viscous biogenic SOA are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle (INP) budget. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN (Ignatius et al., 2015, Järvinen et al., 2015). In the CLOUD chamber, the SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10° C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. As the RHw was increased to between 35 % at -10° C and 80 % at -38° C, a transition to spherical shape was observed with a new in-situ optical method. This transition confirms previous modelling of the viscosity transition conditions. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber SPIN (Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei) for different SOA particle sizes. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4, significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3° C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. References Ignatius, K. et al., Heterogeneous ice

  4. Natural versus anthropogenic inhalable aerosol chemistry of transboundary East Asian atmospheric outflows into western Japan.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Kojima, Tomoko; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Amato, Fulvio; Gibbons, Wes

    2012-05-01

    The eastward transport of aerosols exported from mainland Asia strongly influences air quality in the Japanese archipelago. The bulk of the inhalable particulate matter (PM(10)) in these intrusions comprises either natural, desert-derived minerals (mostly supermicron silicates) or anthropogenic pollutants (mostly submicron sulphates), in various states of mixing. We analyse PM(10) collected in Kumamoto, SW Japan, during three contrasting types of aerosol intrusions, the first being dominated by desert PM which became increasingly mixed with anthropogenic components as time progressed, the second being a relatively minor event mixing fine, distal desert PM with anthropogenic materials, and the third being dominated by anthropogenic pollutants. Whereas the chemistry of the natural mineral component is characterised by "crustal" elements (Si, Al, Fe, Mg, K, Li, P, Sc, V, Rb, Sr, Zr, Th, lanthanoids), the anthropogenic component is rich in secondary inorganic compounds and more toxic metallic elements (NH(4)(+), SO(4)(2-), As, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Sn, Bi, Sb, and Ge). Some desert-dust (Kosa) intrusions are more calcareous than others, implicating geologically different source areas, and contain enhanced levels of NO(3)(-), probably as supermicron Ca(NO(3))(2) particles produced by chemical reaction between NOx pollutants (mostly from industry and traffic) and carbonate during atmospheric transport. The overall trace element chemistry of aerosol intrusions into Kumamoto shows low V/Rb, low NO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-), enhanced As levels, and unfractionated La/Ce values, which are all consistent with anthropogenic sources including coal emissions rather than those derived from the refining and combustion of oil fractionates. Geographically dispersed, residual sulphatic plumes of this nature mix with local traffic (revealed by OC and EC concentrations) and industrial emissions and dissipate only slowly, due to the dominance of submicron accumulation mode PM which is atmospherically

  5. Heterogeneous processing of bromine compounds by atmospheric aerosols: Relation to the ozone budget

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Henson, B.F.; Dubey, M.K.; Casson, J.L.; Johal, M.S.; Wilson, K.R.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The depletion of ozone, particularly above Antarctica, has been investigated extensively to formulate public policy on the use of halocarbons. While it has been shown that heterogeneous reactions of chlorine compounds on stratospheric particulates cause the ozone hole, little is known of the analogous bromine mechanisms, even though it has been recognized for two decades that catalytic destruction of ozone by bromine could be more efficient than chlorine. Furthermore, field measurements and modeling calculations suggest that these heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactions are not restricted to the Antarctic regions but occur globally. The authors have performed laboratory measurements of the uptake of bromine compounds and other halogens on simulated stratospheric aerosols to help elucidate their role in catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Their studies contribute to the data base required to make assessments of the effects of human activities on global change, including the Montreal Protocol.

  6. Evaluation of Present-day Aerosols over China Simulated from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H.; Chang, W.

    2014-12-01

    High concentrations of aerosols over China lead to strong radiative forcing that is important for both regional and global climate. To understand the representation of aerosols in China in current global climate models, we evaluate extensively the simulated present-day aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over China from the 12 models that participated in Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), by using ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing. Ground-based measurements of aerosol concentrations used in this work include those from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) and the observed fine-mode aerosol concentrations collected from the literature. The ground-based measurements of AOD in China are taken from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), the sites with CIMEL sun photometer operated by Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and from Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). We find that the ACCMIP models generally underestimate concentrations of all major aerosol species in China. On an annual mean basis, the multi-model mean concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon are underestimated by 63%, 73%, 54%, 53%, and 59%, respectively. The multi-model mean AOD values show low biases of 20-40% at studied sites in China. The ACCMIP models can reproduce seasonal variation of nitrate but cannot capture well the seasonal variations of other aerosol species. Our analyses indicate that current global models generally underestimate the role of aerosols in China in climate simulations.

  7. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D K; Matsunaga, A; Docherty, K S; Surratt, J D; Seinfeld, J H; Ziemann, P J; Jimenez, J L

    2010-04-13

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as NO(x)+ ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using NO(x)+ fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, HNO(3)+ ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species. PMID:20194777

  8. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, William C.; Long, Michael S.

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of

  9. Impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of atmospheric trace gases: a case study of peroxides and HO2 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, D.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2013-06-01

    Field measurements of atmospheric peroxides were obtained during the summer on two consecutive years over urban Beijing, and focused on the impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of peroxide compounds and hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2). The major peroxides were determined to be hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), and peroxyacetic acid (PAA). A negative correlation was found between H2O2 and PAA in rainwater, providing evidence for a conversion between H2O2 and PAA in the aqueous phase. A standard gas phase chemistry model based on the NCAR Master Mechanism provided a good reproduction of the observed H2O2 profile on non-haze days but greatly overpredicted the H2O2 level on haze days. We attribute this overprediction to the reactive uptake of HO2 by the aerosols, since there was greatly enhanced aerosol loading and aerosol liquid water content on haze days. The discrepancy between the observed and modeled H2O2 can be diminished by adding to the model a newly proposed transition metal ion catalytic mechanism of HO2 in aqueous aerosols. This confirms the importance of the aerosol uptake of HO2 and the subsequent aqueous phase reactions in the reduction of H2O2. The closure of HO2 and H2O2 between the gas and aerosol phases suggests that the aerosols do not have a net reactive uptake of H2O2, because the conversion of HO2 to H2O2 on aerosols compensates for the H2O2 loss. Laboratory studies for the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the presence of HO2 are urgently required to better understand the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the real atmosphere.

  10. Impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of atmospheric trace gases: a case study of peroxides and HO2 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, D.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2013-11-01

    Field measurements of atmospheric peroxides were obtained during the summer on two consecutive years over urban Beijing, which highlighted the impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of peroxide compounds and hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2). The major peroxides were determined to be hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), and peroxyacetic acid (PAA). A negative correlation was found between H2O2 and PAA in rainwater, providing evidence for a conversion between H2O2 and PAA in the aqueous phase. A standard gas phase chemistry model based on the NCAR Master Mechanism provided a good reproduction of the observed H2O2 profile on non-haze days but greatly overpredicted the H2O2 level on haze days. We attribute this overprediction to the reactive uptake of HO2 by the aerosols, since there was greatly enhanced aerosol loading and aerosol liquid water content on haze days. The discrepancy between the observed and modeled H2O2 can be diminished by adding to the model a newly proposed transition metal ion catalytic mechanism of HO2 in aqueous aerosols. This confirms the importance of the aerosol uptake of HO2 and the subsequent aqueous phase reactions in the reduction of H2O2. The closure of HO2 and H2O2 between the gas and aerosol phases suggests that the aerosols do not have a net reactive uptake of H2O2, because the conversion of HO2 to H2O2 on aerosols compensates for the H2O2 loss. Laboratory studies for the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the presence of HO2 are urgently required to better understand the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the real atmosphere.

  11. The Impact of Organic Surfactants and Coatings in Regulating Heterogeneous N2O5 Reaction Kinetics on Nascent Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, O. S.; Campbell, N.; Schill, S.; Pöhlker, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on aerosol particles impacts both the lifetime of nitrogen oxides, and the production rate of chlorine radicals following the activation of particulate chloride to nitryl chloride in both coastal and continental regions. The extent to which N2O5 reactivity impacts oxidant loadings depends on the heterogeneous reaction rate, which is directly influenced by aerosol chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state. In the marine environment, the chemical composition of aerosol particles produced via wave induced bubble bursting mechanisms varies greatly and is influenced by the composition of the sea surface microlayer . Here, we present direct measurements of N2O5 reaction kinetics determined using model sea-spray particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), capable of generating accurate mimics of ambient sea spray particles, in a lab environment. Here, a synthetic sea salt ocean was sequentially doped with organic molecules chosen to mimic organic species present in natural sea water over the course of a phytoplankton bloom in the open ocean. These included sterol, galactose, lippolysaccharide, BSA protein, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DPPA). These observations permit discussion of the role of marine organics in regulating heterogeneous reaction kinetics, as well a re-evaluation of potential organic lab proxies for marine organics.

  12. Ozone response to a CO2 doubling - Results from a stratospheric circulation model with heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitari, G.; Palermi, S.; Visconti, G.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral 3D model of the stratosphere has been used to study the sensitivity of polar ozone with respect to a carbon dioxide increase. The lower stratospheric cooling associated with an imposed CO2 doubling may increase the probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and this affect ozone. The ozone perturbation obtained with the inclusion of a simple parameterization for heterogeneous chemistry on PSCs is compared to that relative to a pure homogeneous chemistry. In both cases the temperature perturbation is determined by a CO2 doubling, while the total chlorine content is kept at the present level. It is shown that the lower temperature may increase the depth and the extension of the ozone hole by extending the area amenable to PSC formation. It may be argued that this effect, coupled with an increasing amount of chlorine, may produce a positive feedback on the ozone destruction.

  13. Heterogeneously catalyzed hydrolysis of chlorine nitrate: Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance investigations of stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Thomas; Berg, Christian; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon; Bondybey, Vladimir E.

    1996-03-01

    High resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectroscopy is used to investigate reactions of large ionic water clusters H+(H2O)n and X-(H2O)n (n=1-100, X=O or OH). Reactions of the clusters with chlorine nitrate, important ``reservoir compound'' involved in the stratospheric ozone chemistry, are investigated to evaluate the importance of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions for ozone depletion. It is found that reactions of both cationic and anionic clusters result in effective hydrolysis of chlorine nitrate and return of the more active hypochlorous acid, HOCl into the gas phase. The chemistry of clusters is discussed, and its validity and relevance as a model for ``real life'' processes in the so-called polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) is assessed.

  14. A unified view on heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts through a combination of spectroscopy and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maganas, Dimitrios; Trunschke, Annette; Schlögl, Robert; Neese, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Identifying catalytically active structures or intermediates in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is a formidable challenge. However, obtaining experimentally verified insight into the active species in heterogeneous catalysis is a tremendously challenging problem. Many highly advanced spectroscopic and microscopic methods have been developed to probe surfaces. In this discussion we employ a combination of spectroscopic methods to study two closely related systems from the heterogeneous (the silica-supported vanadium oxide VOx/SBA-15) and homogeneous (the complex K[VO(O2)Hheida]) domains. Spectroscopic measurements were conducted strictly in parallel for both systems and consisted of oxygen K-edge and vanadium L-edge X-ray absorption measurements in conjunction with resonance Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the full information content of the spectra can be developed through advanced quantum chemical calculations that directly address the sought after structure-spectra relationships. To this end we employ the recently developed restricted open shell configuration interaction theory together with the time-dependent theory of electronic spectroscopy to calculate XAS and rR spectra respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that: (a) a combination of several spectroscopic techniques is of paramount importance in identifying signature structural motifs and (b) quantum chemistry is an extremely powerful guide in cross connecting theory and experiment as well as the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis fields. It is emphasized that the calculation of spectroscopic observables provides an excellent way for the critical experimental validation of theoretical results. PMID:27062973

  15. The Effect of Methyl, Hydroxyl, and Ketone Functional Groups on the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Succinic Acid Aerosol by OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Zhang, H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols can influence their effects on climate, human health, and visibility. During oxidation, functionalization occurs when an oxygenated functional group is added to a molecule, leaving the carbon skeleton intact. Fragmentation involves carbon-carbon bond cleavage and produces two products with smaller carbon numbers than the parent compound. To gain better insights into how the molecular structure of more oxygenated organic compounds affects heterogeneous reactivity, succinic acid aerosols are photo-oxidized in an aerosol flow tube reactor, and the reaction products are analyzed using Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for online chemical analysis. The effect of various functional groups (CH3, OH, C=O) along the carbon backbone on the heterogeneous reaction mechanisms are also investigated using model compounds. For this series of compounds, the formation of more oxygenated products through functionalization can be explained by well-known condensation-phase reactions such as Russell and Bennett and Summers. The number of fragmentation products is found to increase with the presence of OH and CH3 groups. This can be attributed to the increased number of tertiary carbons, enhancing the fragmentation after multiple oxidation steps. Smaller dicaids (oxalic acid and malonic acid) can be formed through the fragmentation processes in the heterogeneous oxidation of succinic acid. The effect of molecular structure on reaction kinetics, volatilization, and the relative importance of functionalization and fragmentation pathways will be discussed.

  16. Results from a new linear O3 scheme with embedded heterogeneous chemistry compared with the parent full-chemistry 3-D CTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Sanz, B. M.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cariolle, D.; Feng, W.

    2010-05-01

    A detailed full-chemistry 3-D chemistry and transport model (CTM) is used to evaluate the current stratospheric O3 parameterisation in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model and to obtain an alternative version of the ozone scheme implicitly including heterogeneous chemistry. The approach avoids the inaccurate treatment currently given to heterogeneous ozone chemistry in the ECMWF model, as well as the uncertainties of a cold-tracer. The new O3 scheme (COPCAT) is evaluated within the same CTM used to calculate it. It is the first time such a comparison has been possible, providing direct information on the validity of the linear parameterisation approach for stratospheric ozone. Simulated total column and O3 profiles are compared against Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) observations. COPCAT successfully simulates polar loss and reproduces a realistic Antarctic O3 hole. The new scheme is comparable to the full-chemistry in many regions for multiannual runs. The parameterisation produces less ozone over the tropics around 10 hPa, compared to full-chemistry and observations, however, this problem can be ameliorated by choosing a different ozone climatology for the scheme. The new scheme is compared to the current ECMWF scheme in the same CTM runs. The Antarctic O3 hole with the current ECMWF scheme is weaker and disappears earlier than with the new COPCAT scheme. Differences between the current ECMWF scheme and COPCAT are difficult to explain due to the different approach used for heterogeneous chemistry and differences in the photochemical models used to calculate the scheme coefficients. Results with the new COPCAT scheme presented here show that heterogeneous and homogeneous ozone chemistry can be included in a consistent way in a linear ozone parameterisation, without any additional tunable parameters, providing a parameterisation scheme in much better agreement with the current

  17. Results from a new linear O3 scheme with embedded heterogeneous chemistry compared with the parent full-chemistry 3-D CTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Sanz, B. M.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cariolle, D.; Feng, W.

    2011-02-01

    A detailed full-chemistry 3-D chemistry and transport model (CTM) is used to evaluate the current stratospheric O3 parameterisation in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model and to obtain an alternative version of the ozone scheme implicitly including heterogeneous chemistry. The approach avoids the inaccurate treatment currently given to heterogeneous ozone chemistry in the ECMWF model, as well as the uncertainties of a cold-tracer. The new O3 scheme (COPCAT) is evaluated within the same CTM used to calculate it. It is the first time such a comparison has been possible, providing direct information on the validity of the linear parameterisation approach for stratospheric ozone. Simulated total column and O3 profiles are compared against Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) observations. COPCAT successfully simulates polar loss and reproduces a realistic Antarctic O3 hole. The new scheme is comparable to the full-chemistry in many regions for multiannual runs. The parameterisation produces less ozone over the tropics around 10 hPa, compared to full-chemistry and observations. However, this problem can be ameliorated by choosing a different ozone climatology for the scheme. The new scheme is compared to the current ECMWF scheme in the same CTM runs. The Antarctic O3 hole with the current ECMWF scheme is weaker and disappears earlier than with the new COPCAT scheme. Differences between the current ECMWF scheme and COPCAT are difficult to explain due to the different approach used for heterogeneous chemistry and differences in the photochemical models used to calculate the scheme coefficients. Results with the new COPCAT scheme presented here show that heterogeneous and homogeneous ozone chemistry can be included in a consistent way in a linear ozone parameterisation, without any additional tunable parameters, providing a parameterisation scheme in better agreement with the current knowledge

  18. Aerosol and cloud chemistry of amines from CCS - reactivity experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Tilgner, Andreas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of power plants using amine scrubbing is a common technology. Therefore, amines can be released during the carbon capture process. To investigate the tropospheric chemical fate of amines from CO2 capturing processes and their oxidation products, the impact of aqueous aerosol particles and cloud droplets on the amine chemistry has been considered. Aqueous phase reactivity experiments of NO3 radicals and ozone with relevant amines and their corresponding nitrosamines were performed. Furthermore, nitrosamine formation and nitrosamine photolysis was investigated during laboratory experiments. These experiments implicated that aqueous phase photolysis can be an effective sink for nitrosamines and that ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines. Multiphase phase oxidation schemes of amines, nitrosamines and amides were developed, coupled to the existing multiphase chemistry mechanism CAPRAM and built into the Lagrangian parcel model SPACCIM using published and newly measured data. As a result, both deliquescent particles and cloud droplets are important compartments for the multiphase processing of amines and their products. Amines can be readily oxidised by OH radicals in the gas and cloud phase during daytime summer conditions. However, amine oxidation is restricted during winter conditions with low photochemical activity leading to long lifetimes of amines. The importance of the gas and aqueous phase depends strongly on the partitioning of the different amines. Furthermore, the simulations revealed that the aqueous formation of nitrosamines in aerosol particles and could droplets is not a relevant process under tropospheric conditions.

  19. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  20. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs. PMID:24491530

  1. The Lampedusa supersite of ChArMex: observing aerosol-radiation interactions and gas phase chemistry in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, Paola; di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    Within the frame of the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment (ChArMex), the ENEA Laboratory for Climate Study "Roberto Sarao" (WMO/GAW/NDACC) on the Island of Lampedusa (35°31'N, 12°37°E) has been augmented to one of the supersites of the first phase of the Special Observing Period 1 by the measurements of the in situ properties of aerosols and trace gases by the of the PortablE Gas and Aerosol Sampling Units (PEGASUS) mobile station. The ground-based measurements have been completed by several coordinated overpasses of the ATR-42 and the F20 of SAFIRE. In this paper we present the first highlights of operations, which took place between June 6 and July 8 2013. Insights on the data provide with an unprecedented characterisation of the physico-chemical and properties aerosols and gas phase chemistry on air masses of various origins (pollution, marine, mineral dust, …..). The effect of aerosols on radiation fields is ascertained by coupling ground-based and aircraft measurements during dedicated overpasses providing with measurements of upwelling and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes together with the properties of the aerosol load resolved on the column. Coordination with CALIPSO overpasses will also be explored.

  2. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-10-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation "onset" conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulfate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the "onset" of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a simple and empirical normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that INAS densities of some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains, fungal spores and diatoms

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-05-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation onset conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulphate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the onset of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains and fungal spores, are not intrinsically better ice nuclei than dust

  4. Distributions and regional budgets of aerosols and their precursors simulated with the EMAC chemistry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer, A.; de Meij, A.; Pringle, K. J.; Tost, H.; Doering, U. M.; van Aardenne, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-01-01

    The new global anthropogenic emission inventory (EDGAR-CIRCE) of gas and aerosol pollutants has been incorporated in the chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). A relatively high horizontal resolution simulation is performed for the years 2005-2008 to evaluate the capability of the model and the emissions to reproduce observed aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) values. Model output is compared with observations from different measurement networks (CASTNET, EMEP and EANET) and AODs from remote sensing instruments (MODIS and MISR). A good spatial agreement of the distribution of sulfate and ammonium aerosol is found when compared to observations, while calculated nitrate aerosol concentrations show some discrepancies. The simulated temporal development of the inorganic aerosols is in line with measurements of sulfate and nitrate aerosol, while for ammonium aerosol some deviations from observations occur over the USA, due to the wrong temporal distribution of ammonia gas emissions. The calculated AODs agree well with the satellite observations in most regions, while negative biases are found for the equatorial area and in the dust outflow regions (i.e. Central Atlantic and Northern Indian Ocean), due to an underestimation of biomass burning and aeolian dust emissions, respectively. Aerosols and precursors budgets for five different regions (North America, Europe, East Asia, Central Africa and South America) are calculated. Over East-Asia most of the emitted aerosols (precursors) are also deposited within the region, while in North America and Europe transport plays a larger role. Further, it is shown that a simulation with monthly varying anthropogenic emissions typically improves the temporal correlation by 5-10% compared to one with constant annual emissions.

  5. Heterogeneous interaction of SiO2 with N2O5: aerosol flow tube and single particle optical levitation-Raman spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; Rkiouak, L; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-09-25

    Silica (SiO2) is an important mineral present in atmospheric mineral dust particles, and the heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on atmospheric aerosol is one of the major pathways to remove nitrogen oxides from the atmosphere. The heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 with SiO2 has only been investigated by two studies previously, and the reported uptake coefficients differ by a factor of >10. In this work two complementary laboratory techniques were used to study the heterogeneous reaction of SiO2 particles with N2O5 at room temperature and at different relative humidities (RHs). The uptake coefficients of N2O5, γ(N2O5), were determined to be (7.2 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) (1σ) at 7% RH and (5.3 ± 0.8) × 10(-3) (1σ) at 40% RH for SiO2 particles, using the aerosol flow tube technique. We show that γ(N2O5) determined in this work can be reconciled with the two previous studies by accounting for the difference in geometric and BET derived aerosol surface areas. To probe the particle phase chemistry, individual micrometer sized SiO2 particles were optically levitated and exposed to a continuous flow of N2O5 at different RHs, and the composition of levitated particles was monitored online using Raman spectroscopy. This study represents the first investigation into the heterogeneous reactions of levitated individual SiO2 particles as a surrogate for mineral dust. Relative humidity was found to play a critical role: while no significant change of particle composition was observed by Raman spectroscopy during exposure to N2O5 at RH of <2%, increasing the RH led to the formation of nitrate species on the particle surface which could be completely removed after decreasing the RH back to <2%. This can be explained by the partitioning of HNO3 between the gas and adsorbed phases. The atmospheric implications of this work are discussed. PMID:25188692

  6. Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts: Innovations, Advantages, and Future Potential in Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Robert; Thomas, John Meurig

    The advantages that flow from the availability of single-site heterogeneous catalysts are many. They facilitate the determination of the kinetics and mechanism of catalytic turnover and render accessible the energetics of various intermediates. More importantly, it is possible to prepare soluble molecular fragments that circumscribe the single site, thus enabling a direct comparison to be made between the catalytic performance of the same active site when functioning as a heterogeneous or a homogeneous catalyst. Our approach adopts the principles and practices of solid-state chemistry, augmented by lessons derived from enzymology, as well as computational chemistry. We have succeeded in designing a range of new catalysts to effect, inter alia, shape-selective, regioselective, bifunctional, and enantioselective catalytic conversions. In particular, large fractions of these catalysts are ideally suited for the era of clean technology in which single-step and/or solvent-free processes abound, and in which benign oxidants such as air or oxygen and inexpensive nanoporous materials are employed.

  7. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2‑ and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios.

  8. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, D X; Liu, Z C; Chen, C; Yang, A J; Li, D; Rong, M Z; Chen, H L; Kong, M G

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H(+), nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2(-) and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  9. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2− and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  10. The influence of carbon surface chemistry on supported palladium nanoparticles in heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuxiao; Zhang, Liyun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Feng, Zhenbao; Shi, Wen; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2016-10-15

    The surface chemistry of nanocarbon support can tailor chemical properties of precious metal nanoparticle/nanocarbon hybrid catalyst in heterogeneous reactions. We report on modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) support with ionic liquid-derived carbonaceous surface for palladium nanoparticle (Pd NPs) decoration and their actions in different heterogeneous reactions. The surface chemistry of support materials was characterized in detail, and the influence of which on the formation and distribution of metal particles was further investigated. Three different types of reactions including Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, CO oxidation and phenol reduction were examined in terms of reactivity and selectivity. The roles of substituted nitrogen in graphitic lattice and grafted groups on the carbon surface were exploited. Nitrogen-doping can give rise to changes in electronic properties of supported metals, and the Lewis basicity of the doped nitrogen atoms can favor the adsorption of acidic reactants in phenol reduction. The grafted groups derived a negative impact to the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, due to the involvement of larger reactant molecules, despite that they could prevent significant sintering of Pd NPs in the CO oxidation. PMID:27442144

  11. A kinetics study of the homogeneous and heterogeneous components of the HCl + ClONO2 reaction. [and its relevance to stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedl, Randall R.; Goble, James H.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction HCl + ClONO2 to Cl2 + HNO3 were investigated at 298 K using a flow reactor with FTIR analysis to assess the importance of this reaction for stratospheric chemistry. The observed reaction was characteristic of a heterogeneous process; an upper limit of 5 x 10 to the -18th cu cm/molecule per s was obtained for the homogeneous gas phase rate constant. From calculations of the first order wall rate constant, estimates were made of the reaction rate on stratospheric aerosols. Because both HCl and ClONO2 need to be adsorbed on the particle surface, the reaction will be of negligible importance under most stratospheric conditions.

  12. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Broekhuizen, K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2007-08-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4), confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  13. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion correction, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependencies; flexible inclusion/omission of chemical species and physicochemical processes; flexible convolution/deconvolution of species and processes; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model

  14. XPS analysis of combustion aerosols for chemical composition, surface chemistry, and carbon chemical state.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Bryg, Vicky M; Hays, Michael D

    2011-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosols can vary in elemental content, surface chemistry, and carbon nano-structure. Each of these properties is related to the details of soot formation. Fuel source, combustion process (affecting formation and growth conditions), and postcombustion exhaust where oxidation occurs all contribute to the physical structure and surface chemistry of soot. Traditionally such physical and chemical parameters have been measured separately by various techniques. Presented here is the unified measurement of these characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the present study, XPS is applied to combustion soot collected from a diesel engine (running biodiesel and pump-grade fuels); jet engine; and institutional, plant, and residential oil-fired boilers. Elemental composition is mapped by a survey scan over a broad energy range. Surface chemistry and carbon nanostructure are quantified by deconvolution of high-resolution scans over the C1s region. This combination of parameters forms a distinct matrix of identifiers for the soots from these sources. PMID:21322576

  15. AMS+ALS: Kinetic and Product Studies of the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Aerosol at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J. H.; Wilson, K. R.; Kessler, S. H.; Browne, E. C.; Nah, T.; Smith, J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of condensed-phase organic species can have a major influence on the composition, properties, and impacts of organic aerosol (OA); however the rates and products of such "aging" reactions are poorly constrained. Here we describe a series of laboratory experiments aimed at better understanding one class of aging reactions, the heterogeneous oxidation of OA by gas-phase oxidants. Central to these experiments is the availability of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source at LBNL, which enables the implementation of VUV photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry. This technique allows for the real-time, speciated measurement of OA composition, yielding molecular information that is highly complementary to ensemble data from electron-impact ionization. OA composition is measured with both ionization schemes as a function of oxidant exposure within a flow reactor, providing detailed information on the kinetics and products of heterogeneous oxidation over multiple generations of oxidation. Specific topics investigated include the branching between functionalization and fragmentation of OA components, the formation of secondary organic aerosol from photolytically-generated radical species, and the heterogeneous aging of soot-associated organic species.

  16. Dependence of Heterogeneous OH Kinetics with Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies on Oxidant Concentration and Relative Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical transformations of aerosol particles by heterogeneous reactions with trace gases such as OH radicals can influence particle physicochemical properties and lifetime, affect cloud formation, light scattering, and human health. Furthermore, OH oxidation can result in degradation of particle mass by volatilization reactions, altering the budget of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the reactive uptake coefficient (γ) and particle oxidation degree can vary depending on several factors including oxidant concentration and relative humidity (RH). While RH can influence the extent of dissociation/ionization, it can also affect particle phase and thus oxidant diffusivity. Only one study so far has investigated the effect of RH on the rate of OH uptake to organic surfaces; however, the underlying processes affecting OH reactivity with organic aerosol under humidified conditions still remains elusive. Here, we determine the effect of RH on OH reactivity with laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles: levoglucosan and 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol. The effect of OH concentration on γ for three common BBA molecular markers (levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol) under dry conditions was investigated from [OH]≈107-1011 molecule cm-3, covering both [OH] in biomass burning plumes and [OH] commonly used in particle aging studies. Furthermore, key VOC reaction products and their production pathways resulting from BBA volatilization by OH were identified. OH radicals are produced using a microwave induced plasma (MIP) of H2 in He or Ar followed by reaction with O2, or by photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O. A cylindrical rotating wall flow-tube reactor and fast-flow aerosol flow reactor are used for conducting kinetic studies. OH is detected using a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) is employed for VOC analysis. γ decreases from 0.2-0.5 at

  17. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  18. Maillard Chemistry in Clouds and Aqueous Aerosol As a Source of Atmospheric Humic-Like Substances.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Lemire, Amanda N; Galloway, Melissa M; Corrigan, Ashley L; Turley, Jacob J; Espelien, Brenna M; De Haan, David O

    2016-07-19

    The reported optical, physical, and chemical properties of aqueous Maillard reaction mixtures of small aldehydes (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde) with ammonium sulfate and amines are compared with those of aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol (water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC) and the humic-like substances (HULIS) fraction of WSOC. Using a combination of new and previously published measurements, we examine fluorescence, X-ray absorbance, UV/vis, and IR spectra, complex refractive indices, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, thermograms, aerosol and electrospray ionization mass spectra, surface activity, and hygroscopicity. Atmospheric WSOC and HULIS encompass a range of properties, but in almost every case aqueous aldehyde-amine reaction mixtures are squarely within this range. Notable exceptions are the higher UV/visible absorbance wavelength dependence (Angström coefficients) observed for methylglyoxal reaction mixtures, the lack of surface activity of glyoxal reaction mixtures, and the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products relative to atmospheric WSOC and HULIS extracts. The overall optical, physical, and chemical similarities are consistent with, but not demonstrative of, Maillard chemistry being a significant secondary source of atmospheric HULIS. However, the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products limits the source strength to ≤50% of atmospheric HULIS, assuming that other sources of HULIS incorporate only negligible quantities of nitrogen. PMID:27227348

  19. Effect of Organic Coatings, Humidity and Aerosol Acidity on Multiphase Chemistry of Isoprene Epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Bell, David M; Hansen, Anne-Maria Kaldal; Drozd, Greg T; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Imre, Dan; Surratt, Jason D; Glasius, Marianne; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-06-01

    Multiphase chemistry of isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) has been shown to be the dominant source of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies have reported particles composed of ammonium bisulfate (ABS) mixed with model organics exhibit slower rates of IEPOX uptake. In the present study, we investigate the effect of atmospherically relevant organic coatings of α-pinene (AP) SOA on the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX onto ABS particles under different conditions and coating thicknesses. Single particle mass spectrometry was used to characterize in real-time particle size, shape, density, and quantitative composition before and after reaction with IEPOX. We find that IEPOX uptake by pure sulfate particles is a volume-controlled process, which results in particles with uniform concentration of IEPOX-derived SOA across a wide range of sizes. Aerosol acidity was shown to enhance IEPOX-derived SOA formation, consistent with recent studies. The presence of water has a weaker impact on IEPOX-derived SOA yield, but significantly enhanced formation of 2-methyltetrols, consistent with offline filter analysis. In contrast, IEPOX uptake by ABS particles coated with AP-derived SOA is lower compared to that of pure ABS particles, strongly dependent on particle composition, and therefore on particle size. PMID:27176464

  20. Impact of continental outflow on chemistry of atmospheric aerosols over tropical Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Kumar, A.; Sarin, M. M.; Sudheer, A. K.

    2011-07-01

    The continental outflow from Indo-Gangetic Plain and south-east Asia dominates the widespread dispersal of pollutants over tropical Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the late NE-monsoon (January-March). It is thus pertinent to assess the impact on marine atmospheric boundary layer of BoB. The chemical data, based on analyses of size-segregated (PM2.5 and PM10) aerosols, suggest the dominance of nss-SO42- (range: 1.3 to 28 μg m-3) in PM2.5. Almost all SO42- is of anthropogenic origin and accounts for as much as 65 % of the water-soluble inorganic constituents. The impact of anthropogenic sources is further evident from the widespread depletion of chloride (range: 40 to 100 %) compared to sea-salt composition. The carbonaceous species (EC and OC) contribute nearly 25 % to PM2.5; and significant linear relationship with K+ suggests biomass burning as their dominant source (biofuels and agricultural waste). The enhancement in the fractional solubility of aerosol Fe, as assessed in PM2.5, re-emphasizes the impact of combustion sources (biomass and fossil-fuel) and chemical processing (of dust) during the long-range transport. The high enrichment factors of heavy metals (Pb and Cd) further demonstrate the influence of pollution sources on the chemistry of MABL. The downwind transport of pollutants and exchange across air-sea interface can, thus, have profound impact on the ocean surface biogeochemistry.

  1. Organic peroxides gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, L. B.; Huang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, will promote secondary organic aerosols (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and is an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in SOA. Comparing the gas-phase and particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in the SOA formation than expected previously. Here, we give the partitioning coefficients of TPO as (2-3) × 10-4 m3μg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or particle phase, but can change the distribution of gaseous peroxides. About 18 % gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially interpret the unexpected high H2O2 yield under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also saves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  2. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Liubin; Huang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA), and total peroxides (TPOs, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in α-pinene/O3 SOA. Comparing the gas-phase peroxides with the particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than the values from the theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in SOA formation than previously expected. Here, the partitioning coefficients of TPO were determined to be as high as (2-3) × 10-4 m3 µg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water changes the distribution of gaseous peroxides, while it does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or the particle phase. Approx. 18 % of gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially explain the unexpectedly high H2O2 yields under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also preserves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  3. 3rd hand smoking; heterogeneous oxidation of nicotine and secondary aerosol formation in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren; Dubowski, Yael

    2010-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is well known as a significant source of primary indoor air pollutants. However, only recently has it been recognized that the impact of Tobacco smoking may continue even after the cigarette has been extinguished (i.e., third hand smoke) due to the effect of indoor surfaces. These surfaces may affect the fate of tobacco smoke in the form of secondary reactions and pollutants, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry with Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) in tandem with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizing (SMPS) system was used to monitor the ozonation of cellulose sorbed nicotine and resulting SOA formation. SOA formation began at onset of ozone introduction ([O3] = 60 ± 5 ppb) with a size distribution of dp ≤ 25 nm, and was determined to be a result of heterogeneous reaction (opposed to homogeneous). SOA yield from reacted surface nicotine was on the order of 10 %. Simultaneous to SOA monitoring, FTIR-ATR spectra showed surface changes in the nicotine film as the reaction progressed, revealing a pseudo first-order surface reaction rate of 0.0026 ± 0.0008 min-1. Identified surface oxidation products included: cotinine, myosmine, methylnicotinamide and nicotyrine. Surface reaction rate was found to be partially inhibited at high relative humidity. Given the toxicity of some of the identified products (e.g., cotinine has shown potential mutagenicity and teratogenicity) and that small particles may contribute to adverse health effects, the present study indicates that exposure to 3rd hand smoke ozonation products may pose additional health risks.

  4. Impact of plasma induced liquid chemistry and charge on bacteria loaded aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; McDowell, David; Mariotti, Davide; Mahony, Charles; Diver, Declan; Potts, Hugh; Bennet, Euan; Maguire, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of living organisms, such as bacteria, into atmospheric pressure microplasmas offers a unique opportunity to study the local chemical and electrical effects on cell structure and viability. Individual bacteria, each encapsulated in an aerosol droplet, were successfully transmitted through a non-thermal equilibrium RF coaxial plasma, using a custom-design concentric double gas shroud interface and via adjustment of transit times and plasma parameters, we can control cell viability. Plasma electrical characteristics (ne ~ 1013 cm-3), droplet velocity profiles and aspects of plasma-induced droplet chemistry were determined in order to establish the nature of the bacteria in droplet environment. Plasma-exposed viable E coli cells were subsequently cultured and the growth rate curves (lag and exponential phase gradient) used to explore the effect of radical chemistry and electron bombardment on cell stress. The extent and nature of membrane disruption in viable and non-viable cells were investigated through genomic and protein/membrane lipid content estimation. We will also compare our results with simulations of the effect of bacterial presence on plasma induced droplet charging and evaporation. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  5. Kinetics of O{sub 3} decomposition and heterogeneous chemistry on aluminum oxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanning-Lee, M.A.; Brady, B.B.; Syage, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of chemistry on aluminum oxide particles pertinent to solid rocket motor plume/stratosphere interactions are reported. A new method for measuring heterogeneous chemistry is described based on real-time studies of the kinetics by absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These measurements complement similar measurements in a flow tube reactor, but have certain advantages in disentangling adsorption/desorption kinetics from equilibrium properties. Catalytic decay of ozone has been expressed as a reaction probability {eta} on different grades of alumina. {eta} ranges from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} over the temperature range 20 to 200{degrees}C, respectively. At stratospheric temperatures (-60{degrees}C), the reaction probability increases to about 10{sup -4} possibly reflecting an increased surface residence time for ozone with decreasing temperature. Adsorption and desorption rate coefficients are presented for plume species of high activity such as ozone, water, and HCl. These measurements enable an assessment of the impact of SRM plumes on stratospheric ozone depletion.

  6. New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric Heterogeneous Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2013-03-01

    Ambient particles and droplets have a significant effect on climate, visibility, and human health. Once formed, they undergo continuous transformations through condensation and evaporation of water, uptake of low-volatility organic molecules, and photochemical reactions involving various gaseous and condensed-phase species in the atmosphere. These transformations determine the physical and chemical properties of airborne particles, such as their ability to absorb and scatter solar radiation and nucleate cloud droplets. The complexity, heterogeneity, and size of ambient particles make it challenging to understand the kinetics and mechanisms of their formation and chemical transformations. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of both small and large molecules in complex matrices. We present an overview of new and emerging experimental MS-based approaches for understanding physical chemistry of environmental particles, droplets, and surfaces. In addition, we emphasize the role of fundamental physical chemistry studies in the development of new methods for chemical analysis of ambient particles and droplets.

  7. Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride as a heterogeneous organocatalyst: from photochemistry to multipurpose catalysis to sustainable chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Xinchen; Antonietti, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride materials (for simplicity: g-C(3)N(4)) have attracted much attention in recent years because of their similarity to graphene. They are composed of C, N, and some minor H content only. In contrast to graphenes, g-C(3)N(4) is a medium-bandgap semiconductor and in that role an effective photocatalyst and chemical catalyst for a broad variety of reactions. In this Review, we describe the "polymer chemistry" of this structure, how band positions and bandgap can be varied by doping and copolymerization, and how the organic solid can be textured to make it an effective heterogenous catalyst. g-C(3)N(4) and its modifications have a high thermal and chemical stability and can catalyze a number of "dream reactions", such as photochemical splitting of water, mild and selective oxidation reactions, and--as a coactive catalytic support--superactive hydrogenation reactions. As carbon nitride is metal-free as such, it also tolerates functional groups and is therefore suited for multipurpose applications in biomass conversion and sustainable chemistry. PMID:22109976

  8. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  9. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It enables a detailed description of mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface, and it allows linking aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined and consistent rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependences (transient and steady-state conditions); flexible addition of unlimited numbers of chemical species and physicochemical processes; optional aggregation or resolution

  10. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2007-02-01

    The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS): the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal) is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that oxidatively processed

  11. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2006-11-01

    The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS): the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the primary products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal) is described. Anomalies in the relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide polymers. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, a series of atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids is presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semisolids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that oxidatively processed particulate may contribute to indirect forcing of radiation. Other effects, including the potential role of aldehydic

  12. Aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing in Guangzhou during the 2006 Pearl River Delta campaign.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsang; Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Gu, Jianwei; Fan, Shaojia

    2009-08-01

    Optical and chemical aerosol measurements were obtained from 2 to 31 July 2006 at an urban site in the metropolitan area of Guangzhou (China) as part of the Program of Regional Integrated Experiment of Air Quality over Pearl River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2006) to investigate aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing. During the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign, the average contributions of ammonium sulfate, organic mass by carbon (OMC), elemental carbon (EC), and sea salt (SS) to total PM(2.5) mass were measured to be 36.5%, 5.7%, 27.1%, 7.8%, and 3.7%, respectively. Compared with the clean marine period, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), and OMC were all greatly enhanced (by up to 430%) during local haze periods via the accumulation of a secondary aerosol component. The OMC dominance increased when high levels of biomass burning influenced the measurement site while (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and OMC did when both biomass burning and industrial emissions influenced it. The effect of aerosol water content on the total light-extinction coefficient was estimated to be 34.2%, of which 25.8% was due to aerosol water in (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 5.1% that in NH(4)NO(3), and 3.3% that in SS. The average mass-scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM(10) particles was determined to be 2.2+/-0.6 and 4.6+/-1.7m(2)g(-1) under dry (RH<40%) and ambient conditions, respectively. The average single-scattering albedo (SSA) was 0.80+/-0.08 and 0.90+/-0.04 under dry and ambient conditions, respectively. Not only are the extinction and scattering coefficients greatly enhanced by aerosol water content, but MSE and SSA are also highly sensitive. It can be concluded that sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol, as well as aerosol water content, play important roles in the processes that determine visibility impairment and radiative forcing in the ambient atmosphere of the Guangzhou urban area. PMID:19523748

  13. Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Hogrefe, C.; Xing, J.; Wei, C.; Gan, M.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. A detailed investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. Anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosol and gaseous precursors have witnessed dramatic changes over the past two decades across the northern hemisphere. During the period 1990-2010, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA). In contrast, anthropogenic emissions have increased dramatically in many developing regions during this period. We conduct a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosols and gaseous precursors over the past two decades, their impacts on trends and spatial heterogeneity in anthropogenic aerosol loading across the northern hemisphere troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is applied for selected time periods spanning the period 1990-2010 over a domain covering the northern hemisphere and a nested finer resolution continental U.S. domain. The model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation. Additionally, treatment of aerosol indirect effects on clouds has also recently been implemented. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate U.S. emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as

  14. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  15. Case studies on aerosol feedback effects in online coupled chemistry-meteorology models during the 2010 Russian fire event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Brunner, Dominik; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocio; Hirtl, Marcus; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Perez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San Jose, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol particles are known to have an impact on weather and climate directly via radiation and via their impact on cloud formation and subsequent modified optical properties of clouds. Integrated or "online" coupled regional meteorology-chemistry models like WRF-Chem, COSMO-ART, COSMO-Muscat, EnviroHIRLAM, NMMB/BSC-CTM, RAMS/ICLAMS or WRF-CMAQ are able to account for this impact of aerosol on simulated meteorological variables. However, besides of the meteorological situation simulated effects may also depend on model configuration. In order to analyse these effects and to compare their representation in different models currently used in Europe, multi model simulations were performed for two episodes with high aerosol loads as a coordinated exercise of the COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem). Here we analyze the first of these two case studies, the severe Russian forest fires in summer 2010. Emission data, boundary conditions, simulation strategy and data output format were harmonized as much as possible to maximize the comparability of the results from the different models. The high aerosol emissions during the summer 2010 Russian wildfire episode led to pronounced feedback effects. For example, the direct aerosol effect lowered the summer mean solar radiation by 20 W m-3 and seasonal mean temperature by 0.25 degrees. This might be considered as a lower limit as it must be taken into account that aerosol concentrations were generally underestimated by the WRF-Chem simulations by up to 50%. The high aerosol concentrations emitted from the wildfires over Russia were found to decrease the small amount of precipitation over Russia during this episode by another 10% to 30% when aerosol cloud interactions were taken into account. The focus of the discussion will be on case study results from WRF-Chem and a comparison with results from COSMO-ART, COSMO-Muscat, and NMMB/BSC-CTM.

  16. A preliminary analysis of the surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles in a typical urban area of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongyan; Ni, Runxiang; Li, Jinjuan; Deng, Liqun; Lu, Defeng; Cheng, Xueli; Duan, Pengli; Li, Wenjun

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle samples were collected using an Ambient Eight Stage (Non-Viable) Cascade Impactor Sampler in a typical urban area of Beijing from 27th Sep. to 5th Oct., 2009. The surface chemistry of these aerosol particles was analyzed using Static Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (Static TOF-SIMS). The factors influencing surface compositions were evaluated in conjunction with the air pollution levels, meteorological factors, and air mass transport for the sampling period. The results show that a variety of organic ion groups and inorganic ions/ion groups were accumulated on the surfaces of aerosol particles in urban areas of Beijing; and hydrophobic organic compounds with short- or middle-chain alkyl as well as hydrophilic secondary inorganic compounds were observed. All these compounds have the potential to affect the atmospheric behavior of urban aerosol particles. PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7 had similar elements on their surfaces, but some molecules and ionic groups demonstrated differences in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry spectra. This suggests that the quantities of elements varied between PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7. In particular, more intense research efforts into fluoride pollution are required, because the fluorides on aerosol surfaces have the potential to harm human health. The levels of air pollution had the most significant influence on the surface compositions of aerosol particles in our study. Hence, heavier air pollution was associated with more complex surface compositions on aerosol particles. In addition, wind, rainfall, and air masses from the south also greatly influenced the surface compositions of these urban aerosol particles. PMID:27593274

  17. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly-simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+). In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Comparing to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions, as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF)) on globe. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry further improves the predictions of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD over globe. IMN can improve the predictions of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe, as well as AOD and CDNC over globe. The explicit

  18. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates particulate-phase sulfate and ammonium. In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics for sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, and chloride have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Compared to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and thus could improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing, SWCF) on the global scale. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry could further improve the prediction of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD on the global scale. IMN can improve the prediction of secondary PM2

  19. Comparison of heterogeneous photolytic reduction of Hg(II) in the coal fly ashes and synthetic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yindong; Eichhorst, Terry; Olson, Michael R.; Rutter, Andrew P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the heterogeneous reduction of Hg(II) on the coal fly ash samples and synthetic aerosols under different light conditions in a controlled laboratory reactor. Three types of coal fly ashes were studied: a high carbon fly ash from a stoker boiler, a low carbon/low sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning low sulfur coal, and a high sulfate fly ash from a pulverized coal combustor burning high sulfur coal. The rate of Hg(II) reduction on the three diverse fly ash samples was found to be relatively fast with an average half-life of 1.6 h under clear sky atmospheric conditions (under the irradiance of 1000 W/m2). The reduction rate in the low sulfate/low carbon fly ash was approximately 1.5 times faster than with the other coal fly ash samples. Synthetic aerosols made of carbon black and levoglucosan produced Hg(II) reduction rates similar to coal fly ashes. However, aerosols composed of adipic acid resulted in reduction rates that were 3-5 times faster. The sensitivity of adipic acid reduction to light source wavelength was found to be greater than for the coal fly ash and other synthetic aerosols. Aerosols made from the water extracts of coal fly ash samples produced reduction rates equal to or slightly higher than with the native fly ash suggesting that the soluble components of fly ash play a significant role in the reduction mechanism. The measured reduction rates are likely important in the chemical processing of mercury in power plant plumes and potentially in the atmosphere and should be considered for incorporation in atmospheric transport models that are used to understand the fate of atmospheric mercury.

  20. Weak global sensitivity of cloud condensation nuclei and the aerosol indirect effect to Criegee + SO2 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; Evans, M. J.; Scott, C. E.; D'Andrea, S. D.; Farmer, D. K.; Swietlicki, E.; Spracklen, D. V.

    2013-03-01

    H2SO4 vapor is important for the nucleation of atmospheric aerosols and the growth of ultrafine particles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sizes with important roles in the global aerosol budget and hence planetary radiative forcing. Recent studies have found that reactions of stabilized Criegee intermediates (CIs, formed from the ozonolysis of alkenes) with SO2 may be an important source of H2SO4 that has been missing from atmospheric aerosol models. For the first time in a global model, we investigate the impact of this new source of H2SO4 in the atmosphere. We use the chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, with the online aerosol microphysics module, TOMAS, to estimate the possible impact of CIs on present-day H2SO4, CCN, and the cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect (AIE). We extend the standard GEOS-Chem chemistry with CI-forming reactions (ozonolysis of isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, propene, and monoterpenes) from the Master Chemical Mechanism. Using a fast rate constant for CI+SO2, we find that the addition of this chemistry increases the global production of H2SO4 by 4%. H2SO4 concentrations increase by over 100% in forested tropical boundary layers and by over 10-25% in forested NH boundary layers (up to 100% in July) due to CI+SO2 chemistry, but the change is generally negligible elsewhere. The predicted changes in CCN were strongly dampened to the CI+SO2 changes in H2SO4 in some regions: less than 15% in tropical forests and less than 2% in most mid-latitude locations. The global-mean CCN change was less than 1% both in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The associated cloud-albedo AIE change was less than 0.03 W m-2. The model global sensitivity of CCN and the AIE to CI+SO2 chemistry is significantly (approximately one order-of-magnitude) smaller than the sensitivity of CCN and AIE to other uncertain model inputs, such as nucleation mechanisms, primary emissions, SOA (secondary organic aerosol) and deposition. Similarly

  1. Capturing Conformation-Dependent Molecule-Surface Interactions When Surface Chemistry Is Heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Joshua N; Kastantin, Mark; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-07-28

    Molecular building blocks, such as carbon nanotubes and DNA origami, can be fully integrated into electronic and optical devices if they can be assembled on solid surfaces using biomolecular interactions. However, the conformation and functionality of biomolecules depend strongly on the local chemical environment, which is highly heterogeneous near a surface. To help realize the potential of biomolecular self-assembly, we introduce here a technique to spatially map molecular conformations and adsorption, based on single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. On a deliberately patterned surface, with regions of varying hydrophobicity, we characterized the conformations of adsorbed helicogenic alanine-lysine copeptides using Förster resonance energy transfer. The peptides adopted helical conformations on hydrophilic regions of the surface more often than on hydrophobic regions, consistent with previous ensemble-averaged observations of α-helix surface stability. Interestingly, this dependence on surface chemistry was not due to surface-induced unfolding, as the apparent folding and unfolding dynamics were usually much slower than desorption. The most significant effect of surface chemistry was on the adsorption rate of molecules as a function of their initial conformational state. In particular, regions with higher adsorption rates attracted more molecules in compact, disordered coil states, and this difference in adsorption rates dominated the average conformation of the ensemble. The correlation between adsorption rate and average conformation was also observed on nominally uniform surfaces. Spatial variations in the functional state of adsorbed molecules would strongly affect the success rates of surface-based molecular assembly and can be fully understood using the approach developed in this work. PMID:26079177

  2. Development of an aerosol-chemistry transport model coupled to non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) through applying a stretched grid system to regional simulations around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Nakajima, T.; Masaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution has a great impact on both climate change and human health. One effective way to tackle with these issues is a use of atmospheric aerosol-chemistry models with high-resolution in a global scale. For this purpose, we have developed an aerosol-chemistry model based on a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM; Tomita and Satoh, Fluid. Dyn. Res. 2004; Satoh et al., J. Comput. Phys. 2008, PEPS, 2014) under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project. In the present study, we have simulated aerosols and tropospheric ozone over Japan by our aerosol-chemistry model "NICAM-Chem" with a stretched-grid system of approximately 10 km resolution, for saving the computer resources. The aerosol and chemistry modules are based on Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2005) and Chemical AGCM for Study of Atmospheric Environment and Radiative Forcing (CHASER; Sudo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2002). We found that our model can generally reproduce both aerosols and ozone, in terms of temporal variations (daily variations of aerosols and diurnal variations of ozone). Under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project, we also have used these results obtained by NICAM-Chem for the assessment of their impact on human health.

  3. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day and night time chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. K. Y.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Leaitch, W. R.; Li, S.-M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Liggio, J.; Macdonald, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region at Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA-2), which were primarily generated by gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes and perhaps sesquiterpenes. The temporal variations of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 can be explained by gas-particle partitioning in response to ambient temperature and the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms between day and night. While BSOA-1 will arise from gas-phase ozonolysis and nitrate radical chemistry at night, BSOA-2 is less volatile than BSOA-1 and consists of products formed via gas-phase oxidation by the OH radical and ozone during the day. Organic nitrates produced through nitrate radical chemistry can account for 22-33 % of BSOA-1 mass at night. The mass spectra of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 have higher values of the mass fraction of m/z 91 (f91) compared to the background organic aerosol, and so f91 is used as an indicator of BSOA formation pathways. A comparison between laboratory studies in the literature and our field observations highlights the potential importance of gas-phase formation chemistry of BSOA-2 type materials that may not be captured in smog chamber experiments, perhaps due to the wall loss of gas-phase intermediate products.

  4. Model development of dust emission and heterogeneous chemistry within the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and its application over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xinyi; Fu, Joshua S.; Huang, Kan; Tong, Daniel; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-07-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been further developed in terms of simulating natural wind-blown dust in this study, with a series of modifications aimed at improving the model's capability to predict the emission, transport, and chemical reactions of dust. The default parameterization of initial threshold friction velocity constants are revised to correct the double counting of the impact of soil moisture in CMAQ by the reanalysis of field experiment data; source-dependent speciation profiles for dust emission are derived based on local measurements for the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts in East Asia; and dust heterogeneous chemistry is also implemented. The improved dust module in the CMAQ is applied over East Asia for March and April from 2006 to 2010. The model evaluation result shows that the simulation bias of PM10 and aerosol optical depth (AOD) is reduced, respectively, from -55.42 and -31.97 % by the original CMAQ to -16.05 and -22.1 % by the revised CMAQ. Comparison with observations at the nearby Gobi stations of Duolun and Yulin indicates that applying a source-dependent profile helps reduce simulation bias for trace metals. Implementing heterogeneous chemistry also results in better agreement with observations for sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfate (SO42-), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous oxides (NOx), and nitrate (NO3-). The investigation of a severe dust storm episode from 19 to 21 March 2010 suggests that the revised CMAQ is capable of capturing the spatial distribution and temporal variation of dust. The model evaluation also indicates potential uncertainty within the excessive soil moisture used by meteorological simulation. The mass contribution of fine-mode particles in dust emission may be underestimated by 50 %. The revised CMAQ model provides a useful tool for future studies to investigate the emission, transport, and impact of wind-blown dust over East Asia and elsewhere.

  5. A review of the sources of uncertainties in atmospheric mercury modeling II. Mercury surface and heterogeneous chemistry - A missing link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subir, Mahamud; Ariya, Parisa A.; Dastoor, Ashu P.

    2012-01-01

    Despite direct and indirect evidence suggesting that heterogeneous surfaces potentially play a key role in mercury chemistry, there is little known about mercury reactions and equilibrium processes that take place at atmospherically relevant surfaces. The lack of knowledge of mercury surface chemistry is a major gap for adequate modeling of mercury cycling. In part I of this review, we assessed the sources of uncertainty associated with existing kinetic parameters. In this part, we present evidence that supports surface-mercury interactions in the ecosystem elucidating the importance of heterogeneous and interfacial chemistry from a fundamental viewpoint. Consequently, we draw attention to the chemical processes that are missing and/or are inadequately incorporated in the atmospheric mercury models and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. We reveal that adsorption equilibrium of mercury species, most of which are not well characterized, to natural surfaces such as atmospheric particles and air/water interface are not known. Gas-liquid partitioning of mercury and its compounds are not adequately implemented. Equilibrium constants for aqueous phase complex formation with dissolved organic matters and formation of possible solid mercury clusters and nanoparticles are not considered in the global models. Potential heterogeneous mercury reduction reactions that can be important in mercury cycling require further evaluation which includes characterizing the influence of surfaces on mercury chemistry. The implementation of chemical processes for which information is available but not currently included in the models bears the potential of greatly reducing the uncertainties that are currently present in the models.

  6. Exploring Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry with Advanced High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Particle Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical complexity of atmospheric aerosols presents significant challenges both to experimentalists working on aerosol characterization and to modelers trying to parameterize critical aerosol properties. Multi-modal approaches that combine state-of-the-art experimental, theoretical, and modeling methods are becoming increasingly important in aerosol research. This presentation will discuss recent applications of unique high-resolution mass spectrometry and particle imaging tools developed at two Department of Energy's user facilities, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and Advanced Light Source (ALS), to studies of molecular composition, photochemical aging, and properties of laboratory-generated and field aerosols. Specifically, this presentation will attempt to address the following questions: (a) how do NO2, SO2, and NH3 affect molecular level composition of anthropogenic aerosols?; (b) what factors determine viscosity/surface tension of organic aerosol particles?; (c) how does photolysis affect molecular composition and optical properties of organic aerosols?

  7. An overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, François

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a French initiative of the MISTRALS meta-programme (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales, http://www.mistrals-home.org). It federates a great number of national and international cooperative research actions aiming at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The target is short-lived particulate and gaseous tropospheric trace species which are the cause of poor air quality events, have two-way interactions with climate, or impact the marine biogeochemistry, in a context of strong regional anthropogenic and climatic pressures. The six ChArMEx work packages include Emissions, Chemical processes and ageing, Transport processes and air quality, Aerosol-radiation-climate interactions, Deposition, and Present and future variability and trends. For several years, efforts have been deployed in several countries to develop (i) a network of relevant stations for atmospheric chemistry at background sites on islands and continental coasts around the basin and (ii) several intensive field campaigns including the operation of surface supersites and various instrumented mobile platforms (large and ultra-light aircraft, sounding and drifting balloons, ZeroCO2 sailboat). This presentation is an attempt to provide an overview of the various experimental, remote sensing and modelling efforts produced and to highlight major findings, by referencing more detailed ChArMEx presentations given in this conference and recently published or submitted papers. During the first phase of the project experimental efforts have been mainly concentrated on the western basin. Plans for the 2nd phase of ChArMEx, more dedicated towards the eastern basin, will also be given. In particular we plan to develop monitoring activities at

  8. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high

  9. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  10. A spectroscopic tour through the liquid aerosol interface: Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.X.; Aiello, D.; Aker, P.M.

    1994-12-20

    A novel nonlinear Raman spectroscopic technique has been used to image the extent of hydrogen bonding at water aerosol interfaces. The aerosols probed were generated in the laboratory using the vibrating orifice technique. The spectroscopic results show that the aerosols suffer severe hydrogen bond disruption and that the structural impairment is more pronounced at the surface. Laboratory aerosols generated this way do not mimic those found naturally. Thus mass accommodation coefficients measured using such aerosols should not be used in global climate-modeling calculations. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  11. The impact of temperature dependent CO2 cross section measurements: A role for heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Allen, M.; Nair, H.; Leu, M-T.; Yung, Y. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon dioxide comprises over 95 percent of the Mars atmosphere, despite continuous photolysis of CO2 by solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Since the direct recombination of CO and O is spinforbidden, the chemical stability of CO2 in the Martian atmosphere is thought to be the result of a HO(x)-catalyzed recombination scheme. Thus the rate of CO oxidation is sensitive to the abundance and altitude distribution of OH, H, and HO2. Most Martian atmospheric models assume that HO(x) abundances are governed purely by gas phase chemistry. However, it is well established that reactive HO(x) radical are adsorbed by a wide variety of surfaces. The authors have combined laboratory studies of H, OH, and HO2 adsorption on inorganic surfaces, observational data of aerosol distributions, and an updated photochemical model to demonstrate that adsorption on either dust or ice aerosols is capable of reducing HO(x) abundances significantly, thereby retarding the rate of CO oxidation.

  12. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  13. The DACCIWA Project: Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Massive economic and population growth and urbanisation are expected to lead to a tripling of anthropogenic emissions from southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, the impacts of which on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An assessment of these impacts is complicated by (a) a superposition with effects of global climate change, (b) the strong dependence of SWA on the sensitive West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations and (d) by a lack of observations to advance our understanding and improve predictions. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce the research consortium DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa), which comprises 16 partners in six European and West African countries. The interdisciplinary DACCIWA team will build on the scientific and logistical foundations established by the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project and collaborate closely with operational centres. DACCIWA will receive funding of about M8.75€ from the European Commission as part of Framework Programme 7 from 2015 until 2018. The DACCIWA project will conduct extensive fieldwork in SWA to collect high-quality observations, spanning the entire process chain from surface-based natural and anthropogenic emissions to impacts on health, ecosystems and climate. This will include a major field campaign in summer 2015 with three research aircrafts and two ground-based supersites. Combining the resulting benchmark dataset with a wide range of modelling activities will allow us: (a) to assess all relevant physical and chemical processes, (b) to improve the monitoring of climate and compositional parameters from space, (c) to determine health impacts from air pollution, and (d) to develop the next generation of weather and climate models capable of representing coupled

  14. A review of uncertainties in atmospheric modeling of mercury chemistry I. Uncertainties in existing kinetic parameters - Fundamental limitations and the importance of heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subir, Mahamud; Ariya, Parisa A.; Dastoor, Ashu P.

    2011-10-01

    Mercury and its related compounds are widely recognized as global pollutants. The accurate atmospheric modeling of its transport and fate has been the subject of much research throughout the last decade. Atmospheric gas, aqueous and heterogeneous chemistry are expected to occur for Hg-containing species and accurate implementation of their chemical parameters is essential for realistic modeling of mercury cycling. Although significant progress has been made, the current state of knowledge of mercury chemistry exhibits numerous uncertainties. The objective of this two-part review is to explore the sources of uncertainty from the viewpoint of mercury chemistry. In this first part, we assess the discrepancy that exists in the currently available mercury kinetic parameters for the gas and aqueous phases. Theoretical and experimental approaches of rate constant determination exhibit various levels of limitation and accuracy. We present an overview of the available techniques and the assumptions and shortcomings associated with these methods in order to assist the atmospheric modellers. We review specific mercury oxidation and reduction reactions that have been investigated and are commonly implemented in mercury models with respect to the uncertainties associated with them. We reveal that for most of these mercury reactions our current state of knowledge reflects a lack of proper understanding of their mechanisms. Atmospheric heterogeneity is a topic of great importance and we elaborate upon it in part II of this review.

  15. Investigation of aviation emission impacts on global tropospheric chemistry and climate using a size-resolved aerosol-chemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Zarashpe; Spracklen, Dominick; Arnold, Stephen; Borman, Duncan; Mann, Graham; Pringle, Kirsty; Monks, Sarah; Reddington, Carly; Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Aviation is responsible for 3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, but 2-14% of anthropogenic induced climate warming due to contributions from short lived climate forcers. The global civil aviation fleet is projected to double by 2026 in relation to a 2006 baseline and so will play a substantial role in future climate change. Uncertainty in the net impact of aviation on climate is largely due to uncertainty in the impacts of aviation emissions on ozone and aerosol. To study the impact of aviation emissions we use the GLOMAP-mode global aerosol microphysics model coupled to the 3-D chemical transport model TOMCAT. GLOMAP-mode has been extended to include treatment of nitrate aerosol. We include a full suite of non-CO2 aviation emissions (including NOX, SO2, HCs, BC and OC) in the model. We combined the simulated changes in ozone and aerosol with a 3D radiative transfer model to quantify the radiative effect due to aviation non-CO2 emissions. We find that aviation emissions increase O3 concentrations by up to 5.3% in the upper troposphere (UT), broadly matching previous studies. Black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations increase by 26.5% and 14.6% respectively in the UT, whereas nitrate aerosol is reduced in some regions due to co-emission of NOX and SO2 In the UT, aviation emissions increase both total aerosol number as well as the concentration of particles greater than 70 nm diameter (N70). Entrainment of these particles into the free troposphere results in aviation emissions also increasing N70 in the boundary layer, causing a cooling through the first aerosol indirect effect. We explore differences in these responses compared with those simulated when using the recommended aviation emissions from CMIP5 (5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project), which only include NOX and BC emissions. Our results suggest that aviation emissions of SO2 and HCs neglected by CMIP5 produce important effects on ozone, aerosol number, and N70. We suggest CMIP5

  16. Evaluation of Meso-NH and WRF/CHEM simulated gas and aerosol chemistry over Europe based on hourly observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Barbet, C.; Leriche, M.; Deguillaume, L.; Mari, C.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bègue, N.; Tulet, P.; Gazen, D.; Escobar, J.

    2016-07-01

    Gas chemistry and aerosol chemistry of 10 km-resolution mesoscale models Meso-NH and WRF/CHEM were evaluated on three cases over Europe. These one-day duration cases were selected from Freney et al. (2011) and occurred on contrasted meteorological conditions and at different seasons: a cyclonic circulation with a well-marked frontal zone on winter, an anti-cyclonic situation with local storm precipitations on summer and a cold front in the northwest of Europe associated to a convergence of air masses over eastern Europe and conflicting air masses over Spain and France on autumn. To assess the performance of the two models, surface hourly databases from observation stations over Europe were used, together with airborne measurements. For both models, the meteorological fields were in good agreement with the measurements for the three days. Winds presented the largest normalised mean bias integrated over all European stations for both models. Daily gas chemistry was reproduced with normalised mean biases between - 14 and 11%, a level of accuracy that is acceptable for policy support. The two models' performances were degraded during night-time quite likely due to the constant primary species emissions. The PM2.5 bulk mass concentration was overestimated by Meso-NH over Europe and slightly underestimated by WRF/CHEM. The absence of wet deposition in the models partly explains the local discrepancies with the observations. More locally, the systematic low mixing ratio of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase simulated by WRF/CHEM at three stations was correlated with the underestimation of OM (organic matter) mass in the aerosol phase. Moreover, this mass of OM was mainly composed of anthropogenic POAs (primary organic aerosols) in WRF/CHEM, suggesting a missing source for SOAs (secondary organic aerosols) mass in WRF/CHEM aerosol parameterisation. The contribution of OM was well simulated by Meso-NH, with a higher contribution for the summer case. For Meso

  17. A new source of Southern Ocean and Antarctic aerosol from tropospheric polar cell chemistry of sea ice emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, R. S.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Schofield, R.; Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; Keywood, M.; Ward, J.; Galbally, I.; Molloy, S.; Thomas, A.; Wilson, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    and the contribution of Antarctic aerosol production to global loading. As climate change intensifies and the ozone hole recovers, the Antarctic polar front may shift latitudes, potentially changing Antarctic and regional aerosol loading, resulting in changes to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry and radiative budgets.

  18. The effect of interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols on climate simulations over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; LeGrande, A. N.; Healy, R. J.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Significant computational resources are required for long transient simulations using coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. Individual simulations from the NINT version of GISS ModelE-R (part of the CMIP5 archive) of the last millennium, from year 850 to 2005, enabled with only 3 water isotopologue tracers, required ~9 months of computational time on the state-of-the-art parallel computing cluster of NCCS. The additional requirements of the full chemistry module would increase this by a factor of ~3. And yet, it is well known that chemistry and aerosols are very important on climate, both regional and global. Therefore, we have designed a set of experiments where the ocean and sea ice boundary conditions of the coupled model, paired with the land surface, greenhouse gases, insolation, and total solar irradiance (TSI) forcing from the PMIP3 protocol are applied to a series of full-chemistry GISS ModelE snap-shots each 50-years through the last millennium. We will present results from atmosphere-only model simulations with the GISS ModelE, which includes interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols at decadal-scale time slices, driven by millennial-length simulations performed with the same model when coupled with an ocean model. The boundary conditions for the transient simulations follow the last millennium coordinated PMIP3 experiment protocol. This experiment directly links in with other pre-industrial experiments being completed as part of IPCC AR5, using the same model and resolution as in GISS IPCC AR5. The impact of the presence of short-lived gases and aerosols on the simulated climate is studied. The role of previously omitted forcing mechanisms will be performed during the whole simulated period. The results presented are the initial runs from a larger set of experiments that will assess the climate impact of changes to dust, sea-salt, and ocean-derived sulfate, biomass burning ozone-precursors and aerosols, organic carbon, wetland methane

  19. First implementation of secondary inorganic aerosols in the MOCAGE version R2.15.0 chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, J.; Josse, B.; Marécal, V.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop a secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) module for the MOCAGE chemistry transport model developed at CNRM. The aim is to have a module suitable for running at different model resolutions and for operational applications with reasonable computing times. Based on the ISORROPIA II thermodynamic equilibrium module, the new version of the model is presented and evaluated at both the global and regional scales. The results show high concentrations of secondary inorganic aerosols in the most polluted regions: Europe, Asia and the eastern part of North America. Asia shows higher sulfate concentrations than other regions thanks to emission reductions in Europe and North America. Using two simulations, one with and the other without secondary inorganic aerosol formation, the global model outputs are compared to previous studies, to MODIS AOD retrievals, and also to in situ measurements from the HTAP database. The model shows a better agreement with MODIS AOD retrievals in all geographical regions after introducing the new SIA scheme. It also provides a good statistical agreement with in situ measurements of secondary inorganic aerosol composition: sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. In addition, the simulation with SIA generally gives a better agreement with observations for secondary inorganic aerosol precursors (nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, ammonia), in particular with a reduction of the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB). At the regional scale, over Europe, the model simulation with SIA is compared to the in situ measurements from the EMEP database and shows a good agreement with secondary inorganic aerosol composition. The results at the regional scale are consistent with those obtained from the global simulations. The AIRBASE database was used to compare the model to regulated air quality pollutants: particulate matter, ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Introduction of the SIA in MOCAGE provides a reduction in the PM2.5 MNMB of 0.44 on a

  20. Simulating contemporary and preindustrial atmospheric chemistry and aerosol radiative forcing in the Southeast Pacific (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    Accurately quantifying the aerosol burden and resultant radiative impacts over the Southeast Pacific presents a critical challenge in constraining the region's upper ocean heat budget and sea surface temperatures. Recent observations and preliminary modeling studies have found consistent aerosol transport above the region's extensive stratoculumus, indicating the need to consider aerosol composition and direct radiative effects in addition to indirect effects on clouds. We simulate regional chemical transport of aerosols and trace gases during VOCALS REx, identifying contributions from coastal anthropogenic emissions, biogenic emissions, biomass burning, and long-range transport to aerosol mass and composition. We evaluate a new emissions inventory through comparison with in-situ observations. Spatial and temporal variability in transport from these varied emissions sources provide insights into land-ocean-atmosphere coupling. We will compare aerosol radiative forcing under present day and preindustrial emissions rates.

  1. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high

  2. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  3. Formation of high-molecular-weight compounds via the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous C8-C10 n-aldehydes in the presence of atmospheric aerosol components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuemei; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Qingcai; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory study on the heterogeneous reactions of straight-chain aldehydes was performed by exposing n-octanal, nonanal, and decanal vapors to ambient aerosol particles. The aerosol and blank filters were extracted using methanol. The extracts were nebulized and the resulting compositions were examined using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. The mass spectral analysis showed that the exposures of the aldehydes to aerosol samples increased the peak intensities in the high mass range. The peaks in the mass spectra of the aerosol samples after exposure to different aldehydes were characterized by a homologous series of peak shifts due to the addition of multiple CH2 units. This result is explained by the formation of high-molecular-weight (HMW) compounds that contain single or multiple aldehyde moieties. The HMW fragment peaks for the blank filters exposed to n-aldehydes were relatively weak, indicating an important contribution from the ambient aerosol components to the formation of the HMW compounds. Among the factors affecting the overall interaction of aldehydes with atmospheric aerosol components, gas phase diffusion possibly limited the reactions under the studied conditions; therefore, their occurrence to a similar degree in the atmosphere is not ruled out, at least for the reactions involving n-nonanal and decanal. The major formation pathways for the observed HMW products may be the self-reactions of n-aldehydes mediated by atmospheric aerosol components and the reactions of n-aldehydes with organic aerosol components. The observed formation of HMW compounds encourages further investigations into their effects on the aerosol properties as well as the organic aerosol mass in the atmosphere.

  4. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; Percival, Carl; Coe, H.; Jones, Roderic L.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlations with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 μg kg−1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 μg kg−1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles.

    The night-time NO

  5. Insights into aerosol formation chemistry from comprehensive gas-phase precursor measurement in the TRAPOZ chamber experiments; an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Timo; Wyche, Kevin; Monks, Paul S.; Camredon, Marie; Alam, Mohammed S.; Bloss, William J.; Rickard, Andrew R.

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols have a profound affect on the environment on local, regional and even global levels, with impacts including adverse health effects, (Alfarra, Paulsen et al. 2006) visibility reduction, cloud formation, direct radiative forcing (Charlson, Schwartz et al. 1992) and an important role in influencing the climate due to their contribution to important atmospheric processes (Baltensperger, Kalberer et al. 2005; Alfarra, Paulsen et al. 2006). The Total Radical Production from the OZonolysis of alkenes (TRAPOZ) project was used to study the gas phase and radical chemistry along with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for a number of different alkenes and terpenes. In order to better the scientific knowledge regarding the oxidation mechanisms of terpene and alkene species along with radical and SOA formation, the experiments were conducted under varying conditions controlled and monitored by the EUropean PHOto REactor (EUPHORE) simulation chamber in Valencia, Spain. A vast number of instruments enabled a detailed examination of the chemistry within oxidation of each precursor. However the work here will focus on the results obtained from the University of Leicester Chemical Ionisation Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CIR-TOF-MS). With regard to the gas phase chemistry an analysis of the degradation of the precursor Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and evolution of certain gas phase species in each experiment has been presented and discussed.

  6. Chlorine Chemistry of the Lower Stratosphere: Aircraft (ALIAS, ER-2) and Balloon (BLISSs) In-Situ Measurements of HC1,NO(sub 2), andN(sub 2)O for Testing Heterogeneous Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C.; May, R.; Jaegle, L.; Hu, H.; Scott, D.; Stimpfle, R.; Salawitch, R.; Fahey, D.; Woodbridge, E.; Proffitt, M.; Margitan, J.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric concentrations of HC1 measured in the northern hemisphere from the ER-2 aircraft are significantly lower than model predictions using both gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry, but measurements in the southern hemisphere are in much better agreement.

  7. The secondary formation of inorganic aerosols in the droplet mode through heterogeneous aqueous reactions under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Lingxiao; Gao, Xiaomei; Nie, Wei; Yu, Yangchun; Xu, Pengju; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Zhe

    2012-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols play important roles in visibility reduction and in regional haze pollution. To investigate the characteristics of size distributions of secondary sulfates and nitrates as well as their formation mechanisms under hazes, size-resolved aerosols were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at an urban site in Jinan, China, in all four seasons (December 2007-October 2008). In haze episodes, the secondary sulfates and nitrates primarily formed in fine particles, with elevated concentration peaks in the droplet mode (0.56-1.8 μm). The fine sulfates and nitrates were completely neutralized by ammonia and existed in the forms of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3, respectively. The secondary formation of sulfates, nitrates and ammonium (SNA) was found to be related to heterogeneous aqueous reactions and was largely dependent on the ambient humidity. With rising relative humidity, the droplet-mode SNA concentration, the ratio of droplet-mode SNA to the total SNA, the fraction of SNA in droplet-mode particles and the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SNA presented an exponential, logarithmic or linear increase. Two heavily polluted multi-day haze episodes in winter and summer were analyzed in detail. The secondary sulfates were linked to heterogeneous uptake of SO2 followed by the subsequent catalytic oxidation by oxygen together with iron and manganese in winter. The fine nitrate formation was strongly associated with the thermodynamic equilibrium among NH4NO3, gaseous HNO3 and NH3, and showed different temperature-dependences in winter and summer.

  8. Heterogeneous reaction probabilities, solubilities, and the physical state of cold volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O.; Browell, E.; Gary, B.; Lait, L.; Livingston, J.; Newman, P.; Pueschel, R.; Russell, P.; Schoeberl, M.; Toon, G.

    1993-01-01

    On 19 January 1992, heterogeneous loss of HNO3, ClNO3, and HCl was observed in part of the Mount Pinatubo volcanic cloud that had cooled as a result of forced ascent. Portions of the volcanic cloud froze near 191 kelvin. The reaction probability of ClNO3 and the solubility of HNO3 were close to laboratory measurements on liquid sulfuric acid. The magnitude of the observed loss of HCl suggests that it underwent a heterogeneous reaction. Such reactions could lead to substantial loss of HCl on background sulfuric acid particles and so be important for polar ozone loss.

  9. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and chemistry transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Huikyo; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Braverman, Amy; Garay, Michael J.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2016-06-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product has provided a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month over 16+ years since March 2000. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: spherical nonabsorbing, spherical absorbing, and nonspherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from two chemistry transport models (CTMs), the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) and SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS). Overall, the AOD distributions retrieved from MISR and modeled by GOCART and SPRINTARS agree with each other in a qualitative sense. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and models show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  10. HETEROGENOUS PHOTOCATALYSIS ON AEROSOL PROCESSED NANOSTRUCTURED TITANIA PARTICLES: ROLE OF PARTICLE SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterogenous photocatalysis with TiO2 has been extensively investigated as a method to oxidize organic pollutants in water and air, including phenols, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and other hydrocarbons. In addition, the use of titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has also been demon...

  11. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  12. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation on Kaolinite Particles, Particle Surrogates of HUmic-Like Substances (HULIS), and Organics-Containing Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Knopf, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol particles can affect the global radiation budget through aerosol-cloud interactions by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei (IN) thereby inducing new clouds and/or modifying the radiative properties of existing clouds. This study presents heterogeneous ice nucleation data as a function of particle temperature and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) for laboratory generated kaolinite particles, leonardite and fulvic acid particles serving as surrogates for aerosols composed of HULIS, and organics-containing urban aerosols collected during the MILAGRO (Mexico City) campaign. These experiments are conducted using an improved version of a previously developed ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope which allows to control particle temperatures between 200-300 K and corresponding atmospherically relevant RHice. Micrometer-sized particles are deposited onto a hydrophobic substrate and are placed in the nucleation cell. To validate the experimental approach and quality of substrates, ice nucleation experiments were performed 1. on plain sample substrates and 2. using a well studied IN: kaolinite particles. The results corroborate that kaolinite particles are efficient IN inducing ice nucleation at 102-120% RHice via deposition mode at temperatures between 200 and 245 K, in agreement with previous studies. The ice nucleation efficiency of leonardite and fulvic acid particles with median diameters of 2-3 µm is determined. Leonardite particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 120-140% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 240 K with the minimum RHice threshold observed at 220 K. Fulvic acid particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 135-150% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 230 K with the minimum RHice threshold determined at 216 K. The fulvic acid particles take up water at RH>95% for temperatures between 235 and 250 K. The contact angle derived from experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation rate

  13. Neutral and charged binary sulfate aerosol nucleation in the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Kokkola, H.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol particles play an important role in the Earth's atmosphere and in the climate system: Aerosols scatter and absorb solar radiation, facilitate heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and change cloud characteristics in many ways. Aerosol particles can be directly emitted from surface sources (primary aerosol) or form from the gas phase (secondary aerosol). Secondary aerosol formation can significantly increase concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. Two important pathways of aerosol formation from the gas phase are neutral and charged binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water. We have introduced laboratory data based representations of these pathways into the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM, and investigate their relative importance and spatial distribution in the troposphere, and discuss ramifications for processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    -volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63) and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a~previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010), most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 to 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemistry might also be higher in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.

  15. Direct Radiative Forcing and Regional Climatic Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols Over East Asia: A Regional Coupled Climate-Chemistry/Aerosol Model Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Filippo; Bi, Xunqiang; Qian, Yun )

    2002-09-01

    We present a series of regional climate model simulations aimed at assessing the radiative forcing and surface climatic effects of anthropogenic sulfate and fossil fuel soot over east Asia. The simulations are carried out with a coupled regional climate-chemistry/aerosol model for the 5-year period of 1993-1997 using published estimates of sulfur emissions for the period. Anthropogenic sulfate induces a negative radiative forcing spatially varying from -1 to -8 W/m2 in the winter to -1 to -15 W/m2 in the summer, with maxima over the Sichan Basin of southwest China and over some areas of east and northeast China. This forcing induces a surface cooling in the range of -0.1 to -0.7 K. Fossil fuel soot exerts a positive atmospheric radiative forcing of 0.5 to 2 W/m2 and enhances the surface cooling by a few tenths of K due to increased surface shielding from solar radiation. Doubling of sulfur emissions induces a substantial increase in radiative forcing (up to -7 to -8 W/m2) and associated surface cooling. With doubled sulfur emissions, the surface cooling exceeds -1 K and is statistically significant at the 90% confidence level over various areas of China. The aerosol forcing and surface cooling tend to inhibit precipitation over the region, although this effect is relatively small in the simulations. Some features of the simulated aerosol-induced cooling are consistent with temperature trends observed in recent decades over different regions of China.

  16. Does cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry influence stratospheric polar ozone loss?

    PubMed

    Müller, Rolf; Grooss, Jens-Uwe

    2009-11-27

    Cosmic-ray (CR) -induced heterogeneous reactions of halogenated species have been suggested to play the dominant role in causing the Antarctic ozone hole. However, measurements of total ozone in Antarctica do not show a compact and significant correlation with CR activity. Further, a substantial CR-induced heterogeneous loss of chlorofluorocarbons is incompatible with multiyear satellite observations of N2O and CFC-12. Thus, CR-induced heterogeneous reactions cannot be considered as an alternative mechanism causing the Antarctic ozone hole. PMID:20366127

  17. Organic Composition of Size-Segregated Aerosols Sampled During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using non-rotating Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, FL, USA. Daily samples were collected 12 m above ground at a flow rate of 30 lpm throughout the month of May 2002. Aluminum foil discs were used to sample aerosol size fractions with aerodynamic cut diameter of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.17 and 0.093 um. Samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Low detection limits were achieved using a HP Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) and large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolution was obtained using a 60 m long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. A quantification method was built for over 90 organic compounds chosen as source markers including straight/iso/anteiso alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed. Also, results will be compared with samples acquired in different environments including the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, GA, USA.

  18. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Implication for prebiotic chemistry on Titan and early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-08-01

    Titan has a significant atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane with a significant organic haze component. Its nitrogen-rich atmosphere, abundant organics, and liquid surface make this moon of interest as a prebiotic laboratory at the planetary scale and one of the best targets for studying prebiotic planetary organic chemistry. In our previous work, we have investigated the chemical composition of Titan aerosol analogs (tholins) and identified a variety of nitrogenous organic molecules. Here we continue our structural investigation and identify four important prebiotic molecules in Titan tholins using NMR, GC-MS and standard sample comparison, including aminoacetonitrile, succinonitrile, acetoguanamine and adenine. On the basis of their structural characteristics, we suggest their formation pathways via simple precursors including methanimine (CH2NH), HCN, NH3, CH3CN and C2H2 in laboratory N2sbnd CH4 plasma or potentially in Titan’s atmosphere. Among these molecules, aminoacetonitrile is a potential precursor of amino acids and peptides, while adenine is a necessary ingredient for DNA and RNA. The identification of these molecules in Titan’s organic aerosol analogs increases our knowledge of Titan’s organic chemistry and its prebiotic implications.

  19. Interannual variabilities in tropospheric constituents during 2000-2013 simulated in a chemistry-aerosol coupled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, K.; Ito, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global distributions and abundances of tropospheric constituents (O3, CH4, NOy, CO, VOCs, NHx, SOx and aerosols) interannually change under the influences of meteorology (transport, temperature, water vapor, clouds, rain, etc.) and emissions from anthropogenic/natural sources and biomass burning. Given the importance of climate effects of these species as short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), there have been increasing number of studies to project future changes in individual constituents and assess impacts of emission reduction in future. Since chemistry climate model is basically used for such purpose, model validation against the observations and precise interpretation/understanding of changing processes in a model are essentially needed. In this study, we investigate interannual variability of tropospheric constituents during the years 2000 to 2013 in a chemistry-aerosol coupled climate model. The base chemical model used in this study is CHASER (Sudo et al., 2002, 2007) coupled with the aerosol model SPRINTARS (Takemura et al., 2006). The CHASER model, also developed in the framework of the MIROC earth system model (MIROC-ESM-CHEM), simulates detailed chemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere with an on-line aerosol simulation including production of particulate nitrate and SOA. We use the NCEP reanalysis data (FNL) for constraining the model's meteorology. Anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are specified using the HTAP2 and MAC inventories, respectively. For biogenic VOCs emissions, we employ calculation by the land ecosystem/trace gas emission model VISIT (Ito et al., 2008). Our results show that temporal variability (anomaly) in surface and lower tropospheric ozone very clearly correlates with that in CO especially in NH, indicating principal importance of biomass burning emission in determining near-surface O3 variability; surface PM (PM2.5) in NH also coincides with CO. Changes in middle to upper tropospheric O3, on the other hand

  20. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry measurements in a remote site in Central Amazonia: the role of biogenic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliquevis, T.; Lara, L. L.; Antunes, M. L.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this analysis a 3.5 years data set of aerosol and precipitation chemistry, obtained in a remote site in Central Amazonia (Balbina, (1°55' S, 59°29' W, 174 m a.s.l.), about 200 km north of Manaus) is discussed. Aerosols were sampled using stacked filter units (SFU), which separate fine (d < 2.5 μm) and coarse mode (2.5 μm < d < 10.0 μm) aerosol particles. Filters were analyzed for particulate mass (PM), Equivalent Black Carbon (BCE) and elemental composition by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE). Rainwater samples were collected using a wet-only sampler and samples were analyzed for pH and ionic composition, which was determined using ionic chromatography (IC). Natural sources dominated the aerosol mass during the wet season, when it was predominantly of natural biogenic origin mostly in the coarse mode, which comprised up to 81% of PM10. Biogenic aerosol from both primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol dominates the fine mode in the wet season, with very low concentrations (average 2.2 μg m-3). Soil dust was responsible for a minor fraction of the aerosol mass (less than 17%). Sudden increases in the concentration of elements as Al, Ti and Fe were also observed, both in fine and coarse mode (mostly during the April-may months), which we attribute to episodes of Saharan dust transport. During the dry periods, a significant contribution to the fine aerosols loading was observed, due to the large-scale transport of smoke from biomass burning in other portions of the Amazon basin. This contribution is associated with the enhancement of the concentration of S, K, Zn and BCE. Chlorine, which is commonly associated to sea salt and also to biomass burning emissions, presented higher concentration not only during the dry season but also for the April-June months, due to the establishment of more favorable meteorological conditions to the transport of Atlantic air masses to Central Amazonia. The chemical composition of rainwater was similar to those

  1. Characterization of vehicle emissions in São Paulo and the impacts on atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira De Brito, J.; Godoy, M.; Godoy, J.; Varanda Rizzo, L.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-12-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an important role. São Paulo, located in Southeast of Brazil, is a megacity with a population of 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in São Paulo is considered one of the worst worldwide. Despite the large impact on human health and atmospheric chemistry/dynamics, many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission pattern, we are running a source apportionment study in São Paulo. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles) and diesel (heavy-duty vehicles). Whereas the latter shows usually much higher emission factors compared with ethanol or gasohol, heavy-duty vehicles have increasingly limited access within the São Paulo city limits, thus increasing the importance of light duty vehicles on air quality degradation. This study comprises four sampling sites, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, ozone, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10^4 and 3.10^4 cm-3, mostly

  2. Investigation of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chlorine Chemistry: Modeling and Environmental Chamber Studies Authors: Cameron B. Faxon, Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz, and David Allen University of Texas at Austin, McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, C. B.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has shown that gas phase atomic chlorine radicals (Cl*) can influence tropospheric photochemistry, including concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and ozone. These radicals are produced through both gas phase and heterogeneous pathways. This work presents computational and experimental investigation into the heterogeneous reactions of chloride aerosols. An overview of a sensitivity analysis of the physical parameters involved in the heterogeneous production of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) (R1-R5) will comprise the computational work presented. NO2(g) + NO3(g) ↔ N2O5(g) (R1) N2O5(aq) ↔ N2O5(aq) (R2) N2O5(aq) ↔ NO2+(aq) + NO3-(aq) (R3) NO2+(aq) + H2O(aq) → H3O+(aq) + HNO3(aq) (R4a) NO2+(aq) + Cl- → ClNO2 + H2O(aq) (R4b) NO3-(aq) + H+ ↔ HNO3+(aq) (R5) Relative parameters include the reactive uptake coefficient, ClNO2 yield, particle surface area, and gas phase concentrations of VOCs and NOx. The sensitivity analysis results were generated through photochemical box modeling and focus on the production of ClNO2 and impacts to ozone production. Results were compared to a base case scenario in which all heterogeneous reactions were absent. Parameter values reaching the upper limits reported in the literature were tested, and results indicate that ClNO2 chemistry can potentially change peak O3 concentrations by -10.5% to 27%. NOx availability was also found to play an important role. Experimental results of the heterogeneous reaction between OH* and particulate chloride (R6-R7) will also be discussed. The mechanism is shown below, and OH***Cl- represents an intermediate species forming at the particle surface. OH(g) + Cl-(aq) → OH***Cl-(aq) (R6) 2OH***Cl-(aq) → Cl2,g + 2OH-(aq) (R7) Environmental chamber experiments involving the exposure of NaCl aerosol particles to typical atmospheric conditions (HOx, NOx, O3 and UV radiation) were performed. A 10 cubic meter teflon reaction chamber equipped with UV lights was used to contain the

  3. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Gan, C.-M.; Wong, D. C.; Wei, C.

    2015-09-01

    The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000-2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to global climate models (GCMs), the model exhibits better estimates of surface-aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ). However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  4. Atmospheric chemistry in stereo: A new look at secondary organic aerosols from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; González, Nélida J. D.; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Pei, Yuxin; Redeby, Johan Pettersson; Krejci, Radovan; Dommen, Josef; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Anthonsen, Thorleif

    2011-06-01

    Isoprene, a compound emitted by vegetation, could be a major contributor to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main evidence for this contribution were the 2-methylbutane-1,2,3,4-tetraols, or 2-methyltetrols (2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol) present in ambient aerosols. In this work, the four stereoisomers of these tetraols were analyzed in aerosols from Aspvreten, Sweden. 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol was found in excess over its enantiomer in the Spring/Summer, by up to 29% in July. This clearly indicated some biological origins for this enantiomer, consistent with its well-documented production by plants and other living organisms. In addition, a minimum of 20 to 60% of the mass of racemic tetraols appeared from biological origin. Thus, the SOA mass produced by isoprene in the atmosphere is less than what indicated by the 2-methyltetrols in aerosols. Our results also demonstrate that stereochemical speciation can distinguish primary and secondary organic material in atmospheric aerosols.

  5. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry of Lead Oxide Particles with Nitrogen Dioxide Increases Lead Solubility: Environmental and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Rubasinghege, Gayan

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrogen dioxide with lead-containing particles is investigated to better understand lead metal mobilization in the environment. In particular, PbO particles, a model lead-containing compound due to its wide spread presence as a component of lead paint and as naturally occurring minerals, massicot and litharge, are exposed to nitrogen dioxide at different relative humidity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that upon exposure to nitrogen dioxide the surface of PbO particles react to form adsorbed nitrates and lead nitrate thin films with the extent of formation of nitrate relative humidity dependent. Surface adsorbed nitrate increases the amount of dissolved lead. These reacted particles are found to have an increase in the amount of lead that dissolves in aqueous suspensions at circumneutral pH compared to unreacted particles. These results point to the potential importance and impact that heterogeneous chemistry with trace atmospheric gases can have on increasing solubility and therefore the mobilization of heavy metals, such as lead, in the environment. This study also show that surface intermediates, such as adsorbed nitrates, that form can yield higher concentrations of lead in water systems. In the environment, these water systems can include drinking water, ground water, estuaries and lakes. PMID:23057678

  6. Mechanisms for Midlatitude Ozone Loss: Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Lowermost Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jessica B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Allen, Norton T.; Stimpfle, Richard M.; Anderson, James G.

    2001-01-01

    The question of midlatitude ozone erosion by chlorine free radical catalysis is examined. We present and analyze simultaneous, high-resolution observations of ClO, H2O, tropopause height, particle reactive surface area, and ice saturation occurrence frequency obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The objective is to test the hypothesis that the existence of cirrus clouds or cold aerosols in the first few kilometers above the tropopause at midlatitudes is responsible for increasing the ratio of chlorine free radicals to total inorganic chlorine, thus amplifying the rate of catalytic ozone destruction. The observations reveal a sharp decrease in ice saturation frequency at the tropopause, a marked degree of undersaturation just above the tropopause, a corresponding sharp gradient in the product of cold aerosol reactive surface area and reaction probability, gamma-S(sub a), and, finally, the consistent absence of enhanced concentrations of ClO immediately above the tropopause. These results suggest that midlatitude ozone loss is not controlled in situ by the mechanism of cirrus cloud and/or cold aerosol enhancement of chlorine radicals in the vicinity of the tropopause.

  7. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-02

    associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.63) and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a previous campaign in winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly 3 times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 and 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemical reactions may have played a more important role in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.« less

  8. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: Results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-02

    -OOA; 16 % of total OA, O/C = 0.63) and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA, O/C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a previous campaign in winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly 3 times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 and 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemical reactions may have played a more important role in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. Furthermore, the greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.« less

  9. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    -OOA; 16 % of total OA, O / C = 0.63) and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA, O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a previous campaign in winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly 3 times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 and 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemical reactions may have played a more important role in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.

  10. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    / C  =  0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.63) and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere.

    Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a previous campaign in winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly 3 times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 and 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemical reactions may have played a more important role in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.

  11. Characterization of aerosol transport in a recoil transfer chamber for heavy element chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Morales, Gabriel; Tereshatov, Evgeny; Folden, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Heavy elements (HE) are elements with Z >103 that can be synthesized via target material bombardment by accelerated charged particles. Production and investigation of properties of new elements result in understanding of upper limit of Periodic Table of Elements. Study of chemical behavior of HE is usually based on comparison with their light homologue properties. Such experiments require transportation of elements of interest from a target chamber to a radiochemical laboratory within several seconds. Aerosol transport is a widely known way to transfer non-volatile elements in on-line experiments. This particular project is devoted to design, characterization and optimization of aerosol transport for implementation in future experiments at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. Different types of aerosol generators and particle parameters such as: size distribution, concentration and charge have been considered. Results showing procedure development will be presented. *Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  12. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  13. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and a high-resolution chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A.; Garay, M. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product provides a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month between March 2000 and the present. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: non-absorbing, absorbing, and non-spherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from the SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS) model, a chemistry transport model (CTM) with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Overall, the AOD distributions of combined MISR aerosol types show good agreement with those from SPRINTARS. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and SPRINTARS show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  14. Aerosol composition, chemistry, and source characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P.

    2010-03-15

    Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined onboard the U.S. DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field campaign between October 16 and November 15, 2008. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) were determined using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ were determined using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non- sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only {approx}0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on sea-salt aerosols, responsible for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role, judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations were substantial ({approx}0.5 - {approx}3 {micro}g/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., {le} 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 {micro}g/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4- aerosols. However, compared to observations, model

  15. Aerosol Composition, Chemistry, and Source Characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J. T.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined on board the US DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field experiment between October 16 and November 15, 2008. Chemical species determined included SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only ~0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are believed to be externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on non-acidic sea-salt aerosols, responsible partly for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations in the study domain were substantial (~0.5 - ~3 μg/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore decreasing with distance from land), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., ≤ 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 μg/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4

  16. Describing the direct and indirect radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols over Europe by using coupled meteorology-chemistry simulations: a contribution from the AQMEII-Phase II exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocío; Curci, Gabriele; Forkel, Renate; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Langer, Matthias; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Zabkar, Rahela

    2014-05-01

    The study of the response of the aerosol levels in the atmosphere to a changing climate and how this affects the radiative budget of the Earth (direct, semi-direct and indirect effects) is an essential topic to build confidence on climate science, since these feedbacks involve the largest uncertainties nowadays. Air quality-climate interactions (AQCI) are, therefore, a key, but uncertain contributor to the anthropogenic forcing that remains poorly understood. To build confidence in the AQCI studies, regional-scale integrated meteorology-atmospheric chemistry models (i.e., models with on-line chemistry) that include detailed treatment of aerosol life cycle and aerosol impacts on radiation (direct effects) and clouds (indirect effects) are in demand. In this context, the main objective of this contribution is the study and definition of the uncertainties in the climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation system associated to the direct radiative forcing and the indirect effect caused by aerosols over Europe, using an ensemble of fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry model simulations with the WRF-Chem model run under the umbrella of AQMEII-Phase 2 international initiative. Simulations were performed for Europe for the entire year 2010. According to the common simulation strategy, the year was simulated as a sequence of 2-day time slices. For better comparability, the seven groups applied the same grid spacing of 23 km and shared common processing of initial and boundary conditions as well as anthropogenic and fire emissions. With exception of a simulation with different cloud microphysics, identical physics options were chosen while the chemistry options were varied. Two model set-ups will be considered here: one sub-ensemble of simulations not taking into account any aerosol feedbacks (the baseline case) and another sub-ensemble of simulations which differs from the former by the inclusion of aerosol-radiation feedback. The existing differences for meteorological

  17. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  18. Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Dorothy; Bauer, Susanne E.; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ronald L.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic carbon, nitrate, sea salt, and dust. Direct and BC snow-albedo radiative effects are included. Model BC and sulfur trends agree fairly well with records from Greenland and European ice cores and with sulfur deposition in North America; however, the model underestimates the sulfur decline at the end of the century in Greenland. Global BC effects peak early in the century (1940s); afterward the BC effects decrease at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but continue to increase at lower latitudes. The largest increase in aerosol optical depth occurs in the middle of the century (1940s-80s) when sulfate forcing peaks and causes global dimming. After this, aerosols decrease in eastern North America and northern Eurasia leading to regional positive forcing changes and brightening. These surface forcing changes have the correct trend but are too weak. Over the century, the net aerosol direct effect is -0.41 Watts per square meter, the BC-albedo effect is -0.02 Watts per square meter, and the net ozone forcing is +0.24 Watts per square meter. The model polar stratospheric ozone depletion develops, beginning in the 1970s. Concurrently, the sea salt load and negative radiative flux increase over the oceans around Antarctica. Net warming over the century is modeled fairly well; however, the model fails to capture the dynamics of the observedmidcentury cooling followed by the late century warming.Over the century, 20% of Arctic warming and snow ice cover loss is attributed to the BC albedo effect. However, the decrease in this effect at the end of the century contributes to Arctic cooling. To test the climate responses to sulfate and BC pollution, two experiments were branched from 1970 that removed

  19. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, B.; Baker, A.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, Alma; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, Eric; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-12-21

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 ug m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 μg m-3 during mid-day. The majority (> 75%) of the model SOA stems from the large n-alkanes, with the remainder mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by *- hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  20. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Baker, A.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, E.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 μg m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 μg m-3 during mid-day. The majority (≥75%) of the model SOA stems from reaction products of the large n-alkanes, used here as surrogates for all emitted hydrocarbons of similar volatility, with the remaining SOA originating mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by δ-hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  1. Catalytic C-H bond functionalisation chemistry: the case for quasi-heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Reay, Alan J; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2015-11-25

    This feature article examines the potential of heterogeneous Pd species to mediate catalytic C-H bond functionalisation processes employing suitable substrates (e.g. aromatic/heteroaromatic compounds). A focus is placed on the reactivity of supported and non-supported Pd nanoparticle (PdNPs) catalysts, in addition to the re-appropriation of well-established heterogeneous Pd catalysts such as Pd/C. Where possible, reasonable comparisons are made between PdNPs and traditional 'homogeneous' Pd precatalyst sources (which form PdNPs). The involvement of higher order Pd species in traditional cross-coupling processes, such as Mizoroki-Heck, Sonogashira and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions, allows the exemplification of potential future topics for study in the area of catalytic C-H bond functionalisation processes. PMID:26439875

  2. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume VI - heterogeneous reactions with liquid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M.; Cox, R. A.; Crowley, J. N.; Jenkin, M. E.; Mellouki, A.; Rossi, M. J.; Troe, J.; Wallington, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    This article, the sixth in the ACP journal series, presents data evaluated by the IUPAC Task Group on Atmospheric Chemical Kinetic Data Evaluation. It covers the heterogeneous processes involving liquid particles present in the atmosphere, for which uptake coefficients and adsorption parameters have been presented on the IUPAC website since 2009. The article consists of an introduction and guide to the evaluation, giving a unifying framework for parameterisation of atmospheric heterogeneous processes. We provide summary sheets containing the recommended uptake parameters for the evaluated processes. The experimental data on which the recommendations are based are provided in data sheets in separate appendices for the four surfaces considered: liquid water, deliquesced halide salts, other aqueous electrolytes and sulfuric acid.

  3. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume VI - heterogeneous reactions with liquid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M.; Cox, R. A.; Crowley, J. N.; Jenkin, M. E.; Mellouki, A.; Rossi, M. J.; Troe, J.; Wallington, T. J.

    2013-08-01

    This article, the sixth in the ACP journal series, presents data evaluated by the IUPAC Task Group on Atmospheric Chemical Kinetic Data Evaluation. It covers the heterogeneous processes involving liquid particles present in the atmosphere with an emphasis on those relevant for the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere and the marine boundary layer, for which uptake coefficients and adsorption parameters have been presented on the IUPAC website since 2009. The article consists of an introduction and guide to the evaluation, giving a unifying framework for parameterisation of atmospheric heterogeneous processes. We provide summary sheets containing the recommended uptake parameters for the evaluated processes. The experimental data on which the recommendations are based are provided in data sheets in separate appendices for the four surfaces considered: liquid water, deliquesced halide salts, other aqueous electrolytes and sulfuric acid.

  4. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  5. Decadal simulation and comprehensive evaluation of CESM/CAM5.1 with advanced chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Zhang, Yang; Glotfelty, Tim; He, Ruoying; Bennartz, Ralf; Rausch, John; Sartelet, Karine

    2015-03-01

    Earth system models have been used for climate predictions in recent years due to their capabilities to include biogeochemical cycles, human impacts, as well as coupled and interactive representations of Earth system components (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice). In this work, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with advanced chemistry and aerosol treatments, referred to as CESM-NCSU, is applied for decadal (2001-2010) global climate predictions. A comprehensive evaluation is performed focusing on the atmospheric component—the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) by comparing simulation results with observations/reanalysis data and CESM ensemble simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The improved model can predict most meteorological and radiative variables relatively well with normalized mean biases (NMBs) of -14.1 to -9.7% and 0.7-10.8%, respectively, although temperature at 2 m (T2) is slightly underpredicted. Cloud variables such as cloud fraction (CF) and precipitating water vapor (PWV) are well predicted, with NMBs of -10.5 to 0.4%, whereas cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud optical thickness (COT) are moderately-to-largely underpredicted, with NMBs of -82.2 to -31.2%, and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is overpredictd by 26.7%. These biases indicate the limitations and uncertainties associated with cloud microphysics (e.g., resolved clouds and subgrid-scale cumulus clouds). Chemical concentrations over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (e.g., SO42-, Cl-, OC, and PM2.5) are reasonably well predicted with NMBs of -12.8 to -1.18%. Concentrations of SO2, SO42-, and PM10 are also reasonably well predicted over Europe with NMBs of -20.8 to -5.2%, so are predictions of SO2 concentrations over the East Asia with an NMB of -18.2%, and the tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) over the globe with an NMB of -3.5%. Most meteorological and radiative variables

  6. A heterogeneous chemistry model for acid rain`s effect on ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tao

    1995-11-01

    A computer model for simulating heterogeneous reactions in cloud is developed to determine the S(IV) species` effect on ozone. Crutzen claims that NO{sub x}, HO{sub x} families and H{sub 2}CO in the troposphere can decrease ozone by 5 to 10%. However, is this claim valid for a SO{sub x} polluted atmosphere? The SO{sub x} family reacts with the ozone destroyers. These reactions seem to be significant enough to reduce the H{sub 2}CO`s destructive effect on ozone.

  7. Specification of Biogenic VOC Emission Data in the Coupled System of Regional Climate and Atmospheric Chemistry/Aerosols Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemankova, K.; Huszar, P.

    2009-12-01

    Coupling of regional climate model RegCM (Pal et al., 2007) and atmospheric chemistry/aerosols model CAMx (Environ, 2006) is being developed at our department under the CECILIA project (EC 6th FP) with the aim to study climate forcing due to atmospheric chemistry/aerosols on regional scale. Regional climate model RegCM with the resolution of 10 km drives transport, chemistry and dry/wet deposition of the CAMx model being operated on the Central and Eastern European domain and consequently the radiative active agents from the CAMx model enter the radiative transfer schemes for the calculation of heating rate changes in the regional climate model. In order to increase the accuracy of land cover data in this model system, a new input dataset has been prepared and used for the calculation of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources. This dataset is mainly based on the single tree species database from the european project of JRC in Ispra - Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Uses in Europe (AFOLU) which covers most of the model domain. For the locations where AFOLU data were not available, i.e. basically non-EU areas, the USGS Eurasia land cover database has been used. Both databases are available in 1 km resolution. Emission factors for new land cover categories were obtained either from the laboratory measurements or from the literature. The Guenther et al. (1995) model algorithm has been used for the calculation of biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission fluxes. Effects of new land cover and BVOC emission data on the CAMx model simulations of low level ozone in the year 2000 have been studied. Improvement of model results when compared with the measured data may be seen, especially in the simulation of extreme values such as ozone summer maxima. References: - ENVIRON Corp., 2006. CAMx User’s Guide, version 4.40 - Guenther A., Hewitt N., Erickson D., Fall R., Geron Ch., Graedel T., Harley P., Klinger L., Lerdau M., McKay W. A., Pierce T., Scholes

  8. Summer and winter time heterogeneity in aerosol single scattering albedo over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean during the TCAP field campaign: Relationship to chemical composition and mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, L. K.; Chand, D.; Fast, J. D.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Mei, F.; Kassianov, E.; Schmid, B.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol play crucial role in earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. The impact of aerosol on radiation budget depend on several factors including single scattering albedo (SSA), composition, and the growth processes, like coating or mixing. We describe findings relevant to optical properties of aerosol characterized over the Cape Cod and nearby northwest Atlantic Ocean during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) during the summer (July 2012) and winter (February 2013) campaigns. The average single scattering albedo (SSA) shows distinctly different vertical profiles during the summer and winter periods. During the summer study period, the average SSA is greater than 0.95 near surface, it increases to 0.97 until an altitude of 2.5 km, and then decreases to 0.94 at top of the column near 4 km. In contrast, during the winter study period the average SSA is less than 0.93 and decreases with height reaching an average value of 0.87 near the top of the column. The large difference in summer and winter time SSA is linked to the presence of biomass burning (BB) aerosol rather than black carbon or soot in both seasons. In our study, the BB on average is factor of two higher in free troposphere (FT) during summer and more than a factor of two higher in the boundary layer during winter. Single particle analysis indicates that the average profiles of refractory black carbon (rBC) mass are similar in both seasons. The average rBC size are similar at all altitudes sampled (0-4 km) in summer time but different during winter time. In addition, the particles sampled in the summertime FT appear to be more aged than those seen during winter. The observed large heterogeneity in SSA and its links to the particle coating and composition highlights the importance of aging and mixing processes of aerosol in this region and represents a challenge for both regional and global scale models.

  9. Application of physical adsorption thermodynamics to heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory isotherms for the binding of several nonheterogeneously active atmospheric gases and for HCl to water ice are translated into adsorptive equilibrium constants and surface enthalpies. Extrapolation to polar conditions through the Clausius Clapeyron relation yields coverage estimates below the percent level for N2, Ar, CO2, and CO, suggesting that the crystal faces of type II stratospheric cloud particles may be regarded as clean with respect to these species. For HCl, and perhaps HF and HNO3, estimates rise to several percent, and the adsorbed layer may offer acid or proton sources alternate to the bulk solid for heterogeneous reactions with stratospheric nitrates. Measurements are lacking for many key atmospheric molecules on water ice, and almost entirely for nitric acid trihydrate as substrate. Adsorptive equilibria enter into gas to particle mass flux descriptions, and the binding energy determines rates for desorption of, and encounter between, potential surface reactants.

  10. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  11. Balloon profiles of stratospheric NO2 and HNO3 for testing the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Allen, M.; Jaegle, L.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of stratospheric NO2, HNO3, HCl, and CH4 from 34 to 24 km were made in August 1992 from Palestine, Texas, using the Balloon-borne Laser In-Situ Sensor (BLISS) tunable diode laser spectrometer. Although the measurements of NO2, HNO3, and NO2/HNO3 agree well with gas-phase model calculations near 34 km where Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 data show little sulfate aerosol, this is not true at the lower altitudes where SAGE 2 shows high aerosol loadings. At 24 km the BLISS NO2 and HNO3 measurements are 70% lower and 50% higher, respectively, than the gas phase model predictions, with a measured NO2/HNO3 ratio 5 times smaller. When the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 and ClONO2 on sulfate aerosol of surface area densities matching the SAGE 2 measurements is added to the model, good agreement with the BLISS measurements is found over the whole altitude range.

  12. Is NO3/N2O5 chemistry a source of aerosol HNO3 in the San Joaquin Valley?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minejima, C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Sensitive and continuous measurements of NO3 + N2O5 concentrations were made at Arvin from March 1 to March 30, 2007 using Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) to investigate the role of NO3 and N2O5 as a cause of high ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) aerosol concentrations in California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV). NH4NO3 is produced via a reaction of HNO3 and NH3. And HNO3 is the limiting reagent for NH3 is emitted in large amount from agricultural sources and motor vehicles in the SJV. NO3 and N2O5 play an important part in producing HNO3. Nighttime production of HNO3 through a heterogeneous N2O5 reaction with H2O on aerosol surfaces was investigated by measuring the NO3 + N2O5 concentrations. Peak values of N2O5 mixing ratio often exceeded 100 pptv and ranged between 25-320 pptv. Size resolved particle number was measured to estimate aerosol surface load and it was found that heterogeneous N2O5 reaction with the estimated surface load could explain only up to a few % of HNO3 production. Here the necessary HNO3 production is calculated by assuming the aerosol lifetime with respect to deposition and/or transport out of PBL is 1 day. Other possible passes to produce HNO3 are the day time NO2 + OH reaction, nighttime NO3 + anthropogenic HC reactions, and NO3 + biogenic HC reactions. Contribution of each pass was estimated by auxiliary measurements and knowledge from literature. Daytime HNO3 production was calculated from the measured NO2 concentration at the nearest CARB site and OH concentration from literature to show that it may account for ~25 % of HNO3 required. Total non methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), which is mostly anthropogenic, is measured at the CARB site. Assuming the similar compositions of NMHCs in Sacramento, NO3 + anthropogenic HCs are calculated to be as fast to explain 40 - 70 % of NO3 + N2O5 loss. HNO3 yield from these reactions are not well known. The upper limit of HNO3 production, however, can be estimated by assuming unity yield

  13. Description and evaluation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Emmons, L. K.; Kinnison, D. E.; Ma, P. -L.; Liu, X.; Ghan, S.; Bardeen, C.; Arnold, S.; Deeter, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 5, is now coupled to extensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, called CAM5-chem, and is available in addition to CAM4-chem in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.2. The main focus of this paper is to compare the performance of configurations with internally derived "free running" (FR) meteorology and "specified dynamics" (SD) against observations from surface, aircraft, and satellite, as well as understand the origin of the identified differences. We focus on the representation of aerosols and chemistry. All model configurations reproduce tropospheric ozone for most regions based on in situ and satellite observations.more » However, shortcomings exist in the representation of ozone precursors and aerosols. Tropospheric ozone in all model configurations agrees for the most part with ozonesondes and satellite observations in the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere within the variability of the observations. Southern hemispheric tropospheric ozone is consistently underestimated by up to 25%. Differences in convection and stratosphere to troposphere exchange processes are mostly responsible for differences in ozone in the different model configurations. Carbon monoxide (CO) and other volatile organic compounds are largely underestimated in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes based on satellite and aircraft observations. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are biased low in the free tropical troposphere, whereas peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is overestimated in particular in high northern latitudes. The present-day methane lifetime estimates are compared among the different model configurations. These range between 7.8 years in the SD configuration of CAM5-chem and 8.8 years in the FR configuration of CAM4-chem and are therefore underestimated compared to observational estimations. We find that differences in tropospheric aerosol surface area between CAM4 and CAM5 play an important role in controlling the burden of

  14. Description and evaluation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Emmons, L. K.; Kinnison, D. E.; Ma, P. -L.; Liu, X.; Ghan, S.; Bardeen, C.; Arnold, S.; Deeter, M.; Vitt, F.; Ryerson, T.; Elkins, J. W.; Moore, F.; Spackman, J. R.; Val Martin, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 5, is now coupled to extensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, called CAM5-chem, and is available in addition to CAM4-chem in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.2. The main focus of this paper is to compare the performance of configurations with internally derived "free running" (FR) meteorology and "specified dynamics" (SD) against observations from surface, aircraft, and satellite, as well as understand the origin of the identified differences. We focus on the representation of aerosols and chemistry. All model configurations reproduce tropospheric ozone for most regions based on in situ and satellite observations. However, shortcomings exist in the representation of ozone precursors and aerosols. Tropospheric ozone in all model configurations agrees for the most part with ozonesondes and satellite observations in the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere within the variability of the observations. Southern hemispheric tropospheric ozone is consistently underestimated by up to 25%. Differences in convection and stratosphere to troposphere exchange processes are mostly responsible for differences in ozone in the different model configurations. Carbon monoxide (CO) and other volatile organic compounds are largely underestimated in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes based on satellite and aircraft observations. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are biased low in the free tropical troposphere, whereas peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is overestimated in particular in high northern latitudes. The present-day methane lifetime estimates are compared among the different model configurations. These range between 7.8 years in the SD configuration of CAM5-chem and 8.8 years in the FR configuration of CAM4-chem and are therefore underestimated compared to observational estimations. We find that differences in tropospheric aerosol surface area between CAM4 and CAM5 play an important role in controlling the

  15. The role of iron chemistry on the interpretation of lower mantle heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Auzende, A; Badro, J; Ryerson, F J; Siebert, J; Fiquet, G

    2008-10-27

    Iron is a major element in the mantle and its chemical behavior (partitioning, spin transition) affect the physical and transport properties of the phases which host it. Such variations can provide explanations of major heterogeneities observed in the mantle. Magnesium silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO{sub 3} (Mg-pv) and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O (fp) are the dominant phases in the lower-mantle and can potentially host significant amount of iron. It is thus of prime importance to constrain element partitioning at high pressure for improving models of the deep Earth. We investigated iron partitioning between Mg-pv and fp synthetised under lower-mantle conditions (up to 115 GPa and 2200 K) in a laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC). Recovered samples were thinned to electron transparency by focused ion beam (FIB) and characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Addititional informations on trace elements were provided by measurements using nanometer scale ion probe (nanoSIMS). Iron concentrations in both phases were obtained from EDX measurements and nanoSIMS and are in excellent agreement. Our results are the first to show that recently reported transitions in the lower-mantle directly affect the evolution of Fe-Mg partitioning between both phases. Mg-pv is increasingly iron-depleted above 70-80 GPa possibly due to the high spin-low spin transition of iron in fp. Conversely, the perovskite to post-perovskite transition is accompanied by a strong iron enrichment of the silicate phase. We will discuss the implications of these partitioning variations in terms of potential heterogeneities. We will also address shortly the early history of the Earth, as the observation of nanoparticles of metallic iron in the Mg-pv bearing runs suggests the disproportionation of ferrous iron and the self-oxidation of the mantle while these particles were not observed when the post-perovskite (ppv) phase was present. Implications on the oxidation state of the Earth

  16. Photo-oxidation of pinonaldehyde at low NOx: from chemistry to organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Madrid, H. J.; Henry, K. M.; Donahue, N. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pinonaldehyde oxidation by OH radicals under low-NOx conditions produces significant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields. Under concurrent UV illumination, mass yields are lower than high-NOx yields published earlier by our group. However, when OH radicals are produced via dark ozonolysis the SOA mass yields are comparable at high and low NOx. Because pinonaldehyde is a major first-generation gas-phase product of α-pinene oxidation by either ozone or OH radicals, its potential to form SOA serves as a molecular counterpoint to bulk SOA aging experiments involving SOA formed from α-pinene. Both the general tendency for aging reactions to produce more SOA and the sensitivity of the low-NOx products to UV photolysis observed in the bulk clearly occur for this single species as well. Photochemical oxidation of pinonaldehye and analogous first-generation terpene oxidation products are potentially a significant source of additional SOA in biogenically influenced air masses.

  17. A Computational Approach to Understanding Oxidant Chemistry and Aerosol Formation in the Troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Bianco, Roberto; Dang, Liem X.; Dixon, David A.; Dupuis, Michel; Francisco, Joseph; Gertner, Bradley; Hynes, James T.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Morita, Akihiro; Peterson, Kirk A.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Seinfeld, John H.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2002-08-01

    Ozone production and aerosol formation in the troposphere are recognized as two major effects of energy-related air pollutants. Tropospheric ozone is of concern primarily because of its impact on health. Ozone levels are controlled by NOx and by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the lower troposphere. The VOCs can either be from natural emissions from such sources as vegetation and phytoplankton or from anthropogenic sources such as automobiles and oil-fueled power production plants. It is of critical importance to the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing national energy use policies to understand the role of VOCs in determining air quality and how VOC emission or NOx emission control strategies should be designed.

  18. Observation of Organic Molecules at the Aerosol Surface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yajing; Li, Wanyi; Xu, Bolei; Li, Xia; Wang, Han; McNeill, V Faye; Rao, Yi; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2016-06-16

    Organic molecules at the gas-particle interface of atmospheric aerosols influence the heterogeneous chemistry of the aerosol and impact climate properties. The ability to probe the molecules at the aerosol particle surface in situ therefore is important but has been proven challenging. We report the first successful observations of molecules at the surface of laboratory-generated aerosols suspended in air using the surface-sensitive technique second harmonic light scattering (SHS). As a demonstration, we detect trans-4-[4-(dibutylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide and determine its population and adsorption free energy at the surface of submicron aerosol particles. This work illustrates a new and versatile experimental approach for studying how aerosol composition may affect the atmospheric properties. PMID:27249662

  19. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry in the southwestern United States: spatiotemporal trends and interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, A.; Shingler, T.; Harpold, A.; Feagles, C. W.; Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterizes the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol and precipitation composition at six sites across the United States Southwest between 1995 and 2010. Precipitation accumulation occurs mostly during the wintertime (December–February) and during the monsoon season (July–September). Rain and snow pH levels are usually between 5–6, with crustal-derived species playing a major role in acid neutralization. These species (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+) exhibit their highest concentrations between March and June in both PM2.5 and precipitation due mostly to dust. Crustal-derived species concentrations in precipitation exhibit positive relationships with SO42−, NO3−, and Cl–, suggesting that acidic gases likely react with and partition to either crustal particles or hydrometeors enriched with crustal constituents. Concentrations of particulate SO42− show a statistically significant correlation with rain SO42− unlike snow SO42−, which may be related to some combination of the vertical distribution of SO42− (and precursors) and the varying degree to which SO42−-enriched particles act as cloud condensation nuclei versus ice nuclei in the region. The coarse : fine aerosol mass ratio was correlated with crustal species concentrations in snow unlike rain, suggestive of a preferential role of coarse particles (mainly dust) as ice nuclei in the region. Precipitation NO3− : SO42− ratios exhibit the following features with potential explanations discussed: (i) they are higher in precipitation as compared to PM2.5; (ii) they exhibit the opposite annual cycle compared to particulate NO3− : SO42− ratios; and (iii) they are higher in snow relative to rain during the wintertime. Long-term trend analysis for the monsoon season shows that the NO3− : SO42− ratio in rain increased at the majority of sites due mostly to air pollution regulations of SO42− precursors. PMID:24432030

  20. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  1. On-line Meteorology-Chemistry/Aerosols Modelling and Integration for Risk Assessment: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostanbekov, Kairat; Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Nurseitov, Daniyar; Zakarin, Edige; Baklanov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    On regional level, and especially in areas with potential diverse sources of industrial pollutants, the risk assessment of impact on environment and population is critically important. During normal operations, the risk is minimal. However, during accidental situations, the risk is increased due to releases of harmful pollutants into different environments such as water, soil, and atmosphere where it is following processes of continuous transformation and transport. In this study, the Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment High Resolution Limited Area Model) was adapted and employed for assessment of scenarios with accidental and continuous emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) for selected case studies during January of 2010. The following scenarios were considered: (i) control reference run; (ii) accidental release (due to short-term 1 day fire at oil storage facility) occurred at city of Atyrau (Kazakhstan) near the northern part of the Caspian Sea; and (iii) doubling of original continuous emissions from three locations of metallurgical enterprises on the Kola Peninsula (Russia). The implemented aerosol microphysics module M7 uses 5 types - sulphates, sea salt, dust, black and organic carbon; as well as distributed in 7 size modes. Removal processes of aerosols include gravitational settling and wet deposition. As the Enviro-HIRLAM model is the on-line integrated model, both meteorological and chemical processes are simultaneously modelled at each time step. The modelled spatio-temporal variations for meteorological and chemical patterns are analyzed for both European and Kazakhstan regions domains. The results of evaluation of sulphur dioxide concentration and deposition on main populated cities, selected regions, countries are presented employing GIS tools. As outcome, the results of Enviro-HIRLAM modelling for accidental release near the Caspian Sea are integrated into the RANDOM (Risk Assessment of Nature Detriment due to Oil spill Migration) system.

  2. Atmospheric chemistry of nitrogenous aerosols in northeastern Asia: biological sources and secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P. Q.

    2015-09-01

    To better understand the sources of nitrogenous aerosols, particularly water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) and water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION), in northeastern Asia, we measured total nitrogen (TN) and water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) as well as nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of TN (δ15NTN) and WSTN (δ15NWSTN) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) samples collected from Sapporo, northern Japan, for a 1-year period. In general, WION was more abundant (126 ± 117 ng m-3), whereas WSON was 89.7 ± 80.6 ng m-3, accounting for 14 ± 11 % and 9.2 ± 7.3 % of TN, respectively. WSON peaked in late autumn to winter (maximum 288 ng m-3) and WION peaked in mid-spring to early summer (454 ng m-3). δ15NTN (21.9 ± 4.1 ‰) and δ15NWSTN (25.8 ± 8.2 ‰) showed peaks in summer with relatively high ratios in late autumn. Based on the seasonal variations in WSON and WION together with organic tracers, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are found to be two major sources of WSON, whereas emissions of biological particles and secondary formation by reactions of biogenic secondary organic species (carbonyls) with NH3 are suggested as an important source of WION. The seasonality of δ15NTN and δ15NWSTN, together with the comparisons to literature values, implies that chemical aging (including gas-particle partitioning) and biomass burning are the causes of the enhanced values in summer and autumn, respectively. This study demonstrates that contributions of aerosol N from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning dominate in autumn and/or winter, whereas emission of terrestrial biological particles and secondary formation from biogenic hydrocarbons and subsequent chemical aging in the atmosphere are important in spring and/or summer in northeastern Asia.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry of nitrogenous aerosols in Northeast Asia: biological sources and secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P. Q.

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the sources of nitrogenous aerosols, particularly water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) and water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION), in Northeast Asia, we measured total nitrogen (TN) and water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) as well as nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of TN (δ15NTN) and WSTN (δ15NWSTN) in the total suspended particles (TSP) collected from Sapporo, northern Japan for one-year period. In general, WION was more abundant (126 ± 117 ng m-3) whereas WSON (89.7 ± 80.6 ng m-3), accounting for 14 ± 11% and 9.2 ± 7.3% of TN, respectively. WSON peaked in late autumn to winter (maximum 288 ng m-3) and WION peaked in mid spring to early summer (454 ng m-3). δ15NTN (21.9 ± 4.1‰) and δ15NWSTN (25.8 ± 8.2‰) showed peaks in summer with relatively high ratios in late autumn. Based on the seasonal variations of WSON and WION together with organic tracers, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are found to be two major sources of WSON whereas emissions of biological particles and secondary formation by reactions of biogenic secondary organic species (carbonyls) with NH3 are suggested as important source of WION. The seasonality of δ15NTN and δ15NWSTN, together with the comparisons to literature values, implies that chemical aging (including gas/particle partitioning) and biomass burning are the causes of the enhanced values in summer and autumn, respectively. This study demonstrates that contributions of aerosol N from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning dominate in autumn/winter whereas emission of terrestrial biological particles and secondary formation from biogenic hydrocarbons and subsequent chemical aging in the atmosphere are important in spring/summer in Northeast Asia.

  4. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Wealthall, G. P.; Loke, M. H.; Dearden, R.; Wilson, R.; Allen, D.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-10-01

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents.

  5. Numerical studies of the heterogeneous combustion of char using detailed chemistry.

    PubMed

    Miessen, G; Behrendt, F; Deutschmann, O; Warnatz, J

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of graphite is used as a model system for the combustion of char. In order to understand this oxidation process a stagnation-point flow of an oxygen stream on a graphite surface is investigated numerically. The chemical reactions in the gas phase as well as on the surface are modelled by a series of elementary steps. The surface reactions take into consideration the different surface complexes formed, the influence of the geometry of the graphite surface and the interaction of gas-phase molecules with surface complexes. The rate coefficients used are estimated by applying methods of the microkinetic analysis of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The mechanism is used to simulate the combustion rate of a graphite surface and the ratio of CO to CO2 formed on the surface. The simulation results are compared with experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. Furthermore, the fraction of char-bound nitrogen converted to N2 and N2O is calculated. PMID:11219686

  6. Effects of cloudy/clear air mixing and droplet pH on sulfate aerosol formation in a coupled chemistry/climate global model

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Atherton, C.A.; Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we will briefly describe our coupled ECHAM/GRANTOUR model, provide a detailed description of our atmospheric chemistry parameterizations, and discuss a couple of numerical experiments in which we explore the influence of assumed pH and rate of mixing between cloudy and clear air on aqueous sulfate formation and concentration. We have used our tropospheric chemistry and transport model, GRANTOUR, to estimate the life cycle and global distributions of many trace species. Recently, we have coupled GRANTOUR with the ECHAM global climate model, which provides several enhanced capabilities in the representation of aerosol interactions.

  7. Seasonal variations of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars: Further indications of heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Lefèvre, F.; Montmessin, F.; Forget, F.; Fouchet, T.; DeWitt, C.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Atreya, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have completed our seasonal monitoring of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars using ground-based thermal imaging spectroscopy, by observing the planet in March 2014, when water vapor is maximum, and July 2014, when, according to photochemical models, hydrogen peroxide is expected to be maximum. Data have been obtained with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mounted at the 3 m-Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Maunakea Observatory. Maps of HDO and H2O2 have been obtained using line depth ratios of weak transitions of HDO and H2O2 divided by CO2. The retrieved maps of H2O2 are in good agreement with predictions including a chemical transport model, for both the March data (maximum water vapor) and the July data (maximum hydrogen peroxide). The retrieved maps of HDO are compared with simulations by Montmessin et al. (2005, J. Geophys. Res., 110, 03006) and H2O maps are inferred assuming a mean martian D/H ratio of 5 times the terrestrial value. For regions of maximum values of H2O and H2O2, we derive, for March 1 2014 (Ls = 96°), H2O2 = 20+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 450 +/-75 ppbv (45 +/-8 pr-nm), and for July 3, 2014 (Ls = 156°), H2O2 = 30+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 375+/-70 ppbv (22+/-3 pr-nm). In addition, the new observations are compared with LMD global climate model results and we favor simulations of H2O2 including heterogeneous reactions on water-ice clouds.

  8. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2014-05-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  9. Sensitivity of tropospheric chemical composition to halogen-radical chemistry using a fully coupled size-resolved multiphase chemistry-global climate system: halogen distributions, aerosol composition, and sensitivity of climate-relevant gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, R. C.; Sander, R.; Liu, X.; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

    2014-04-01

    Observations and model calculations indicate that highly non-linear multiphase atmospheric processes involving inorganic Cl and Br significantly impact tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, and radiative transfer. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was investigated using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry-global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) v3.6.33). Simulated results revealed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. They also point to possible physicochemical mechanisms that may account for several previously unexplained phenomena, including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile inorganic Br mixing ratios in the troposphere were generally higher than observed, due in part to the overly efficient net production of BrCl. In addition, the emission scheme for marine aerosol and associated Br-, which is the only source for Br in the model, overestimates emission fluxes from the high-latitude Southern Ocean. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived precursor organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrates a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to halogen cycling. Globally, halogen chemistry had relatively less impact on SO2 and non-sea-salt (nss) SO42- although significant regional differences were evident. Although variable geographically, much of this sensitivity is attributable to either over-vigorous activation of Br (primarily BrCl) via the chemical mechanism or overproduction of sea

  10. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  11. Electron-molecule chemistry and charging processes on organic ices and Titan's icy aerosol surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, C.; Gann, R. D.; McLain, J. L.; Orlando, T. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron-induced polymerization processes and charging events that can occur within Titan's atmosphere or on its surface were simulated using electron irradiation and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) studies of nitrogen-containing organic condensates. The DEA studies probe the desorption of H- from hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile (CH3CN), and aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN) ices, as well as from synthesized tholin materials condensed or deposited onto a graphite substrate maintained at low temperature (90-130 K). The peak cross sections for H- desorption during low-energy (3-15 eV) electron irradiation were measured and range from 3 × 10-21 to 2 × 10-18 cm2. Chemical and structural transformations of HCN ice upon 2 keV electron irradiation were investigated using X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The electron-beam processed materials displayed optical properties very similar to tholins produced by conventional discharge methods. Electron and negative ion trapping lead to 1011 charges cm-2 on a flat surface which, assuming a radius of 0.05 μm for Titan aerosols, is ∼628 charges/radius (in μm). The facile charge trapping indicates that electron interactions with nitriles and complex tholin-like molecules could affect the conductivity of Titan's atmosphere due to the formation of large negative ion complexes. These negatively charged complexes can also precipitate onto Titan's surface and possibly contribute to surface reactions and the formation of dunes.

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  13. Impact of human presence on secondary organic aerosols derived from ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated office environment.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Moshood O; Weschler, Charles J; Tham, Kwok W; Wu, Wei Y; Sultan, Zuraimi M

    2013-04-16

    Several studies have documented reductions in indoor ozone levels that occur as a consequence of its reactions with the exposed skin, hair and clothing of human occupants. One would anticipate that consumption of ozone via such reactions would impact co-occurring products derived from ozone's reactions with various indoor pollutants. The present study examines this possibility for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) derived from ozone-initiated chemistry with limonene, a commonly occurring indoor terpene. The experiments were conducted at realistic ozone and limonene concentrations in a 240 m(3) chamber configured to simulate a typical open office environment. During an experiment the chamber was either unoccupied or occupied with 18-20 workers. Ozone and particle levels were continuously monitored using a UV photometric ozone analyzer and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), respectively. Under otherwise identical conditions, when workers were present in the simulated office the ozone concentrations were approximately two-thirds and the SOA mass concentrations were approximately one-half of those measured when the office was unoccupied. This was observed whether new or used filters were present in the air handling system. These results illustrate the importance of accounting for occupancy when estimating human exposure to pollutants in various indoor settings. PMID:23488675

  14. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  15. Tropospheric Trace Gas Interactions with Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Maddrea, George L., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are of considerable environmental importance. They modify the radiative budget of Earth by scattering and absorbing radiation, and by providing nuclei for cloud formation. Additionally, they provide surfaces for heterogeneous and multiphase reactions that affect tropospheric chemistry. For example, Dentener and Crutzen (1993) showed that reactions of N2O5 and NO3 with sulfate aerosols may significantly alter the tropospheric concentrations of NO(x), O3, and OH by converting NOx to HNO3 which is rapidly removed by precipitation. Zhang et al. (1994) assumed these same reactions would occur on dust aerosols and showed that dust outbreaks may reduce NO(x) levels by up to 50%. Dentener et al. (1996) studied the possible effect of reactions on dust on sulfate, nitrate, and O3 concentration. Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions on aerosols may also perturb the sulfur cycle the chlorine cycle and the bromine cycle. Because these reactions can release free chlorine and free bromine they might lead to the destruction of ozone in the marine boundary layer that may be important to include in models of tropospheric chemistry. The goal of our proposed work is to examine the role of heterogeneous and multiphase reactions in the tropospheric cycles of reactive nitrogen and sulfur.

  16. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6 h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to>2.0 μm diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to>12 h -1, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6 h -1 particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2 μm size-range peaked 1.2 h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8 h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7 μm diameter range. At higher air exchange rates, the resulting concentrations of total particles and particle mass (calculated from particle counts) were smaller, and at exchange rates exceeding 12 h -1, no excess particle formation was detectable with the instrument used in this study. Particle size evolved through accretion and, in some cases, coagulation. There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were shifted towards smaller particle diameters and less time was required to achieve the maximum concentration in each of the size-ranges where discernable particle growth

  17. Aerosol chamber and modelling studies on the reaction of soot aerosols with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moehler, O.; Naumann, K.H.; Saathoff, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous processes in atmospheric aerosols are known to play important roles in the chemical transformation of air pollutants. Especially irregularly shaped aerosol particles like soot have large surface areas to interact with trace gases. The overall efficiency of those processes depends on various parameters like the particle shape, the chemical surface conditions, the surface reaction mechanisms and the gas transport processes to and from the surface. The shape and surface of soot particles are transformed due to their heterogeneous chemical activity. Therefore, the surface reaction efficiency of atmospheric soot particles also depends on their age and history. The scope of this work is to investigate the ozone depletion potential of soot particles at typical atmospheric conditions. The experiments are carried out in a cylindrical aerosol vessel with a volume of 3.7 m{sup 3}. The soot aerosol is produced with a sparc generator and introduced into the aerosol vessel together with the ozone. The variation of the number concentration, the mass concentration and the size distribution of the soot aerosol within the aerosol vessel is measured and electron micrographs are taken to obtain information on the particle morphology. The ozone concentration is continuously monitored by UV-absorption. The experimental data are compared with model results to analyze the physical and chemical processes in the aerosol system in more detail. The aerosol model developed at our institute is based on the concept of fractal geometry and calculates the dynamic behaviour of irregularly shaped aerosols. More recently, the model was extended to describe the interaction of the aerosol particles with gases. This paper summarizes first results of the experimental and modelling work. The possible impact on tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  18. Aerosol Properties Over the Eastern US in July 2002: Comparison of Long-Term Measurements With Results From a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, U.; Husain, L.; Khan, A. J.; Ahmed, T.; Adelman, Z.; Xiu, A.; Arunachalam, S.

    2007-12-01

    Elemental or black carbon aerosols absorb solar radiation and have direct and indirect effect on radiative forcing. Unfortunately, global EC data are rather sparse. Therefore, for planetary radiative forcing calculations atmospheric EC burdens are obtained from model estimates based on energy consumptions. In this work we have attempted to evaluate a multiscale integrated model for aerosol physics, chemistry and radiative effects using measurements of EC and sulfate at two sites in New York State. The EC and sulfate concentrations were measured for January, February, July and August 2002 at Mayville, and Whiteface Mountain. Our Mayville site is located near Lake Chautauqua, ~ 100 km southwest of Buffalo and ~ 530 km upwind of Whiteface Mountain. Our observatory at Whiteface Mountain is located at an altitude of 1.5 km above mean sea level. Whereas at Mayville samples were collected daily, the duration of sampling at Whiteface Mountain varied from 6 to 48 h. The samples were analyzed for EC using the thermal optical method and sulfate by ion chromatography. The observations of elemental carbon and sulfate from Whiteface and Mayville for the summer of 2002 have been used along with other network measurements from the IMPROVE and CASTNet networks to evaluate METCHEM, a tightly coupled meteorology-chemistry model in nested simulations over the U.S. to examine the radiative impacts of absorbing and scattering aerosols. The model is being driven by a high-quality bottom-up inventory of emissions compiled by the Regional Planning Organizations for their 2002 visibility assessments, and the National Emissions Inventories compiled previously by the U.S. EPA in the years 2002 and 1999. The model was used to compare both the effects of evolving emissions, and the successive improvements in characterizing wildfire emissions in each of these inventories. Results of aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depths are compared for a 3-week test period of simulation using the

  19. An evaluation of uncertainty in the aerosol optical properties as represented by satellites and an ensemble of chemistry-climate coupled models over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Peña, Laura; Baró, Rocío; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The changes in Earth's climate are produced by forcing agents such as greenhouse gases, clouds and atmospheric aerosols. The latter modify the Earth's radiative budget due to their optical, microphysical and chemical properties, and are considered to be the most uncertain forcing agent. There are two main approaches to the study of aerosols: (1) ground-based and remote sensing observations and (2) atmospheric modelling. With the aim of characterizing the uncertainties associated with these approaches, and estimating the radiative forcing caused by aerosols, the main objective of this work is to assess the representation of aerosol optical properties by different remote sensing sensors and online-coupled chemistry-climate models and to determine whether the inclusion of aerosol radiative feedbacks in this type of models improves the modelling outputs over Europe. Two case studies have been selected under the framework of the EuMetChem COST Action ES1004, when important aerosol episodes during 2010 over Europe took place: a Russian wildfires episode and a Saharan desert dust outbreak covering most of Europe. Model data comes from an ensemble of regional air quality-climate simulations performed by the working group 2 of EuMetChem, that investigates the importance of different processes and feedbacks in on-line coupled chemistry-climate models. These simulations are run for three different configurations for each model, differing in the inclusion (or not) of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. The remote sensing data comes from three different sensors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and SeaWIFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor). The evaluation has been performed by using classical statistical metrics, comparing modelled and remotely sensed data versus a ground-based instrument network (AERONET). The evaluated variables are aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Angström exponent (AE) at

  20. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  1. The interaction of climate and glacial landforms on subsurface and surface hydrology and chemistry across a heterogeneous boreal plain landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokanson, Kelly; Carrera-Hernández, Jaime; Devito, Kevin; Mendoza, Carl

    2016-04-01

    The Boreal Plains (BP) region of Canada is experiencing high levels of anthropogenic activity and may be susceptible to climate change to various degrees. The BP is characterized by heterogeneous glacial landforms, with large contrasts in storage and transmissivity, which when coupled with wet-dry climate cycles, results in complex groundwater-surface water interactions. Predicting the impacts of land use change, climate change, and the future performance of constructed and reclaimed landscapes is currently not possible due to our limited knowledge regarding the natural variability of water table fluctuations, geochemistry, and salinity across the various glacial landforms in the BP. We compare isotopes, EC, chemistry (DOC, Ca, Mg, SO4) and water table position between a drought (2003) and a wet (2013) year to examine the interactions between climate, landform, and geology on the variation in landscape connectivity and overall salinity distribution. Data were collected from surface waters to a depth of 40 m, along a 50 km transect encompassing pond-wetland-forestland sequences across the major glacial depositional types typical of the BP (coarse textured glaciofluvial outwash, fine textured stagnant ice moraine, and lacustrine clay plain). Within each landform, sites range from isolated local flow systems to large intermediate scale flow systems. High spatial variability of water table fluctuations and salinity illustrate the strong regional controls that climate and geology exerts over scales of groundwater flow between landforms and surface water bodies across the BP, reinforcing the need to link surface water and groundwater processes when developing conceptual models. Additionally, when coupled with a strong, physical hydrogeologic conceptual model, synoptic chemical and isotopic surveys can be used to confirm scales and directions of flow; however, without an understanding of the climatic and geologic influence of the region, such data cannot be used as a

  2. Effect of volcanic aerosol on stratospheric NO2: Odin-OSIRIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Cristen; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry on the surface of volcanic stratospheric aerosols from large eruptions such as Mt. Pinatubo in 1991 has been shown to cause substantial decreases of stratospheric NO2. Here we present measurements from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (OSIRIS), which simultaneously observed wide-spread enhancements of stratospheric aerosol following several relatively minor volcanic eruptions between 2002 and 2014, along with coincident depletion of stratospheric NO2. OSIRIS stratospheric NO2 partial columns for ~3-7 km above the tropopause were found to be smaller than baseline levels during these aerosol enhancements by up to ~60%. Correlations with measurements from MIPAS are also used to show that this is consistent with heterogeneous chemistry on the surface of volcanic aerosols.

  3. Element composition of insoluble fraction of aerosols in snow in the vicinity of oil chemistry refinery (Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan) and petrochemical plant (Tomsk City, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talovskaya, Anna V.; Filimonenko, Ekaterina A.; Yazikov, Egor G.; Shakhova, Tatyana S.; Parygina, Irina A.

    2015-11-01

    Tomsk petrochemical plant (Russia) and Pavlodar oil chemistry refinery (Kazakhstan) are the sources of air contamination in Tomsk and Pavlodar respectively. Therefore, it is very important to study the level of air contamination with particulate matter as well as ultimate composition of these particles. Disposable solid particles fall out to the snow cover, so snow is an accumulator of the particles. The article deals with the study results of dust load and concentrations of Br, Sb, La, Ce, Sm and Nd in insoluble fraction of aerosols in snow in the vicinity of Pavlodar oil chemistry refinery and Tomsk petrochemical plant. The instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the ultimate composition detection. Results were shown that the dust load in the vicinity of Tomsk petrochemical plant is higher than in Pavlodar. We have detected high concentrations of La, Br and Sm in insoluble fraction of aerosols in snow in the vicinity of Pavlodar refinery and high concentrations of Sb and Ce in Tomsk. Moreover, we have detected high Br concentration in insoluble fraction of aerosols in snow of the vicinity of both plants. Gas burning on the flares of these enterprises is likely a potential source of Br. La to light lanthanoids ratio have shown La is of anthropogenic origin. In addition, enrichment factor estimation reflects an anthropogenic origin of La, Sm, Br, Ce and Sb as well. These elements might be emitted from different production facilities of the plants.

  4. Aerosol chemistry in Beijing, China: Different pollution regimes and diurnal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Iinuma, Y.; Müller, K.; Nowak, A.; Achtert, P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2009-04-01

    influence of meteorology on the PM pollution was observed: The highest concentrations of both PM mass and particle constituents were measured when sampled air masses originated south of Beijing and moved over the area with low wind speeds. During such periods, a strong increase of daytime concentrations of the secondary ions sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and also some dicarboxylic acids could be observed. The comparison of a suburban sampling site to an urban one revealed a clear influence of urban emissions on top of the regional pollution level for a period with relatively stagnant meteorological conditions and high photochemical processing. In contrast, during measurement periods with higher wind speeds and different air mass origins, the concentration levels of particulate pollutants were basically the same at the two sites. During an intensive period, a strong diurnal variation of particle sulfate concentration with increasing values from morning to afternoon was observed, which could be attributed to regional production. Similar observations where made for oxalic acid. Generally, water soluble organic carbon concentrations were enhanced by a factor of 2 in fine particles during the studied period of intense photochemistry. Elemental carbon, alkanes, and PAHs showed clear nighttime concentration maxima obviously due to enhanced emissions and a relatively low mixing volume during night. For the newly studied compound group of nitrooxy-organosulfates qualitative data can be presented indicating an influence of night-time chemistry and/or anthropogenic activities on their concentrations. The investigation of an intense nucleation and particle growth event revealed that the youngest particles largely consist of ammonium sulfate and primary carbonaceous material, with a possible contribution of secondary organic compounds.

  5. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot and TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Setyan, A; Sauvain, J-J; Rossi, M J

    2009-08-01

    Six gases [N(CH(3))(3), NH(2)OH, CF(3)COOH, HCl, NO(2) and O(3)] were selected to probe the surface of seven different types of combustion aerosol samples (amorphous carbon, flame soot) and three types of TiO(2) nanoparticles using heterogeneous, i.e. gas-surface reactions. The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions in a Knudsen flow reactor and expressed as a density of surface functional groups on a particular aerosol, namely acidic (carboxylic) and basic (conjugated oxides such as pyrone, N-heterocycle and amine) sites, carbonyl (R(1)-C(O)-R(2)) and oxidizable (olefinic, -OH) groups. The limit of detection was generally well below 1% of a formal monolayer of adsorbed probe gas. With few exceptions most investigated aerosol samples interacted with all probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as acidic and basic groups. Generally, the carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences in surface group density: Printex 60 amorphous carbon had the lowest density of surface functional groups throughout, whereas Diesel soot recovered from a Diesel particulate filter had the largest. The presence of basic oxides on carbonaceous aerosol particles was inferred from the ratio of uptakes of CF(3)COOH and HCl owing to the larger stability of the acetate compared to the chloride counterion in the resulting pyrylium salt. Both soots generated from a rich and a lean hexane diffusion flame had a large density of oxidizable groups similar to amorphous carbon FS 101. TiO(2) 15 had the lowest density of functional groups studied for all probe gases among the three TiO(2) nanoparticles despite the smallest size of its primary particles. The technique used enabled the measurement of the uptake probability of the probe gases on the various supported aerosol samples. The initial uptake probability, gamma(0), of the probe gas onto the supported

  6. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  7. Fine mode aerosol chemistry over a rural atmosphere near the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Anandamay; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted on the chemical characterization of fine mode aerosol or PM2.5 over a rural atmosphere near the coast of Bay of Bengal in eastern India. Samples were collected and analyzed during March 2013 - February 2014. The concentration of PM2.5 was found span over a wide range from as low as 3 µg m-3 to as high as 180 µg m-3. The average concentration of PM2.5 was 62 µg m-3. Maximum accumulation of fine mode aerosol was observed during winter whereas minimum was observed during monsoon. Water soluble ionic species of fine mode aerosol were characterized over this rural atmosphere. In spite of being situated near the coast of Bay of Bengal, we observed significantly higher concentrations for anthropogenic species like ammonium and sulphate. The concentrations of these two species were much higher than the sea-salt aerosols. Ammonium and sulphate contributed around 30 % to the total fine mode aerosols. Even dust aerosol species like calcium also showed higher concentrations. Chloride to sodium ratio was found to be much less than that in standard sea-water indicating strong interaction between sea-salt and anthropogenic aerosols. Use of fertilizers in various crop fields and human and animal wastes significantly increased ammonium in fine mode aerosols. Dust aerosol species were accumulated in the atmosphere which could be due to transport of finer dust species from nearby metropolis or locally generated. Non-sea-sulphate and nitrate showed significant contributions in fine mode aerosols having both local and transported sources. Source apportionment shows prominent emission sources of anthropogenic aerosols from local anthropogenic activities and transported from nearby Kolkata metropolis as well.

  8. “Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model”

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challengi...

  9. "Investigation of Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America Using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model"

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radi...

  10. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot from a diesel engine at a particular running condition.

    PubMed

    Tapia, A; Salgado, M S; Martín, M P; Sánchez-Valdepeñas, J; Rossi, M J; Cabañas, B

    2015-04-01

    Two gases, O3 and NO2, were selected to probe the surface of a diesel fuel combustion aerosol sample, diesel soot, and amorphous carbon nanoparticles (PRINTEX XE2-B) using heterogeneous (i.e., gas-surface reactions). The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions using a Knudsen flow reactor in order to quantify and characterize surface functional groups. Specifically, O3 and NO2 are used for the titration of oxidizable groups. Diesel soot samples interacted with the probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as reduced groups. The carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences: PRINTEX XE2-B amorphous carbon had a significantly lower surface functional group density of both total and strongly reducing groups despite its significantly larger internal surface area, compared to diesel soot. The uptake kinetics of the gas-phase probe molecules (uptake probabilities) were also measured in order to obtain further information on the reactivity of emitted soot aerosols in order to enable the potential prediction of health effects. PMID:24807246

  11. Sensitivity of Tropospheric Chemical Composition to Halogen-Radical Chemistry Using a Fully Coupled Size-Resolved Multiphase Chemistry-Global Climate System: Halogen Distributions, Aerosol Composition, and Sensitivity of Climate-Relevant Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Long, M.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, Richard C.; Sander, Rolf; Liu, Xiaohong; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

    2014-04-07

    Observations and model studies suggest a significant but highly non-linear role for halogens, primarily Cl and Br, in multiphase atmospheric processes relevant to tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, radiative transfer, weather, and climate. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was tested using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry/global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM); v3.6.33). Simulation results showed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. The simulation reproduced most available observations with reasonable confidence permitting the formulation of potential mechanisms for several previously unexplained halogen phenomena including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol, and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile Br mixing ratios were generally high in the troposphere. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrated a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC’s) to halogen cycling. Simulated O3 and NOx were globally lower (65% and 35%, respectively, less in the planetary boundary layer based on median values) in simulations that included halogens. Globally, little impact was seen in SO2 and non-sea-salt SO42- processing due to halogens. Significant regional differences were evident: The lifetime of nss-SO42- was extended downwind of large sources of SO2. The burden and lifetime of DMS (and its oxidation products) were lower by a factor of 5 in simulations that included halogens, versus those without, leading to a 20

  12. Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Navarro-González, R.; Szopa, C.; Poch, O.; Ramírez, S. I.; Coscia, D.; Raulin, F.; Cabane, M.; Buch, A.; Israël, G.

    2013-03-01

    The first results obtained by the ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe revealed that the main products obtained after thermolysis of Titan's collected aerosols, were ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Titan's aerosols, and their laboratory analogues named tholins, have been the subject of experimental or theoretical studies during the last four decades. These studies have been mainly devoted to understanding their origin and formation mechanisms, their physical, chemical and optical properties, and their role in the radiative equilibrium of the satellite. Before the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens mission, the dense layer of aerosols hid many aspects of the satellite's surface and precious information about its composition. If Titan's aerosols have been in the eye and mind of planetary scientists during such a long time, it is not surprising that a literature survey displays a good quantity of papers on aerosol analogues. With aerosol analogues we mean any material produced in a terrestrial laboratory under conditions that try to represent those of Titan's atmosphere. We present here a study aimed to understand the particularities of aerosol analogues synthesized in different laboratories around the world in order to determine some of their most representative chemical fingerprints and in some cases, to perform a direct comparison of the volatiles produced after a thermal treatment done in conditions similar to the ones used by the ACP experiment. From the information collected, we propose a broad classification of aerosol analogues highlighting the materials that can be more representative of Titan's aerosols in terms of their content of organic volatiles. We identify the laboratory analogs that best suit the ACP results; such identification is of prime importance to correctly predict the optical properties of Titan's aerosol and to accurately estimate their contribution in radiative equilibrium models and/or to assess their role in chemical reactions of

  13. Aerosol Chemistry from the Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans: Results from the CLIVAR/Repeat Hydrography Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. S.; Landing, W. M.; Resing, J. A.; Buck, N.; Lam, P.; Ohnemus, D.

    2008-12-01

    Daily-integrated aerosol samples were collected on CLIVAR/Repeat Hydrography cruises from 2003-2006 using a bow-mounted sector-controlled aerosol sampling system. In addition, a Micro-Orifice Deposit Impactor (MODI) was deployed to provide size-fractionated aerosol samples. The goals of this research were to measure the concentration and solubility of aerosol Fe and other trace elements, to estimate their deposition to the oceans, and to study the factors responsible for creating soluble aerosol trace elements. Aerosol filters were leached with 100 mL of either 0.2 um filtered surface seawater (pH 8.2) or unacidified ultrapure water (pH 5.6). The seawater filtrates were analyzed for soluble Fe(II) by the FeLume chemiluminescent method and for total dissolved Fe using ion-exchange column chromatography and isotope dilution ICP-MS. Ultrapure water filtrates were analyzed for soluble major anions and soluble oxalate by ion chromatography, as well as soluble Fe and other elements by ICP-MS. Replicate aerosol filters were analyzed at NOAA/PMEL for total Fe (and other elements) by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and using synchrotron radiation (XANES) at the Brookhaven synchrotron (NSLS). Air-mass back trajectory analysis was conducted using the NOAA/HYSPLIT model. Rainfall samples were also collected to quantify the fraction of soluble aerosol Fe and other trace elements using ICP-MS. These data are used to discuss the sources, transport, and deposition of soluble and total aerosol trace elements and major ions. Samples from the North Atlantic include those impacted by anthropogenic emissions and the Saharan dust plume. Samples from the Pacific Ocean (including samples from the South Pacific and the Southern Ocean) illustrate the influences of anthropogenic emissions and mineral dust from Asia and Australia, and the extremely low aerosol loads found south of the equator.

  14. Remote Sensing of Glyoxal as a New Atmospheric Tracer for VOC Chemistry and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Shirley, T.; Lesher, R.; Brune, W.; Dzepina, K.; Jimenez, J.

    2004-12-01

    Air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is intimately linked with the photochemical transformation of primary pollutants like VOC (volatile organic compounds) and NOx, which gives rise to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and their associated adverse effects on human health. As part of the field campaign held in the MCMA in April/May 2003, state-of-the-art measurement techniques including open-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), spectroradiometry, Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) were located at the National Center for Environmental Research and Training (CENICA) in Mexico City to characterize the gas-phase and aerosol-phase composition of relevance to the formation of ozone and SOA. A first-ever spectroscopic detection of glyoxal (DOAS) in the atmosphere is described. Glyoxal is shown to be a very useful new photochemical tracer for the chemistry of VOC. The time-resolved glyoxal measurements reveal a very efficient VOC oxidation process during morning hours, which is found to be relevant for overall smog formation later in the day. In combination with measurements of the radical precursor substances HONO, HCHO, ozone (DOAS), their respective J-values (spectroradiometry), OH- and HO2-radical concentrations (LIF), speciated aromatic hydrocarbons (DOAS) and chemical composition of the aerosol phase (AMS), the glyoxal data enables assessment of the role of VOC oxidation in the formation of secondary pollutants in the gas- and aerosol-phase by placing a lower limit on the extend of VOC turnover.

  15. Major element chemistry of ocean island basalts — Conditions of mantle melting and heterogeneity of mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Jackson, Matthew G.; Lee, Cin-Ty A.

    2010-01-01

    We estimate average compositions of near-primary, 'reference' ocean island basalts (OIBs) for 120 volcanic centers from 31 major island groups and constrain the depth of lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at the time of volcanism and the possible depth of melt-mantle equilibration based on recently calibrated melt silica activity barometer. The LAB depth versus fractionation corrected OIB compositions (lava compositions, X, corrected to Mg# 73, X OIB#73, i.e., magmas in equilibrium with Fo 90, if olivine is present in the mantle source) show an increased major element compositional variability with increasing LAB depths. OIBs erupted on lithospheres < 40 km thick approach the compositions (e.g. SiO 2#73, TiO 2#73, [CaO/Al 2O 3] #73) of primitive ridge basalts and are influenced strongly by depth and extent of shallow melting. However, X OIB#73 on thicker lithospheres cannot be explained by melt-mantle equilibration as shallow as LAB. Melt generation from a somewhat deeper (up to 50 km deeper than the LAB) peridotite source can explain the OIB major element chemistry on lithospheres ≤ 70 km. However, deeper melting of volatile-free, fertile peridotite is not sufficient to explain the end member primary OIBs on ≥ 70 km thick lithospheres. Comparison between X OIB#73 and experimental partial melts of fertile peridotite indicates that at least two additional melt components need to be derived from OIB source regions. The first component, similar to that identified in HIMU lavas, is characterized by low SiO 2#73, Al 2O 3#73, [Na 2O/TiO 2] #73, and high FeO* #73, CaO #73, [CaO/Al 2O 3] #73. The second component, similar to that found in Hawaiian Koolau lavas, is characterized by high SiO 2#73, moderately high FeO* #73, and low CaO #73 and Al 2O 3#73. These two components are not evenly sampled by all the islands, suggesting a heterogeneous distribution of mantle components that generate them. We suggest that carbonated eclogite and volatile-free, silica

  16. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  17. Impact of geoengineered aerosols on the troposphere and stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tilmes, S.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Gettelman, A.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2009-06-27

    A coupled chemistry climate model, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model was used to perform a transient climate simulation to quantify the impact of geoengineered aerosols on atmospheric processes. In contrast to previous model studies, the impact on stratospheric chemistry, including heterogeneous chemistry in the polar regions, is considered in this simulation. In the geoengineering simulation, a constant stratospheric distribution of volcanic-sized, liquid sulfate aerosols is imposed in the period 2020–2050, corresponding to an injection of 2 Tg S/a. The aerosol cools the troposphere compared to a baseline simulation. Assuming an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B emission scenario, global warming is delayed by about 40 years in the troposphere with respect to the baseline scenario. Large local changes of precipitation and temperatures may occur as a result of geoengineering. Comparison with simulations carried out with the Community Atmosphere Model indicates the importance of stratospheric processes for estimating the impact of stratospheric aerosols on the Earth’s climate. Changes in stratospheric dynamics and chemistry, especially faster heterogeneous reactions, reduce the recovery of the ozone layer in middle and high latitudes for the Southern Hemisphere. In the geoengineering case, the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole is delayed by about 30 years on the basis of this model simulation. For the Northern Hemisphere, a onefold to twofold increase of the chemical ozone depletion occurs owing to a simulated stronger polar vortex and colder temperatures compared to the baseline simulation, in agreement with observational estimates.

  18. Investigation of Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America Using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating tropospheric aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects in conjunction with verification of their simulated radiative effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in orde...

  19. Prebiotic chemistry on Titan ? The nature of Titan's aerosols and their potential evolution at the satellite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P. J.; Poch, O.; Ramirez, S. I.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Raulin, F.

    2010-12-01

    How may Titan's aerosols interact with Titan's surface after settling down in the atmosphere ? Could they play the role of bio-precursors ? A laboratory study based on the chemical transformation that Titan’s aerosol analogues suffer when placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite was performed. In order to understand the role that aqueous ammonia may play on the chemical transformation of atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we synthesized laboratory analogues of Titan’s aerosols from a N2:CH4 (98:2) mixture irradiated at low temperatures under a continuous flow regime by a cold plasma discharge of 180 W. The analogues were recovered, partitioned in several 10.0 mg samples and placed inside different ammonia concentrations during 10 weeks at temperatures as low as those reported for Titan’s surface. After a derivatization process performed to the aerosols’ refractory phase with MTBSTFA in DMF, the products were identified and quantified using a GC-MS system. We found derived residues related to amino acids as well as urea. Our results have important astrobiological implications to Titan’s environment particularly if the existence of the suggested subsurface water-ammonia mixture and its deposition on the satellite’s surface is validated. This paper will also deal with more general discussions : we will especially emphasize what we learn about Titan’s aerosol nature from Space Exploration (especially ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe) and more globally on aerosol fate in Titan’s environment, and what we learn about Titan’s aerosol nature from laboratory studies (characterization of aerosol analogues, aka tholins) Illustration of the chemical evolution of Titan’s tholins in NH4OH neutralizing solution : depending of the group nature (-R) of some tholins components the name of the resulting amino-acid obtained after NH4OH hydrolysis is listed at the bottom of the figure.

  20. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  1. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  2. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ∼30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  3. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a 3-D Lagrangian chemistry transport model using the reduced Common Representative Intermediates mechanism (CRI v2-R5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utembe, S. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Archibald, A. T.; Shallcross, D. E.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.

    2011-03-01

    A secondary organic aerosol (SOA) code, coupled to the reduced Common Representative Intermediates chemical mechanism (CRI v2-R5), has been used in the global 3-D chemistry-transport model, STOCHEM, to simulate the global distribution of organic aerosol (OA) mass loadings. The SOA code represents the gas-to-aerosol partitioning of products formed over several generations of oxidation of a variety of organic precursors emitted from anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources. The model also includes emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA), based on the AeroCom inventory and the Global Fire Emissions database (GFED). The calculated burdens for POA, 0.89 Tg, and SOA, 0.23 Tg, are well within the range of values that have been reported in previous modelling studies. The calculated SOA annual in-situ production of 22.5 Tg yr -1 also falls within the 8-110 Tg yr -1 range calculated by other models, but is somewhat lower than observationally-constrained top-down estimates which have been reported recently. The oxidation of biogenic precursors is found to account for about 90% of the global SOA burden, and this makes a substantial contribution to the highest annual mean surface OA concentrations (up to 8 μg m -3), which are simulated in tropical forested regions. Comparison of the simulated OA mass loadings with surface observations from a variety of locations indicate a good description of the OA distribution, but with an average underestimation of about a factor of 3. Sustained formation of SOA into the free troposphere is simulated, with important contributions from second and third-generation products of terpene oxidation in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the simulated OA mass loadings with vertical profiles from the ACE-Asia campaign indicates a very good description of the relative variation of OA with altitude, but with consistent underestimation of about a factor of 5. Although the absolute magnitude of the global source strength is underestimated

  4. Impact of resolution on aerosol radiative feedbacks with in online-coupled chemistry/climate simulations (WRF-Chem) for EURO-CORDEX compliant domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Romero, Jose Maria; Baró, Rocío; Palacios-Peña, Laura; Jerez, Sonia; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Montávez, Juan Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that a high spatial resolution in atmospheric model runs improves the simulation of some meteorological variables, such as precipitation, particularly extreme events and in regions with complex orography [1]. However, increasing model spatial resolution makes the computational time rise exponentially. Hence, very high resolution experiments on large domains can hamper the execution of climatic runs. This problem shoots up when using online-coupled chemistry climate models, making a careful evaluation of improvements versus costs mandatory. Under this umbrella, the objective of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative feedbacks from online-coupled chemistry regional model simulations to the spatial resolution. For that, the WRF-Chem [2] model is used for a case study to simulate the episode occurring between July 25th and August 15th of 2010. It is characterized by a high loading of atmospheric aerosol particles coming mainly from wildfires over large European regions (Russia, Iberian Peninsula). Three spatial resolutions are used defined for Euro-Cordex compliant domains [3]: 0.44°, 0.22° and 0.11°. Anthropogenic emissions come from TNO databases [4]. The analysis focuses on air quality variables (mainly PM10, PM2.5), meteorological variables (temperature, radiation) and other aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth). The CPU time ratio for the different domains is 1 (0.44°), 4(0.22°) and 28(0.11°) (normalized times). Comparison among simulations and observations are analyzed. Preliminary results show the difficulty to justify the much larger computational cost of high-resolution experiments when comparing with observations from a meteorological point of view, despite the finer spatio-temporal detail of the obtained pollutant fields. [1] Prein, A. F. (2014, December). Precipitation in the EURO-CORDEX 0.11° and 0.44° simulations: high resolution, high benefits?. In AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (Vol

  5. The role of sea-salt emissions and heterogeneous chemistry in the air quality of polluted coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Tombrou, M.; Pandis, S. N.; Russell, A. G.

    2008-02-01

    Open-ocean and surf-zone sea-salt aerosol (SSA) emissions algorithms are incorporated in the CAMx aerosol model and applied over an area with an extended Archipelago (Greece), with a fine grid nested over the highly populated Attica peninsula. The maximum indirect impact of SSA on PM10 mass (35%) is located over a marine area with moderate SSA production and elevated shipping emissions (central Aegean Sea) where SSA interacts with anthropogenic nitric acid forming sodium nitrate. SSA increases PM10 levels in the Athens city center up to 27% during stable onshore winds. Under such conditions both open-ocean and surf-zone mechanisms contribute to aerosol production over Attica. A hybrid scheme for gas-to-particle mass transfer is necessary for accurately simulating semi-volatile aerosol components when coarse SSA is included. Dynamically simulating mass transfer to the coarse particles leads to a quadrupling of predicted PM10 nitrate in the Athens city center and up to two orders of magnitude in its coarse mass in comparison to using a bulk equilibrium approach.

  6. The role of sea-salt emissions and heterogeneous chemistry in the air quality of polluted coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Tombrou, M.; Pandis, S. N.; Russell, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Open-ocean and surf-zone sea-salt aerosol (SSA) emission parameterizations are incorporated in the CAMx aerosol model and applied over an area with an extended Archipelago (Greece), with a fine grid nested over the highly populated Attica peninsula. The maximum indirect impact of SSA on PM10 mass (35%) is located over a marine area with moderate SSA production and elevated shipping emissions (central Aegean Sea) where SSA interacts with anthropogenic nitric acid forming sodium nitrate. SSA increases PM10 levels in the Athens city center up to 25% during stable onshore winds. Under such conditions both open-ocean and surf-zone mechanisms contribute to aerosol production over Attica. A hybrid scheme for gas-to-particle mass transfer is necessary for accurately simulating semi-volatile aerosol components when coarse SSA is included. Dynamically simulating mass transfer to the coarse particles leads to a quadrupling of predicted PM10 nitrate in the Athens city center and up to two orders of magnitude in its coarse mass in comparison to using a bulk equilibrium approach.

  7. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  8. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  9. Investigating the links between ozone and organic aerosol chemistry in a biomass burning plume from a prescribed fire in California chaparral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Akagi, S. K.; Coe, H.; Craven, J. S.; Fischer, E. V.; McMeeking, G. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Soni, T.; Taylor, J. W.; Weise, D. R.; Wold, C. E.

    2015-06-01

    Within minutes after emission, complex photochemistry in biomass burning smoke plumes can cause large changes in the concentrations of ozone (O3) and organic aerosol (OA). Being able to understand and simulate this rapid chemical evolution under a wide variety of conditions is a critical part of forecasting the impact of these fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, and climate. Here we use version 2.1 of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP) to simulate the evolution of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) within a young biomass burning smoke plume from the Williams prescribed fire in chaparral, which was sampled over California in November 2009. We demonstrate the use of a method for simultaneously accounting for the impact of the unidentified intermediate volatility, semi-volatile, and extremely low volatility organic compounds (here collectively called "SVOCs") on the formation of OA (using the Volatility Basis Set - VBS) and O3 (using the concept of mechanistic reactivity). We show that this method can successfully simulate the observations of O3, OA, NOx, ethylene (C2H4), and OH to within measurement uncertainty using reasonable assumptions about the average chemistry of the unidentified SVOCs. These assumptions were (1) a reaction rate constant with OH of ~ 10-11 cm3 s-1; (2) a significant fraction (up to ~ 50 %) of the RO2 + NO reaction resulted in fragmentation, rather than functionalization, of the parent SVOC; (3) ~ 1.1 molecules of O3 were formed for every molecule of SVOC that reacted; (4) ~ 60 % of the OH that reacted with the unidentified non-methane organic compounds (NMOC) was regenerated as HO2; and (5) that ~ 50 % of the NO that reacted with the SVOC peroxy radicals was lost, presumably to organic nitrate formation. Additional evidence for the fragmentation pathway is provided by the observed rate of formation of acetic acid (CH3COOH), which is consistent with our assumed fragmentation rate. However, the model overestimates peroxyacetyl

  10. Organic composition of PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols and their sources during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Raphaël T.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Zika, Rod G.

    PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols were collected in May 2002 as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA. Aerosol organic composition was used to estimate sources of a series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using chemical indices, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and a chemical mass balance receptor model (CMB). Aerosols were collected on quartz fiber filters (QFF) using a PM 2.5 high volume sampler and on aluminum foil discs using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI, 50% aerodynamic cut diameters were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.315 and 0.171 μm). Target compounds included alkanes and PAHs and were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane, acetone and hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The target compounds in PM 2.5 were dominated by six sources during the study period: mobile sources (39±5%), coal burning (33±5%), biogenic primary emission (20±2%), oil combustion (5±2%), biomass burning (1.0±0.3%) and an unidentified source (3±2%). Results obtained from the chemical indices, HCA and CMB were in very good agreement with each other. PAH size distributions are presented for days dominated by a same source. Seventy-five percent and 50% of the PAH were found below 1.8 and 0.56 μm, respectively (monthly PAH geometric diameters averaged 0.43 μm). Coarse size PAHs were observed on 1 day (15 May) and were correlated with nitrate and sodium size distribution. It is hypothesized that the PAHs, sodium and nitrate were internally mixed and that the PAHs deposited onto a pre-existing marine aerosol. This transfer process has significant implications for PAH deposition and lifetime and warrants further study.

  11. A Transition from a Traditional to a Project-Like Physical Chemistry Laboratory via a Heterogeneous Catalysis Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldwasser, M. R.; Leal, O.

    1979-01-01

    Outlines an approach for instruction in a physical chemistry laboratory which combines traditional and project-like experiments. An outline of laboratory experiments and examples of project-like experiments are included. (BT)

  12. Balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO and ozone - Implications for heterogeneous chemistry and mid-latitude ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Brune, W. H.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dessler, A. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine oxide (ClO) obtained on 31 March 1991 with a new balloon-borne instrument are compared to results from a photochemical model which incorporates hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols. With the addition of this process, there is better agreement between calculation and measurement over most of the profile, except below 20 km where observed ClO is greater by as much as a factor of four. In a model which is constrained to reproduce the observed ClO below 20 km, ozone loss by catalytic cycles involving halogen oxides becomes larger than that from NO(x), which would dominate under gas-phase or standard heterogeneous conditions.

  13. A consistent prescription of stratospheric aerosol for both radiation and chemistry in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds Neely, Ryan, III; Conley, Andrew J.; Vitt, Francis; Lamarque, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    Here we describe an updated parameterization for prescribing stratospheric aerosol in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model (CESM1). The need for a new parameterization is motivated by the poor response of the CESM1 (formerly referred to as the Community Climate System Model, version 4, CCSM4) simulations contributed to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) to colossal volcanic perturbations to the stratospheric aerosol layer (such as the 1991 Pinatubo eruption or the 1883 Krakatau eruption) in comparison to observations. In particular, the scheme used in the CMIP5 simulations by CESM1 simulated a global mean surface temperature decrease that was inconsistent with the GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP), NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, and the Hadley Centre of the UK Met Office (HADCRUT4). The new parameterization takes advantage of recent improvements in historical stratospheric aerosol databases to allow for variations in both the mass loading and size of the prescribed aerosol. An ensemble of simulations utilizing the old and new schemes shows CESM1's improved response to the 1991 Pinatubo eruption. Most significantly, the new scheme more accurately simulates the temperature response of the stratosphere due to local aerosol heating. Results also indicate that the new scheme decreases the global mean temperature response to the 1991 Pinatubo eruption by half of the observed temperature change, and modelled climate variability precludes statements as to the significance of this change.

  14. A 3D-CTM with detailed online PSC microphysics: Heterogeneous chemistry and comparison with CALIPSO satellite observations during Antarctic winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscardy, S.; Errera, Q.; Pitts, M. C.; Daerden, F.

    2012-04-01

    A 3-D Chemical Transport Model (CTM), with full stratospheric chemistry and driven by the ECMWF temperature and wind fields, is coupled to the PSC microphysical model PSCBox. This interactively describes the formation and evolution of four types of PSC particles (STS, SAT, NAT, and ice) through relevant microphysical processes. The number density and composition of each type of particles are computed for a binned size distribution. As a result, the calculation of surface area densities is accurately performed, of which the computation of the heterogeneous reaction constants takes advantage. The explicit computation of the particle size distributions allows obtaining the same optical properties as those measured by CALIPSO. Hence, the evolution of PSC coverage and composition will be studied and compared to the CALIPSO observations during Antarctic winters. The relationship between the presence of PSCs and the heterogeneous chemistry will also be investigated. In particular, two issues will be considered: (i) how the ozone depletion is related to the PSC coverage, and (ii) how each PSC particle type contributes to the chlorine activation.

  15. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of γPAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas γH2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  16. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  17. Investigating the links between ozone and organic aerosol chemistry in a biomass burning plume from a prescribed fire in California chaparral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Akagi, S. K.; Coe, H.; Craven, J. S.; Fischer, E. V.; McMeeking, G. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Soni, T.; Taylor, J. W.; Weise, D. R.; Wold, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Within minutes after emission, rapid, complex photochemistry within a biomass burning smoke plume can cause large changes in the concentrations of ozone (O3) and organic aerosol (OA). Being able to understand and simulate this rapid chemical evolution under a wide variety of conditions is a critical part of forecasting the impact of these fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, and climate. Here we use version 2.1 of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP) to simulate the evolution of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) within a young biomass burning smoke plume from the Williams prescribed burn in chaparral, which was sampled over California in November 2009. We demonstrate the use of a method for simultaneously accounting for the impact of the unidentified semi-volatile to extremely low volatility organic compounds (here collectively called "SVOCs") on the formation of OA (using the Volatility Basis Set) and O3 (using the concept of mechanistic reactivity). We show that this method can successfully simulate the observations of O3, OA, PAN, NOx, and C2H4 to within measurement uncertainty using reasonable assumptions about the chemistry of the unidentified SVOCs. These assumptions were: (1) a~reaction rate constant with OH of ~10-11cm3s-1, (2) a significant fraction (~50%) of the RO2 + NO reaction resulted in fragmentation, rather than functionalization, of the parent SVOC, (3) ~1.1 molecules of O3 were formed for every molecule of SVOC that reacted, (4) ~60% of the OH that reacted with the unidentified SVOCs was regenerated as HO2, and (5) that ~50% of the NO that reacted with the SVOC peroxy radicals was lost, presumably to organic nitrate formation. Additional evidence for the fragmentation pathway is provided by the observed rate of formation of acetic acid, which is consistent with our assumed fragmentation rate. This method could provide a way for classifying different smoke plume observations in terms of the average chemistry of their SVOCs, and could

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MEASURED WATER VAPOR GROWTH AND CHEMISTRY OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL FOR GRAND CANYON, ARIZONA, IN WINTER 1990.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Size-resolved aerosol growth measurements (growth = moist particle diameter/dry particle diameter) and chemical composition monitoring were conducted during a 3 month period in the winter of 1990 at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ as part of the Navajo Generating ...

  19. Observations of Ozone-aerosol Correlated Behaviour in the Lower Stratosphere During the EASOE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digirolamo, P.; Cacciani, M.; Disarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Fua, D.; Joergensen, T. S.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.

    1992-01-01

    The question of possible interactions between ozone and stratospheric aerosol has been open for a long time. Measurements carried out after the Mt. Agung and El Chicon eruptions showed evidence of negative correlations between the presence of volcanic stratospheric aerosols and ozone concentration. Evidence for negative correlations in the polar winter has been also found. It is only after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole that catalytic effects related to low temperature heterogeneous chemistry have become the object of much investigation, now extended to the role of volcanic aerosol in the ozone reduction. These phenomena can be the object of various interpretations, not mutually exclusive, including the effect of transport, diffuse radiation as well as heterogeneous chemistry. The present paper provides preliminary results of simultaneous measurements of ozone and aerosol, carried out at Thule, Greenland, during the winter 1991-92. The European Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) was aimed at monitoring the winter Arctic stratosphere in order to obtain a deeper insight of the ozone destruction processes taking place in the polar regions. A large amount of aerosol was injected into the lower stratosphere by the recent eruption of Volcano Pinatubo. A lidar system, already operational in Thule since November 1990, has provided detailed measurements of the stratospheric aerosol concentration during EASOE. In the same period, a large number of ozonesondes were launched. Although no PSC formation was detected over Thule, the simultaneous measurement of the stratospheric aerosol and ozone profiles give the possibility to study interactions occurring in the stratosphere between these two constituents.

  20. Global Radiative Forcing of Coupled Tropospheric Ozone and Aerosols in a Unified General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.; Adams, Peter J.; Mickley, Loretta J.

    2008-01-01

    Global simulations of sea salt and mineral dust aerosols are integrated into a previously developed unified general circulation model (GCM), the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM II', that simulates coupled tropospheric ozone-NOx-hydrocarbon chemistry and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, and secondary organic carbon aerosols. The fully coupled gas-aerosol unified GCM allows one to evaluate the extent to which global burdens, radiative forcing, and eventually climate feedbacks of ozone and aerosols are influenced by gas-aerosol chemical interactions. Estimated present-day global burdens of sea salt and mineral dust are 6.93 and 18.1 Tg with lifetimes of 0.4 and 3.9 days, respectively. The GCM is applied to estimate current top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone and all natural and anthropogenic aerosol components. The global annual mean value of the radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone is estimated to be +0.53 W m(sup -2) at TOA and +0.07 W m(sup -2) at the Earth's surface. Global, annual average TOA and surface radiative forcing by all aerosols are estimated as -0.72 and -4.04 W m(sup -2), respectively. While the predicted highest aerosol cooling and heating at TOA are -10 and +12 W m(sup -2) respectively, surface forcing can reach values as high as -30 W m(sup -2), mainly caused by the absorption by black carbon, mineral dust, and OC. We also estimate the effects of chemistry-aerosol coupling on forcing estimates based on currently available understanding of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols. Through altering the burdens of sulfate, nitrate, and ozone, heterogeneous reactions are predicted to change the global mean TOA forcing of aerosols by 17% and influence global mean TOA forcing of tropospheric ozone by 15%.

  1. Heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanism of the nitration of aerosolized protein by O3 and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Sosedova, Yulia; Rouvière, Aurélie; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    The effects of air pollution on allergic diseases are not yet well-understood. Proteins contained in biogenic aerosol particles (pollen, spores, bacteria, etc.), which accounts for up to 5% of urban air particulate matter, are efficiently nitrated in polluted environments before inhalation and deposition in the human respiratory tract [1], which is likely to trigger immune reactions for allergies. Proteins undergo a nitration reaction that leads to the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine residues. The kinetics and reaction mechanism of protein nitration are still largely unknown. The kinetics of nitration of protein particles by O3 and NO2 was measured using the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N. The routine for the online production of 13N-labeled nitrogen dioxide and the main experimental setup were reported previously [2]. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein compound. Deliquesced NaCl particles were also used as a reference. Particles generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer were mixed with O3 (0 - 150 ppb) and NO2 (5 - 100 ppb) in a flow tube reactor under humid conditions (30 - 75 % RH), which lead to gel-like swelling of the protein [3, 4]. The reaction time was varied in the range of 4 -10 min by changing the position of the inlet of the reactor. The surface concentration of particles was monitored by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). After passing through the flow tube reactor, the gas and aerosol flow entered a narrow parallel-plate diffusion denuder coated to selectively absorb gas phase NO2, followed by a particle filter collecting the particles. The γ detectors were attached to each denuders and the filter to count the amount of gamma quanta, which are emitted in the decay of 13N. From the count-rate, the concentration of the corresponding species was derived, which was used for the calculation of uptake coefficients of NO2 (γNO2). In absence of O3 in the flow tube reactor, NO2 uptake by both BSA and deliquesced NaCl were below the

  2. PREP-CHEM-SRC - 1.0: a preprocessor of trace gas and aerosol emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; Pirre, M.; Marecal, V.; Grell, G.; Stockler, R.; Mello, R. F.; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2011-05-01

    The preprocessor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emission fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in atmospheric-chemistry transport models. The considered emissions are from the most recent databases of urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources. For biomass burning, emissions can be also estimated directly from satellite fire detections using a fire emission model included in the tool. The preprocessor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The inclusion of these emissions in transport models is also presented. The preprocessor is coded using Fortran90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the databases.

  3. Study of atmospheric aerosol processing using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, O.; Grassian, V. H.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols undergo aging and heterogeneous chemistry as they are transported through the atmosphere. This leads to changes in their properties and their effects on climate, biogeochemistry and human health. Chemical imaging of individual particles may be used to directly investigate the heterogeneity of composition within atmospheric aerosol particles. Single-particle Raman microspectroscopy is a powerful method for chemical imaging and non-destructive physico-chemical characterization of aerosol particles. In this study we investigate the effect of chemical processing on the distribution of chemical species in single particles of mineral dust aerosol using Raman spectral imaging. Raman mapping was used to show the distribution of humic substances and organic acids on some major components of mineral dust (quartz, clays and calcium carbonate). It was shown that humic materials form coating on the surface of particles, whereas interactions of calcium carbonate with organic acids (oxalic and acetic acids) lead to reactions that cause a heterogeneous distribution of components within the reacted particle. Additionally, in a newly designed flow system aerosol can be equilibrated at different relative humidities to study hygroscopicity and phase transitions within these particles. These types of studies are important as the distribution of species in a single particle determines its reactivity, water uptake, and optical properties and thus defines its impact on climate and environment.

  4. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  5. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles with Nitric Acid. A Combined CCSEM/EDX, ESEM AND ICP-MS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2005-05-26

    The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four authentic dust samples with gas-phase nitric acid was investigated in this study. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic behavior of mineral dust particles reacted with nitric acid. Differences in the reactivity of mineral dust particles from these four different dust source regions with nitric acid were observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, namely China loess dust and Saudi coastal dust, were found to react to the greatest extent.

  6. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  7. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  8. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  9. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  10. The new Mediterranean background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica: A long term Observatory component of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) is a French initiative supported by the MISTRALS program (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales, http://www.mistrals-home.org). It aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The major stake is an understanding of the future of the Mediterranean region in a context of strong regional anthropogenic and climatic pressures. The target of ChArMEx is short-lived particulate and gaseous tropospheric trace species which are the cause of poor air quality events, have two-way interactions with climate, or impact the marine biogeochemistry. In order to fulfill these objectives, important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, a key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly air masses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The observations at this station began in June 2012 (in the context of the EMEP / ACTRIS / PEGASOS / ChArMEx campaigns). A broad spectrum of aerosol properties is also measured at the station, from the chemical composition (off-line daily filter sampling in PM2.5/PM10, on-line Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor), ground optical properties (extinction/absorption/light scattering coeff. with 1-? CAPS PMex monitor, 7-? Aethalometer, 3-? Nephelometer), integrated and vertically resolved optical properties (4-? Cimel sunphotometer and LIDAR, respective), size distribution properties (N-AIS, SMPS, APS, and OPS instruments), mass (PM1/PM10 by TEOM/TEOM-FDMS), hygroscopicity (CCN), as well as total insoluble deposition. So far, real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), and off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges) are also

  11. Heterogeneous processing of biomass burning aerosol proxies by OH radicals for a wide range of OH concentrations and detection of volatilization products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning aerosol (BBA) constitutes the majority of primary organic aerosol found in the atmosphere, with emission rates comparable to fossil-fuel burning. BBA affects earth's radiative budget directly through absorption and scattering of radiation or indirectly by modifying cloud radiative properties, and impacts air quality. Quantifying BBA source strength and thus its effects on air quality, human health, and climate can be difficult since these organic particles can chemically transform during atmospheric transport, a process also termed aging, due to heterogeneous reactions with oxidants and radicals such as OH. In this work we investigate the reactive uptake of OH radicals by typical BBA compounds that also serve as molecular markers for source apportionment studies. Organic substrates of cellulose pyrolysis products such as levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-glucopyranose, C6H10O5), resin acids such as abietic acid (1-phenanthrenecarboxylic acid, C20H30O2), and lignin decomposition products such as 5-nitroguaiacol (2-methoxy-5-nitrophenol, C7H7NO4) have been exposed to a wide range of OH concentrations (~107-1011 cm-3), in presence of O2 in a rotating wall flow reactor operated at 2-6 mbar coupled to a custom built chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). OH radicals were generated through H2 dissociation in an Evenson microwave resonant cavity operated at 2.45 GHz followed by reaction with O2 or NO2. In addition, potential volatilization of organic material due to heterogeneous oxidation by OH has been determined in-situ by monitoring the volatile organic compounds using a high resolution-proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (HR-PTR-ToF-MS). The volatilization studies are conducted at 1 atm and OH is generated by O3 photolysis in the presence of H2O vapor and quantified using a photochemical box model as well as through reaction with a known concentration of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, C5H8). Reactive uptake validation

  12. Heterogeneous reactions in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Lukachko, S. P.; Waitz, I. A.

    2002-05-01

    One-dimensional flow models and unity probability heterogeneous rate parameters are used to estimate the maximum effect of heterogeneous reactions on trace species evolution in aircraft gas turbines. The analysis includes reactions on soot particulates and turbine/nozzle material surfaces. Results for a representative advanced subsonic engine indicate the net change in reactant mixing ratios due to heterogeneous reactions is <10-6 for O2, CO2, and H2O, and <10-10 for minor combustion products such as SO2 and NO2. The change in the mixing ratios relative to the initial values is <0.01%. Since these estimates are based on heterogeneous reaction probabilities of unity, the actual changes will be even lower. Thus, heterogeneous chemistry within the engine cannot explain the high conversion of SO2 to SO3 which some wake models require to explain the observed levels of volatile aerosols. Furthermore, turbine heterogeneous processes will not effect exhaust NOx or NOy levels.

  13. Heterogeneous oxidation kinetics of organic biomass burning aerosol surrogates by O3, NO2, N2O5, and NO3.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Forrester, Seanna M; Slade, Jonathan H

    2011-12-21

    The reactive uptake coefficients (γ) of O(3), NO(2), N(2)O(5), and NO(3) by levoglucosan, abietic acid, nitroguaiacol, and an atmospherically relevant mixture of those species serving as surrogates for biomass burning aerosol have been determined employing a chemical ionization mass spectrometer coupled to a rotating-wall flow-tube reactor. γ of O(3), NO(2), N(2)O(5), and NO(3) in the presence of O(2) are in the range of 1-8 × 10(-5), <10(-6)-5 × 10(-5), 4-6 × 10(-5), and 1-26 × 10(-3), respectively, for the investigated organic substrates. Within experimental uncertainties the uptake of NO(3) was not sensitive to the presence of water vapour ( <0.5% relative humidity). [corrected]. NO(3) uptake experiments involving substrates of levoglucosan, abietic acid, and the mixture exhibit an initial strong uptake of NO(3) followed by NO(3) gas-phase recovery as a function of NO(3) exposure. In contrast, the uptake of NO(3) by nitroguaiacol continuously proceeds at the same efficiency for investigated NO(3) exposures. The derived oxidative power, i.e. the product of γ and atmospheric oxidant concentration, for applied oxidants is similar or significantly larger in magnitude than for OH, emphasizing the potential importance of these oxidants for particle oxidation. Estimated atmospheric lifetimes for the topmost organic layer with respect to O(3), NO(2), N(2)O(5), and NO(3) oxidation for typical polluted conditions range between 1-112 min, indicating the potential for significant chemical transformation during atmospheric transport. The contact angles determined prior to, and after heterogeneous oxidation by NO(3), representative of 50 ppt for 1 day, do not decrease and thus do not indicate a significant increase in hygroscopicity with potential impacts on water uptake and cloud formation processes. PMID:22020363

  14. Nonlinear optical studies of terpene-functionalized silica and its interactions with ozone as models for tropospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, G. Y.; Buchbinder, A. M.; Gibbs-Davis, J. M.; Scheidt, K. A.; Geiger, F. M.

    2008-12-01

    Terpenes emitted from vegetation can become oxidized and form molecular films on tropospheric aerosols. These greasy olefinic coatings can be oxidized by ozone and may influence the microphysics of cloud formation and the earth's climate. Using a laboratory approach that combines organic synthesis with nonlinear optical spectroscopy, we utilized vibrational broadband sum frequency generation (SFG) to survey a number of terpene-modified glass surfaces and track their interactions with ozone in real time. Exposure of these surfaces to tropospherically relevant amounts of ozone at 1 atm total pressure and 296 K yield initial reactive uptake coefficients that are significantly higher than those measured in corresponding gas phase reactions and correlate with the accessibility of the C=C double bonds at the surface. The intensity changes in the olefinic =C-H stretch and aliphatic C-H stretching region of surface vibrational spectra were used to characterize surface-bound product species. Combined with a histogram analysis of contact angle measurements carried out before and after ozonolysis, our kinetic and spectroscopic studies suggest a reaction pathway involving vibrationally hot Criegee intermediates that strongly compete with pathways that involve thermalized surface species, a chemical insight which may help reduce uncertainties associated with aerosols when included in global climate change models.

  15. Measurement of heterogeneous chemical processes relevant to aerosol surfaces and trace gases active in the marine environment. Progress report, February 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zahniser, M.S.; Jayne, J.T.; Kolb, C.E.

    1995-02-01

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds from the marine environment, deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is about half as large as that due to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to evaluate the relative roles of biogenic and combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. The aim of the studies funded by the subject DOE grant is to measure parameters governing the heterogeneous chemistry of the species occurring in the marine environment. During the past year, uptake studies for the sulfur species MSA, DMSO, DMSO{sub 2}, DMS, OCS, CS{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and CH{sub 3}SH have been finalized. Studies of the reactive uptake of Cl{sub 2} and Br{sub 2} by Br{sup -} and I{sup -} solutions as a function of temperature have been completed. The uptake of O{sub 3} by aqueous NaI solutions has also been studied for the purpose of comparison. We have begun co-deposition studies and have obtained some preliminary results for the codeposition with ozone of DMS, DMSO, DMSO{sub 2} and MSA. For the next phase of the work, a new horizontal bubbler apparatus was designed and built and construction to improve the detection sensitivity of the apparatuses was begun. Altogether during 1994, 8 articles have been accepted for publication and 2 Ph.D. dissertations have been submitted and approved.

  16. A pre-processor of trace gases and aerosols emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; Pirre, M.; Marecal, V.; Grell, G.; Stockler, R.; Mello, R. F.; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2010-06-01

    The pre-processor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emissions fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in regional or global transport models. The emissions considered are urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources from most recent databases or from satellite fire detections for biomass burning. A plumerise model is used to derive the height of smoke emissions from satellite fire products. The pre-processor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The way to include these emissions in transport models is also detailed. The pre-processor is coded using Fortran 90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the database.

  17. Spatial Heterogeneity of Stream Water Chemistry in the Elder Creek Catchment at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurnhoffer, B. M.; Lovill, S. M.; Nghiem, A.; Kim, H.; Bishop, J. K. B.

    2014-12-01

    How does stream chemistry vary with respect to discharge, flow distance, elevation, hill slope orientation, lithology, and vegetation on catchment scale? Is it possible to discern fast flowing seasonally recharged subsurface waters from long residence time waters contributing to base flow? To answer these questions, water samples were collected at ~80 locations distributed over the channel network of the (17 km2) Elder Creek catchment during surveys in May and August/September 2014. The site, located at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve near the headwaters of the South Fork of the Eel River in northern California, experiences a Mediterranean climate with warm dry summers and cold wet winters; this year (2014), our area has received less than 50% of expected precipitation and is experiencing an extreme drought. Our survey times correspond to the beginning of the dry season and late dry season, respectively. The subsurface lithology of the region almost uniform, being largely composed of argillite mudstone with intermittent areas underlain with sandstone. It is forested with Douglas fir, live and tan oaks, madrone and California bay laurel, which vary in abundance with hill-slope orientation. Due to drought, the Elder Catchment has recently experienced the effects of the nearby Lodge Lightening Complex Fire (first detection July 31 2014) and its effects may be differentiated through the continuous 1 - 3 day frequency sampling of Elder Creek water using the ISCO Gravity Filtration System (GFS; Kim et al. 2012, EST). All water samples are analyzed for dissolved major, minor, and trace solutes by Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry and this report focuses on major solutes such as Na, K, Ca, Mg and Si; redox sensitive metals Fe and Mn; and Ba and Sr. Preliminary analysis of May 2014 data shows interesting patterns between tributaries, particularly differences between streams on north vs. south facing slopes. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, and Na decrease down slope in

  18. High-speed civil transport impact: Role of sulfate, nitric acid trihydrate, and ice aerosols studied with a two-dimensional model including aerosol physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pitari, G.; Ricciardulli, L.; Visconti, G.; Rizi, V.

    1993-12-20

    The authors discuss a two-dimensional model used to study the atmospheric interactions of ozone with exhaust gases from high speed civil transport (HSCT) fleets. Their model encompases the stratosphere and troposphere, includes photochemical reactions as part of the sulfur cycle, and models sulfuric acid aerosols. The inclusion of heterogeneous chemistry effects tempers the impact of nitrogen oxide emissions from HSCT on ozone depletion, in support of previous work from other studies.

  19. Gas-phase chemistry in Oxidation Flow Reactors for the study of secondary organic aerosols systematically examined by modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Li, R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation Flow Reactors (OFRs) using OH produced from low-pressure Hg lamps at 254 nm (OFR254) or both 185 and 254 nm (OFR185) are commonly used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. OFR254 requires addition of externally formed O3 since OH is formed mainly from O3 photolysis, while OFR185 does not since OH can also be formed from H2O photolysis. In this study we use a plug-flow kinetic model to investigate OFR properties under a very wide range of conditions applicable to both field and laboratory studies. We show that radical chemistry in OFRs can be characterized as a function of 3 main parameters: UV light intensity, H2O concentration, and total external OH reactivity (e.g. from VOCs, NOx, and SO2). In OFR185, OH exposure is more sensitive to external OH reactivity than in OFR254, because injected O3 in OFR254 greatly promotes the recycling of HO2 to OH, making external perturbations to the radical chemistry less significant. The uncertainties of modeled OH, O3, and H2O2 due to uncertain kinetic parameters are within 40% in most cases. Sensitivity analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis and reactions involving OH and HO2, e.g. 2HO2→H2O2+O2 and OH+O3→HO2+O2. Reactants of atmospheric interest are dominantly consumed by OH, except some biogenics that can have substantial contributions from O3. Other highly reactive species (UV photons, O(1D), and O(3P)) only contribute for some species under conditions low H2O concentration and/or high external OH reactivity, which can be avoided by experimental planning. OFR185 and OFR254 are comparable in terms of non-OH oxidants' influence. In OFRs NO is fast oxidized. RO2 fate is similar to that in the atmosphere under low NO conditions. A comprehensive comparison of OFRs with typical environmental chamber studies with UV blacklights and with the atmosphere is also performed. OFRs' key advantages are their short experimental time scales, portability to field sites, and generally good

  20. The impact of port emissions and marine biogenics on the single-particle chemistry of marine aerosol measured on board the R/V Atlantis during the CalNEX 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, C. J.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Prather, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Marine environments are characterized by low particle concentrations and, as such, are sensitive to changes in particle number concentration and chemistry induced by biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Measurements of both gas phase and particle phase emissions on board the R/V Atlantis during the CalNEX 2010 field campaign provided an opportunity to examine the impact of anthropogenic and marine biogenic emissions on particle chemistry along the California coast. Real-time, single-particle measurements made using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) revealed the single-particle mixing state of the sampled marine aerosols. Submicron particles (0.2-1.0 um) containing organic carbon, elemental carbon mixed with organic carbon, and unique V-containing particles previously detected in port regions were prevalent throughout the Southern California coast; most of these particles were also associated with sulfate. Measurements made in the deep water channel near Sacramento, CA revealed dramatically different particle chemistry that was characterized by organic carbon and amines. Particles measured further away from the continent toward the open ocean were influenced by marine biological activity due to a phytoplankton bloom that was occurring off the California coast. During this sampling period, unique ocean-derived particles containing internal mixtures of Mg and organic carbon were detected in addition to unique particles containing elemental S ions, which were only detected at night. An aerosol generator used to bubble seawater in order to characterize primary emissions from the ocean confirmed that the Mg-organic carbon and S-containing particles were indeed emitted from the ocean. These measurements reveal the strong impact of both port emissions as well as marine biogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry along the California coast.

  1. How relevant is heterogeneous chemistry on Mars? Strong tests via global mapping of water and ozone (sampled via O2 dayglow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Ozone and water are powerful tracers of photochemical processes on Mars. Considering that water is a condensable with a multifaceted hydrological cycle and ozone is continuously being produced / destroyed on short-time scales, their maps can test the validity of current 3D photochemical and dynamical models. Comparisons of modern GCM models (e.g., Lefèvre et al. 2004) with certain datasets (e.g., Clancy et al. 2012; Bertaux et al. 2012) point to significant disagreement, which in some cases have been related to heterogeneous (gas-dust) chemistry beyond the classical gas-gas homogeneous reactions.We address these concerns by acquiring full 2D maps of water and ozone (via O2 dayglow) on Mars, employing high spectral infrared spectrometers at ground-based telescopes (CRIRES/VLT and CSHELL/NASA-IRTF). By performing a rotational analysis on the O2 lines, we derive molecular temperature maps that we use to derive the vertical level of the emission (e.g., Novak et al. 2002). Our maps sample the full observable disk of Mars on March/25/2008 (Ls=50°, northern winter) and on Jan/29/2014 (Ls=83°, northern spring). The maps reveal a strong dependence of the O2 emission and water burden on local orography, while the temperature maps are in strong disagreement with current models. Could this be the signature of heterogeneous chemistry? We will present the global maps and will discuss possible scenarios to explain the observations.This work was partially funded by grants from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program (344-32-51-96), NASA’s Mars Fundamental Research Program (203959.02.02.20.29), NASA’s Astrobiology Program (344-53-51), and the NSF-RUI Program (AST-805540). We thank the administration and staff of the European Southern Observatory/VLT and NASA-IRTF for awarding observing time and coordinating our observations.Bertaux, J.-L., Gondet, B., Lefèvre, F., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res. Pl. 117. pp. 1-9.Clancy, R.T., Sandor, B.J., Wolff, M.J., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res

  2. Long-term flow/chemistry feedback in a porous medium with heterogenous permeability: Kinetic control of dissolution and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, E.W.; Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of dissolution and precipitation is of central importance to understanding the long-term evolution of fluid flows in crustal environments, with implications for problems as diverse as nuclear waste disposal and crustal evolution. The authors examine the dynamics of such evolution for several geologically relevant permeability distributions (models for en-echelon cracks, an isolated sloping fractured zone, and two sloping high-permeability zones that are close enough together to interact). Although the focus is on a simple quartz matrix system, generic features emerge from this study that can aid in the broader goal of understanding the long-term feedback between flow and chemistry, where dissolution and precipitation is under kinetic control. Examples of thermal convection in a porous medium with spatially variable permeability reveal features of central importance to water-rock interaction. After a transient phase, an accelerated rate of change of porosity may be used with care to decrease computational time, as an alternative to the quasi-stationary state approximation (Lichtner, 1988). Kinetic effects produce features not expected by traditional assumptions made on the basis of equilibrium, for example, that cooling fluids are oversaturated and heating fluids are undersaturated with respect to silicic acid equilibrium. Indeed, the authors observe regions of downwelling oversaturated fluid experiencing heating and regions of upwelling, yet cooling, undersaturated fluid. When oscillatory convection is present, the amplitudes of oscillation generally increase with time in near-surface environments, whereas amplitudes tend to decrease over long times near the heated lower boundary. The authors examine the scaling behavior of characteristic length scales, of terms in the solute equation, and of the typical deviation from equilibrium, each as a function of the kinetic rate parameters.

  3. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  4. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  5. Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A. )

    1994-04-22

    Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

  6. Microwave-assisted cross-coupling and hydrogenation chemistry by using heterogeneous transition-metal catalysts: an evaluation of the role of selective catalyst heating.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammed; Fuchs, Michael; Glasnov, Toma N; Kappe, C Oliver

    2009-11-01

    The concept of specific microwave effects in solid/liquid catalytic processes resulting from the selective heating of a microwave-absorbing heterogeneous transition-metal catalyst by using 2.45 GHz microwave irradiation was evaluated. As model transformations Ni/C-, Cu/C-, Pd/C-, and Pd/Al2O3-catalyzed carbon-carbon/carbon-heteroatom cross-couplings and hydrogenation reactions were investigated. To probe the existence of specific microwave effects by means of selective catalyst heating in these transformations, control experiments comparing microwave dielectric heating and conventional thermal heating at the same reaction temperature were performed. Although the supported metal catalysts were experimentally found to be strongly microwave absorbing, for all chemistry examples investigated herein no differences in reaction rate or selectivity between microwave and conventional heating experiments under carefully controlled conditions were observed. This was true also for reactions that use low-absorbing or microwave transparent solvents, and was independent of the microwave absorbtivity of the catalyst support material. In the case of hydrogenation reactions, the stirring speed was found to be a critical factor on the mass transfer between gas and liquid phase, influencing the rate of the hydrogenation in both microwave and conventionally heated experiments. PMID:19774573

  7. Polar Stratospheric Clouds and heterogeneous chemistry: Comparison between a 3D-CTM with detailed online PSC microphysics and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Errera, Quentin; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Chabrillat, Simon; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    A 3-D Chemical Transport Model (CTM), with full stratospheric chemistry and driven by the ECMWF temperature and wind fields, has been coupled to a detailed PSC microphysical model to simulate polar winters. The formation and evolution of four types of PSC particles (STS, SAT, NAT, and ice) are described through relevant microphysical processes which alter interactively the nitric acid and water vapor concentrations of the atmosphere. Each particle type is described by a binned size distribution for the number density and chemical composition. This set-up allows for detailed calculation of optical properties and surface area densities used to compute the heterogeneous reaction rates. After comparing the evolution of the stratospheric chemical structure to satellite observations, we will investigate how the model reproduces the PSC coverage detected by CALIPSO. A comparison between the model and CALIPSO optical properties will be used to discuss the PSC composition. Finally, we aim at estimating the contribution of each PSC particle type to the chlorine activation.

  8. Solar proton impact on polar ozone and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, E.; Shumilov, O.; Kyro, E.; Kivi, R.

    The influence of solar proton events of Ground Level Event (GLE) type on ozone layer through the aerosol creation at high latitudes on the base of some experimental data and model simulation is discussed. For analysis we used ozone total content measurements from TOMS and ground based ozonometers installed at high latitudes (Barentsburg, corrected geomagnetic latitude: 74.9; Murmansk, 64.5; Sodankyla, 63.5). Ozonesonde data from Sodankyla observatory have also been used. A possible trigger mechanism of ozone destruction by incident solar protons including ion nucleation mechanism and heterogeneous chemistry is discussed. The model calculations of altitude distribution of CN (condensation nuclei), plausible centres of sulfate aerosol and Polar Startospheric Cloud (PSC) formation, are presented. Analysis of experimental data and model calculations permits us to explain some distinctions observed in ozone total content variations during several GLEs. For example, aerosol content increased significantly during moderate 21-24 May 1990 GLEs, when polar ozone "miniholes" (ozone total content depletions up to 20%)have been observed. Other GLEs (more intensive ones: 2 May 1998, 14 July 2000, 15 April 2001) caused no considerable enhancement in aerosol layer. In other words the value of aerosol increase during GLE depends on the spectrum of incident solar protons. These results demonstrate that only moderate GLEs can increase aerosol content significantly and cause ozone "minihole" creation.

  9. Temperature dependent optical constants from aerosol spectroscopy: Applications to stratospheric clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, R.F.; Miller, R.E.

    1996-10-01

    The refractive indices of various atmospheric condensates are of great importance in both modeling and remote sensing. In the past, data of this type was only available from thin film measurements made on substrates. The applicability of these data for the study of atmospheric aerosols has really never been tested in detail. We have developed a new approach that allows for the direction determination of frequency dependent refractive indices directly from aerosol spectra. In this paper we discuss the application of this methodology to the study of laboratory generated aerosols of interest in stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry. In particular, we report studies on water, nitric and sulfuric acid aerosols. In the latter case, we report temperature and composition dependent optical constants over the range of conditions appropriate for the stratosphere.

  10. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ether formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes may potentially lead to a considerable amount of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under acidic conditions, which can be highly significant for freshly nucleated aerosols, particularly given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  11. Evidence of Aerosols as a Media for Rapid Daytime HONO Production over China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Costabile, Francesa; Amoroso, Antonio; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-16

    Current knowledge of daytime HONO sources remains incomplete. A large missing daytime HONO source has been found in many places around the world, including polluted regions in China. Conventional understanding and recent studies attributed this missing source mainly to ground surface processes or gas-phase chemistry, while assuming aerosols to be an insignificant media for HONO production. We analyze in situ observations of HONO and its precursors at an urban site in Beijing, China, and report an apparent dependence of the missing HONO source strength on aerosol surface area and solar ultraviolet radiation. Based on extensive correlation analysis and process-modeling, we propose that the rapid daytime HONO production in Beijing can be explained by enhanced hydrolytic disproportionation of NO2 on aqueous aerosol surfaces due to catalysis by dicarboxylic acid anions. The combination of high abundance of NO2, aromatic hydrocarbons, and aerosols over broad regions in China likely leads to elevated HONO levels, rapid OH production, and enhanced oxidizing capacity on a regional basis. Our findings call for attention to aerosols as a media for daytime heterogeneous HONO production in polluted regions like Beijing. This study also highlights the complex and uncertain heterogeneous chemistry in China, which merits future efforts of reconciling regional modeling and laboratory experiments, in order to understand and mitigate the regional particulate and O3 pollutions over China.

  12. A new chemistry option in WRF-Chem v. 3.4 for the simulation of direct and indirect aerosol effects using VBS: evaluation against IMPACT-EUCAARI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccella, P.; Curci, G.; Grell, G. A.; Visconti, G.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A parameterization for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production based on the volatility basis set (VBS) approach has been coupled with microphysics and radiative schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model. The new chemistry option called "RACM-MADE-VBS-AQCHEM" was evaluated on a cloud resolving scale against ground-based and aircraft measurements collected during the IMPACT-EUCAARI (Intensive Cloud Aerosol Measurement Campaign - European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air quality interaction) campaign, and complemented with satellite data from MODIS. The day-to-day variability and the diurnal cycle of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the surface are captured by the model. Surface aerosol mass concentrations of sulfate (SO4), nitrate (NO3), ammonium (NH4), and organic matter (OM) are simulated with correlations larger than 0.55. WRF-Chem captures the vertical profile of the aerosol mass concentration in both the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free troposphere (FT) as a function of the synoptic condition, but the model does not capture the full range of the measured concentrations. Predicted OM concentration is at the lower end of the observed mass concentrations. The bias may be attributable to the missing aqueous chemistry processes of organic compounds and to uncertainties in meteorological fields. A key role could be played by assumptions on the VBS approach such as the SOA formation pathways, oxidation rate, and dry deposition velocity of organic condensable vapours. Another source of error in simulating SOA is the uncertainties in the anthropogenic emissions of primary organic carbon. Aerosol particle number concentration (condensation nuclei, CN) is overestimated by a factor of 1.4 and 1.7 within the PBL and FT, respectively. Model bias is most likely attributable to the uncertainties of primary particle emissions (mostly in the PBL) and to the nucleation rate. Simulated cloud

  13. Laboratory studies of thin films representative of atmospheric sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Tara Jean

    Sulfate aerosols are present globally in both the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These aerosols are of great interest because they have a profound influence on Earth's radiation balance, heterogeneous chemistry, and cloud formation mechanisms throughout the atmosphere. The magnitude of these effects is ultimately determined by the size, phase, and chemical composition of the aerosols themselves. This thesis explores some of the questions that remain concerning the phase of these aerosols under atmospheric conditions and the effects of their chemical composition on heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation mechanisms. In the upper troposphere, cirrus clouds are thought to form via the homogeneous nucleation of ice out of dilute sulfate aerosols such as ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). To investigate this, the low-temperature phase behavior of ammonium sulfate films has been studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Experiments performed as a function of increasing relative humidity demonstrate that a phase transition from crystalline (NH 4)2SO4 to a metastable aqueous solution can occur at temperatures below the eutectic at 254 K. However, on occasion, direct deposition of ice from the vapor phase was observed, possibly indicating selective heterogeneous nucleation. In addition to serving as nuclei for cirrus clouds, sulfate aerosols can participate in heterogeneous reactions. The interaction of HNO3 with ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a possible loss mechanism for gas-phase HNO3 using a Knudsen cell reactor coupled with transmission FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that HNO3 reacts with solid ammonium sulfate to produce ammonium nitrate and letovicite at 203 K. Furthermore, this reaction is enhanced as a function of relative humidity from 0 to 41%. In the lower stratosphere, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are important for springtime ozone depletion. The vapor deposition of ice on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) has

  14. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  15. Acid-catalyzed Heterogeneous Reactions in SOA Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N.; Keywood, M.; Varutbangkul, V.; Gao, S.; Loewer, E.; Surratt, J.; Richard, F. C.; John, S. H.

    2003-12-01

    The importance of heterogeneous reactions in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has recently excited a great deal of interest in the aerosol community. Jang and Kamens (2001) showed enhanced aerosol yield from aldehydes, which can be produced by atmospheric photochemical reactions, in the presence of acidic seed. They suggest that the carbonyl functional groups of the aldehydes further react in the aerosol phase via hydration, polymerization, and hemiacetal/acetal formation with alcohols at an accelerated rate in the presence of acid. Jang et al. (2003) demonstrated similar results using a flow reactor and Czoschke et al. (in press) qualitatively showed increased yields for isoprene and alpha-pinene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic seed. While these findings are intriguing and important, the conditions under which the experiments were carried out were atmospherically unrealistic. A series of SOA formation experiments have been carried out in the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility, which is comprised of dual 28 m3 FEP Teflon chambers, with the flexibility to carry out both dark ozonolysis and photochemical OH oxidation reactions. Cycloheptene and alpha-pinene were oxidized in the presence of neutral seed under dry (<10% RH) and humid (50% RH) conditions and in the presence of acidic seed under humid (50% RH) conditions. The SOA yields for these experiments will be presented, and the extent of the influence of acid-catalyzed reactions on SOA yield will be discussed. Reference List 1. Cocker, D. R. III. and R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld, State-of-the-art chamber facility for studying atmospheric aerosol chemistry, Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2594-2601, 2001. 2. Czoschke, N. M., M. Jang, and R. M. Kamens, Effect of acid seed on biogenic sceondary organic aerosol growth, Atmospheric Environment, In press. 3. Jang, M., S. Lee, and R. M. Kamens, Organic aerosol growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of octanal in a flow reactor

  16. Changes in the optical properties of benzo[a]pyrene-coated aerosols upon heterogeneous reactions with NO2 and NO3.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jessica W; Flores, J Michel; Lavi, Avi; Abo-Riziq, Ali; Rudich, Yinon

    2011-04-14

    Chemical reactions can alter the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosols. It has been postulated that nitration of aerosols can account for atmospheric absorbance over urban areas. To study this potentially important process, the change in optical properties of laboratory-generated benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-coated aerosols following exposure to NO(2) and NO(3) was investigated at 355 nm and 532 nm by three aerosol analysis techniques. The extinction coefficient was determined at 355 nm and 532 nm from cavity ring-down aerosol spectroscopy (CRD-AS); the absorption coefficient was measured by photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at 532 nm, while an on-line aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) supplied real-time quantitative information about the chemical composition of aerosols. In this study, 240 nm polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres were thinly coated with BaP to form 300 or 310 nm aerosols that were exposed to high concentrations of NO(2) and NO(3) and measured with CRD-AS, PAS, and the AMS. The extinction efficiencies (Q(ext)) changed after exposure to NO(2) and NO(3) at both wavelengths. Prior to reaction, Q(ext) for the 355 nm and 532 nm wavelengths were 4.36 ± 0.04 and 2.39 ± 0.05, respectively, and Q(ext) increased to 5.26 ± 0.04 and 2.79 ± 0.05 after exposure. The absorption cross-section at 532 nm, determined with PAS, reached σ(abs) = (0.039 ± 0.001) × 10(-8) cm(2), indicating that absorption increased with formation of nitro-BaP, the main reaction product detected by the AMS. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), a measure of particle scattering efficiency, decreased from 1 to 0.85 ± 0.03, showing that changes in the optical properties of BaP-covered aerosols due to nitration may have implications for regional radiation budget and, hence, climate. PMID:21373662

  17. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems. PMID:27095585

  18. A New Bioinspired Perchlorate Reduction Catalyst with Significantly Enhanced Stability via Rational Tuning of Rhenium Coordination Chemistry and Heterogeneous Reaction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyong; Han, Mengwei; Wu, Dimao; Chen, Xi; Choe, Jong Kwon; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Rapid reduction of aqueous ClO4(-) to Cl(-) by H2 has been realized by a heterogeneous Re(hoz)2-Pd/C catalyst integrating Re(O)(hoz)2Cl complex (hoz = oxazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand) and Pd nanoparticles on carbon support, but ClOx(-) intermediates formed during reactions with concentrated ClO4(-) promote irreversible Re complex decomposition and catalyst deactivation. The original catalyst design mimics the microbial ClO4(-) reductase, which integrates Mo(MGD)2 complex (MGD = molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide) for oxygen atom transfer (OAT). Perchlorate-reducing microorganisms employ a separate enzyme, chlorite dismutase, to prevent accumulation of the destructive ClO2(-) intermediate. The structural intricacy of MGD ligand and the two-enzyme mechanism for microbial ClO4(-) reduction inspired us to improve catalyst stability by rationally tuning Re ligand structure and adding a ClOx(-) scavenger. Two new Re complexes, Re(O)(htz)2Cl and Re(O)(hoz)(htz)Cl (htz = thiazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand), significantly mitigate Re complex decomposition by slightly lowering the OAT activity when immobilized in Pd/C. Further stability enhancement is then obtained by switching the nanoparticles from Pd to Rh, which exhibits high reactivity with ClOx(-) intermediates and thus prevents their deactivating reaction with the Re complex. Compared to Re(hoz)2-Pd/C, the new Re(hoz)(htz)-Rh/C catalyst exhibits similar ClO4(-) reduction activity but superior stability, evidenced by a decrease of Re leaching from 37% to 0.25% and stability of surface Re speciation following the treatment of a concentrated "challenge" solution containing 1000 ppm of ClO4(-). This work demonstrates the pivotal roles of coordination chemistry control and tuning of individual catalyst components for achieving both high activity and stability in environmental catalyst applications. PMID:27182602

  19. Raman diagnostic of the reactivity between ZnSO4 and CaCO3 particles in humid air relevant to heterogeneous zinc chemistry in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgayrac, Guillaume; Sobanska, Sophie; Brémard, Claude

    2014-03-01

    Laboratory experiments using Raman imaging demonstrated the behaviour of ZnSO4·7H2O (goslarite) microparticles in contact with a {101bar4} CaCO3 (calcite) surface under three different experimental conditions representative of remote atmosphere. Contact between the ZnSO4·7H2O particles and the CaCO3 surface in humid air (RH ∼40-80%) did not induce any deliquescence and chemical phenomena. In contrast, condensation of a water drop at the ZnSO4·7H2O-CaCO3 interface caused free dissolution of the ZnSO4·7H2O particle and rapid precipitation of Zn4SO4(OH)6 onto the CaCO3 surface. This coating inhibited the surface reaction and subsequent drying resulted in the deposition of residual ZnSO4·7H2O, then ZnSO4·H2O (gunningite) and CaSO4·2H2O (gypsum) superimposed onto the Zn4SO4(OH)6 layer. The deposition of ZnSO4·7H2O particles in a water drop, previously in contact with a CaCO3 particle for a long time, resulted in the coprecipitation of Zn4SO4(OH)6 and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 (hydrozincite). Subsequent drying caused the deposition of residual ZnSO4·7H2O, ZnSO4·H2O and CaSO4·2H2O as small particles. These results indicated the possible fates of ZnSO4 particles in a humid atmosphere, when externally mixed with CaCO3 mineral dust after atmospheric events such as aggregation, water condensation and evaporation. This study indicated the fundamental role of water that typically existed on the surface of aerosol particles in the troposphere. These heterogeneous chemical processes have substantial consequences on particle size and solubility, and thus on bioavailability and toxicity of metal-rich particles.

  20. Evolution of aerosol chemistry in Xi'an, inland China during the dust storm period of 2013 - Part 1: Sources, chemical forms and formation mechanisms of nitrate and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Huang, Y.; Tao, J.; Ren, Y. Q.; Wu, F.; Cheng, C. L.; Meng, J. J.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, Y. T.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, R.

    2014-06-01

    In the current work TSP sample was hourly collected in Xi'an, an inland mega-city of China near the Loess Plateau, during a dust storm event of 2013 (9 March 18:00-12 March 10:00 LT), along with a size-resolved aerosol sampling and an online measurement of PM2.5. The TSP and size-resolved samples were determined for EC, OC, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and nitrogen (WSON), inorganic ions and elements to investigate aerosol chemistry evolution. Hourly concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+ and Ca2+ in the TSP samples reached up to 34, 12, 180, 72 and 28 μg m-3, respectively, when dust peak arrived over Xi'an. Chemical compositions of the TSP samples showed that NH4+ and NO3- strongly correlated each other in the whole observation period (r2=0.76), while SO42- and Cl- well correlated with Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ (r2>0.85). Size distributions of NH4+ and NO3- presented a same pattern, which dominated in the coarse mode (>2.1 μm during the event and predominated in the fine mode (<2.1 μm) during the non-event. SO42- and Cl- also dominated in the coarse mode during the event, but both exhibited two equivalent peaks in the fine and coarse modes during the non-event, respectively, due to the fine mode accumulations of secondarily produced SO42- and biomass burning emitted Cl- and the coarse mode enrichments of urban soil-derived SO42- and Cl-. Linear fit regression analysis further indicated that SO42- and Cl- in the dust samples possibly exist as Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, which directly originated from Gobi desert surface soil, while NH4+ and NO3- in the dust samples exist as NH4NO3. We propose a mechanism to explain these observations in which aqueous phase of dust particle surface is formed via uptake of water vapor by hygroscopic Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, followed by heterogeneous formation of nitrate on the liquid phase and subsequent absorption of ammonia. Our data indicate that 54 ± 20% and 60 ± 23% of NH4+ and NO3- during the dust period were secondarily

  1. Heterogeneous reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Dao

    2013-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of central importance in the atmosphere because of their close relation to air quality and climate change. As a significant sink for VOCs, the fate of VOCs via heterogeneous reactions may explain the big gap between field and model studies. These reactions play as yet unclear but potentially crucial role in atmospheric processes. In order to better evaluate this reaction pathway, we present the first specific review for the progress of heterogeneous reaction studies on VOCs, including carbonyl compounds, organic acids, alcohols, and so on. Our review focuses on the processes for heterogeneous reactions of VOCs under varying experimental conditions, as well as their implications for trace gas and HOx budget, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, physicochemical properties of aerosols, and human health. Finally, we propose the future direction for laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry of VOCs that should be carried out under more atmospherically relevant conditions, with a special emphasis on the effects of relative humidity and illumination, the multicomponent reaction systems, and reactivity of aged and authentic particles. In particular, more reliable uptake coefficients, based on the abundant elaborate laboratory studies, appropriate calibration, and logical choice criterion, are urgently required in atmospheric models.

  2. Stratospheric changes caused by geoengineering aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckendorn, P.; Peter, T.; Weisenstein, D.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2010-05-01

    region and lead to heating; as a consequence the entry mixing ratio of water vapour increases. We show that this may have significant impact on radiative forcing and total ozone, because of several effects: the higher temperatures lead to a general acceleration of ozone loss cycles; faster heterogeneous chemistry on the aerosol surfaces lead to a deceleration of NOx-induced ozone loss, but to an acceleration of HOx and ClOx-induced ozone loss; the increased water vapour intensifies the HOx-induced ozone loss cycle. Furthermore, the stratospheric circulation is affected by the strong heating of the lower stratosphere, intensifying the meridional temperature gradient and the polar vortices. As a consequence, PSC formation and polar ozone depletion are enhanced. In addition, further ozone depletion will result from the emissions of aircraft or rockets that need to be operated to establish the sulphur injection.

  3. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  4. Evaluating Ammonium, Nitrate and Sulfate Aerosols in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezuman, Keren; Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The effect aerosols have on climate and air quality is a func-on of their chemical composi-on, concentra-on and spa-al distribu-on. These parameters are controlled by emissions, heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry, where thermodynamics plays a key role, transport, which includes stratospheric-­- tropospheric exchange, and deposi-onal sinks. In this work we demonstrate the effect of some of these processes on the SO4-NH4­-NO3 system using the GISS ModelE2 Global Circula-on Model (GCM).

  5. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2007-08-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ester formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes are estimated to potentially produce greater than 2.5 μg m-3 of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, which can be highly significant given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  6. Implementation of the chemistry module MECCA (v2.5) in the modal aerosol version of the Community Atmosphere Model component (v3.6.33) of the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, Richard C.; Sander, R.; Kergweg, A.; Erickson, D.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-02-22

    A coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate system model was developed using the modal aerosol version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (modal-CAM; v3.6.33) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry’s Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere (MECCA; v2.5) to provide enhanced resolution of multiphase processes, particularly those involving inorganic halogens, and associated impacts on atmospheric composition and climate. Three Rosenbrock solvers (Ros-2, Ros-3, RODAS-3) were tested in conjunction with the basic load-balancing options available to modal-CAM (1) to establish an optimal configuration of the implicitly-solved multiphase chemistry module that maximizes both computational speed and repeatability of Ros- 2 and RODAS-3 results versus Ros-3, and (2) to identify potential implementation strategies for future versions of this and similar coupled systems. RODAS-3 was faster than Ros-2 and Ros-3 with good reproduction of Ros-3 results, while Ros-2 was both slower and substantially less reproducible relative to Ros-3 results. Modal-CAM with MECCA chemistry was a factor of 15 slower than modal-CAM using standard chemistry. MECCA chemistry integration times demonstrated a systematic frequency distribution for all three solvers, and revealed that the change in run-time performance was due to a change in the frequency distribution of chemical integration times; the peak frequency was similar for all solvers. This suggests that efficient chemistry-focused load-balancing schemes can be developed that rely on the parameters of this frequency distribution.

  7. Temporal heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiative impact at a tropical coastal station - Part 1: Microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Moorthy, K.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    In Part 1 of this two-part paper, we present the results of extensive and collocated measurements of the columnar and near-surface (in the well mixed region) properties of atmospheric aerosol particles at a tropical coastal location, Trivandrum (8.55° N; 76.97° E), located close to the southwest tip of Indian peninsula. These are used to evolve average, climatological pictures of the optical and microphysical properties and to delineate the distinct changes associated with the contrasting monsoon seasons as well as the transition from one season to the other. Our observations show a dramatic change in the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra, being steep during winter monsoon season (WMS, months of December through March) and becoming quite flat during summer monsoon season (SMS, June through September). The derived Ångström exponent (α) decreases from a mean value of 1.1±0.03 in WMS to 0.32±0.02 in SMS, signifying a change in columnar aerosol size spectrum from an accumulation mode dominance in WMS to a coarse mode dominance in SMS. The composite aerosols near the surface follow suit with the share of the accumulation mode to the total mass concentration decreasing from ~70% to 34% from WMS to SMS. The overall mass burden also decreases in tandem. The changes in α are well correlated to those in the accumulation fraction of the mass concentration. Long-term measurements of the concentration of aerosol black carbon (BC), show prominent annual variations, with its mean value decreasing from as high as 6 μg m-3 in WMS to 2 μg m-3 in SMS. Correspondingly, its mass mixing ratio to the composite aerosols comes down from 11% to 4%. The changes in AOD and α are significantly positively correlated to those of BC concentration. The columnar properties are, in general well associated with the features near the surface. The implications of these changes to the optical properties and single scattering albedo and the resulting impact on direct radiative

  8. A simple parameterization of aerosol emissions in RAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letcher, Theodore

    Throughout the past decade, a high degree of attention has been focused on determining the microphysical impact of anthropogenically enhanced concentrations of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) on orographic snowfall in the mountains of the western United States. This area has garnered a lot of attention due to the implications this effect may have on local water resource distribution within the Region. Recent advances in computing power and the development of highly advanced microphysical schemes within numerical models have provided an estimation of the sensitivity that orographic snowfall has to changes in atmospheric CCN concentrations. However, what is still lacking is a coupling between these advanced microphysical schemes and a real-world representation of CCN sources. Previously, an attempt to representation the heterogeneous evolution of aerosol was made by coupling three-dimensional aerosol output from the WRF Chemistry model to the Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) (Ward et al. 2011). The biggest problem associated with this scheme was the computational expense. In fact, the computational expense associated with this scheme was so high, that it was prohibitive for simulations with fine enough resolution to accurately represent microphysical processes. To improve upon this method, a new parameterization for aerosol emission was developed in such a way that it was fully contained within RAMS. Several assumptions went into generating a computationally efficient aerosol emissions parameterization in RAMS. The most notable assumption was the decision to neglect the chemical processes in formed in the formation of Secondary Aerosol (SA), and instead treat SA as primary aerosol via short-term WRF-CHEM simulations. While, SA makes up a substantial portion of the total aerosol burden (much of which is made up of organic material), the representation of this process is highly complex and highly expensive within a numerical

  9. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  10. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Ravelo, R.

    1999-10-05

    A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

  11. Quantifying the Reactive Uptake of OH by Organic Aerosols in aContinuous Flow Stirred Tank Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Dung L.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-03-01

    Here we report a new method for measuring the heterogeneous chemistry of submicron organic aerosol particles using a continuous flow stirred tank reactor. This approach is designed to quantify the real time heterogeneous kinetics, using a relative rate method, under conditions of low oxidant concentration and long reaction times that more closely mimic the real atmosphere. A general analytical expression, which couples the aerosol chemistry with the flow dynamics in the chamber is developed and applied to the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane particles by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the presence of O2. The particle phase reaction is monitored via photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry and yields a reactive uptake coefficient of 0.51+-0.10, using OH concentrations of 1-7x108 molec cdot cm-3 and reaction times of 1.5+-3 hours. This uptake coefficient is larger than that found for the reaction carried out under high OH concentrations (~;;1x1010 molec cdot cm-3) and short reaction times in a flow tube reactor. This difference suggests that oxidant concentration and reaction time are not interchangeable quantities in reactions of organic aerosols with radicals. In general, this approach provides a new way to examine how the chemical aging of organic particles measured at short reaction times and high oxidant concentrations in flow tubes might differ from the long reaction times and low oxidant levels found in the real atmosphere.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  13. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  14. Investigation of Multi-decadal Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Wei, C.; Xing, J.; Gan, M.; Yu, S.; Binkowski, F.

    2012-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing. A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. This study aims at addressing this issue through a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past two decades in the United States, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading in the North American troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. A newly developed 2-way coupled meteorology and air pollution model composed of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is being run for 20 years (1990 - 2010) on a 12 km resolution grid that covers most of North America including the entire conterminous US. During this period US emissions of SO2 and NOx have been reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA) that aimed to reduce emissions that contribute to acid deposition. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation and the direct effects of tropospheric ozone on the long

  15. Heterogeneous processes involving nitrogenous compounds and Saharan dust inferred from measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy-Lacaux, C.; Carmichael, G. R.; Song, C. H.; Lacaux, J. P.; Al Ourabi, H.; Modi, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on aerosol chemical composition and gaseous concentrations in various African ecosystems have been obtained under the IGAC DEBITS AFRICA (IDAF) program. In this paper, data covering a complete wet and dry season (1996 and 1998) in the semiarid savanna of the Sahelian region of Niger are presented. The analysis of the aerosol chemical composition and the gas phase concentrations at the Banizoumbou station indicates two strong signatures: a nitrogenous component composed of nitric acid, ammonia, particulate ammonium, and nitrates; and a terrigenous component originating from semiarid and desert soils (calcium, carbonates, magnesium, potassium, sulfate). To further investigate the interactions between gas and particles and to help interpret the IDAF experimental data, these data are analyzed using a gas aerosol equilibrium model (Simulating Composition of Atmospheric Particles at Equilibrium (SCAPE)). The model is found to accurately represent the mean aerosol composition for the dry and the wet season of the studied region. It is found that heterogeneous processes involving terrigenous compounds are important and play a major role in partitioning semivolatile species, such as nitric acid, between the gas and aerosol phases. The important role of these heterogeneous processes in the atmospheric chemistry in the Sahelian region is discussed. To compare results obtained in the semiarid savanna of Niger and other African ecosystems, SCAPE model is also applied to humid savanna and forest using IDAF and Experiment for Regional Sources and Sinks of Oxidants (EXPRESSO) measurements.

  16. Importance of tropospheric ClNO2 chemistry across the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Simon, Heather; Xing, Jia; Mathur, Rohit

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory and field experiments have revealed that uptake of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on aerosols containing chloride produces nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and nitric acid. We incorporate heterogeneous ClNO2 formation into the hemispheric Community Multiscale Air Quality model. This heterogeneous chemistry substantially enhances ClNO2 levels in several areas of the Northern Hemisphere and alters the composition of airborne reactive nitrogen, comprising more than 15% of monthly mean values in some areas. Model results suggest that this heterogeneous chemistry reduces monthly mean total nitrate by up to 25% and enhances monthly mean daily maximum 8 h ozone by up to 7.0 ppbv. The pathway also enhances hydroxyl radical by more than 20% in some locations which in turn increases sulfate and other secondary pollutants. The largest ClNO2 concentrations and impacts occur over China and Western Europe, two areas in which few relevant field measurements have been made.

  17. Aerosol chemistry and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer: insights on the relevant role of nitrate from case studies in Milan (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Observations of the aerosol vertical profile reveal the formation of elevated aerosol layers within and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Those layers may have chemical composition significantly different from that observed near the ground, and the knowledge about the role they play in the budget of the ground-level particulate matter is still incomplete. Here we investigate this aspect combining chemical and physical aerosol measurements with WRF/Chem model simulations. The observations were collected in the Milan urban area (Northern Italy) during summer of 2007 and winter of 2008. We find that an important player in shaping the upper aerosol layers is particulate nitrate, which may reach higher values in the upper PBL (up to 30% of the aerosol mass) than the lower. The nitrate formation process is predicted to be largely driven by the relative humidity vertical profile, that may trigger efficient aqueous nitrate formation when exceeding the ammonium nitrate deliquescence point. Secondary PM2.5 produced in the upper half of the PBL may contribute up to 7-8 μg m-3 (or 25%) to ground level concentrations on hourly basis. A large potential role is also found to be played by the residual aerosol layer above the PBL, which may occasionally contribute up to 10-12 μg m-3(or 40%) to hourly ground level PM2.5 concentrations during the morning.

  18. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  19. A new chemistry option in WRF/Chem v. 3.4 for the simulation of direct and indirect aerosol effects using VBS: evaluation against IMPACT-EUCAARI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccella, P.; Curci, G.; Grell, G. A.; Visconti, G.; Crumeroylle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    A parameterization for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production based on the volatility basis set (VBS) approach has been coupled with microphysics and radiative scheme in WRF/Chem model. The new chemistry option called "RACM/MADE/VBS" was evaluated on a cloud resolving scale against ground-based and aircraft measurements collected during the IMPACT-EUCAARI campaign, and complemented with satellite data from MODIS. The day-to-day variability and the diurnal cycle of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the surface is captured by the model. Surface aerosol mass of sulphate (SO4), nitrate (NO3), ammonium (NH4), and organic matter (OM) is simulated with a correlation larger than 0.55. WRF/Chem captures the vertical profile of the aerosol mass in both the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free troposphere (FT) as a function of the synoptic condition, but the model does not capture the full range of the measured concentrations. Predicted OM concentration is at the lower end of the observed mass. The bias may be attributable to the missing aqueous chemistry processes of organic compounds, the uncertainties in meteorological fields, the assumption on the deposition velocity of condensable organic vapours, and the uncertainties in the anthropogenic emissions of primary organic carbon. Aerosol particle number concentration (condensation nuclei, CN) is overestimated by a factor 1.4 and 1.7 within PBL and FT, respectively. Model bias is most likely attributable to the uncertainties of primary particle emissions (mostly in the PBL) and to the nucleation rate. The overestimation of simulated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is more contained with respect to that of CN. The CCN efficiency, which is a measure of the ability of aerosol particles to nucleate cloud droplets, is underestimated by a factor of 1.5 and 3.8 in the PBL and FT, respectively. The comparison with MODIS data shows that the model overestimates the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The domain averages (for

  20. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  1. IMPACTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN U.S. ON HETEROGENEOUS CHEMISTRY OF ISOPRENE-DERIVED EPOXIDES LEADING TO SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed activities will yield the formulation of parameterizations that can be incorporated into SOA models that will lead to improvement in the ability to simulate isoprene SOA formation in the southeastern U. S. Specific results include: (1) characterization of reaction...

  2. The effects of Mt Etna eruption of 25-28 October 2013 on the atmospheric chemistry and aerosols in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Boichu, Marie; di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Monteleone, Francesco; Herbin, Hervé; Rusalem, Justin; Briole, Pierre; Legras, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can influence the tropospheric and stratospheric composition and the Earth's radiation budget. While the effect of strong explosive eruptions affects also the stratosphere on hemispheric and global scale, the spatial extent of the tropospheric perturbation due to weaker activity can be variable. Small volcanic eruptions may potentially affect tropospheric composition at relatively distant locations, depending on the emissions and the local dynamics. One of the most important effects on the tropospheric composition is the impact on the aerosol distribution, following the conversion of the emitted sulphur dioxide to sulphate aerosols. Here we present a study aimed at identifying the possible effects of the Mt Etna activity on the aerosol composition and the sulphate aerosol content in the Southern part of the Central Mediterranean. This study is based on aerosols and sulphur dioxide measurements made at the ENEA Station for Climate Observations (35.5° N, 12.6°E, 50 m asl) on the island of Lampedusa, and on an array of satellite observations, including UV and TIR sensors like IASI and OMI, and the space-borne Lidar CALIOP. The recent Mt. Etna activity occurred on 25-28 October 2013 has been selected as a case study, as the resulting sulphur dioxide plume has reached locations as far as Lampedusa. As a support to the identification of Mt Etna's impact on the sulphate aerosol content in that area, we perform trajectory analyses by means of a Lagrangian scheme coupled with a chemical box models to describe the chemical transformation of emitted sulphur dioxide to sulphate aerosols. Starting from this case study, we try to systematically determine the impact of the Mt Etna activity in this section of the Mediterranean, by matching the long-term ground measurements at Lampedusa with information of the Etna activity.

  3. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkin formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.

  4. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  5. Black carbon (soot) aerosol in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Blake, D. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Verma, S.; Kato, K.

    1992-01-01

    As determined by impactor samplers flown on ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass loadings in the stratosphere average 0.6 nanograms per standard cubic meter, or 0.01 percent of the total aerosol. Upper tropospheric BCA increases to 0.3 percent. Low stratospheric concentration is commensurate with present commercial air traffic fuel consumption, given the following assumptions: the BCA emissions are 0.1 grams per kilogram of fuel consumed, 10 percent of route mileage is above the tropopause, and average BCA stratospheric residence time is about one year. Taking BCA into account, the stratospheric single scatter albedo is about 0.99. Using parameters for planned supersonic commercial aircraft, whose emissions will be predominantly in the stratosphere, it is shown that such traffic will double stratospheric BCA concentration. This would reduce the aerosol single scattering albedo by one percent, and double the BCA surface area that is available for heterogeneous chemistry.

  6. Dust, Aerosol Ions and Their Interactions with Gaseous Species in East Asia During Spring 2001: A three-dimensional model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Dabdub, D.; Weber, R. J.; Huebert, B.; Clarke, A. D.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Prather, K. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Uno, I.; Woo, J.; Streets, D. G.; Quinn, P.; Johnson, J. E.; Song, C.; Anderson, T. L.; Sandu, A.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive regional chemical transport model is developed to study the aerosol-related issues for TRACE-P and ACE-ASIA experiments, which includes on-line thermodynamic module SCAPE II and on-line photolysis-rate calculation TUV, and explicitly considers dust heterogeneous reactions and chemical-aging process. The Asian outflow during March and April of 2001 is heavy polluted with high aerosol loading. Under cation-limited condition, SO2 oxidation and ammonium availability determined the nitrate size and gas-aerosol distributions. Dust was one of most important aerosol outflow during this period, which brought significant influences on other aerosols and gaseous species. A main role of dust in the equilibrium process is through the enhancement of the aerosol calcium concentration, which shifts the equilibrium balance to an anion-limited status. This status benefits the uptake of sulfate and nitrate, but repels ammonium. Dust influence on secondary aerosols and their size distributions is also determined by dust mass, size distribution and fresh ratio. The impacts of heterogeneous reactions on fresh dust involving O3, NO2, SO2 and HNO3 are studied by incorporating these reactions into the analysis. These reactions have significant influence on regional chemistry. For examples, the low O3 concentrations in the C-130 flight 6 can be explained only by the influence of heterogeneous reactions. Dust appearance significantly increased optical depth, and the radiative influence of dust can also affect the photochemical system. For example, OH levels can decrease by 20% near surface. All these dust impacts is sensitive to the dust mass, its size distribution, assumptions about its mixing state (internal vs. external), and the fraction of the aerosol mass available for heterogeneous reactions and equilibrium process.

  7. Aerosol chemical and optical properties over the Paris area within ESQUIF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Vautard, R.; Chazette, P.; Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol chemical and optical properties are extensively investigated for the first time over the Paris Basin in July 2000 within the ESQUIF project. The measurement campaign offers an exceptional framework to evaluate the performances of the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE in simulating concentrations of gaseous and aerosol pollutants, as well as the aerosol-size distribution and composition in polluted urban environment against ground-based and airborne measurements. A detailed comparison of measured and simulated variables during the second half of July with particular focus on 19 and 31 pollution episodes reveals an overall good agreement for gas-species and aerosol components both at the ground level and along flight trajectories, and the absence of systematic biases in simulated meteorological variables such as wind speed, relative humidity and boundary layer height as computed by the MM5 model. A good consistency in ozone and NO concentrations demonstrates the ability of the model to reproduce fairly well the plume structure and location both on 19 and 31 July, despite an underestimation of the amplitude of ozone concentrations on 31 July. The spatial and vertical aerosol distributions are also examined by comparing simulated and observed lidar vertical profiles along flight trajectories on 31 July and confirmed the model capacity to simulate the plume characteristics. The comparison of observed and modeled aerosol components in the southwest suburb of Paris during the second half of July indicated that the aerosol composition is rather correctly reproduced, although the total aerosol mass is underestimated of about 20%. The simulated Parisian aerosol is dominated by primary particulate matter that accounts for anthropogenic and biogenic primary particles (40%) and inorganic aerosol fraction (40%) including nitrate (8%), sulfate (22%) and ammonium (10%). The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) represent 12% of the total aerosol mass, while the mineral dust

  8. Aerosol chemical and optical properties over the Paris area within ESQUIF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Vautard, R.; Chazette, P.; Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.

    2006-08-01

    Aerosol chemical and optical properties are extensively investigated for the first time over the Paris Basin in July 2000 within the ESQUIF project. The measurement campaign offers an exceptional framework to evaluate the performances of the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE in simulating concentrations of gaseous and aerosol pollutants, as well as the aerosol-size distribution and composition in polluted urban environments against ground-based and airborne measurements. A detailed comparison of measured and simulated variables during the second half of July with particular focus on 19 and 31 pollution episodes reveals an overall good agreement for gas-species and aerosol components both at the ground level and along flight trajectories, and the absence of systematic biases in simulated meteorological variables such as wind speed, relative humidity and boundary layer height as computed by the MM5 model. A good consistency in ozone and NO concentrations demonstrates the ability of the model to reproduce the plume structure and location fairly well both on 19 and 31 July, despite an underestimation of the amplitude of ozone concentrations on 31 July. The spatial and vertical aerosol distributions are also examined by comparing simulated and observed lidar vertical profiles along flight trajectories on 31 July and confirm the model capacity to simulate the plume characteristics. The comparison of observed and modeled aerosol components in the southwest suburb of Paris during the second half of July indicates that the aerosol composition is rather correctly reproduced, although the total aerosol mass is underestimated by about 20%. The simulated Parisian aerosol is dominated by primary particulate matter that accounts for anthropogenic and biogenic primary particles (40%), and inorganic aerosol fraction (40%) including nitrate (8%), sulfate (22%) and ammonium (10%). The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) represent 12% of the total aerosol mass, while the mineral dust

  9. Evolution of aerosol chemistry in Xi'an, inland China, during the dust storm period of 2013 - Part 1: Sources, chemical forms and formation mechanisms of nitrate and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Cheng, C. L.; Huang, Y.; Tao, J.; Ren, Y. Q.; Wu, F.; Meng, J. J.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, Y. T.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, R.; Chen, Y. B.

    2014-11-01

    A total suspended particulate (TSP) sample was collected hourly in Xi'an, an inland megacity of China near the Loess Plateau, during a dust storm event of 2013 (9 March 18:00-12 March 10:00 LT), along with a size-resolved aerosol sampling and an online measurement of PM2.5. The TSP and size-resolved samples were determined for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and nitrogen (WSON), inorganic ions and elements to investigate chemistry evolution of dust particles. Hourly concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+ and Ca2+ in the TSP samples reached up to 34, 12, 180, 72 and 28 μg m-3, respectively, when dust peak arrived over Xi'an. Chemical compositions of the TSP samples showed that during the whole observation period NH4+ and NO3- were linearly correlated with each other (r2=0.76) with a molar ratio of 1 : 1, while SO42- and Cl- were well correlated with Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ (r2 > 0.85). Size distributions of NH4+ and NO3- presented a same pattern, which dominated in the coarse mode (> 2.1 μm) during the event and predominated in the fine mode (< 2.1 μm) during the non-event. SO42- and Cl- also dominated in the coarse mode during the event hours, but both exhibited two equivalent peaks in both the fine and the coarse modes during the non-event, due to the fine-mode accumulations of secondarily produced SO42- and biomass-burning-emitted Cl- and the coarse-mode enrichments of urban soil-derived SO42- and Cl-. Linear fit regression analysis further indicated that SO42- and Cl- in the dust samples possibly exist as Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, which directly originated from Gobi desert surface soil, while NH4+ and NO3- in the dust samples exist as NH4NO3. We propose a mechanism to explain these observations in which aqueous phase of dust particle surface is formed via uptake of water vapor by hygroscopic salts such as Na2SO4 and NaCl, followed by heterogeneous formation of nitrate on the liquid phase and subsequent absorption

  10. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  11. Charactering biomass burning aerosol in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), with evaluation against SAMBBA flight data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Darbyshire, E.; Morgan, W.; Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2014-12-01

    The burning of forests in the Amazonia region is a globally significant source of carbonaceous aerosol, containing both absorbing and scattering components. Biomass burning aerosol (BBA) are efficient CCN, modifying cloud properties and influencing atmospheric circulation and precipitation tendencies. The impacts of BBA are highly dependent on their size distribution and composition. Studies in this region can therefore benefit greatly from the use of state-of-the-art sectional aerosol representations. A bottom-up fire emissions inventory, 3BEM, has been developed by Longo et al.1. It uses satellite products to identify fire locations, applying the emissions factors of Andrei and Merlot3 to generate daily emission maps. Flaming emissions are very buoyant, and a method for injecting emissions at altitude is needed to accurately describe the vertical profile of BBA. A parameterisation has been developed to simulate this sub-grid process4, and previously implemented in WRF-Chem using a modal aerosol scheme5. For this work we have modified the WRF-Chem model to simulate 3BEM emissions using the MOSAIC sectional aerosol scheme6. This modified version of WRF-Chem v3.4.1 has been run for September 2012 over South America (25km grid-spacing). We will present model results evaluating the modelled aerosol vertical distribution, size distribution, composition and optical properties against measurements taken by the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the SAMBBA field campaign. The plume-rise parameterisation was found to inject flaming emissions too high over most fires, resulting in high modelled aerosol loadings at high altitude. We probed the behaviour of the parameterisation by developing a new SAMBBA-tuned 3BEM emissions scenario, which uses more realistic estimates of fire size. Results from high-resolution (5 and 1km) nested simulations will also be presented, in order to evaluate the impacts of explicit aerosol-cloud interactions in non-parameterised clouds. 1. K

  12. A brief overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) database and campaign operation centre (ChOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Dulac, François; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché,