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Sample records for aerosol hygroscopic growth

  1. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  2. Water Uptake and Hygroscopic Growth of Organosulfate Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Estillore, Armando D; Hettiyadura, Anusha P S; Qin, Zhen; Leckrone, Erin; Wombacher, Becky; Humphry, Tim; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-19

    Organosulfates (OS) are important components of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that have been identified in numerous field studies. This class of compounds within SOA can potentially affect aerosol physicochemical properties such as hygroscopicity because of their polar and hydrophilic nature as well as their low volatility. Currently, there is a dearth of information on how aerosol particles that contain OS interact with water vapor in the atmosphere. Herein we report a laboratory investigation on the hygroscopic properties of a structurally diverse set of OS salts at varying relative humidity (RH) using a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA). The OS studied include the potassium salts of glycolic acid sulfate, hydroxyacetone sulfate, 4-hydroxy-2,3-epoxybutane sulfate, and 2-butenediol sulfate and the sodium salts of benzyl sulfate, methyl sulfate, ethyl sulfate, and propyl sulfate. In addition, mixtures of OS and sodium chloride were also studied. The results showed gradual deliquescence of these aerosol particles characterized by continuous uptake and evaporation of water in both hydration and dehydration processes for the OS, while the mixture showed prompt deliquescence and effloresce transitions, albeit at a lower relative humidity relative to pure sodium chloride. Hygroscopic growth of these OS at 85% RH were also fit to parameterized functional forms. This new information provided here has important implications about the atmospheric lifetime, light scattering properties, and the role of OS in cloud formation. Moreover, results of these studies can ultimately serve as a basis for the development and evaluation of thermodynamic models for these compounds in order to consider their impact on the atmosphere. PMID:26967467

  3. Water Activity Limits the Hygroscopic Growth Factor of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Cabrera, J. A.; Golden, D.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we study the hygroscopic behavior of organic aerosols, which has important implications for Earth's climate. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) is defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to dry conditions to that at humid conditions. We present a new formulation to express the HGF of an aerosol particle as a function of water activity (aw) in the aqueous phase. This new formulation matches reported HGFs for common inorganic salts and water-miscible organic particles that are known to deliquesce into aqueous drops at high relative humidities (RH). Many studies use tandem differential mobility analyzers (TDMA) to determine the HGF of organic aerosols. For example, Brooks et al. used a TDMA to measure a HGF of 1.2 for 2 μm phthalic acid (PA) particles at 90% RH (aw= 0.9). However, water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. We have assembled a vapor pressure apparatus to measure aw of aqueous solutions at room temperature. Measured water activities for PA, used in our growth formulation, yield a HGF of ~ 1.0005 for 2 μm PA particles at 90% RH. Comparing our results against Brooks et al. suggests that TDMA experiments may grossly overestimate the HGF of PA particles since water activity limits this growth to below 1.0005. Alternatively, we suggest that the adsorption of a negligible mass of water by a highly porous PA particle can lead to an apparent growth in particle size by changing its morphology. Other studies also use TDMAs to measure HGFs of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). HGFs reported for SOAs are very similar to PA, suggesting that the observed growth may be due to morphological changes in particle size rather than water uptake as commonly assumed. We built a smog chamber where an organic precursor, such as d-limonene, reacts with nitrogen oxides under UV radiation to produce SOAs. We compare the HGFs for SOAs obtained with our method to those obtained with

  4. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xingnan; Tang, Chen; Yin, Zi; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Kong, Lingdong; Yang, Xin; Gao, Wei; Geng, Fuhai

    2013-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicrometer urban aerosol particles were studied during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign. The urban aerosols were composed of more-hygroscopic and nearly-hydrophobic particles, together with a trace of less-hygroscopic particles. The mean hygroscopicity parameter κ of the more-hygroscopic mode varied in the range of 0.27-0.39 depending on particle size. The relative abundance of the more-hygroscopic particles at any size was ca. 70%, slightly increasing with particle size. The number fraction of the nearly-hydrophobic particles fluctuated between 0.1 and 0.4 daily, in accordance with traffic emissions and atmospheric diffusion. The results from relative humidity dependence on hygroscopic growth and chemical analysis of fine particles indicated that particulate nitrate formation through the homogenous gas-phase reaction was suppressed under ammonia-deficient atmosphere in summer whereas the equilibrium was broken by more available NH3 during adverse meteorological conditions.

  5. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  6. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds.

  7. Control over hygroscopic growth of saline aqueous aerosol using Pluronic polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Hargreaves, Graham; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-02-25

    The hygroscopic properties of an aerosol originating from a nebulizer solution can affect the extent of peripheral deposition within the respiratory tract, which in turn affects drug efficacy of drugs delivered to the lungs. Thus, the ability to tailor the degree and rate of hygroscopic growth of an aerosol produced by a nebulizer through modification of the formulation would serve to improve drug efficacy through targeted lung deposition. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride aerosol mixed with commercially available Pluronic polymers, specifically F77 and F127, are reported using three complementary single aerosol analysis techniques, specifically aerosol optical tweezers, a double ring electrodynamic balance and a concentric cylinder electrodynamic balance. The F77 polymer is shown to have a predictable effect on the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol: the ability of the droplet to uptake water from the air depends on the solute weight percent of sodium chloride present in a linear dose dependant manner. Unlike the smaller F77, a non-linear relationship was observed for the larger molecular weight F127 polymer, with significant suppression of hygroscopic growth (>50% by mass) for solution aerosol containing even only 1 wt% of the polymer and 99 wt% sodium chloride. The suppression of growth is shown to be consistent with the formation of mixed phase aerosol particles containing hydrophilic inorganic rich domains and hydrophobic polymer rich domains that sequester some of the inorganic component, with the two phases responding to changes in relative humidity independently. This independence of coupling with the gas phase is apparent in both the equilibrium state and the kinetics of water evaporation/condensation. By starting with a saline nebulizer solution with a concentration of F127 ∼10(-2)mM, a 12% reduction in the radius of all aerosol produced at a relative humidity (RH) of 84% is possible. The

  8. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-06-01

    Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to consistently include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - merely based on solute solubilities - to explicitly account for the water mass consumed by hydration. As a result, in chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH) suffices to determine the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and directly links the aerosol hygroscopic growth to fog, haze and cloud formation. We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3) for use in regional and global chemistry-transport and climate models. Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stoichiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by computing aerosol properties such as

  9. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 1: Hygroscopic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Attwood, A. R.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Carlton, A. G.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ng, N. L.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Welti, A.; Xu, L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-09-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made during May-September 2013 in the southeastern United States (US) under fair-weather, afternoon conditions with well-defined planetary boundary layer structure. Optical extinction at 532 nm was directly measured at three relative humidities and compared with extinction calculated from measurements of aerosol composition and size distribution using the κ-Köhler approximation for hygroscopic growth. Using this approach, the hygroscopicity parameter κ for the organic fraction of the aerosol must have been < 0.10 to be consistent with 75 % of the observations within uncertainties. This subsaturated κ value for the organic aerosol in the southeastern US is consistent with several field studies in rural environments. We present a new parameterization of the change in aerosol extinction as a function of relative humidity that better describes the observations than does the widely used power-law (gamma, γ) parameterization. This new single-parameter κext formulation is based upon κ-Köhler and Mie theories and relies upon the well-known approximately linear relationship between particle volume (or mass) and optical extinction (Charlson et al., 1967). The fitted parameter, κext, is nonlinearly related to the chemically derived κ parameter used in κ-Köhler theory. The values of κext we determined from airborne measurements are consistent with independent observations at a nearby ground site.

  10. Aerosol mixing state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2013-05-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic hygroscopicity parameter, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions (forg) are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which predictions of the hygroscopicity parameter are compared against κ*. Strong diurnal changes in aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN at 0.51% ± 0.06% supersaturation can surpass by more than a factor of two the corresponding concentrations of 100 nm particles. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 LT throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as "internally mixed". Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour" and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing state and the presence of refractory material not measured

  11. Variations in hygroscopic growth of sub- and super-micron sea spray aerosols during a phytoplankton bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Jayarathne, T. S.; Stone, E. A.; Laskina, O.; Grassian, V. H.; Lee, C.; Sultana, C. M.; Moore, K.; Cornwell, G.; Novak, G.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Marine sea spray aerosols (SSA) make up an important portion of natural aerosols (prior to anthropogenic influence) and are therefore important in establishing the baseline for anthropogenic aerosol climate impacts. One way aerosols impact climate is by scattering solar radiation, and how much light is scattered depends upon the size of aerosols. Aerosols grow larger via water uptake and thus scatter more light at elevated relative humidities. This growth depends on composition. SSA can become enriched in organics during phytoplankton blooms, becoming less salty and therefore less hygroscopic. Aerosol hygroscopicity of SSA sampled during an in-lab phytoplankton bloom were measured during the CAICE-IMPACTS 2014 study. SSA were generated via breaking waves in an enclosed 33 m wave channel filled with natural seawater. Aerosol hygroscopicity was characterized by measuring light extinction at 532 nm of dry aerosols and of aerosols humidified to 85% relative humidity using a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer. These optical growth factors (humidified extinction/dry extinction) were converted to physical growth factors using Mie Theory calculations and aerosol size distributions measured with a scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (SEMS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Growth factors for super- and sub-micron SSA were quantified separately through the use of a PM2.5 cyclone or PM1 impactor. The observed SSA growth factors will be linked to SSA and source water chemical composition determined by both offline and online analysis of samples. The SSA bulk growth factors will also be compared with concurrent measurements of the efficiency with which SSA act as cloud condensation nuclei. Observed SSA growth factors will also be compared to offline hygroscopic growth measurements.

  12. Dynamics of aerosol size during inhalation: hygroscopic growth of commercial nebulizer formulations.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Dailey, Lea Ann; Murnane, Darragh

    2014-03-10

    The size of aerosol particles prior to, and during, inhalation influences the site of deposition within the lung. As such, a detailed understanding of the hygroscopic growth of an aerosol during inhalation is necessary to accurately model the deposited dose. In the first part of this study, it is demonstrated that the aerosol produced by a nebulizer, depending on the airflows rates, may experience a (predictable) wide range of relative humidity prior to inhalation and undergo dramatic changes in both size and solute concentration. A series of sensitive single aerosol analysis techniques are then used to make measurements of the relative humidity dependent thermodynamic equilibrium properties of aerosol generated from four common nebulizer formulations. Measurements are also reported of the kinetics of mass transport during the evaporation or condensation of water from the aerosol. Combined, these measurements allow accurate prediction of the temporal response of the aerosol size prior to and during inhalation. Specifically, we compare aerosol composed of pure saline (150 mM sodium chloride solution in ultrapure water) with two commercially available nebulizer products containing relatively low compound doses: Breath®, consisting of a simple salbutamol sulfate solution (5 mg/2.5 mL; 1.7 mM) in saline, and Flixotide® Nebules, consisting of a more complex stabilized fluticasone propionate suspension (0.25 mg/mL; 0.5 mM in saline. A mimic of the commercial product Tobi© (60 mg/mL tobramycin and 2.25 mg/mL NaCl, pH 5.5-6.5) is also studied, which was prepared in house. In all cases, the presence of the pharmaceutical was shown to have a profound effect on the magnitude, and in some cases the rate, of the mass flux of water to and from the aerosol as compared to saline. These findings provide physical chemical evidence supporting observations from human inhalation studies, and suggest that using the growth dynamics of a pure saline aerosol in a lung inhalation model

  13. Dynamics of aerosol size during inhalation: hygroscopic growth of commercial nebulizer formulations.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Dailey, Lea Ann; Murnane, Darragh

    2014-03-10

    The size of aerosol particles prior to, and during, inhalation influences the site of deposition within the lung. As such, a detailed understanding of the hygroscopic growth of an aerosol during inhalation is necessary to accurately model the deposited dose. In the first part of this study, it is demonstrated that the aerosol produced by a nebulizer, depending on the airflows rates, may experience a (predictable) wide range of relative humidity prior to inhalation and undergo dramatic changes in both size and solute concentration. A series of sensitive single aerosol analysis techniques are then used to make measurements of the relative humidity dependent thermodynamic equilibrium properties of aerosol generated from four common nebulizer formulations. Measurements are also reported of the kinetics of mass transport during the evaporation or condensation of water from the aerosol. Combined, these measurements allow accurate prediction of the temporal response of the aerosol size prior to and during inhalation. Specifically, we compare aerosol composed of pure saline (150 mM sodium chloride solution in ultrapure water) with two commercially available nebulizer products containing relatively low compound doses: Breath®, consisting of a simple salbutamol sulfate solution (5 mg/2.5 mL; 1.7 mM) in saline, and Flixotide® Nebules, consisting of a more complex stabilized fluticasone propionate suspension (0.25 mg/mL; 0.5 mM in saline. A mimic of the commercial product Tobi© (60 mg/mL tobramycin and 2.25 mg/mL NaCl, pH 5.5-6.5) is also studied, which was prepared in house. In all cases, the presence of the pharmaceutical was shown to have a profound effect on the magnitude, and in some cases the rate, of the mass flux of water to and from the aerosol as compared to saline. These findings provide physical chemical evidence supporting observations from human inhalation studies, and suggest that using the growth dynamics of a pure saline aerosol in a lung inhalation model

  14. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, <0.05) on time scales of <10 s for droplets containing involatile or volatile solutes. The approach is benchmarked for binary and ternary inorganic solution aerosols with typical uncertainties in water activity of <±0.2% at water activities >0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1). PMID:27285052

  15. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    in the mid-IR range (800 to 7000 cm(-1)) also showed no significant changes in either the real or the imaginary parts of the refractive indices for brown carbon aerosol particles when compared to ammonium sulfate. Therefore, changes in the optical properties of ammonium sulfate in the mid-IR spectral range due to reaction with methylglyoxal appear to be insignificant. In addition to these measurements, we have characterized additional physicochemical properties of the brown carbon aerosol particles including hygroscopic growth using a tandem-differential mobility analyzer. Compared to ammonium sulfate, brown carbon aerosol particles are found to have lower deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), efflorescence relative humidity (ERH), and hygroscopic growth at the same relative humidities. Overall, our study provides new details of the optical and physicochemical properties of a class of secondary organic aerosol which may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry and climate.

  16. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    in the mid-IR range (800 to 7000 cm(-1)) also showed no significant changes in either the real or the imaginary parts of the refractive indices for brown carbon aerosol particles when compared to ammonium sulfate. Therefore, changes in the optical properties of ammonium sulfate in the mid-IR spectral range due to reaction with methylglyoxal appear to be insignificant. In addition to these measurements, we have characterized additional physicochemical properties of the brown carbon aerosol particles including hygroscopic growth using a tandem-differential mobility analyzer. Compared to ammonium sulfate, brown carbon aerosol particles are found to have lower deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), efflorescence relative humidity (ERH), and hygroscopic growth at the same relative humidities. Overall, our study provides new details of the optical and physicochemical properties of a class of secondary organic aerosol which may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry and climate. PMID:27253434

  17. Discontinuities in hygroscopic growth below and above water saturation for laboratory surrogates of oligomers in organic atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Natasha; Zuend, Andreas; Schilling, Katherine; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Discontinuities in apparent hygroscopicity below and above water saturation have been observed for organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles in both laboratory studies and in the ambient atmosphere. However, uncertainty remains regarding the factors that contribute to observations of low hygroscopic growth below water saturation but enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a given aerosol population. Utilizing laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosols, we explore the extent to which such discontinuities are influenced by organic component molecular mass and viscosity, non-ideal thermodynamic interactions between aerosol components, and the combination of these factors. Measurements of hygroscopic growth under subsaturated conditions and the CCN activity of aerosols comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with average molecular masses ranging from 200 to 10 000 g mol-1 and mixtures of PEG with ammonium sulfate (AS) were conducted. Experimental results are compared to calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium conducted with the Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model, and the potential influence of kinetic limitations on observed water uptake was further explored through estimations of water diffusivity in the PEG oligomers. Particle-phase behavior, including the prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), was also modeled with AIOMFAC. Under subsaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions, we observed little variability in hygroscopic growth across PEG systems with different molecular masses; however, an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular mass was observed. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures, and, in fact, an enhancement in CCN activity was observed for the PEG10000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 15 % reduction in critical activation diameter at a supersaturation of 0.8 %. We also

  18. The hygroscopicity of indoor aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-07-01

    A system to study the hygroscopic growth of particle was developed by combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a wetted wall reactor. This system is capable of mimicking the conditions in human respiratory tract, and measuring the particle size change due to the hygroscopic growth. The performance of the system was tested with three kinds of particles of known composition, NaCl, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and (NH{sub 4})HS0{sub 4} particles. The hygroscopicity of a variety of common indoor aerosol particles was studied including combustion aerosols (cigarette smoking, cooking, incenses and candles) and consumer spray products such as glass cleaner, general purpose cleaner, hair spray, furniture polish spray, disinfectant, and insect killer. Experiments indicate that most of the indoor aerosols show some hygroscopic growth and only a few materials do not. The magnitude of hygroscopic growth ranges from 20% to 300% depending on the particle size and fraction of water soluble components.

  19. Effect of hygroscopic growth on the aerosol light-scattering coefficient: A review of measurements, techniques and error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Zieger, P.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is important for an accurate description of direct aerosol radiative forcing. This factor is defined as the ratio between the scattering coefficient at enhanced relative humidity, RH, to a reference (dry) scattering coefficient. Here, we review the different experimental designs used to measure the scattering coefficient at dry and humidified conditions as well as the procedures followed to analyze the measurements. Several empirical parameterizations for the relationship between f(RH) and RH have been proposed in the literature. These parameterizations have been reviewed and tested using experimental data representative of different hygroscopic growth behavior and a new parameterization is presented. The potential sources of error in f(RH) are discussed. A Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the overall measurement uncertainty, which is found to be around 20-40% for moderately hygroscopic aerosols. The main factors contributing to this uncertainty are the uncertainty in RH measurement, the dry reference state and the nephelometer uncertainty. A literature survey of nephelometry-based f(RH) measurements is presented as a function of aerosol type. In general, the highest f(RH) values were measured in clean marine environments, with pollution having a major influence on f(RH). Dust aerosol tended to have the lowest reported hygroscopicity of any of the aerosol types studied. Major open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are outlined.

  20. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity, Droplet Growth Kinetics and Hygroscopicity of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Defeng; Buchholz, Angela; Kortner, Birthe; Schlag, Patrick; Rubach, Florian; Hendrik, Fucks; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Hallquist, Mattias; Flores, Michel; Rudich, Yinon; Glasius, Marianne; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus; Mentel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recent field data and model analysis show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is enhanced under anthropogenic influences (de Gouw et al. 2005, Spracklen et al. 2011). The interaction of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) with anthropogenic emissions such as anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) could change the particle formation yields and the aerosol properties, as was recently demonstrated (Emanuelsson et al., 2013; Flores et al., 2014). However, the effect of the interaction of BVOCs with AVOCs on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopicity of SOA remains elusive. Characterizing such changes is necessary in order to assess the indirect radiative forcing of biogenic aerosols that form under anthropogenic influence. In this study, we investigated the influence of AVOCs on CCN activation and hygroscopic growth of BSOA. SOA was formed from photooxidation of monoterpenes and aromatics as representatives of BVOCs and AVOCs, respectively. The hygroscopicity and CCN activation of BSOA were studied and compared with that of anthropogenic SOA (ASOA) and the mixture of ASOA and BSOA (ABSOA). We found that ASOA had a significantly higher hygroscopicity than BSOA at similar OH dose, which is attributed to a higher oxidation level of ASOA. While the ASOA fraction had an enhancing effect on the hygroscopicity of ABSOA compared to BSOA, the hygroscopicity of ABSOA cannot be explained by a linear combination of the pure ASOA and BSOA systems, indicating potentially additional non-linear effects such as oligomerization. However, in contrast to hygroscopicity, ASOA showed similar CCN activity as BSOA, in spite of its higher oxidation level. The ASOA fraction did not enhance the CCN activity of ABSOA. The discrepancy between hygroscopicity and CCN activity is discussed. In addition, BSOA, ABSOA and ASOA formed similar droplet size with ammonium sulfate in CCN at a given supersaturation, indicating none of these aerosols had a delay in the water uptake in the supersaturated

  1. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles in Beijing (China) during wintertime: a comparison of three experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Gnauk, T.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.; Min, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-09-01

    The hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols are highly relevant for the quantification of radiative effects in the atmosphere, but also of interest for the assessment of particle health effects upon inhalation. This article reports measurements of aerosol particle hygroscopicity in the highly polluted urban atmosphere of Beijing, China in January 2005. The meteorological conditions corresponded to a relatively cold and dry atmosphere. Three different methods were used: 1) A combination of Humidifying Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (H-DMPS) and Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) measurements, 2) A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA), and 3) A simplistic solubility model fed by chemical particle composition determined from Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) samples. From the H-DMPS and TDMPS particle number size distributions, a size-resolved descriptive hygroscopic growth factor (DHGF) was determined for the relative humidities (RH) 55%, 77% and 90%, and particle diameters between 30 and 400 nm. In Beijing, the highest DHGFs were observed for accumulation mode particles, 1.40 (±0.03) at 90% RH. DHGF decreased significantly with particle size, reaching 1.04 (±0.15) at 30 nm. H-TDMA data also suggest a decrease in growth factor towards the biggest particles investigated (350 nm), associated with an increasing fraction of nearly hydrophobic particles. The agreement between the H-DMPS/TDMPS and H-TDMA methods was satisfactory in the accumulation mode size range (100-400 nm). In the Aitken mode range (<100 nm), the H-DMPS/TDMPS method yielded growth factors lower by up to 0.1 at 90% RH. The application of the solubility model based on measured chemical composition clearly reproduced the size-dependent trend in hygroscopic particle growth observed by the other methods. In the case of aerosol dominated by inorganic ions, the composition-derived growth factors tended to agree (± 0.05) or underestimate (up to

  2. Aerosol mixingstate, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Sara; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenberg, Mark; McMurry, Peter; Smith, James N.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2013-05-15

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. K¨ohler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, k*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, (forg), are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which kAMS is inferred and compared against k*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased k* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% +/- 0.06%. We also find that at 0600-0800 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as “internally-mixed”. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning “rush hour”, and the entire campaign. We show that k* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for k* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the

  3. Aerosol mixing-state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2012-06-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTDMA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, forg, are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which κAMS is inferred and compared against κ*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% ± 0.06%. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as internally-mixed. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour", and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the AMS

  4. Hygroscopic growth of size-resolved, emission-source classified, aerosol particles sampled across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, T.; Crosbie, E. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Mikoviny, T.; Wisthaler, A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is a key air quality parameter, impacting the radiation budget, visibility, and cloud formation. During the DC3 and SEAC4RS field campaigns (>300 total flight hours), measurements were made over 32 US states, Canada, the Pacific Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico, between the surface and 41,000 feet ASL. The aircraft research payloads included a suite of in-situ aerosol and gas phase instruments. The Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe (DASH-SP) and the Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) humidified nephelometer instrument applied different techniques to measure water uptake by aerosol particles at prescribed relative humidity values. Size-resolved growth factor (GF ≡ Dp,wet/Dp,dry) measurements by the DASH-SP are compared to bulk scattering measurements (f(RH) ≡ σscat,wet/σscat,dry) by the LARGE instrument. Spatial location and volatile organic compound tracers such as isoprene and acetonitrile are used to classify the origin of distinct air masses, including: forest fires, biogenic-emitting forests, agricultural use lands, marine boundary layer, urban, and rural background. Analyses of GF results by air mass origin are reported and results are compared with f(RH) measurements. A parameterization between the f(RH) and GF measurements and its potential uses are discussed.

  5. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  6. Measuring and modeling the hygroscopic growth of two humic substances in mixed aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, I. R.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2013-09-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric particles affects atmospheric chemistry and Earth's climate. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constitutes a significant fraction of the dry submicron mass of atmospheric aerosols, thus affecting their water uptake properties. Although the WSOC fraction is comprised of many compounds, a set of model substances can be used to describe its behavior. For this study, mixtures of Nordic aquatic fulvic acid reference (NAFA) and Fluka humic acid (HA), with various combinations of inorganic salts (sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate) and other representative organic compounds (levoglucosan and succinic acid), were studied. We measured the equilibrium water vapor pressure over bulk solutions of these mixtures as a function of temperature and solute concentration. New water activity (aw) parameterizations and hygroscopic growth curves at 25 °C were calculated from these data for particles of equivalent composition. We examined the effect of temperature on the water activity and found a maximum variation of 9% in the 0-30 °C range, and 2% in the 20-30 °C range. Five two-component mixtures were studied to understand the effect of adding a humic substance (HS), such as NAFA and HA, to an inorganic salt or a saccharide. The deliquescence point at 25 °C for HS-inorganic mixtures did not change significantly from that of the pure inorganic species. However, the hygroscopic growth of HA / inorganic mixtures was lower than that exhibited by the pure salt, in proportion to the added mass of HA. The addition of NAFA to a highly soluble solute (ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride or levoglucosan) in water had the same effect as the addition of HA to the inorganic species for most of the water activity range studied. Yet, the water uptake of these NAFA mixtures transitioned to match the growth of the pure salt or saccharide at high aw values. The remaining four mixtures were based on chemical composition data for different aerosol types. As

  7. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate. PMID:26794419

  8. Characterization of solvent-extractable organics in urban aerosols based on mass spectrum analysis and hygroscopic growth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Toshiyuki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2011-11-01

    To characterize atmospheric particulate organics with respect to polarity, aerosol samples collected on filters in the urban area of Nagoya, Japan, in 2009 were extracted using water, methanol, and ethyl acetate. The extracts were atomized and analyzed using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer. The atmospheric concentrations of the extracted organics were determined using phthalic acid as a reference material. Comparison of the organic carbon concentrations measured using a carbon analyzer and the HR-ToF-AMS suggests that organics extracted with water (WSOM) and ethyl acetate (EASOM) or those extracted with methanol (MSOM) comprise the greater part of total organics. The oxygen-carbon ratios (O/C) of the extracted organics varied: 0.51-0.75 (WSOM), 0.37-0.48 (MSOM), and 0.27-0.33 (EASOM). In the ion-group analysis, WSOM, MSOM, and EASOM were clearly characterized by the different fractions of the CH and CO(2) groups. On the basis of the hygroscopic growth measurements of the extracts, κ of organics at 90% relative humidity (κ(org)) were estimated. Positive correlation of κ(org) with O/C (r 0.70) was found for MSOM and EASOM, but no clear correlation was found for WSOM.

  9. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Niessner, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2004-02-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Köhler theory calculations (100-300nm particle size range, 298K, 960hPa). BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance for proteins and other macromolecular compounds, which constitute a large fraction of the water-soluble organic component of air particulate matter.

    Pure BSA particles exhibited deliquescence and efflorescence transitions at sim35% relative humidity (RH) and a hygroscopic diameter increase by up to sim10% at 95% RH in good agreement with model calculations based on a simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient. Pure NaCl particles were converted from near-cubic to near-spherical shape upon interaction with water vapor at relative humidities below the deliquescence threshold (partial surface dissolution and recrystallisation), and the diameters of pure NH4NO3 particles decreased by up to 10% due to chemical decomposition and evaporation.

    Mixed NaCl-BSA and NH4NO3-BSA particles interacting with water vapor exhibited mobility equivalent diameter reductions of up to 20%, depending on particle generation, conditioning, size, and chemical composition (BSA dry mass fraction 10-90%). These observations can be explained by formation of porous agglomerates (envelope void fractions up to 50%) due to ion-protein interactions and electric charge effects on the one hand, and by compaction of the agglomerate structure due to capillary condensation effects on the other. The size of NH4NO3-BSA particles was apparently also influenced by volatilisation of NH4NO3, but not as much as for pure salt particles, i.e. the protein inhibited the decomposition of NH4NO3 or the

  10. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Niessner, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2003-09-01

    decomposition products NH3 and HNO3. The efflorescence threshold of NaCl-BSA particles decreased with increasing BSA dry mass fraction, i.e. the protein inhibited the formation of salt crystals and enhanced the stability of supersaturated solution droplets. The H-TDMA and TEM results indicate that the protein was enriched at the surface of the mixed particles and formed an envelope, which inhibits the access of water vapor to the particle core and leads to kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth, phase transitions, and microstructural rearrangement processes. Besides these surface and kinetic effects, proteins and comparable organic macromolecules may also influence the thermodynamic properties of the aqueous bulk solution (solubilities, vapor pressures, and chemical equilibria, e.g. for the decomposition and evaporation of NH4NO3. The observed effects should be taken into account in the analysis of data from laboratory experiments and field measurements and in the modelling of aerosol processes involving water vapor and particles with complex composition. They can strongly influence experimental results, and depending on ambient conditions they may also play a significant role in the atmosphere (deliquescence, efflorescence, and CCN activation of particles). In fact, irregular hygroscopic growth curves similar to the ones observed in this study have recently been reported from H-TDMA experiments with water-soluble organics extracted from real air particulate matter and with humic-like substances. The Köhler theory calculations performed with different models demonstrate that the hygroscopic growth of particles composed of inorganic salts and proteins can be efficiently described with a simple volume additivity approach, provided that the correct dry solute mass equivalent diameter and composition are known. A simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient has been derived from an osmotic pressure virial equation and appears to be well-suited for proteins and comparable

  11. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  12. Relating hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosol particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Duplissy, J.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Dommen, J.; Alfarra, M. R.; Metzger, A.; Barmpadimos, I.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Tritscher, T.; Gysel, M.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collins, D. R.; Tomlinson, J.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-01-01

    A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) was used to measure the water uptake (hygroscopicity) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed during the chemical and photochemical oxidation of several organic precursors in a smog chamber. Electron ionization mass spectra of the non-refractory submicron aerosol were simultaneously determined with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and correlations between the two different signals were investigated. SOA hygroscopicity was found to strongly correlate with the relative abundance of the ion signal m/z 44 expressed as a fraction of total organic signal (f44). m/z 44 is due mostly to the ion fragment CO2+ for all types of SOA systems studied, and has been previously shown to strongly correlate with organic O/C for ambient and chamber OA. The analysis was also performed on ambient OA from two field experiments at the remote site Jungfraujoch, and the megacity Mexico City, where similar results were found. A simple empirical linear relation between the hygroscopicity of OA at subsaturated RH, as given by the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) or "κorg" parameter, and f44 was determined and is given by κorg = 2.2 × f44 - 0.13. This approximation can be further verified and refined as the database for AMS and HTDMA measurements is constantly being expanded around the world. Finally, the use of this approximation could introduce an important simplification in the parameterization of hygroscopicity of OA in atmospheric models, since f44 is correlated with the photochemical age of an air mass.

  13. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, D. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Zhang, Q.; Setyan, A.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2015-04-17

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter γ, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter κ for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles (defined heremore » as particles with aerodynamic diameters between 1 and 2.5 microns), yielding κ = 0.1–0.15 and 0.9–1.0, respectively. The derived range of oxygenated OA κ values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea-salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.« less

  14. How Important Is Organic Aerosol Hygroscopicity to Aerosol Indirect Forcing?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jian

    2010-12-07

    Organics are among the most abundant aerosol components in the atmosphere. However, there are still large uncertainties with emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (precursor gases of secondary organic aerosol, SOA), formation and yield of SOA, and chemical and physical properties (e.g., hygroscopicity) of POA and SOA. All these may have significant impacts on aerosol direct and indirect forcing estimated from global models. In this study a modal aerosol module (MAM) in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) is used to examine sensitivities of aerosol indirect forcing to hygroscopicity (“κ” value) of POA and SOA. Our model simulation indicates that in the present-day condition changing “κ” value of POA from 0 to 0.1 increases the number concentration of cloud condensational nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation S=0.1% by 40-60% over the POA source regions, while changing “κ” value of SOA by ±50% (from 0.14 to 0.07 and 0.21) changes the CCN within 30%. Changes in the in-cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) are within 20% in most locations on the globe with the above changes in “κ” value of POA and SOA. Global annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) between present-day (PD) and pre-industrial (PI) conditions change by 0.4 W m-2 with the control run of -1.3 W m-2. AIF reduces with the increase hygroscopicity of organic aerosol, indicating the important role of natural organic aerosol in buffering the relative change of CDNC from PI to PD.

  15. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES Campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, D. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Zhang, Q.; Setyan, A.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2014-12-10

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 CARES study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter γ, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter κ for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles, yielding κ = 0.1–0.15 and 0.9–1.0, respectively. Themore » derived range of oxygenated OA κ values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.« less

  16. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Liu, Qifan; Li, Kun; Wang, Weigang; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-03-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, knowledge on the water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single components such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, phthalic acid, and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid, and phthalic acid have a strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppressing its crystallization completely during the drying process. The phase behaviors of oxalic acid/levoglucosan mixed particles are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with the Universal Quasi-Chemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a crystalline solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH compared to the model predictions based on reasonable oxalic acid phase assumption. Organic mixture has more complex effects on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan account for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing the phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake

  17. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B.; Tong, S. R.; Liu, Q. F.; Li, K.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2015-08-01

    Water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited characterization. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single component such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid and phthalic acid and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid and phthalic acid have strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppress its crystallization completely. The interactions between oxalic acid and levoglucosan are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with UNIFAC method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH due to positive chemical interactions between solutes. Organic mixture has more complex effect on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan accounts for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake under high RH conditions and thus affect the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  18. Application of Aerosol Hygroscopicity Measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains Site to Examine Composition and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Runjun, Li; Collins, Don R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Brackett, Vincent G.

    2006-01-01

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure submicron aerosol size distributions, hygroscopicity, and occasionally volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Central Facility of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) site. Hygroscopic growth factor distributions for particles at eight dry diameters ranging from 0.012 micrometers to 0.600 micrometers were measured throughout the study. For a subset of particle sizes, more detailed measurements were occasionally made in which the relative humidity or temperature to which the aerosol was exposed was varied over a wide range. These measurements, in conjunction with backtrajectory clustering, were used to infer aerosol composition and to gain insight into the processes responsible for evolution. The hygroscopic growth of both the smallest and largest particles analyzed was typically less than that of particles with dry diameters of about 0.100 micrometers. It is speculated that condensation of secondary organic aerosol on nucleation mode particles is largely responsible for the minimal hygroscopic growth observed at the smallest sizes considered. Growth factor distributions of the largest particles characterized typically contained a nonhygroscopic mode believed to be composed primarily of dust. A model was developed to characterize the hygroscopic properties of particles within a size distribution mode through analysis of the fixed size hygroscopic growth measurements. The performance of this model was quantified through comparison of the measured fixed size hygroscopic growth factor distributions with those simulated through convolution of the size-resolved concentration contributed by each of the size modes and the mode-resolved hygroscopicity. This transformation from sizeresolved hygroscopicity to mode-resolved hygroscopicity facilitated examination of changes in the hygroscopic

  19. In-cloud measurements highlight the role of aerosol hygroscopicity in cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väisänen, Olli; Ruuskanen, Antti; Ylisirniö, Arttu; Miettinen, Pasi; Portin, Harri; Hao, Liqing; Leskinen, Ari; Komppula, Mika; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud droplet activation was studied at the Puijo measurement station in Kuopio, Finland, during the autumn 2014. The hygroscopic growth of 80, 120 and 150 nm particles was measured at 90 % relative humidity with a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer. Typically, the growth factor (GF) distributions appeared bimodal with clearly distinguishable peaks around 1.0-1.1 and 1.4-1.6. However, the relative contribution of the two modes appeared highly variable reflecting the probable presence of fresh anthropogenic particle emissions. The hygroscopicity-dependent activation properties were estimated in a case study comprising four separate cloud events with varying characteristics. At 120 and 150 nm, the activation efficiencies within the low- and high-GF modes varied between 0-34 and 57-83 %, respectively, indicating that the less hygroscopic particles remained mostly non-activated, whereas the more hygroscopic mode was predominantly scavenged into cloud droplets. By modifying the measured GF distributions, it was estimated how the cloud droplet concentrations would change if all the particles belonged to the more hygroscopic group. According to κ-Köhler simulations, the cloud droplet concentrations increased up to 70 % when the possible feedback effects on effective peak supersaturation (between 0.16 and 0.29 %) were assumed negligible. This is an indirect but clear illustration of the sensitivity of cloud formation to aerosol chemical composition.

  20. Hygroscopicity of dicarbonyl-amine secondary organic aerosol products investigated with HTDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; de Haan, D. O.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of amine-dicarbonyl chemistry as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathway, producing imines, imidazoles, and N-containing oligomers. Preliminary work in our group has suggested that some of these products may be surface active. Therefore, the presence of these products may result in important changes to submicron particle hygroscopicity that affect aerosol scattering and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, especially in regions with significant amine-containing particles. To investigate their hygroscopicity, we have designed a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system around a 300 L Teflon chamber that allows for longer humidification times needed for some organic aerosol components that are only slightly hygroscopic. This modification provides a range of residence times from 2.5 minutes up to 1 hour, unlike previously published systems that vary from 2-30 seconds. Using the modified hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), we have measured the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of SOA formed from reactions of glyoxal (and methylglyoxal) with methylamine, ammonium sulfate, and several amino acids. Changes to inorganic aerosol HGF in response to the presence of SOA products are also investigated.

  1. Optical and Hygroscopic Studies of Aerosols In Simulated Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, Christa A.

    2011-08-01

    in the UV-Vis than Khare et al. (1984) values. These results may imply that (a) photolysis is not the dominant source of aerosol on Titan, and/or (b) the optical retrievals are dominated by the more absorbing and scattering electric discharge generated aerosol. For the hygroscopicity studies, the optical growth of the early Earth analog at various relative humidities (RH) was measured, as well as a Titan analog for comparison. The retrieved hygroscopic parameter for the early Earth analog indicates that a humidified early Earth aerosol could have contributed to a larger antigreenhouse effect on the early Earth atmosphere than previously modeled with dry aerosol. Such effects would be important in regions where RH is greater than 50% because such high humidities are needed for significant amounts of water to be on the aerosol. The retrieved hygroscopicity parameter also indicates that the particles could activate into cloud droplets at reasonable supersaturations. In regions where the haze was dominant, it is expected that low particle concentrations, once activated into cloud droplets, would create short-lived, optically thin clouds. Such clouds, if predominant on the early Earth, would have a lower albedo than clouds today, thereby warming the planet relative to current day clouds.

  2. Hygroscopic properties of levoglucosan and related organic compounds characteristic to biomass burning aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2004-11-01

    Biomass burning, which is characterized by pyrolysis as well as vaporization and condensation of biomass constituents, is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosols. In this study, hygroscopic properties of five organic compounds (levoglucosan, D-glucose, and vanillic, syringic, and 4-hydroxybenozoic acids), which are major pyrolysis products of wood, were measured using a tandem differential mobility analyzer. Levoglucosan, which is typically the most abundant species in wood burning aerosols, showed a significant hygroscopic growth for particles with a diameter of 100 nm. No efflorescence was observed under the measured relative humidity, and a supersaturated condition of levoglucosan-water particles was observed. The growth factors of levoglucosan are 1.08, 1.18, 1.23, and 1.38 at relative humidity (RH) of 60, 80, 85, and 90%, respectively. The measured hygroscopic curves are in general consistent with those estimated from ideal solution theory and Uniquac Functional-Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) and Conductor-Like Screening Model for Real Solvent (COSMO-RS) methods. Significant hygroscopic growth was also observed for D-glucose, whose growth factor is quite similar to that of levoglucosan. However, three model pyrolysis products of lignin (i.e., vanillic-, syringic-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids) did not show any hygroscopic growth under the RH conditions up to 95%. On the basis of the organic composition of wood burning aerosols, the water absorption attributed to levoglucosan in wood burning aerosols is calculated to be up to 30% of the organic mass at 90% RH. This study demonstrates that oxygenated organics emitted from biomass burning could significantly enhance the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Hygroscopic Behavior of Multicomponent Aerosols Involving NaCl and Dicarboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yu-Cong; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2016-02-25

    Atmospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds. The hygroscopicity of mixed particles is closely related to their chemical composition and interactions between components, which is still poorly understood. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of submicron particles composed of NaCl and dicarboxylic acids including oxalic acid (OA), malonic acid (MA), and succinic acid (SA) with various mass ratios are investigated with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system. Both the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method and extended aerosol inorganics model (E-AIM) are applied to predict the water uptake behaviors of sodium chloride/dicarboxylic acid mixtures. For NaCl/OA mixed particles, the measured growth factors were significantly lower than predictions from the model methods, indicating a change in particle composition caused by chloride depletion. The hygroscopic growth of NaCl/MA particles was well described by E-AIM, and that of NaCl/SA particles was dependent upon mixing ratio. Compared with model predictions, it was determined that water uptake of the NaCl/OA mixture could be enhanced and could be closer to the predictions by addition of levoglucosan or malonic acid, which retained water even at low relative humidity (RH), leading to inhibition of HCl evaporation during dehydration. These results demonstrate that the coexisting hygroscopic species have a strong influence on the phase state of particles, thus affecting chemical interactions between inorganic and organic compounds as well as the overall hygroscopicity of mixed particles. PMID:26820230

  4. Online hygroscopicity and chemical measurement of urban aerosol in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinning; Ye, Xingnan; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Gross, Deborah S.

    2014-10-01

    Submicron aerosol hygroscopicity and composition were simultaneously measured with a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) in-line with an Aerosol Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) in wintertime of 2009 in Shanghai. 250 nm dry diameter aerosol particles were humidified (85% RH) and selected based on their hygroscopicity. Two Growth Factor (GF) modes were observed persistently: a weak nearly-hydrophobic (NH) mode with GF at around 1.05 and a strong hydrophilic mode with GF around 1.46. Aerosol particles at different GFs were chemically analyzed by ATOFMS to link the aerosol hygroscopicity and chemistry. Particles were grouped into five major classes: inorganic dust/ash, biomass burning particles (BB), elemental carbon and organic carbon mixed particles (ECOC), Amine rich organic carbon particles (OC-Amine), and high mass organic carbon particles (HMOC). Different particle types were found enriched in the two GF modes. ECOC and OC-Amine particles internally mixed with secondary inorganic species were found mostly in the hydrophilic mode. Pure EC particles and a small group of clay particles among the dust/ash type with strong signals of aluminum and silicon oxides appeared in the NH mode. HMOC particles were exclusively found in the NH mode. Chemical signature intensities were analyzed to examine the particle mixing states and their impact on the diversity of hygroscopicity for each particle type. BB particles in the NH mode had stronger organic carbon signals, while those in hydrophilic mode had stronger potassium salt signals. In general, an elevated OC mass fraction increased particle's hydrophobicity. Amine and secondary inorganic species such as nitrate strongly increased particle's hygroscopicity.

  5. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  6. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas F.; Goger, Brigitta; Poulain, Laurent; Schlag, Patrick; Miettinen, Pasi; Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele; Klein Baltink, Henk; Bas Henzing, J. S.; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS; for hygroscopic growth) were deployed on a Zeppelin NT airship within the PEGASOS project. This allowed one to investigate the development of the different layers within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), providing a unique in situ data set for airborne aerosol particles properties in the first kilometre of the atmosphere. Profiles measured during the morning hours on 20 June 2012 in the Po Valley, Italy, showed an increased nitrate fraction at ˜ 100 m above ground level (a.g.l.) coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth compared to ˜ 700 m a. g. l. This result was derived from both measurements of the aerosol composition and direct measurements of the hygroscopicity, yielding hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 0.34 ± 0.12 and 0.19 ± 0.07 for 500 nm particles, at ˜ 100 and ˜ 700 m a. g. l., respectively. The difference is attributed to the structure of the PBL at this time of day which featured several independent sub-layers with different types of aerosols. Later in the day the vertical structures disappeared due to the mixing of the layers and similar aerosol particle properties were found at all probed altitudes (mean κ ≈ 0.18 ± 0.07). The aerosol properties observed at the lowest flight level (100 m a. g. l.) were consistent with parallel measurements at a ground site, both in the morning and afternoon. Overall, the aerosol particles were found to be externally mixed, with a prevailing hygroscopic fraction. The flights near Cabauw in the Netherlands in the fully mixed PBL did not feature altitude-dependent characteristics. Particles were also externally mixed and had an even larger hygroscopic fraction compared to the results in Italy. The mean κ from

  7. Hygroscopic Growth and Activation of Particles containing Algea-Exudate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Fuentes, Elena; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Voigtländer, Jens; Clauss, Tina; Kiselev, Alexei; Green, David; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    A large amount of the Earth is covered by oceans, which provide a constant source of marine aerosol particles, produced due to bubble bursting processes that depend on wind speed (O'Dowd and de Leeuw, 2007). In general, marine particles can be assumed to play an important role for the Earth atmosphere on a global scale, due to their abundance and due to their effect on clouds. E.g. marine stratus and stratocumulus clouds contribute about 30% to 40% to the Earth's albedo (Randall et al., 1984). The activation of aerosol particles to cloud droplets depends on the hygroscopic properties of the particles, which, in turn, depend on their chemical composition. For marine particles, is has been and still is discussed what the effects of organic substances being present in the particles might be. These substances originate from marine biota where they enrich at the ocean surface. To mimic marine aerosol particles, algae-exudates of different algae species were mixed with artificial sea-water. These samples were used in the laboratory to produce particles via a bubble bursting process (Fuentes et al., 2009). The hygroscopic growth and activation of the (size selected) particles was measured, using LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004) and the DMT-CCNc (Cloud Condensation Nucleus counter from Droplet Measurement Technologies, Roberts and Nenes, 2005). The hygroscopic growth was measured twice, 3 and 10 seconds after humidification, and no difference in the grown size was detected, i.e. no kinetic effect was observed for the examined time range. From LACIS and CCNc measurements, the hygroscopicity was deduced through determination of the amount of ions being effective in the particle / droplet solution (Rho(ion), Wex et al., 2007). A concentration dependent non-ideal behaviour was found for particles produced from an artificial sea-water sample that contained only inorganic salts, as can be expected (see e.g. Niedermeier et al., 2008

  8. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activation kinetics in a boreal forest environment during the 2007 EUCAARI campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, K. M.; Raatikainen, T.; Lance, S.; Tkacik, D.; Tiitta, P.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Laaksonen, A.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, subsaturated hygroscopic growth, size distribution, and chemical composition were collected from March through May, 2007, in the remote Boreal forests of Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaign. Hygroscopicity parameter, κ, distributions were derived independently from Continuous Flow-Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber (CFSTGC) and Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) measurements. CFSTGC-derived κ values for 40, 60, and 80 nm particles range mostly between 0.10 and 0.40 with an average characteristic of highly oxidized organics of 0.20 ± 0.10, indicating that organics play a dominant role for this environment. HTDMA-derived κ were generally 30% lower. Diurnal trends of κ show a minimum at sunrise and a maximum in the late afternoon; this trend covaries with inorganic mass fraction and the m/z 44 organic mass fraction given by a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, further illustrating the importance of organics in aerosol hygroscopicity. The chemical dispersion inferred from the observed κ distributions indicates that while 60 and 80 nm dispersion increases around midday, 40 nm dispersion remains constant. Additionally, 80 nm particles show a markedly higher level of chemical dispersion than both 40 and 60 nm particles. An analysis of droplet activation kinetics for the sizes considered indicates that most of the CCN activate as rapidly as (NH4)2SO4 calibration aerosol.

  9. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activation kinetics in a boreal forest environment during the 2007 EUCAARI campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, K. M.; Raatikainen, T.; Lance, S.; Tkacik, D.; Tiitta, P.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Laaksonen, A.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), subsaturated hygroscopic growth, size distribution, and chemical composition were collected from March through May, 2007, in the remote Boreal forests of Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaign. Hygroscopicity parameter, κ, distributions were derived independently from Continuous Flow-Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber (CFSTGC) and Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) measurements. CFSTGC-derived κ values for 40, 60, and 80 nm particles range mostly between 0.10 and 0.40 with an average of 0.20 ± 0.10; this is characteristic of highly oxidized organics and reflect their dominant influence in this environment. HTDMA-derived κ were generally 30 % lower. Diurnal trends of κ show a minimum at sunrise and a maximum in the late afternoon; this trend covaries with inorganic mass fraction and the m/z 44 organic mass fraction given by a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, further illustrating the importance of ageing on aerosol hygroscopicity. The chemical dispersion inferred from the observed κ distributions indicates that while 60 and 80 nm dispersion increases around midday, 40 nm dispersion remains constant. Additionally, 80 nm particles show a markedly higher level of chemical dispersion than both 40 and 60 nm particles. An analysis of droplet activation kinetics for the sizes considered indicates that the CCN activate as rapidly as (NH4)2SO4 calibration aerosol.

  10. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle–particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle–particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  11. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate.

  12. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  13. Characterizing the Hygroscopicity of Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol from Synthetic Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Wang, X.; Helgestad, T.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Cornwell, G.; Novak, G.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles make up a significant portion of natural aerosols and are therefore important in establishing the baseline for anthropogenic aerosol climate impacts. Scattering of solar radiation by aerosols affects Earth's radiative budget and the degree of scattering is size-dependent. Thus, aerosols scatter more light at elevated relative humidities when they grow larger via water uptake. This growth depends critically on chemical composition. SSA can become enriched in organics during phytoplankton blooms, becoming less salty and therefore less hygroscopic. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85% relative humidity (GF(85%)) of SSA particles were quantified during two mesocosm experiments in enclosed marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). The two experiments were conducted with filtered seawater collected at separate times from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA. Phytoplankton blooms in each tank were induced via the addition of nutrients and photosynthetically active radiation. The "indoor" MART was illuminated with fluorescent light and the other "outdoor" MART was illuminated with sunlight. The peak chlorophyll-a concentrations were 59 micrograms/L and 341 micrograms /L for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. GF(85%) values for SSA particles were quantified using a humidified cavity ringdown spectrometer and particle size distributions. Particle composition was monitored with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Relationships between the observed particle GFs and the particle composition markers will be discussed.

  14. Reconciling Organic Aerosol Volatility, Hygroscopicity, and Oxidation State During the Colorado DISCOVER-AQ Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hite, J. R.; Moore, R.; Martin, R.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    The organic fraction of submicron aerosol can profoundly impact radiative forcing on climate directly, through enhancement of extinction, or indirectly through modulation of cloud formation. Semi-volatile constituents of organic ambient aerosol are of particular interest as their partitioning between the vapor and aerosol phases is not well constrained by current atmospheric models and appears to play an important role in the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) as suggested by recent research. An experimental setup consisting of a DMT CCN counter and SMPS downstream of a custom-built thermodenuder assembly was deployed during the summer 2014 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign to retrieve simultaneous, size-resolved volatility and hygroscopicity - through the use of scanning mobility CCN analysis (SMCA). Housed in the NASA Langley mobile laboratory, a suite of complimentary measurements were made available onboard including submicron aerosol composition and oxidation state provided by an HR-ToF-AMS, and aerosol optical properties provided by a range of other instruments including an SP2. Air masses sampled from locations across the Central Colorado region include influences from regional aerosol nucleation/growth events, long-range transport of Canadian biomass burning aerosols, cattle feedlot emissions and influences of the Denver urban plume - amidst a backdrop of widespread oil and gas exploration. The analysis focuses on the reconciliation of the retrieved aerosol volatility distributions and corresponding hygroscopicity and oxidation state observations, including the use of AMS factor analysis.

  15. A combined particle trap/HTDMA hygroscopicity study of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, A. A.; Sjogren, S.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Peter, T.

    2008-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are often mixtures of inorganic and organic material. Organics can represent a large fraction of the total aerosol mass and are comprised of water-soluble and insoluble compounds. Increasing attention was paid in the last decade to the capability of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles to take up water (hygroscopicity). We performed hygroscopicity measurements of internally mixed particles containing ammonium sulfate and carboxylic acids (citric, glutaric, adipic acid) in parallel with an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds were chosen to represent three distinct physical states. During hygroscopicity cycles covering hydration and dehydration measured by the EDB and the HTDMA, pure citric acid remained always liquid, adipic acid remained always solid, while glutaric acid could be either. We show that the hygroscopicity of mixtures of the above compounds is well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relationship as long as the two-component particle is completely liquid in the ammonium sulfate/glutaric acid system; deviations up to 10% in mass growth factor (corresponding to deviations up to 3.5% in size growth factor) are observed for the ammonium sulfate/citric acid 1:1 mixture at 80% RH. We observe even more significant discrepancies compared to what is expected from bulk thermodynamics when a solid component is present. We explain this in terms of a complex morphology resulting from the crystallization process leading to veins, pores, and grain boundaries which allow for water sorption in excess of bulk thermodynamic predictions caused by the inverse Kelvin effect on concave surfaces.

  16. [Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosol Particles in North Suburb of Nanjing in Spring].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Ze-feng; Li, Yan-weil; Qin, Xin; Miao, Qing; Shen, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles have significant effects on spectral distribution, CCN activation, climate forcing, human health and so on. A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) was utilized to analyze the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the northern suburb of Nanjing during 16 April to 21 May, 2014. At relative humidity (RH) of 90%, for particles with dry diameters 30-230 nm, the probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF) shows a distinct bimodal pattern, with a dominant more-hygroscopic group and a smaller less-hygroscopic group. A contrast analysis between day and night suggests that, aerosol particles during day time have a stronger hygroscopicity and a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group than that at night overall. Aerosol particles during night have a higher degree of externally mixed state. Backward trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT mode reveals that, the sampling site is mainly affected by three air masses. For aitken nuclei, northwest continental air masses experience a longer aging process and have a stronger hygroscopicity. For condensation nuclei, east air masses have a stronger hygroscopicity and have a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group. Aerosol particles in local air masses have a high number fraction of more-hygroscopic group in the whole diameter range.

  17. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF < 1.1 and GF > 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  18. Simultaneous analysis of the equilibrium hygroscopicity and water transport kinetics of liquid aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Rickards, Andrew M J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-06-18

    We demonstrate that the equilibrium hygroscopic response of an aerosol droplet and the kinetics of water condensation and evaporation can be retrieved with high accuracy, even close to saturation, through comparative measurements of probe and sample aerosol droplets. The experimental methodology is described and is based on an electrodynamic balance with a newly designed trapping chamber. Through use of a probe aerosol, composed of either pure water or a sodium chloride solution of known concentration, the gas-phase relative humidity (RH) can be accurately measured with an uncertainty of typically <0.005. By fast manipulation of the airflows into the chamber, a step-change in RH over a time scale of <0.5 s can be achieved. Using this approach, the kinetics of mass transfer are studied using the comparative procedure, and results are compared to theoretical mass flux predictions. The time-dependent measured mass fluxes for sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, sorbitol, and galactose are used to calculate droplet water activities as a function of the droplet growth factor, allowing retrieval of a hygroscopic growth curve in a matter of seconds. Comparisons with both new and established thermodynamic predictions of hygroscopicity, as well as to optical tweezers measurements, are presented, demonstrating good agreement within the experimental uncertainties. PMID:23662676

  19. Hygroscopic Measurements of Aerosol Particles in Colorado during the Discover AQ Campaign 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, D.; Delgado, R.; Espinosa, R.; Martins, J. V.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground observations with other optical aerosol measurements such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. In the summer of 2014, the DISCOVER-AQ campaign was held in Colorado, where systematic and concurrent observations of column- integrated surface, and vertically-resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases relevant to air quality and their evolution during the day were observed. Aerosol optical properties were measured in the UMBC trailer at the city of Golden using a TSI-3563 nephelometer and an in-situ Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-NEPH) designed and built by the LACO group at UMBC. The PI-NEPH measures aerosol phase matrix components in high angular range between 2 and 178 degrees scattering angle at three wavelengths (λ=473, 532 and 671nm). The two measured elements of the phase matrix, intensity (P11) and linear polarization (P12) provide extensive characterization of the scattering properties of the studied aerosol. The scattering coefficient, P11 and P12 were measured under different humidity conditions to obtain the enhancement factor f(RH) and the dependence of P11 and P12 to RH using a humidifier dryer system covering a RH range from 20 to 90%. The ratio between scattering coefficients at high and low humidity in Golden Colorado showed relatively low hygroscopic growth in the aerosol particles f(RH=80%) was 1.27±0.19 for the first three weeks of sampling. According to speciated measurements performed at the UMBC trailer, the predominance of dust and organic aerosols over more hygroscopic nitrate and sulfate in the

  20. Marine aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility, measured on the Chatham Rise (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravigan, Luke; Mallet, Marc; Ristovski, Zoran; Vaattovaara, Petri; Talbot, Nick; Olivares, Gustavo; Harvey, Mike; Law, Cliff

    2013-05-01

    The Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study was undertaken in February/ March 2012 in the biologically active waters of the Chatham Rise, NZ. Aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility were examined with a volatility hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser. These observations confirm results from other hygroscopicity-based studies that the dominant fraction of the observed remote marine particles were non-sea salt sulfates. Further observations are required to clarify the influences of seawater composition, meteorology and analysis techniques seasonally across different ocean basins.

  1. Hygroscopicity of internally mixed multi-component aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qifan; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of two water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) relevant to urban haze pollution (phthalic acid and levoglucosan) and their internally mixtures with inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) are investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) system. The multi-component particles uptake water gradually in the range 5-90% relative humidity (RH). The experimental results are compared with the thermodynamic model predictions. For most mixtures, Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) predictions agree well with the measured growth factors. The hygroscopic growth of mixed particles can be well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation as long as the mixed particles are completely liquid. ZSR calculations underestimate the water uptake of mixed particles at moderate RH due to the partial dissolution of ammonium sulfate in the organic and ammonium nitrate solution in this RH region. The phase of ammonium nitrate in the initial dry particles changes dramatically with the composition of mixtures. The presence of organics in the mixed particles can inhibit the crystallization of ammonium nitrate during the drying process and results in water uptake at low RH (RH < 60%). These results demonstrate that certain representative WSOCs can substantially influence the hygroscopicity of inorganic salts and overall water uptake of particles.

  2. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site Laboratoire d'Hygiène de la Ville de Paris (LHVP) in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m-3, e.g., during winter.

  3. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site LHVP in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m3, e.g. during winter.

  4. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  5. Hygroscopic, Morphological, and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Cheek, L.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Littleton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust is a significant source of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. In the Texas Panhandle, daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots are routinely observed in conjunction with increased cattle activity in the late afternoons and early evenings. We conducted a field study to characterize size-selected agricultural aerosols with respect to hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties and to attempt to identify any correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle and have used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity. To characterize the size distribution of agricultural aerosols as a function of time, A GRIMM aerosol spectrometer and Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer and Counter (SMPS) measurements were simultaneously performed in an overall size range of 11 nm to 20 µm diameters at a cattle feedlot. Complementary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles was performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the EDS analysis, an ammonia scrubber was used to collect ammonia and ammonium in the gas and particulate phases, respectively. The concentration of these species was quantified offline via UV spectrophotometry at 640 nanometers. The results of this study will provide important particulate emission data from a feedyard, needed to improve our understanding of the role of agricultural particulates in local and regional air quality.

  6. The effects of models of aerosol hygroscopicity on the apportionment of extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    The role that aerosols play in climate forcing and visibility issues has been the subject of research for several decades. Recent research efforts have focused on assessing the contribution of individual species to scattering and absorption under ambient conditions and on how scattering and absorption change as one or more species are removed from the atmosphere. A key concern is the distribution of water among aerosols as a function of mixing assumptions. As an illustrative and relevant example, we examine the roles of sulfates and organics in visibility and climate forcing, and in particular, the implications of assumptions regarding hygroscopic growth behavior upon the assignment of mass-scattering efficiencies to these species. We demonstrate that the total scattering computed for an aerosol sample is relatively insensitive to the choice of internal or external mixture, and can be insensitive to the exact formulation of the hygroscopic growth of the sample. Since the atmospheric aerosol is generally a complex mixture of chemical species, with the precise distribution of species on a particle-by-particle basis not known, the use of semi-empirical models of multicomponent aerosol hygroscopicity is appropriate for the calculation of atmospheric aerosol scattering and/or extinction, particularly since these details appear to be unimportant in most cases. In contrast, the apportionment of percentages of the total scattering to individual chemical species is quite sensitive to the choice of assumption regarding the aerosol microphysical structure. The use of semi-empirical hygroscopic growth models for computing the change in species scattering efficiency can lead to incorrect predictions in the limit of the complete removal of all but one chemical component. We propose a model that invokes the Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) assumptions for the water content of multicomponent mixtures, and demonstrate that this method both approximates the predictions of

  7. Variability in morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosols during atmospheric processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyi; Khalizov, Alexei F; Pagels, Joakim; Zhang, Dan; Xue, Huaxin; McMurry, Peter H

    2008-07-29

    The atmospheric effects of soot aerosols include interference with radiative transfer, visibility impairment, and alteration of cloud formation and are highly sensitive to the manner by which soot is internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. We present experimental studies to show that soot particles acquire a large mass fraction of sulfuric acid during atmospheric aging, considerably altering their properties. Soot particles exposed to subsaturated sulfuric acid vapor exhibit a marked change in morphology, characterized by a decreased mobility-based diameter but an increased fractal dimension and effective density. These particles experience large hygroscopic size and mass growth at subsaturated conditions (<90% relative humidity) and act efficiently as cloud-condensation nuclei. Coating with sulfuric acid and subsequent hygroscopic growth enhance the optical properties of soot aerosols, increasing scattering by approximately 10-fold and absorption by nearly 2-fold at 80% relative humidity relative to fresh particles. In addition, condensation of sulfuric acid is shown to occur at a similar rate on ambient aerosols of various types of a given mobility size, regardless of their chemical compositions and microphysical structures. Representing an important mechanism of atmospheric aging, internal mixing of soot with sulfuric acid has profound implications on visibility, human health, and direct and indirect climate forcing.

  8. CCN, hygroscopicity, and activation kinetics of Los Angeles aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Lathem, T. L.; Nenes, A.; Suski, K.; Cahill, J. F.; Prather, K. A.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The CalNex field campaign was designed as a comprehensive regional air quality and climate assessment study with an emphasis on the interaction between air quality and climate change. The southern California region is an excellent location for the study of air quality and climate change due to the existence and interaction of biogenic, dust, and urban plumes. Research flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter platform focused on the origin and evolution of the Los Angeles plume as it is advected across the basin and outflows into the Coachella valley and Mojave Desert. This study focuses on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements taken aboard the Twin Otter. A continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient chamber operating in scanning flow CCN analysis (SFCA) mode provided high resolution, in situ CCN spectra (0.4-0.8% supersaturation) once every 40 seconds. In conjuncture with other aerosol instrumentation aboard the Twin Otter, the data provide a comprehensive picture of the interaction of ambient aerosol with water vapor. The analysis presented then quantifies the relationship between aerosol size, chemical composition, mixing state, hygroscopicity, and activation kinetics of aerosol from the variety of sources sampled.

  9. Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at high relative humidity and their diurnal variations in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. F.; Zhao, C. S.; Göbel, T.; Hallbauer, E.; Nowak, A.; Ran, L.; Xu, W. Y.; Deng, Z. Z.; Ma, N.; Mildenberger, K.; Henning, S.; Stratmann, F.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles were determined at a suburban site (Wuqing) in the North China Plain among a cluster of cities during the period 17 July to 12 August 2009. A High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HH-TDMA) instrument was applied to measure the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) at 90%, 95% and 98.5% relative humidity (RH) for particles with dry diameter between 50-250 nm. The probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF) averaged over the period shows a distinct bimodal pattern, namely, a dominant more-hygroscopic (MH) group and a smaller nearly-hydrophobic (NH) group. The MH group particles were highly hygroscopic, and their GF was relatively constant during the period with average values of 1.54±0.02, 1.81±0.04 and 2.45±0.07 at 90%, 95% and 98.5% RH (D0=100 nm), respectively. The NH group particles grew very slightly when exposed to high RH, with GF values of 1.08±0.02, 1.13±0.06 and 1.24±0.13, respectively at 90%, 95% and 98.5% RH (D0=100 nm). The hygroscopic growth behaviours at different RHs were well represented by the hygroscopicity parameter κ with a single-parameter Köhler model. Thus, the calculation of GF as a function of RH and dry diameter could be facilitated by an empirical parameterization of κ as function of dry diameter. A strong diurnal pattern in number fraction of different hygroscopic groups was observed, indicating a diurnal variation of aerosol mixing state and/or chemical composition. The average number fraction of NH particles during the day was about 8%, while during the nighttime fractions up to 20% were reached. Correspondingly, the state of mixing in terms of water uptake varied significantly during a day. The high fraction of NH particles measured during the night denotes a high degree of external mixing of ambient aerosols, while during the day the degree of external mixing decreased. Simulations using a particle-resolved aerosol box model (PartMC-MOSAIC) suggest that the diurnal

  10. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration. PMID:26421659

  11. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  12. Airborne measurements of hygroscopicity and mixing state of aerosols in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols interact directly with the incident solar radiation by scattering or absorbing the light. The optical properties of an aerosol particle can strongly be altered at enhanced relative humidity (RH). Depending on the particle's chemical composition, it can experience hygroscopic growth, leading to a change in size and index of refraction compared to the dry particle (Zieger et al., 2011). Besides, aerosols can exist in different mixing states which are usually divided into internal and external mixtures. If all particles of a certain size have the same chemical composition, they are described as internally mixed, whereas if particles of equal size have different chemical composition, they are defined as externally mixed. Depending on the mixture the hygroscopic behavior will change: internally mixed aerosols will grow uniformly with increasing RH, while the different substances in external mixtures will experience different growing behaviors leading to a mode-splitting or broadened size distribution. Laboratory studies are commonly performed at dry conditions but it is known that temperature and RH as well as chemical composition are changing with altitude (Morgan et al., 2010). This further leads to the conclusion that the in-situ measurements of optical properties at different heights are crucial for climate forcing calculations. Within the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) the white- light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS) was developed and installed on the Zeppelin to investigate changes of light scattering with regard to water uptake and altitude. This instrument firstly selects a dry monodisperse aerosol by its electrical mobility and then exposes it to a well-defined RH (typically 95%). Alternately, the dry and humidified particles are measured in a white-light optical particle spectrometer (WELAS). In this way it is possible to infer the effective index of refraction of the dry particles, their hygroscopic

  13. Hygroscopic growth and activation of uncoated and coated soot particles and their relation to ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziese, M.; Henning, S.; Mildenberger, K.; Stratmann, F.; Möhler, O.; Benz, S.; Buchholz, A.; Mentel, Th.; Aida/Lacis-Mobile-Team

    2009-04-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopic growth (HTDMA, LACIS-mobile), activation behavior (DMT-CCNC) - scope of this paper - and ice nucleation (AIDA chamber) were performed to estimate the cloud-forming potential of pure and coated soot particles. Globally, soot particles contribute up to 2.5 % to the atmospheric aerosol. In the framework of the investigations described here, soot particles were generated either applying a graphite-spark-generator (GFG1000) or a flame-soot-generator (Mini-CAST). With respect to the hygroscopic growth and activation behavior, the influences of the carrier-gas (GFG-soot), the OC-content (CAST-soot) and of different coating materials were investigated. Differences in the hygroscopic growth and activation behavior of GFG generated soot particles were found for the two carrier-gases considered. If nitrogen was used, neither hygroscopic growth nor activation were observed. In contrast, when argon was used, particles featured a slight hygroscopic growth and were easier to activate. Hygroscopic growth increases with decreasing OC-content of the CAST-soot, up to growth factor 1.04 at 98.4 % relative humidity. Lower OC-contents also result in the particles being activated more easily. Coating with sulfuric acid enhances the hygroscopic growth and activation behavior of CAST-soot for different OC-contents. If the soot (GFG & CAST) was coated with dicarboxylic acids (oxalic and succinic acid), no enhancement of hygroscopic growth and activation was observed. This is most likely due to evaporation of the coating material. In comparison to the hygroscopic growth and activation behavior, the same trends were observed in the ice-nucleation behavior. That is, the more active a particle is as cloud condensation nuclei, the better it functions as ice nuclei. GFG-soot with argon as carrier-gas acts as a better ice nuclei than GFG-soot with nitrogen. For the CAST-soot the ice-nucleation activity decreases with increasing OC-content. Coating with sulfuric acid

  14. On the Physicochemical Processes Controlling Organic Aerosol Hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, Sarah Suda

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere can influence air quality and climate through their interaction with water. Aerosols are an important factor in cloud formation because they serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Organic compounds contribute a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass but their ability to serve as CCN is less certain relative to inorganic compounds. Limitations of the measurement techniques and theoretical gaps in understanding have prevented agreement between predicted and measured CCN. One way to quantify a compound's CCN activity is by the hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. This dissertation presents research towards constraining the variability of organic aerosol kappa at the process level using three approaches: developing a measurement technique; measuring the dependence of kappa on molecular functional groups; and measuring the effect of surface active molecules on kappa for mixtures. Chapter 2 presents a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) instrument to measure aerosol water uptake at high relative humidity (RH). Measurements up to 99% RH were achieved by improving the precision of aerosol sizing, actively controlling temperature, and calibrating RH between measurements. Osmotic coefficients were obtained within +/-20% for organic aerosols sized between 30 and 200 nanometers. These results may improve water uptake models by providing accurate data at high RH. Chapter 3 presents a study of the sensitivity of kappa to changes in molecular functional group composition for pure compounds. Molecules were synthesized via gas and liquidphase reactions varying the type and location of functional groups, purified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and routed for CCN measurement. The hydroxyl (-OH) and carbon chain length (-CH2-) changed kappa most, where hydroxyl groups increase kappa and longer carbon chains decrease kappa. This suggests that hydroxyl groups and molecular size dominate the

  15. Comparative analysis of hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols at ZOTTO Siberian background station during summer and winter campaigns of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryshkevich, T. I.; Mironov, G. N.; Mironova, S. Yu.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Chi, X.; Andreae, M. O.; Mikhailov, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measurements of hygroscopic properties and chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected from June 10 to 20 and December 15 to 25, 2011, at the ZOTTO background stations (60.8° N, 89.35° E) in Central Siberia are presented. The sorption properties of aerosols are studied with the help of a differential analyzer of absorbed water mass in the relative humidity range of 5 to 99%. It has been found that the hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol particles collected during the winter campaign is on average 45% higher than that of the aerosol collected in the summer campaign, which leads to a 40% decrease in the critical supersaturation threshold of cloud activation of particles. The measurement data are analyzed and parameterized using a new approach that takes into account the concentration effects in the particle—water vapor system at low humidities. Based on the chemical analysis, the content of water-soluble substances in the winter sample is 2.5 times higher than in the summer sample. Here, the amount of sulfates and nitrates increases 20 and 88 times, respectively. A trajectory analysis of air mass motion shows that the increased content of inorganic ions in aerosols for the winter sample is caused by long-range transport of pollutants from industrial areas of Siberia. This difference in the chemical composition is the main source of the observed difference in hygroscopic and condensation properties of the aerosol particles.

  16. Influence of particle-phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle-phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids to phase-separated particles to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40 to 90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids; (2) forcing a single phase but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations; and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation of the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  17. Influence of particle phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids, to phase-separated particles, to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40-90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids, (2) forcing a single phase, but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations, and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation between the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water-uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  18. Hygroscopic properties and mixing state of aerosol measured at the high altitude site Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, H.; Sellegri, K.; Hervo, M.; Rose, C.; Freney, E.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.

    2014-03-01

    A Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) was used to evaluate the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles measured at the Puy de Dôme research station in central France from September 2008 to December 2012. This high-altitude site is ideally situated to allow for both the upper part of the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere to be sampled. The aim of the study is to investigate both the influence of year-to-year, seasonal, and diurnal cycles, as well as the influence of air mass type on particle hygroscopicity and mixing state. Results show that particle hygroscopicity increases with particle size and depends both on air mass type and on season. Average growth factor values are lowest in winter (1.21 ± 0.13, 1.23 ± 0.18 and 1.38 ± 0.25 for 25, 50 and 165 nm particles, respectively) and highest in autumn (1.27 ± 0.11, 1.32 ± 0.12 and 1.49 ± 0.15 for 25, 50 and 165 nm particles, respectively). Particles are generally more hygroscopic at night than during the day. The seasonal and diurnal variations are likely to be strongly influenced by boundary layer dynamics. Furthermore, particles originating from oceanic and continental regions tend to be more hygroscopic than those measured in African and local air masses. The high hygroscopicity of marine aerosol may be explained by large proportions of inorganic aerosol and sea salts, and it is speculated that continental particles are more hygroscopic than local and African ones due to ageing of fresh combustion aerosol. Aerosol measured at the Puy de Dôme display a high degree of external mixing, and hygroscopic growth spectra can be divided into three different hygroscopic modes: a less hygroscopic mode (GF < 1.3), a hygroscopic mode (GF 1.3-1.7) and a more hygroscopic mode (GF > 1.7). The majority of particles measured can be classified as being in either the less hygroscopic mode or the hygroscopic mode, and only few of them have more hygroscopic properties. The

  19. Comparison Between Lidar and Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopicity at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlow, M.; Feingold, G.; Jefferson, A.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J. A.; Wang, J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopicity has a significant effect on radiative properties of aerosols. Here a lidar method, applicable to cloud-capped, well-mixed atmospheric boundary layers, is employed to determine the hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) under unperturbed, ambient atmospheric conditions. The data used for the analysis were collected under a wide range of atmospheric aerosol levels during both routine measurement periods and during the intensive operations period (IOP) in May 2003 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. There is a good correlation (approx. 0.7) between a lidar-derived growth factor (measured over the range 85% RH to 96% RH) with a nephelometer-derived growth factor measured over the RH range 40% to 85%. For these RH ranges, the slope of the lidar-derived growth factor is much steeper than that of the nephelometer-derived growth factor, reflecting the rapid increase in particle size with increasing RH. The results are corroborated by aerosol model calculations of lidar and nephelometer equivalent f(RH) based on in situ aerosol size and composition measurements during the IOP. It is suggested that the lidar method can provide useful measurements of the dependence of aerosol optical properties on relative humidity, and under conditions closer to saturation than can currently be achieved with humidified nephelometers.

  20. Physiochemical properties of carbonaceous aerosol from agricultural residue burning: Density, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlin; Hu, Yunjie; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Ye, Xingnan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lin; Wang, Xinming; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-09-01

    Size-resolved effective density, mixing state, and hygroscopicity of smoke particles from five kinds of agricultural residues burning were characterized using an aerosol chamber system, including a volatility/hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (V/H-TDMA) combined with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). To profile relationship between the thermodynamic properties and chemical compositions, smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5 were also measured for the water soluble inorganics, mineral elements, and carbonaceous materials like organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Smoke particle has a density of 1.1-1.4 g cm-3, and hygroscopicity parameter (κ) derived from hygroscopic growth factor (GF) of the particles ranges from 0.20 to 0.35. Size- and fuel type-dependence of density and κ are obvious. The integrated effective densities (ρ) and hygroscopicity parameters (κ) both scale with alkali species, which could be parameterized as a function of organic and inorganic mass fraction (forg &finorg) in smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5: ρ-1 =finorg ·ρinorg-1 +forg · ρorg-1 and κ =finorg ·κinorg +forg ·κorg . The extrapolated values of ρinorg and ρorg are 2.13 and 1.14 g cm-3 in smoke PM1.0, while the characteristic κ values of organic and inorganic components are about 0.087 and 0.734, which are similar to the bulk density and κ calculated from predefined chemical species and also consistent with those values observed in ambient air. Volatility of smoke particle was quantified as volume fraction remaining (VFR) and mass fraction remaining (MFR). The gradient temperature of V-TDMA was set to be consistent with the splitting temperature in the OC-EC measurement (OC1 and OC2 separated at 150 and 250 °C). Combing the thermogram data and chemical composition of smoke PM1.0, the densities of organic matter (OM1 and OM2 correspond to OC1 and OC2) are estimated as 0.61-0.90 and 0.86-1.13 g cm-3, and the ratios of OM1/OC1 and OM2/OC2 are 1.07 and 1.29 on average

  1. Physiochemical properties of carbonaceous aerosol from agricultural residue burning: Density, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlin; Hu, Yunjie; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Ye, Xingnan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lin; Wang, Xinming; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-09-01

    Size-resolved effective density, mixing state, and hygroscopicity of smoke particles from five kinds of agricultural residues burning were characterized using an aerosol chamber system, including a volatility/hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (V/H-TDMA) combined with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). To profile relationship between the thermodynamic properties and chemical compositions, smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5 were also measured for the water soluble inorganics, mineral elements, and carbonaceous materials like organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Smoke particle has a density of 1.1-1.4 g cm-3, and hygroscopicity parameter (κ) derived from hygroscopic growth factor (GF) of the particles ranges from 0.20 to 0.35. Size- and fuel type-dependence of density and κ are obvious. The integrated effective densities (ρ) and hygroscopicity parameters (κ) both scale with alkali species, which could be parameterized as a function of organic and inorganic mass fraction (forg &finorg) in smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5: ρ-1 =finorg · ρinorg-1 +forg · ρorg-1 and κ =finorg ·κinorg +forg ·κorg . The extrapolated values of ρinorg and ρorg are 2.13 and 1.14 g cm-3 in smoke PM1.0, while the characteristic κ values of organic and inorganic components are about 0.087 and 0.734, which are similar to the bulk density and κ calculated from predefined chemical species and also consistent with those values observed in ambient air. Volatility of smoke particle was quantified as volume fraction remaining (VFR) and mass fraction remaining (MFR). The gradient temperature of V-TDMA was set to be consistent with the splitting temperature in the OC-EC measurement (OC1 and OC2 separated at 150 and 250 °C). Combing the thermogram data and chemical composition of smoke PM1.0, the densities of organic matter (OM1 and OM2 correspond to OC1 and OC2) are estimated as 0.61-0.90 and 0.86-1.13 g cm-3, and the ratios of OM1/OC1 and OM2/OC2 are 1.07 and 1.29 on average

  2. Hygroscopic properties and mixing state of aerosol measured at the high-altitude site Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, H.; Sellegri, K.; Hervo, M.; Rose, C.; Freney, E.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.

    2014-09-01

    A Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HTDMA) was used to evaluate the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles measured at the Puy de Dôme research station in central France, periodically from September 2008 to January 2010, and almost continuously from October 2010 to December 2012. This high-altitude site is ideally situated to allow for both the upper part of the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere to be sampled. The aim of the study is to investigate both the influence of year-to-year, seasonal and diurnal cycles, as well as the influence of air mass type on particle hygroscopicity and mixing state. Results show that particle hygroscopicity increases with particle size and depends both on air mass type and on season. Average growth factor values, GFs, are lowest in winter (1.21 ± 0.13, 1.23 ± 0.18 and 1.38 ± 0.25 for 25, 50 and 165 nm particles, respectively) and highest in autumn (1.27 ± 0.11, 1.32 ± 0.12 and 1.49 ± 0.15 for 25, 50 and 165 nm particles, respectively). Particles are generally more hygroscopic at night than during the day. The seasonal and diurnal variations are likely to be strongly influenced by boundary layer dynamics. Furthermore, particles originating from oceanic and continental regions tend to be more hygroscopic than those measured in African and local air masses. The high hygroscopicity of oceanic aerosol can be explained by large proportions of inorganic aerosol and sea salts. Aerosols measured at the Puy de Dôme display a high degree of external mixing, and hygroscopic growth spectra can be divided into three different hygroscopic modes: a less-hygroscopic mode (GF < 1.3), a hygroscopic mode (GF 1.3-1.7) and a more-hygroscopic mode (GF > 1.7). The majority of particles measured can be classified as being in either the less-hygroscopic mode or the hygroscopic mode, and only few of them have more-hygroscopic properties. The degree of external mixing, evaluated as the fraction of time when

  3. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  4. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  5. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOIs-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more there was sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics (ELVOCs) concentration and the HGF of particles of any size.

  6. Direct measurements of the optical cross sections and refractive indices of individual volatile and hygroscopic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Mason, B J; Cotterell, M I; Preston, T C; Orr-Ewing, A J; Reid, J P

    2015-06-01

    We present measurements of the evolving extinction cross sections of individual aerosol particles (spanning 700-2500 nm in radius) during the evaporation of volatile components or hygroscopic growth using a combination of a single particle trap formed from a Bessel light beam and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. For single component organic aerosol droplets of 1,2,6-hexanetriol, polyethylene glycol 400, and glycerol, the slow evaporation of the organic component (over time scales of 1000 to 10,000 s) leads to a time-varying size and extinction cross section that can be used to estimate the refractive index of the droplet. Measurements on binary aqueous-inorganic aerosol droplets containing one of the inorganic solutes ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, or sodium chloride (over time scales of 1000 to 15,000 s) under conditions of changing relative humidity show that extinction cross-section measurements are consistent with expectations from accepted models for the variation in droplet refractive index with hygroscopic growth. In addition, we use these systems to establish an experimental protocol for future single particle extinction measurements. The advantages of mapping out the evolving light extinction cross-section of an individual particle over extended time frames accompanied by hygroscopic cycling or component evaporation are discussed.

  7. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  8. Aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud droplet activation of extracts of filters from biomass burning experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Engling, Guenter; Malm, William C.

    2008-04-01

    In this laboratory closure study, we compare sub- and supersaturated water uptake properties for aerosol particles possessing a range of hygroscopicity. Measurements for water sub-saturated conditions used a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Simultaneously, measurements of particle critical supersaturation were conducted on the same sample stream with a continuous flow cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. For these experiments, we used filter-collected samples of biomass smoke generated in the combustion of two common wildland fire fuels, western sagebrush and Alaskan duff core. Extractions of separate sections of the filter were performed using two solvents, ultrapure water and methanol. The extracts were subsequently atomized, producing aerosols having a range of hygroscopic responses. HTDMA and CCN measurements were fit to a single-parameter model of water uptake, in which the fit parameter is denoted κ, the hygroscopicity parameter. Here, for the four extracts we observed mean values of the hygroscopicity parameter of 0.06 < κ < 0.30, similar to the range found previously for numerous pure organic compounds. Particles generated from the aqueous extracts of the filters had consistently larger κ than methanol extracts, while western sagebrush extract aerosols κ exceeded those from Alaskan duff core. HTDMA- and CCN-derived values of κ for each experiment agreed within approximately 20%. Applicability of the κ-parameterization to other multicomponent aerosols relevant to the atmosphere remains to be tested.

  9. Relationship between volatility, hygroscopicity, and CCN activity of winter aerosols: Kanpur, Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, Sachchida

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol volatility is one of the key property in deciding their lifetime and fate. The volatile species have the potential to affect SOA estimation, so their characterization and establishment of relationship with mass loading, chemical composition, hygroscopicity and CCN activity is required. A 42 days long winter campaign was conducted in an anthropogenically polluted location (Kanpur, India) where CCN activity of both ambient and thermally treated aerosols was characterized. Enhanced partitioning of semi-volatile molecules into particle phase at higher loading conditions was observed. Unexpectedly, the most oxidized organic factor was observed both least volatile and hygroscopic in nature. Lower

  10. Hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Eastern Mediterranean: implications for regional direct radiative forcing under clean and polluted conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Cheng, Y. F.; Birmili, W.; Massling, A.; Wehner, B.; Müller, T.; Leinert, S.; Kalivitis, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-05-01

    This work examines the effect of direct radiative forcing of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean troposphere as a function of air mass composition, particle size distribution and hygroscopicity, and relative humidity (RH). During intensive field measurements on the island of Crete, Greece, the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric particles were determined using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) and a Hygroscopicity Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (H-DMA-APS). Similar to former studies, the H-TDMA identified three hygroscopic sub-fractions of particles in the sub-μm range: a more hygroscopic group, a less hygroscopic group and a nearly hydrophobic particle group. The average hygroscopic particle growth factors at 90 % RH were a significant function of particle mobility diameter (Dp): 1.42 (± 0.05) at 30 nm compared to 1.63 (± 0.07) at 250 nm. The H-DMA-APS identified up to three hygroscopic sub-fractions at mobility diameters of 1.0 and 1.2 μm. The data recorded between 12 August and 20 October 2005 were classified into four distinct synoptic-scale air mass types distinguishing between different regions of origin (western Mediterranean vs. the Aegean Sea) as well as the degree of continental pollution (marine vs. continentally influenced). The hygroscopic properties of particles with diameter Dp≥150 nm showed the most pronounced dependency on air mass origin, with growth factors in marine air masses exceeding those in continentally influenced air masses. Particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth factors were used to calculate aerosol light scattering coefficients at ambient RH using a Mie model. A main result was the pronounced enhancement of particle scattering over the eastern Mediterranean due to hygroscopic growth, both in the marine and continentally influenced air masses. When RH reached its summer daytime values around 70-80 %, up to 50-70 % of the calculated visibility reduction was

  11. Hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Eastern Mediterranean: implications for regional direct radiative forcing under clean and polluted conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Cheng, Y. F.; Birmili, W.; Massling, A.; Wehner, B.; Müller, T.; Leinert, S.; Kalivitis, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2010-11-01

    This work examines the effect of direct radiative forcing of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean troposphere as a function of air mass composition, particle size distribution and hygroscopicity, and relative humidity (RH). During intensive field measurements on the island of Crete, Greece, the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric particles were determined using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) and a Hygroscopicity Differential Mobility Analyzer - Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (H-DMA-APS). Like in several studies before, the H-TDMA identified three hygroscopic sub-fractions of particles in the sub-μm range: a more hygroscopic group, a less hygroscopic group and a nearly hydrophobic particle group. The hygroscopic particle growth factors at 90% RH were a significant function of particle mobility diameter (Dp): 1.42 (± 0.05) at 30 nm compared to 1.63 (± 0.07) at 250 nm. The H-DMA-APS identified up to three hygroscopic sub-fractions at mobility diameters of 1.0 and 1.2 μm. All data recorded between 12 August and 20 October, 2005 were classified into four distinct synoptic-scale air mass types distinguishing between different regions of origin (western Mediterranean vs. the Aegean Sea) as well as the degree of continental pollution (marine vs. continentally influenced). The hygroscopic properties of particles with diameter Dp ≥ 150 nm showed the most pronounced dependency on air mass origin, with growth factors in marine air masses exceeding those in more continentally influenced air masses. Particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth factors were employed to calculate aerosol light scattering coefficients at ambient RH using a Mie model. A main result was the pronounced enhancement of particle scattering over the eastern Mediterranean due to hygroscopic growth, both in the marine and continentally influenced air masses. When RH reached its daytime values around 70-80% in summer, up to 50-70% of the calculated visibility

  12. A combined particle trap/HTDMA hygroscopicity study of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, A. A.; Sjogren, S.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Peter, T.

    2008-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are often mixtures of inorganic and organic material. Organics can represent a large fraction of the total aerosol mass and are comprised of water-soluble and insoluble compounds. Increasing attention was paid in the last decade to the capability of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles to take up water (hygroscopicity). We performed hygroscopicity measurements of internally mixed particles containing ammonium sulfate and carboxylic acids (citric, glutaric, adipic acid) in parallel with an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds were chosen to represent three distinct physical states. During hygroscopicity cycles covering hydration and dehydration measured by the EDB and the HTDMA, pure citric acid remained always liquid, adipic acid remained always solid, while glutaric acid could be either. We show that the hygroscopicity of mixtures of the above compounds is well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relationship as long as the two-component particle is completely liquid in the ammonium sulfate/citric acid and in the ammonium sulfate/glutaric acid cases. However, we observe significant discrepancies compared to what is expected from bulk thermodynamics when a solid component is present. We explain this in terms of a complex morphology resulting from the crystallization process leading to veins, pores, and grain boundaries which allow for water sorption in excess of bulk thermodynamic predictions caused by the inverse Kelvin effect on concave surfaces.

  13. Comparison of aerosol hygroscopicity and mixing state between winter and summer seasons in Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rongxin; Tan, Haobo; Tang, Lili; Cai, Mingfu; Yin, Yan; Li, Fei; Liu, Li; Xu, Hanbing; Chan, P. W.; Deng, Xuejiao; Wu, Dui

    2016-03-01

    Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles are important for determining aerosol size distributions, and thus determining scattering and absorption coefficients at ambient atmospheric conditions. In this study, hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at an urban site in Guangzhou, China, were measured using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) system during the winter and the summer. The results show that the urban aerosols were composed of more-hygroscopic, less-hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic particles. For less-hygroscopic particles of 40-200 nm in diameter, the hygroscopic parameter κLH was around 0.15. For more-hygroscopic particles, the κMH was from 0.290 to 0.339 with a particle size from 40 to 200 nm. For non-hygroscopic particles, the κNH was about 0.015. It was found that the number fraction of less-hygroscopic particles (NFLH) was correlated with the atmospheric oxidation which can be presented by OC/EC. This paper attributed the larger NFLH in winter to the higher value of OC/EC (3.0). Such conditions may lead to more formation of less-hygroscopic particles. Backward trajectories cluster analysis shows that there is a certain link between air mass origin and aerosol hygroscopicity, but it seems to be independent of the level of pollution. The difference of NFNH indicates that the mixing state of aerosol particles can also be affected by air mass origin. Diurnal variations in aerosol hygroscopic parameters in both seasons show that during daytime, aerosol particles tend to have a low degree of external mixing or quasi-internal mixing, resulting in a higher NFMH and a larger κmean; during nighttime and early mornings, they tend to be mixed externally, resulting in a lower NFMH and a smaller κmean. This can be attributed to atmospheric aging effect and evolution of mixing layer height and implies that soot (non-hygroscopic) particles present to a large extent as internal mixtures by the time they leave the urban

  14. Vacuum FTIR Observation on the Dynamic Hygroscopicity of Aerosols under Pulsed Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun; Cai, Chen; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-08-01

    A novel approach based on a combination of a pulse RH controlling system and a rapid scan vacuum FTIR spectrometer (PRHCS-RSVFTIR) was utilized to investigate dynamic hygroscopicity of two atmospheric aerosols: ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). In this approach, rapid-scan infrared spectra of water vapor and aerosols were obtained to determine relative humidity (RH) in sample cell and hygroscopic property of aerosols with a subsecond time resolution. Heterogeneous nucleation rates of (NH4)2SO4 were, for the first time, measured under low RH conditions (<35% RH). In addition, studies of MgSO4 aerosols revealed that water mass transport may be limited by different processes depending on RH values (surface limited at 40% < RH < 52% and bulk phase limited at RH < 40%). Furthermore, we are also the first to report water diffusion constants in micron size MgSO4 aerosols at very low RH values. Our results have shown that the PRHCS-RSVFTIR is well-suited for determination of hygroscopicity of atmospheric aerosols and water transport and nucleation kinetics of liquid aerosols.

  15. Hygroscopicity of Amine Secondary Aerosol - Mixtures of Organic and Inorganic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Cocker, D. R.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Aliphatic amines are emitted from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and contribute to the formation of secondary aerosol in reactions with atmospheric radicals. However, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) ability of amine aerosol has not been explored yet. Here, we study the hygroscopicity of aerosol formed from three aliphatic amines (trimethylamine, diethylamine and butylamine) in the UCR environmental chamber. Amines can react with NO3, a dominant night time oxidant in acid-base and/or oxidation reactions. The mass fraction of organic and inorganic components of formed aerosol was measured by Particle-into-Liquid Sampler coupled to dual ion chromatographs (PILS-ICs) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CCN counter was used to measure the water-uptake ability of these particles. Significantly high hygroscopicity (κ>0.3) was observed for aerosols formed from diethylamine and butylamine with NO3 radicals, which comprised >40% inorganic salt. Compared with amines oxidized by hydroxyl radicals, the presence of aminium salts formed in acid-base reactions greatly improved CCN activity of NO3-initiated aerosol. The effect of water vapor on the formation of aminium salts and aerosol hygroscopicity was also studied. Our results will significantly impact the estimation and role of amines in atmospheric chemistry and global climate models.

  16. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  17. Chemical and hygroscopic properties of aerosol organics at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Clegg, Simon L.; Samburova, Vera; Taylor, Nathan; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Zielinska, Barbara K.; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Chirokova, Galina; McCubbin, Ian B.; Dodson, Craig; Collins, Don

    2013-05-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was conducted to improve our understanding of the chemical and hygroscopic properties of organic compounds in aerosols sampled in the background continental atmosphere. PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 2.5 µm) aerosols were collected from 24 June to 28 July 2010 at Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) in the Park Range of northwestern Colorado. New particle formation (NPF) was frequent at SPL during this campaign, and the samples were not influenced by regional dust storms. Filter samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), water soluble OC (WSOC), major inorganic ions, and detailed organic speciation. WSOC was isolated from inorganic ions using solid phase absorbents. Hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of the WSOC were measured in the laboratory. Organic compounds compose the majority (average of 64% with a standard deviation (SD) of 9%) of the mass of measured species and WSOC accounted for an average of 89% (with a SD of 21%) of OC mass. Daily samples were composited according to back trajectories. On average, organic acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols accounted for 12.5 ± 6.2% (average ± SD) of WSOC. Based on the composition of these compounds and that of high molecular weight compounds identified using ultra high resolution mass spectrometry, the organic mass to OC ratio of the WSOC is estimated to be 2.04. The average hygroscopic GFs at RH = 80% (GF80) were 1.10 ± 0.03 for particles derived from isolated WSOC and 1.27 ± 0.03 for particles derived from the total water-soluble material (WSM). CCN activity followed a similar pattern. The critical diameters at a super-saturation of 0.35% were 0.072 ± 0.009 and 0.094 ± 0.006 µm for particles derived from WSM and isolated WSOC, respectively. These GF results compare favorably with estimates from thermodynamic models, which explicitly relate the water activity (RH) to concentration for

  18. Linking variations in sea spray aerosol particle hygroscopicity to composition during two microcosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, Sara D.; Cornwell, Gavin C.; Helgestad, Taylor M.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Lee, Christopher; Novak, Gordon A.; Sultana, Camille M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Bertram, Timothy H.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2016-07-01

    The extent to which water uptake influences the light scattering ability of marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles depends critically on SSA chemical composition. The organic fraction of SSA can increase during phytoplankton blooms, decreasing the salt content and therefore the hygroscopicity of the particles. In this study, subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85 % relative humidity (GF(85 %)) of predominately submicron SSA particles were quantified during two induced phytoplankton blooms in marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). One MART was illuminated with fluorescent lights and the other was illuminated with sunlight, referred to as the "indoor" and "outdoor" MARTs, respectively. Optically weighted GF(85 %) values for SSA particles were derived from measurements of light scattering and particle size distributions. The mean optically weighted SSA diameters were 530 and 570 nm for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. The GF(85 %) measurements were made concurrently with online particle composition measurements, including bulk composition (using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer) and single particle (using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer) measurement, and a variety of water-composition measurements. During both microcosm experiments, the observed optically weighted GF(85 %) values were depressed substantially relative to pure inorganic sea salt by 5 to 15 %. There was also a time lag between GF(85 %) depression and the peak chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations by either 1 (indoor MART) or 3-to-6 (outdoor MART) days. The fraction of organic matter in the SSA particles generally increased after the Chl a peaked, also with a time lag, and ranged from about 0.25 to 0.5 by volume. The observed depression in the GF(85 %) values (relative to pure sea salt) is consistent with the large observed volume fractions of non-refractory organic matter (NR-OM) comprising the SSA. The GF(85 %) values exhibited a reasonable negative

  19. Deriving aerosol hygroscopic mixing state from size-resolved CCN activity and HR-ToF-AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, Abhishek

    2016-10-01

    The ability of a particle to uptake water and form a cloud droplet depends on its hygroscopicity. To understand its impact on cloud properties and ultimately radiative forcing, knowledge of chemically-resolved mixing state information or the one based on hygroscopic growth is crucial. Typically, global models assume either pure internal or external mixing state which might not be true for all conditions and sampling locations. To investigate into this, the current study employed an indirect approach to infer the probable mixing state. The hygroscopic parameters derived from κ-Kohler theory using size-resolved CCN measurements (κCCN) and bulk/size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements (κAMS) were compared. The accumulation mode particles were found to be more hygroscopic (κCCN = 0.24) than Aitken mode (κCCN = 0.13), perhaps due to increased ratio of inorganic to organic mass fraction. The activation diameter calculated from size-resolved CCN activity measurements at 5 different supersaturation (SS) levels varied in the range of 115 nm-42 nm with κCCN = 0.13-0.23 (avg = 0.18 ± 0.10 (±1σ)). Further, κAMS>κCCN was observed possibly due to the fact that organic and inorganic mass present in the Aitken mode was not correctly represented by bulk chemical composition and size-resolved fractional contribution of oxidized OA was not accurately accounted. Better correlation of organic fraction (forg) and κCCN at lower SS explained this behaviour. The decrease in κCCN with the time of the day was more pronounced at lower SS because of the relative mass reduction of soluble inorganic species by ∼17%. Despite the large differences between κ measured from two approaches, less over-prediction (up to 18%) between measured and predicted CCN concentration suggested lower impact of chemical composition and mixing state at higher SS. However, at lower SS, presences of externally mixed CCN-inactive aerosols lead to CCN over-prediction reflecting the

  20. Chemical and size effects of hygroscopic aerosols on light scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ignatius N.

    1996-08-01

    The extensive thermodynamic and optical properties recently reported [Tang and Munkelwitz, 1994a] for sulfate and nitrate solution droplets are incorporated into a visibility model for computing light scattering by hygroscopic aerosols. The following aerosol systems are considered: NH4HSO4, (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)3H(SO4), NaHSO4, Na2SO4, NH4NO3, and NaNO3. In addition, H2SO4 and NaCl are included to represent freshly formed sulfate and background sea-salt aerosols, respectively. Scattering coefficients, based on 1 μg dry salt per cubic meter of air, are calculated as a function of relative humidity for aerosols of various chemical compositions and lognormal size distributions. For a given size distribution the light scattered by aerosol particles per unit dry-salt mass concentration is only weakly dependent on chemical constituents of the hygroscopic sulfate and nitrate aerosols. Sulfuric acid and sodium chloride aerosols, however, are exceptions and scatter light more efficiently than all other inorganic salt aerosols considered in this study. Both internal and external mixtures exhibit similar light-scattering properties. Thus for common sulfate and nitrate aerosols, since the chemical effect is outweighed by the size effect, it follows that observed light scattering by the ambient aerosol can be approximated, within practical measurement uncertainties, by assuming the aerosol being an external mixture. This has a definite advantage for either visibility degradation or climatic impact modeling calculations, because relevant data are now available for external mixtures but only very scarce for internal mixtures.

  1. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  2. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article.

  3. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE PAGES

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore » photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  4. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.

  5. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed.

  6. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  7. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

    2009-11-27

    Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

  8. Hygroscopicity, CCN and volatility properties of submicron atmospheric aerosol in a boreal forest environment during the summer of 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Häkkinen, S. A. K.; Paramonov, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Mikkilä, J.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.; Bilde, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-05-01

    A Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (VH-TDMA) was applied to study the hygroscopicity and volatility properties of submicron atmospheric aerosol particles in a boreal forest environment in Hyytiälä, Finland during the summer of 2010. Aitken and accumulation mode internally mixed particles (50 nm, 75 nm and 110 nm in diameter) were investigated. Hygroscopicity was found to increase with particle size. The relative mass fraction of organics and SO42- is probably the major contributor to the fluctuation of the hygroscopicity for all particle sizes. The Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC)-derived hygroscopicity parameter κ was observed to be slightly higher than κ calculated from VH-TDMA data under sub-saturated conditions, potential reasons for this behavior are discussed shortly. Also, the size-resolved volatility properties of particles were investigated. Upon heating, more small particles evaporated compared to large particles. There was a significant amount of aerosol volume (non-volatile material) left, even at heating temperatures of 280 °C. Using size resolved volatility-hygroscopicity analysis, we concluded that there was always hygroscopic material remaining in the particles at different heating temperatures, even at 280 °C. This indicates that the observed non-volatile aerosol material did not consist solely of black carbon.

  9. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  10. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles <100 nm generated by means of jets

  11. Hygroscopicity Behavior, Activation Properties and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosol at a Background Site in the Megacity Region of Peking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Nowak, Andreas; Mildenberger, Katrin; Göbel, Tina; Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of China suffer from heavy air pollution (both gaseous and particulate) caused by strong economic growth in the last two decades. However, knowledge concerning the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol particles populations, and their effects on the optical properties of the atmosphere, is still sparse. In the framework of the investigations presented here, comprehensive measurements concerning aerosol particle hygroscopicity, CCN ability, composition, and optical properties were performed. The investigations are part of the DFG-funded project HaChi (Haze in China) and are conducted in collaboration with the Peking University. A conclusive parameterization of aerosol hygroscopicity and activation data is aimed for, which will then be implemented in a meso-scale model to investigate aerosol-cloud-radiation and precipitation interactions. During two intensive measurements campaigns (March 2009 and July/ August 2009), in-situ aerosol measurements have been performed in an air-conditioned mobile laboratory next to the Wuqing Meteorological Station (39°23'8.53"N, 117°1'25.88"E), which is located between Bejing and Tijanjin and is thereby an ideal background site in a megacity region. The particle number size distribution (TDMPS), the particle optical properties (MAAP and nephelometer) and their hygroscopic properties at high RH (HH-TDMA, LACIS-mobile) were characterized as well as their cloud nucleating properties above supersaturation (DMT-CCNC). 24 h PM1 particle samples were continuously collected over the two campaigns in winter and summer using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). Additionally two 6h size-resolved samples (daytime and night-time) were collected each day applying an 11-stage Berner impactor. The size-selection of HH-TDMA, LACIS and the CCNC was synchronized with the Berner stages. Opening analysis of the winter campaign data showed that the HH-TDMA usually detected a hydrophobic and a hygroscopic mode, i.e., the

  12. The effect of low solubility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be investigated in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide sub-micrometre particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion, whereas the organic surfactant has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles experience appreciable shifts in their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  13. The effect of low solublility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-02-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be performed in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide submicrometer particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion: whereas the organic covering has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles change their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  14. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH < 90%, under supersaturated conditions (with respect to RH), an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric

  15. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ∼34% in the accumulation vs. ∼47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ∼70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ∼35% RH for submicron particles vs. ∼50% RH for supermicron particles. This ∼15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ∼0.15 for

  16. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; et al

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water solublemore » fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ~ 0.15 for the

  17. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in central Siberia (61° N, 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical compositions of aerosol particles were analyzed by x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38 % of particulate matter (PM) in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water-soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8 % of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34 % in the accumulation mode vs. ~ 47 % in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4 % RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same relative humidity (RH), starting at ~ 70 %, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35 % RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50 % RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15 % RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4 % RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv,ws value related to the water-soluble (ws

  18. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Hygroscopic Properties at the Look Rock Site during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Li, X.; Surratt, J. D.; Hicks, W.; Bairai, S. T.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is to characterize the climate-relevant properties of aerosols over the southeastern United States at the interface of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. As part of the SOAS campaign, the UCD cavity ringdown/photoacoustic spectrometer was deployed to make in-situ measurements of aerosol light extinction, absorption and sub-saturated hygroscopicity at the Look Rock site (LRK) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The site is influenced by substantial biogenic emissions with varying impacts from anthropogenic pollutants, allowing for direct examination of the optical and hygroscopic properties of anthropogenic-influenced biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA). During the experiment period, the average dry aerosol extinction (Bext), absorption (Babs) coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 532 nm were 30.3 × 16.5 Mm-1, 1.12 × 0.78 Mm-1 and 0.96 × 0.06. The Babs at 532 nm was well correlated (r2 = 0.79) with the refractory black carbon (rBC) number concentration determined by a single particle soot spectrometer (SP2). The absorption by black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) and the absorption enhancement due to the 'lensing' effect were quantified by comparing the Babs of ambient and thermo-denuded aerosols at 405 nm and 532 nm. The optical sub-saturated hygroscopic growth factor was derived from extinction and particle size distribution measurements at dry and elevated relative humidity. In addition, to explore the extent to which ammonia mediated chemistry leads to BrC formation, as suggested in recent laboratory studies(1,2), we performed an NH3 perturbation experiment in-situ for 1 week during the study, in which ambient aerosols were exposed to approximately 100 ppb NH3 with a residence time of ~ 3hr. The broader implications of these observational data at LRK will be discussed in the context of the concurrent gas and aerosol chemical

  19. Using environmental scanning electron microscopy to determine the hygroscopic properties of agricultural aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah D.; Auvermann, Brent W.; Littleton, Rick

    A field study at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle was conducted to characterize the hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties of agricultural aerosols and to identify possible correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of the agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system and have used an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity (RH). In addition, complementary determination of the elemental composition of single particles was performed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Our results indicate that most of the agricultural particles do not take up significant amounts of water when exposed to up to 96% RH. However, a small fraction of particles in the coarse mode deliquesced at approximately 75% RH and reached twice their original sizes by 96% RH. The observed changes in particle size with increased RH may significantly impact total aerosol extinction, visibility, and human health.

  20. Organic component vapor pressures and hygroscopicities of aqueous aerosol measured by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Stewart, David J; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun-hong; Ohm, Peter; Dutcher, Cari S; Clegg, Simon L

    2015-01-29

    Measurements of the hygroscopic response of aerosol and the particle-to-gas partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds are crucial for providing more accurate descriptions of the compositional and size distributions of atmospheric aerosol. Concurrent measurements of particle size and composition (inferred from refractive index) are reported here using optical tweezers to isolate and probe individual aerosol droplets over extended timeframes. The measurements are shown to allow accurate retrievals of component vapor pressures and hygroscopic response through examining correlated variations in size and composition for binary droplets containing water and a single organic component. Measurements are reported for a homologous series of dicarboxylic acids, maleic acid, citric acid, glycerol, or 1,2,6-hexanetriol. An assessment of the inherent uncertainties in such measurements when measuring only particle size is provided to confirm the value of such a correlational approach. We also show that the method of molar refraction provides an accurate characterization of the compositional dependence of the refractive index of the solutions. In this method, the density of the pure liquid solute is the largest uncertainty and must be either known or inferred from subsaturated measurements with an error of <±2.5% to discriminate between different thermodynamic treatments.

  1. Variations in organic aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties upon heterogeneous OH oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Che, Daphne L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2011-08-01

    Measurements of the evolution of organic aerosol extinction cross sections (σext) and subsaturated hygroscopicity upon heterogeneous OH oxidation are reported for two model compounds, squalane (a C30 saturated hydrocarbon) and azelaic acid (a C9 dicarboxylic acid). For both compounds, the σext values at 532 nm increase substantially as the particles undergo oxidation, exhibiting a logarithmic increase with OH exposure. The increase in σext correlates with both an increase in the particle oxygen to carbon (O:C) atomic ratio and density and a decrease in mean molecular weight. The measurements have been used to calculate the variation with oxidation of the mean polarizability, α, of the molecules comprising the particles. The absolute α values for the two systems are shown to be related through the variation in the particle chemical composition, specifically the relative abundances of C, O, and H atoms and the mean molecular weight. Unlike σext, it was found that the evolution of the particle hygroscopicity upon oxidation is quite different for the two model systems considered. Hygroscopicity was quantified by measuring γext, which is a single-parameter representation of hygroscopicity that describes the increase in extinction upon exposure of the particles to a high-relative humidity environment (here, 75% and 85% RH). For unoxidized squalane, γext was zero and only increased slowly as the particles were oxidized by OH radicals. In contrast, γext for azelaic acid increased rapidly upon exposure to OH, eventually reaching a plateau at high OH exposures. In general, γext appears to vary sigmoidally with O:C, reaching a plateau at high O:C.

  2. Airborne characterization of subsaturated aerosol hygroscopicity and dry refractive index from the surface to 6.5 km during the SEAC4RS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, Taylor; Crosbie, Ewan; Ortega, Amber; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Zuend, Andreas; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Ziemba, Luke; Anderson, Bruce; Thornhill, Lee; Perring, Anne E.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Campazano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin; Sorooshian, Armin

    2016-04-01

    In situ aerosol particle measurements were conducted during 21 NASA DC-8 flights in the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys field campaign over the United States, Canada, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. For the first time, this study reports rapid, size-resolved hygroscopic growth and real refractive index (RI at 532 nm) data between the surface and upper troposphere in a variety of air masses including wildfires, agricultural fires, biogenic, marine, and urban outflow. The Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe (DASH-SP) quantified size-resolved diameter growth factors (GF = Dp,wet/Dp,dry) that are used to infer the hygroscopicity parameter κ. Thermokinetic simulations were conducted to estimate the impact of partial particle volatilization within the DASH-SP across a range of sampling conditions. Analyses of GF and RI data as a function of air mass origin, dry size, and altitude are reported, in addition to κ values for the inorganic and organic fractions of aerosol. Average RI values are found to be fairly constant (1.52-1.54) for all air mass categories. An algorithm is used to compare size-resolved DASH-SP GF with bulk scattering f(RH = 80%) data obtained from a pair of nephelometers, and the results show that the two can only be reconciled if GF is assumed to decrease with increasing dry size above 400 nm (i.e., beyond the upper bound of DASH-SP measurements). Individual case studies illustrate variations of hygroscopicity as a function of dry size, environmental conditions, altitude, and composition.

  3. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  4. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements.

  5. Sensitivity of depositions to the size and hygroscopicity of Cs-bearing aerosols released from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Mizuo; Adachi, Kouji; Sekiyama, Tsuyoshi; Zaizen, Yuji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    We recently revealed that the microphysical properties of aerosols carrying the radioactive Cs released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) at an early stage (March 14-15, 2011) of the accident could be very different from what we assumed previously: super-micron and non-hygroscopic at the early stage, whereas sub-micron and hygroscopic afterwards (at least later than March 20-22). In the study, two sensitivity simulations with the two different aerosol microphysical properties were conducted using a regional scale meteorology- chemical transport model (NHM-Chem). The impact of the difference was quite significant. 17% (0.001%) of the radioactive Cs fell onto the ground by dry (wet) deposition processes, and the rest was deposited into the ocean or was transported out of the model domain, which is central and northern part of the main land of Japan, under the assumption that Cs-bearing aerosols are non-hygroscopic and super-micron. On the other hand, 5.7% (11.3%) fell onto the ground by dry (wet) deposition, for the cases under the assumption that the Cs-bearing aerosols are hygroscopic and sub-micron. For the accurate simulation of the deposition of radionuclides, knowledge of the aerosol microphysical properties is essential as well as the accuracy of the simulated wind fields and precipitation patterns.

  6. Aerosol Size Distribution, Composition, and Hygroscopicity Measurements During CSTRIPE Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Varutbangkul, V.; Conant, W. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Buzorius, G.; Jonsson, H. H.

    2003-12-01

    During July 2003, the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was deployed in the CSTRIPE (Coastal STRatocumulus Imposed Perturbation Experiment) field experiment in order to quantify the effects of aerosols on the microphysics and dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds. In order to characterize the effects of different aerosol types on stratocumulus clouds, various air masses were sampled, including local fire plumes, pollution over the San Joaquin valley, unperturbed marine stratocumulus clouds, and stratocumulus clouds perturbed by seeding flares. Some research flights were also dedicated to characterize the seeding flares in the clear sky. Measurements of aerosol mass distribution and composition, using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), and size distribution and hygroscopic behavior, using a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer (Dual DMA) with one column at dry conditions and another at a relative humidity of approximately 70 percent, will be presented here. During a number of in-cloud sampling periods, the Counter-flow Virtual Impactor (CVI) was used to select and dry cloud droplets, which were then analyzed by the AMS and the Dual DMA. The AMS composition measurements showed that sulfate and organics comprised most of the mass of the non-refractory components of the aerosol. The DMA showed a mixture of unimodal and bimodal size distributions in most types of air masses. The air mass over the San Joaquin valley, however, showed strong evidence of freshly nucleated particles, with aerosol number concentrations often above 80,000 cm-3.

  7. Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Markus; Heim, Lars-Oliver; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kandler, Konrad

    2015-04-01

    Hygroscopic properties of large aerosol particles using the example of aged Saharan mineral dust - a semi-automated electron microscopy approach Markus Hartmann(1), Lars-Oliver Heim(2), Martin Ebert(1), Stephan Weinbruch(1), Konrad Kandler(1) The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados from June 10 to July 15 2013. During this period, dust was frequently transported from Africa across the Atlantic Ocean toward the Caribbean. In this study, we investigate the atmospheric aging of the dust aerosol based on its hygroscopicity. Aerosol samples were collected ground-based at Ragged Point (13°9'54.4"N, 59°25'55.7"W) with a single round jet cascade impactor on nickel-substrates. The particles from the stage with a 50% efficiency cutoff size of 1 µm were analyzed with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) and a cooling stage. In an initial automated run, information on particle size and chemical composition for elements heavier than carbon were gathered. Afterwards, electron microscope images of the same sample areas as before were taken during a stepwise increase of relative humidities (between 50 % and 92%), so that the hygroscopic growth of the droplets could be directly observed. The observed hygroscopic growth can be correlated to the chemical composition of the respective particles. For the automated analysis of several hundred images of droplets an image processing algorithm in Python was developed. The algorithm is based on histogram equalization and watershed segmentation. Since SEM images can only deliver two-dimensional information, but the hygroscopic growth factor usually refers to the volume of a drop, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to derive an empirical function for the drop volume depending on the apparent drop diameter in the electron images. Aside from the mineral dust, composed of mostly silicates and

  8. Low hygroscopic scattering enhancement of boreal aerosol and the implications for a columnar optical closure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P. P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Hong, J.; Komppula, M.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; Lampilahti, J.; de Leeuw, G.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Tunved, P.; Väänänen, R.; Petäjä, T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient aerosol particles can take up water and thus change their optical properties depending on the hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. Knowledge of the hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for radiative forcing calculations and is also needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing or model results with in situ measurements. Specifically, particle light scattering depends on RH and can be described by the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value (RH <30-40 %). Here, we present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä, Finland. Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground level by a humidified nephelometer is found to be generally lower (e.g. 1.63±0.22 at RH = 85 % and λ = 525 nm) than observed at other European sites. One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the aerosol encountered at Hyytiälä to which f(RH) is clearly anti-correlated (R2≈0.8). A simplified parametrization of f(RH) based on the measured chemical mass fraction can therefore be derived for this aerosol type. A trajectory analysis revealed that elevated values of f(RH) and the corresponding elevated inorganic mass fraction are partially caused by transported hygroscopic sea spray particles. An optical closure study shows the consistency of the ground-based in situ measurements. Our measurements allow to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient using the measured f(RH). By combining the ground-based measurements with intensive aircraft measurements of the particle number size distribution and ambient RH, columnar values of the particle extinction coefficient are determined and compared to columnar measurements of a co-located AERONET sun photometer. The water

  9. Some insights into the condensing vapors driving new particle growth to CCN sizes on the basis of hygroscopicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Poulain, L.; Birmili, W.; Größ, J.; Niedermeier, N.; Wang, Z. B.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    New particle formation (NPF) and growth is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In this study, we investigated the chemical species driving new particle growth to the CCN sizes on the basis of particle hygroscopicity measurements carried out at the research station Melpitz, Germany. Three consecutive NPF events occurred during summertime were chosen as examples to perform the study. Hygroscopicity measurements showed that the (NH4)2SO4-equivalent water-soluble fraction accounts for 20 and 16 % of 50 and 75 nm particles, respectively, during the NPF events. Numerical analysis showed that the ratios of H2SO4 condensational growth to the observed particle growth were 20 and 13 % for 50 and 75 nm newly formed particles, respectively. Aerosol mass spectrometer measurements showed that an enhanced mass fraction of sulfate and ammonium in the newly formed particles was observed when new particles grew to the sizes larger than 30 nm shortly after the particle formation period. At a later time, the secondary organic species played a key role in the particle growth. Both hygroscopicity and aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements and numerical analysis confirmed that organic compounds were major contributors driving particle growth to CCN sizes. The critical diameters at different supersaturations estimated using AMS data and κ-Köhler theory increased significantly during the later course of NPF events. This indicated that the enhanced organic mass fraction caused a reduction in CCN efficiency of newly formed particles. Our results implied that the CCN production associated with atmospheric nucleation may be overestimated if assuming that newly formed particles can serve as CCN once they grow to a fixed particle size, an assumption made in some previous studies, especially for organic-rich environments. In our study, the enhancement in CCN number concentration associated with individual NPF events were 63, 66, and 69 % for 0.1, 0.4, and 0

  10. Seasonal behavior of PM2.5 deliquescence, crystallization, and hygroscopic growth in the Po Valley (Milan): Implications for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Luca; Rovelli, Grazia; Casati, Marco; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Ferrero, Luca

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols deliquescence and crystallization relative humidity (DRH and CRH) are rarely measured compared to the worldwide number of hygroscopicity measurements; this feature comes from the lack of an efficient method able to capture the whole complexity of chemical composition of aerosols. Despite this, the knowledge of both DRH and CRH are crucial for a correct parameterization of the aerosol hygroscopic growth used in different applications, among which the remote sensing is very important. In this paper, a newly developed technique (direct current conductance method) was applied in an aerosol chamber to Milan PM2.5 samples, to identify aerosol DRH and CRH both during winter and summer. These results were compared with those independently obtained by gravimetric measurements conducted in the chamber using a microbalance. Microbalance data allowed also the determination of the mass hygroscopic growth factor on the collected PM2.5 samples. Results evidenced first a good agreement between the two methods (RMSE = 2.7% and 2.3% for DRH and CRH, respectively). Collected data evidenced the hysteresis behavior of ambient particles and variability in both DRH and CRH between the two seasons. Summer samples showed higher DRH and CRH (on average 71.4 ± 1.0% RH and 62.6 ± 1.2% RH, respectively) than the winter ones (on average 55.2 ± 0.7% RH and 46.9 ± 0.6% RH). This behavior was related to the higher content of sulfates during the summer season. Conversely, the mass hygroscopic growth factor at 90% RH was higher for winter samples (2.76 ± 0.06) with respect to the summer ones (1.91 ± 0.11). Since hysteresis behavior affects optical properties of aerosols, when RH conditions are within the loop, the hygroscopic growth factor could be assigned in a wrong way. Thus, the growth factor was calculated within the hysteresis loop for both upper and lower branches: results showed that difference in hygroscopic growth factor could reach up the 24%.

  11. A 12-year observation of chemical and hygroscopic properties of marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions from East Asia, especially in China, have significantly increased over the recent decades due to the rapid industrial development. They are implausible to decline in the next 20 years and may have a strong impact on tropospheric chemistry in marine boundary layer and cloud properties over the western North Pacific. To better understand the long-term observation of aerosol characterization and their effect on the hygroscopicity and precipitation process over the western North Pacific, we collected TSP aerosol samples on a weekly basis during the 2001-2012 at a remote marine island, Chichijima (27°04'E; 142°13'N), which is located in the outflow region of Asian dust and East Asian anthropogenic pollutants. We present here long-term observations of seasonal and annual variation of chemical and hygroscopic properties of water-soluble matter, extracted from the remote marine aerosols, based on the measurement of major inorganic ions, total organic carbon and hygroscopicity by HTDMA. Concentrations of nss-SO42- are high in winter and spring and low in summer, whereas hygroscopicity is high in summer to autumn and low in winter to spring, probably due to the influence of long-range transport of anthropogenic pollutants and dusts. Annual variation of nss-SO42- increased from 2001 to 2006 and continuously decreased from 2007 to 2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, hygroscopicity (g(90%)ZSR) showed a decrease from 2001 to 2006 and an increase from 2007 to 2012. These results demonstrate that although WSOM often suppress the hygroscopicity of marine aerosols, long-range atmospheric transport of nss-SO42- seriously suppress the hygroscopicity and thus affect the precipitation process over the western North Pacific. This study also demonstrates that Asian dusts can act as an important source of nutrients for phytoplankton and thus sea-to-air emission of dimethyl sulfide and subsequent

  12. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  13. Hygroscopic and chemical properties of aerosols collected near a copper smelter: implications for public and environmental health.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2012-09-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g., arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18-0.55 μm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10-0.32 μm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  14. Hygroscopic and Chemical Properties of Aerosols collected near a Copper Smelter: Implications for Public and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples collected near an active copper smelter were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g. arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18–0.55 µm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10–0.32 µm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  15. Phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride/water aerosol particles before and after ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Hanford, Kate L; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-06-21

    Aerosol optical tweezers are used to probe the phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of single aerosol particles consisting of an inorganic component, sodium chloride, and a water insoluble organic component, oleic acid. Coagulation of oleic acid aerosol with an optically trapped aqueous sodium chloride droplet leads to formation of a phase-separated particle with two partially engulfed liquid phases. The dependence of the phase and morphology of the trapped particle with variation in relative humidity (RH) is investigated by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy over the RH range <5% to >95%. The efflorescence and deliquescence behavior of the inorganic component is shown to be unaffected by the presence of the organic phase. Whereas efflorescence occurs promptly (<1 s), the deliquescence process requires both dissolution of the inorganic component and the adoption of an equilibrium morphology for the resulting two phase particle, occurring on a time-scale of <20 s. Comparative measurements of the hygroscopicity of mixed aqueous sodium chloride/oleic acid droplets with undoped aqueous sodium chloride droplets show that the oleic acid does not impact on the equilibration partitioning of water between the inorganic component and the gas phase or the time response of evaporation/condensation. The oxidative aging of the particles through reaction with ozone is shown to increase the hygroscopicity of the organic component.

  16. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode.

    The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments.

    The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was

  17. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE PAGES

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSmore » C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  18. Size Resolved measurements of aerosol hygroscopicity and mixing state during Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R. M.; Artaxo, P.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Day, D. A.; de Sá, S. S.; Hu, W.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kuang, C.; Palm, B. B.; Krüger, M. L.; Manzi, A. O.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Springston, S. R.; Alexander, M. L.; Watson, T. B.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nucleai (CCN) spectra were performed at the T3 site of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) field project located near Manacapuru, Brazil during 2014. The T3 site is a receptor site for both polluted urban down-wind (Manaus, BR a city of several million 70 km up wind) and background (Amazon rainforest) air-masses and can provide a contrast between clean and polluted conditions. Particle hygroscopicity (kappa) and mixing state were calculated from the particle activation spectrum measured by size selecting aerosols and exposing them to a wide range of supersaturation in the CCN counter (Droplet Measurement Technologies Continuous-Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber). The supersaturation was varied between 0.07 and 1.1% by changing a combination of both total flow rate and temperature gradient in the CCN counter. Measured spectra were examined for air masses with different level of influence from Manaus plume. Particle hygroscopicity generally peaked near noon local time which was broadly consistent with the trend in aerosol sulfate. The average kappa values during the first intensive operation period were 0.14±0.05, 0.14±0.04 and 0.16±0.06 for 75, 112 and 171 nm particles respectively. Evaluation of particle hygroscopicity and dispersion (mixing state) will be presented with respect to size and level of pollution.

  19. Relating hygroscopicity and optical properties to chemical composition and structure of secondary organic aerosol particles generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Formenti, P.; Picquet-Varrault, B.; Pangui, E.; Zapf, P.; Katrib, Y.; Giorio, C.; Tapparo, A.; Monod, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Decorse, P.; Mangeney, C.; Doussin, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene in the CESAM (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber) simulation chamber. The SOA formation and aging were studied by following their optical, hygroscopic and chemical properties. The optical properties were investigated by determining the particle complex refractive index (CRI). The hygroscopicity was quantified by measuring the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the particle size (size growth factor, GF) and on the scattering coefficient (scattering growth factor, f(RH)). The oxygen to carbon atomic ratios (O : C) of the particle surface and bulk were used as a sensitive parameter to correlate the changes in hygroscopic and optical properties of the SOA composition during their formation and aging in CESAM. The real CRI at 525 nm wavelength decreased from 1.43-1.60 (±0.02) to 1.32-1.38 (±0.02) during the SOA formation. The decrease in the real CRI correlated to the O : C decrease from 0.68 (±0.20) to 0.55 (±0.16). In contrast, the GF remained roughly constant over the reaction time, with values of 1.02-1.07 (±0.02) at 90% (±4.2%) RH. Simultaneous measurements of O : C of the particle surface revealed that the SOA was not composed of a homogeneous mixture, but contained less oxidised species at the surface which may limit water absorption. In addition, an apparent change in both mobility diameter and scattering coefficient with increasing RH from 0 to 30% was observed for SOA after 14 h of reaction. We postulate that this change could be due to a change in the viscosity of the SOA from a predominantly glassy state to a predominantly liquid state.

  20. Ambient Observations of Sub-1.0 Hygroscopic Growth Factor and f(RH) Values: Case Studies from Surface and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Shingler, T.; Crosbie, E.; Wonaschutz, A.; Froyd, K. D.; Adler, G.; Gao, R. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Perring, A. E.; Brock, C. A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Wisthaler, A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hygroscopic growth occurs when particles take up water vapor and grow when exposed to elevated relative humidity (RH), and is controlled largely by chemical composition. Previous laboratory studies of biomass burning and combustion particles observed particle size shrinkage as soot aerosols, especially those with coatings, were exposed to increasing RH levels, which resulted in sub-1.0 hygroscopicity parameter values (i.e., ratio of humidified-to-dry diameter g(RH) and ratio of humidified-to-dry scattering coefficients f(RH)). To investigate the potential for sub-1.0 hygroscopicity in ambient aerosol, we utilized data from (i) a ship-board HTDMA during E-PEACE 2011, (ii) multiple instruments on the DC8 during SEAC4RS-2013, as well as (iii) the DASH-SP during measurement intensives in Summer 2014 and Winter 2015 in Tucson, Arizona. Suppressed hygroscopicity, including sub-1.0 g(RH), was observed during smoke-influenced periods in SEAC4RS, episodic events in the winter season in Arizona, and smoke-influenced air during E-PEACE. Across the range of RH investigated (75-95%), sub-1.0 g(RH) was lowest at the highest RH values probed (~95%). These sub-1.0 g(RH) observations are consistent with elevated black carbon and organic aerosol concentration in both E-PEACE and SEAC4RS. Collocated measurements during SEAC4RS indicate elevated spikes in black carbon concentrations are coincident with both sub-1.0 f(RH) and g(RH) observations, as well as elevated organic aerosol- and gas-phase fire tracers such as AMS f60 and PTR-MS acetonitrile concentration. This is the first set of ambient observations of sub-1.0 hygroscopicity factors g(RH) and f(RH), with consistency across different instruments, regions, and platforms. Although particle restructuring has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments, field observations are complex as soot coating, secondary chemistry, and heterogeneous processing can occur on the same time scale as measurements. This work motivates continued

  1. Direct comparison of the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol at relative humidities approaching saturation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jim S; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Wang, Liangyu; Topping, David O; Butler, Jason R; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Holographic optical tweezers are used to make comparative measurements of the hygroscopic properties of single component aqueous aerosol containing sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate over a range of relative humidity from 84% to 96%. The change in RH over the course of the experiment is monitored precisely using a sodium chloride probe droplet with accuracy better than ±0.09%. The measurements are used to assess the accuracy of thermodynamic treatments of the relationship between water activity and solute mass fraction with particular attention focused on the dilute solute limit approaching saturation vapor pressure. The consistency of the frequently used Clegg-Brimblecombe-Wexler (CBW) treatment for predicting the hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol is confirmed. Measurements of the equilibrium size of ammonium sulfate aerosol are found to agree with predictions to within an uncertainty of ±0.2%. Given the accuracy of treating equilibrium composition, the inconsistencies highlighted in recent calibration measurements of critical supersaturations of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol cannot be attributed to uncertainties associated with the thermodynamic predictions and must have an alternative origin. It is concluded that the CBW treatment can allow the critical supersaturation to be estimated for sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol with an accuracy of better than ±0.002% in RH. This corresponds to an uncertainty of ≤1% in the critical supersaturation for typical supersaturations of 0.2% and above. This supports the view that these systems can be used to accurately calibrate instruments that measure cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at selected supersaturations. These measurements represent the first study in which the equilibrium properties of two particles of chemically distinct composition have been compared simultaneously and directly alongside each other in the same environment.

  2. The impact of marine surface organic enrichment on the measured hygroscopicity parameter of laboratory generated sea-spray aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, S.; Novak, G.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean serves as a major source for atmospheric aerosol particles, yet the chemicophysical properties of sea spray aerosol to date are not well characterized. Understanding the transfer of organic compounds, present in the sea surface microlayer (SSML), to sea-spray particles and their resulting impact on cloud formation is important for predicting aerosol impact on climate in remote marine environments. Here, we present a series of laboratory experiments designed to probe the fractionation of select organic molecules during wave breaking. We use a representative set of organic mimics (e.g. sterols, sugars, lipids, proteins, fatty acids) to test a recent physically based model of organic enrichment in sea-spray aerosol [Burrows et al., 2014] that is based on Langmuir absorption equilibria. Experiments were conducted in the UCSD Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART) permitting accurate representation of wave breaking processes in the laboratory. We report kappa values for the resulting sea-spray aerosols and compare them to a predictions made using Kappa-Köhler Theory driven by a linear combination of the pure component kappa values. Hygroscopicity determinations made using the model systems are discussed within the context of measurements of CCN activity made using natural, coastal water.

  3. Aerosol Activity and Hygroscopicity Combined with Lidar Data in the Urban Atmosphere of Athens, Greece in the Frame of the HYGRA_CD Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Papayannis, Alexandros; Vratolis, Stergios; Argyrouli, Athina; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsagkaraki, Maria; Nenes, Athanasios; Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations between 0.2-1.0% supersaturation and aerosol size distribution were performed at an urban background site of Athens during HygrA-CD. The site is affected by local and long-range transported emissions as portrayed by the external mixing of the particles, as the larger ones appear to be more hygroscopic and more CCN-active than smaller ones. Activation fractions at all supersaturations exhibit a diurnal variability with minimum values around noon, which are considerably lower than unity. This reinforces the conclusion that the aerosol is mostly externally mixed between "fresher", less hygroscopic components with more aged, CCN active constituents.

  4. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ‒ for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ‒ and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  5. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  6. Study of aerosol hygroscopic events over the Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (CESAR) using the multi-wavelength Raman lidar Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A. J.; Apituley, A.; Veselovskii, I.; Suvorina, A.; Henzing, J.; Pujadas, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a study of aerosol optical and microphysical properties under different relative humidity (RH) but well mixed layer conditions using optical and microphysical aerosol properties from multi-wavelength (MW) Raman lidar and in-situ aerosol observations collected at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR). Two hygroscopic events are described through 3 backscatter (β) and 2 extinction (α) coefficients which in turn provide intensive parameters such as the backscatter-related Ångström exponent (åβ) and the lidar ratio (LR). Along with it, profiles of RH were inferred from Raman lidar observations and therefore, as a result of varying humidity conditions, a shift on the aerosol optical properties can be described. Thus, it is observed that as RH increases, aerosols uptake water vapour, augment their size and consequently the åβ diminishes whereas the LR increases. The enhancement factor based on the backscatter coefficient at 532 nm, which characterizes the aerosol from hygroscopic standpoint, is also estimated. Finally, microphysical properties that are necessary for aerosol radiative forcing estimates - such as volume, effective radii, refractive index and size distribution, all vertically resolved - are retrieved using the inversion with regularization. Using this method, two hygroscopic events are described in detail.

  7. Quantifying the Relationship between Organic Aerosol Composition and Hygroscopicity/CCN Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-06-30

    The overall objective for this project was to provide the data and underlying process level understanding necessary to facilitate the dynamic treatment of organic aerosol CCN activity in future climate models. The specific objectives were as follows: (1) employ novel approaches to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity, (2) evaluate the effects of temperature and relative humidity on organic aerosol CCN activity, and (3) develop parameterizations to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity.

  8. A case study of single hygroscopicity parameter and its link to the functional groups and phase transition for urban aerosols in Taipei City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hui-Ming; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yu-Quan

    2016-05-01

    The hygroscopicity, functional groups and phase transitions of urban aerosol particles in Taipei City were studied using a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc) with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an attenuated total reflectance with infrared (ATR-IR) detection technique. With the assumption of larger particles being activated first, the derived single hygroscopicity parameter (κ) exhibited an increasing trend with particle size, i.e., from 0.022 ± 0.01 at 87 ± 10 nm to 0.13 ± 0.03 at 240 ± 20 nm. The collected size-selected particles were characterized using ATR-IR for the functional groups of alkyl, carbonyl, ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, which showed various size dependence patterns, linked to different formation mechanisms. The hygroscopic response based on the ratio (xW_solute) for sample film of absorption by the enhanced water-stretching peak to that by the selected solute showed a better consistency with pure ammonium sulfate for sub-micron size particles. Based on the derived ammonium sulfate volume fraction from IR analysis, the κ received from CCNc measurements was concluded mainly contributed by ammonium sulfate for sub-micrometer particles. The increasing trend of sodium nitrate absorbance at aerosol diameter ≥1 μm was due to a reaction of nitric acid with sea salt particles. The micrometer sized particles were apparent not only in a significantly higher xW_solute than pure sodium nitrate but also had a deliquescence RH of 69 ± 1%, similar to that of sodium nitrate-sodium chloride mixtures. Overall, the organic species in this study exhibited a low hygroscopicity with less than 0.036 of contribution for the overall κ, and the major hygroscopic material of urban aerosols consisted primarily of ammonium sulfate in the sub-micrometer particles and sodium nitrate with sea salt in the coarse particles.

  9. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-12-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm (diameter) in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhanced growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  10. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, O.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-09-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhance growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  11. Vapour pressures and hygroscopicity of semi-volatile organic components in ternary organic/inorganic/water aerosol droplet trapped by aerosol optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vapour pressures of semi-volatile organic compounds is of critical importance in determining their partitioning behaviour into atmospheric aerosol. Quantifying the gas/particle partitioning of organic compounds is of great importance since at present published results of the vapour pressures of compounds of interest (typically with vapour pressures lower than 0.01 Pa) can be different by several orders of magnitude and influences on SVOCs evaporation from participation of inorganic compounds remains unclear. In this study we present a new method for the retrieval of SVOCs vapour pressures from single aerosol droplets in an aerosol optical tweezers system. Measurements of the concentration of SVOC (derived from experimentally determined RI) and radius of SVOC aqueous droplets are correlated in an expression derived from the Maxwell gas phase diffusion equation for the determination of vapour pressure. ( ) dmi-= 4π dr3Conc + dConcir3 = 4πrMiDi,gas-(p - p) dt 3 dt i dt RT i,∞ i,r Relationship between r dr/dt (nm2s-1) and r2dConcentration/dt (nm2gL-1s-1) is presented, in which the slope is derived for determination of hygroscopic line whilst the axis intercept can be determined to estimate vapour pressure. Briefly the method relies on the levitation of a droplet (3-7 μm radius) in an aerosol optical tweezers system. In this system the droplet acts as a microcavity and the size and refractive index of the particle can be extracted by using Mie theory to fit the positions of the "whispering gallery modes" in the cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy fingerprint. The vapour pressure can then be extracted from the correlation between the rate of change of particle radius with the rate of change of composition (refractive index, n). We will show that information about the hygroscopicity of the particle and how this changes as the particle evaporates can also be determined from the changing slopes of these plots.

  12. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles. PMID:27372129

  13. Properties of jet engine combustion particles during the PartEmis experiment. Hygroscopic growth at supersaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Giebl, H.; Petzold, A.; Gysel, M.; Nyeki, S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Wilson, C. W.

    2003-07-01

    During the EU Project PartEmis, the microphysical properties of aircraft combustion aerosol were investigated. This study is focused on the ability of exhaust aerosols to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The combustor was operated at two different conditions representing old and modern aircraft engine technology. CCN concentrations were measured with the University of Vienna CCN counter [ Giebl et al., 2002] at supersaturations around 0.7%. The activation ratio (fraction of CCN in total aerosol) depended on the fuel sulphur content (FSC) and also on the operation conditions. CCN/CN ratios increased from 0.93 through 1.43 to 5.15 . 10-3 (old cruise conditions) and 0.67 through 3.04 to 7.94 . 10-3 (modern cruise conditions) when FSC increased from 50 through 410 to1270 μg/g. The activation behaviour was modelled using classical theories and with a semi-empirical model [ Gysel et al., 2003] based on measured hygroscopicity of the aerosol under subsaturated conditions, which gave the best agreement.

  14. Hygroscopic behavior of NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles as nascent sea-spray aerosol surrogates and observation of efflorescence during humidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Eom, H.-J.; Cho, H.-R.; Ro, C.-U.

    2015-10-01

    As Na+, Mg2+, and Cl- are major ionic constituents of seawater, NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles might represent sea-spray aerosols (SSAs) better than pure NaCl. However, there have been very few hygroscopic studies of pure MgCl2 and NaCl-MgCl2 mixture aerosol particles despite the MgCl2 moiety playing a major role in the hygroscopic behavior of nascent SSAs. Laboratory-generated pure MgCl2 and NaCl-MgCl2 mixture aerosol particles with 12 mixing ratios (0.01 ≤ mole fraction of NaCl (XNaCl) ≤ 0.9) were examined systematically by optical microscopy (OM), in situ Raman micro-spectrometry (RMS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX) elemental X-ray mapping to observe their hygroscopic behavior, derive the experimental phase diagrams, and obtain the chemical micro-structures. Dry-deposited MgCl2 ⋅ 6H2O particles exhibited a deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of ~ 33.0 % and an efflorescence RH (ERH) of 10.8-9.1 %, whereas the nebulized pure MgCl2 and MgCl2-dominant particles of XNaCl = 0.026 (eutonic) and 0.01 showed single-stage transitions at DRH of ~ 15.9 % and ERH of 10.1-3.2 %. The characteristic OH-stretching Raman signatures indicated the crystallization of MgCl2 ⋅ 4H2O at low relative humidities (RHs), suggesting that the kinetic barrier to MgCl2 ⋅ 6H2O crystallization is not overcome in the timescale of the dehydration measurements. The NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles of 0.05 ≤ XNaCl ≤ 0.9 generally showed two-stage deliquescence: first at the mutual DRH (MDRH) of ~ 15.9 %; and second with the complete dissolution of NaCl at the second DRHs depending on the mixing ratios, resulting in a phase diagram composed of three distinct phases. During dehydration, most particles of 0.05 ≤ XNaCl ≤ 0.9 exhibited two-stage efflorescence: first, by the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl; and second, at mutual ERH (MERH) of ~ 10.4-2.9 %, by the crystallization of the MgCl2 ⋅ 4H2O moiety, also resulting in three

  15. Hygroscopic behavior of NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles as nascent sea-spray aerosol surrogates and observation of efflorescence during humidifying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Eom, H.-J.; Cho, H.-R.; Ro, C.-U.

    2015-07-01

    NaCl and MgCl2 are the two major constituents of seawater, so NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles can be a better representative of sea-spray aerosols (SSAs) than pure NaCl. However, there have been very few hygroscopic studies of pure MgCl2 and NaCl-MgCl2 mixture aerosol particles despite the MgCl2 moiety playing a major role in the hygroscopic behavior of nascent SSAs. Laboratory-generated pure MgCl2 and NaCl-MgCl2 mixture aerosol particles with 12 mixing ratios (0.01 ≤ mole fraction of NaCl (XNaCl) ≤ 0.9) were examined systematically by optical microscopy, in-situ Raman microspectrometry (RMS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX) elemental X-ray mapping to observe their hygroscopic behavior, derive the experimental phase diagrams, and obtain the chemical micro-structures. Dry-deposited MgCl2·6H2O particles exhibited a deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of ∼ 33.0 % and an efflorescence RH (ERH) of 10.8-9.1 %, whereas the nebulized pure MgCl2 and MgCl2-dominant particles of XNaCl = 0.026 (eutonic) and 0.01 showed single-stage transitions at DRH of ∼ 15.9 % and ERH of 10.1-3.2 %. The characteristic OH-stretching Raman signatures indicated the crystallization of MgCl2·4H2O at low RHs, suggesting that the kinetic barrier to MgCl2·6H2O crystallization is not overcome in the timescale of the dehydration measurements. The NaCl-MgCl2 mixture particles of 0.05 ≤ XNaCl ≤ 0.9 generally showed two-stage deliquescence: first at the mutual DRH (MDRH) of ~ 15.9 %; and second with the complete dissolution of NaCl at the second DRHs depending on the mixing ratios, resulting in a phase diagram composed of three distinct phases. During dehydration, most particles of 0.05 ≤ XNaCl ≤ 0.9 exhibited two-stage efflorescence: first, by the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl; and second, at mutual ERH (MERH) of ∼ 10.4-2.9 %, by the crystallization of the MgCl2·4H2O moiety, also resulting in three distinct phases. Interestingly

  16. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  17. Aerosol hygroscopicity and its impact on atmospheric visibility and radiative forcing in Guangzhou during the 2006 PRIDE-PRD campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Cheng, Yafang; Hu, Min; Han, Tingting

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the relation of aerosol chemical compositions and optical properties, and to assess the impact of relative humidity (RH) on atmospheric visibility and aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF). Mass concentration and size distribution of aerosol chemical compositions as well as aerosol optical properties were concurrently measured at Guangzhou urban site during the PRD (Pearl River Delta) campaign from 1 to 31 July, 2006. Gaseous pollutant NO2 and meteorological parameter were simultaneously monitored. Compared with its dry condition, atmospheric ambient extinction coefficient σext(RH) averagely increased about 51% and atmospheric visibility deceased about 35%, among which RH played an important role on the optical properties of water soluble inorganic salts. (NH4)2SO4 is the most important component responsible for visibility degradation at Guangzhou. In addition, the asymmetry factor g increased from 0.64 to 0.74 with the up-scatter fraction β decreasing from 0.24 to 0.19 when RH increasing from 40% to 90%. At 80% RH, the ADRF increased about 280% compared to that at dry condition and it averagely increased about 100% during the campaign under ambient conditions. It can be inferred that aerosol water content is a key factor and could not be ignored in assessing the role of aerosols in visibility impairment and radiative forcing, especially in the regions with high RH.

  18. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  19. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine particles in coastal and forest environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hämeri, K.; Väkevä, M.

    2000-08-01

    The hygroscopic properties of recently produced ultrafine particles were measured in forestal and coastal environments using an Ultrafine Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser. The size range of the ambient aerosol particles that was investigated ranged from 8 nm to 30 nm in dry diameter. The measurements in a boreal forest site (SMEAR II station, Hyytiälä, Finland) showed that the growth factors during the days with production of ultrafine particles have a clear diurnal behavior. The minimum growth factor was ca. 1.12-1.13 and was obtained during nighttime. The maximum values were obtained between 13:00 and 16:00. The median values for the maximum growth factor for 10 nm dry diameter particles was 1.26 and for 20 nm dry size 1.28. The measurements in a coastal site (Mace Head station, Carna, Ireland) showed that the new particles produced during nucleation bursts were non- or slightly hygroscopic, with growth factor ca. 1.0-1.1 for 8 nm and 10 nm particles. The background ultrafine particles that were not connected with nucleation bursts were found to be more hygroscopic.

  20. Hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei activation of limonene-derived organosulfates and their mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Hong, J.; Kristensen, K.; Ylisirniö, A.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Glasius, M.; Prisle, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have the ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), initiating the formation of clouds and hereby influencing the climate system. The ability of aerosols to act as CCN is believed to depend on particle size and chemical composition. Organosulfates (OS), e.g sulfate esters, have been observed as constituents of secondary organic aerosols in numerous atmospheric environments, even as far as the Arctic, where OS have been found to comprise 7-15% of total organic matter and 9-11% of submicron organic matter in two independent studies. However, the properties of particulate OS have not yet been investigated. Here limonene derived OS were synthesized and the hygroscopic properties of these OS and their mixtures with ammonium sulfate (AS) were examined through a series of laboratory experiments. Laboratory generated particles of limonene-derived OS and AS were analysed using a unique set-up splitting the particle flow between a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer and a Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter, enabling simultaneous measurements of hygroscopic growth and CCN activation. Limonene-derived OS were chosen as study components, since monoterpenes (including limonene) have been identified as important precursors of OS in field samples as well as in smog chamber experiments. AS was used as a representative of the inorganic fraction in atmospheric aerosols. The preliminary results show that limonene-derived OS exhibit weak hygroscopic growth as well as CCN activation potential, however, not as strong as AS. For the organic-inorganic mixtures, it was observed that AS dominated the hygroscopic properties over the limonene-derived OS and became dictating for the measured values of hygroscopic growth and CCN activation, when the mass fraction of AS reached 20% or above. The results will be discussed further and supplementary measurements of OS surface tension and water activity will be presented.

  1. Aerosolization Characteristics of Dry Powder Inhaler Formulations for the Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Application: Effect of Spray Drying Process Conditions on Aerosol Performance

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxamer 188 were selected as a model drug, hygroscopic excipient, dispersibility enhancer and surfactant, respectively. Formulations were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and aerosol performance following aerosolization using an Aerolizer® dry powder inhaler (DPI). In vitro drug deposition was studied using a realistic mouth-throat (MT) model. Based on the in vitro aerosolization results, the best performing submicrometer powder formulation consisted of albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine and poloxamer 188 in a ratio of 30:48:20:2, containing 0.5% solids in a water:ethanol (80:20% v/v) solution which was spray dried at 70 °C. The submicrometer particle fraction (FPF1μm/ED) of this final formulation was 28.3% with more than 80% of the capsule contents being emitted during aerosolization. This formulation also showed 4.1% MT deposition. The developed combination formulation delivered a powder aerosol developed for the EEG application with high dispersion efficiency and low MT deposition from a convenient DPI device platform. PMID:23313343

  2. How Does a Raindrop Grow?: Precipitation in natural clouds may develop from ice crystals or from large hygroscopic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Braham, R R

    1959-01-16

    On the basis of presently available data, combined with present-day knowledge of the physics and chemistry of cloud particle development, it is possible to make the following generalizations about the mode of precipitation in natural clouds. 1) The all-water mechanism begins to operate as soon as a parcel of cloud air is formed and continues to operate throughout the life of the cloud. The ice-crystal mechanism, on the other hand, can begin to operate only after the top of the cloud has reached levels where ice nuclei can be effective (about -15 degrees C). Some clouds never reach this height; any precipitation from them must be through the all-water mechanism. In cold climates and at high levels in the atmosphere, the cloud bases may be very close to this critical temperature. In the tropics, approximately 25,000 feet separate the bases of low clouds from the natural ice level. 2) The number of large hygroscopic nuclei in maritime air over tropical oceans is entirely adequate to rain-out any cloud with a base below about 10,000 feet, provided the cloud duration and cloud depth is sufficient for the precipitation process to operate. Extensive trajectories over land will decrease the number of sea-salt particles, both because of sedimentation and removal in rain. Measurements show an order-of-magnitude decrease in the number of large particles as maritime air moves from the Gulf of Mexico to the vicinity of St. Louis, during the summer months. Measurements in Arizona and New Mexico show even smaller chloride concentrations, presumably because of the long overland trajectories required in reaching these areas. The maritime particles lost in overland trajectories apparently are more than replaced by particles of land origin. The latter are usually of mixed composition and are less favorable for the formation of outsized solution droplets. 3) Ice nuclei, required for the formation of ice crystals and for droplet freezing, are rather rare at temperatures higher than

  3. Evaluation and Modification of Commercial Dry Powder Inhalers for the Aerosolization of a Submicrometer Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and modify commercial dry powder inhalers (DPIs) for the aerosolization of a submicrometer excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation. The optimized device and formulation combination was then tested in a realistic in vitro mouth-throat - tracheobronchial (MT-TB) model. An optimized EEG submicrometer powder formulation, consisting of albuterol sulfate (drug), mannitol (hygroscopic excipient), L-leucine (dispersion enhancer) and poloxamer 188 (surfactant) in a ratio of 30:48:20:2 was prepared using a Büchi Nano spray dryer. The aerosolization performance of the EEG formulation was evaluated with 5 conventional DPIs: Aerolizer, Novolizer, HandiHaler, Exubera and Spiros. To improve powder dispersion, the HandiHaler was modified with novel mouth piece (MP) designs. The aerosol performance of each device was assessed using a next generation impactor (NGI) at airflow rates generating a pressure drop of 4 kPa across the DPI. In silico and in vitro deposition and hygroscopic growth of formulations was studied using a MT-TB airway geometry model. Both Handihaler and Aerolizer produced high emitted doses (ED) together with a significant submicrometer aerosol fraction. A modified HandiHaler with a MP including a three-dimensional (3D) array of rods (HH-3D) produced a submicrometer particle fraction of 38.8% with a conventional fine particle fraction (% <5µm) of 97.3%. The mass median diameter (MMD) of the aerosol was reduced below 1 µm using this HH-3D DPI. The aerosol generated from the modified HandiHaler increased to micrometer size (2.8 µm) suitable for pulmonary deposition, when exposed to simulated respiratory conditions, with negligible mouth-throat (MT) deposition (2.6 %). PMID:23608613

  4. Beyond the Alphabet Soup: Molecular Properties of Aerosol Components Influence Optics. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Components within atmospheric aerosols exhibit almost every imaginable model of chemical bonding and physical diversity. The materials run the spectrum from crystalline to amorphous, covalent to ionic, and have varying viscosities, phase, and hygroscopicity. This seminar will focus on the molecular properties of materials that influence the optical behavior of aerosols. Special focus will be placed on the polarizability of materials, hygroscopic growth, and particle phase.

  5. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  6. Particle hygroscopicity and its link to chemical composition in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, China, during summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Zheng, J.; Shang, D. J.; Du, Z. F.; Wu, Y. S.; Zeng, L. M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Hu, M.

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distribution, particle hygroscopic properties, and size-resolved chemical composition were made during the summer of 2014 in Beijing, China. During the measurement period, the mean hygroscopicity parameters (κs) of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 nm particles were respectively 0.16 ± 0.07, 0.19 ± 0.06, 0.22 ± 0.06, 0.26 ± 0.07, and 0.28 ± 0.10, showing an increasing trend with increasing particle size. Such size dependency of particle hygroscopicity was similar to that of the inorganic mass fraction in PM1. The hydrophilic mode (hygroscopic growth factor, HGF > 1.2) was more prominent in growth factor probability density distributions and its dominance of hydrophilic mode became more pronounced with increasing particle size. When PM2.5 mass concentration was greater than 50 μg m-3, the fractions of the hydrophilic mode for 150, 250, and 350 nm particles increased towards 1 as PM2.5 mass concentration increased. This indicates that aged particles dominated during severe pollution periods in the atmosphere of Beijing. Particle hygroscopic growth can be well predicted using high-time-resolution size-resolved chemical composition derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule. The organic hygroscopicity parameter (κorg) showed a positive correlation with the oxygen to carbon ratio. During the new particle formation event associated with strongly active photochemistry, the hygroscopic growth factor or κ of newly formed particles is greater than for particles with the same sizes not during new particle formation (NPF) periods. A quick transformation from external mixture to internal mixture for pre-existing particles (for example, 250 nm particles) was observed. Such transformations may modify the state of the mixture of pre-existing particles and thus modify properties such as the light absorption coefficient and cloud condensation nuclei activation.

  7. Volatility and Hygroscopicity of Atlanta CCN During New Particle Formation Events in Summer 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Scheckman, J.; Williams, B. J.; Jiang, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) has the potential to substantially impact the population of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by both by altering their number concentrations and the hygroscopic properties. It is currently thought that while NPF proceeds via condensation of gas-phase sulfuric acid, subsequent growth must be dominated by the condensation of secondary organic species in order to reconcile field observations with theory1,2. This implies size-dependent aerosol composition with varying amounts of organic species, yet the impact of these organics on cloud droplet formation remains one of the largest sources of uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-climate interactions studies. Consequently, there is a need for in-situ, size-resolved field measurements of CCN to unravel these complex effects. // // We present a comprehensive characterization of aerosol and CCN sampled in Midtown Atlanta during the August 2009 Nucleation and CCN intensive campaign (NCCN) at the Jefferson Street monitoring site. A Droplet Measurement Technologies Continuous-Flow Stream-wise Thermal-Gradient Chamber was operated in spectrometer mode using Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA)3 to provide size-resolved CCN concentrations over a variety of particle sizes (20-50 nm) and supersaturations (0.3-2%) with high temporal resolution (~30 seconds/scan). Continuous measurements of the aerosol size distribution (1-1000 nm) and chemical composition were also made. The inferred hygroscopicity increased substantially during NPF from ~0.2-0.3 (consistent with soluble secondary organic species) to ~0.6-0.8, consistent with sulfate species or organic salts. This finding is contrary to previous work suggesting less-CCN-active aerosol during NPF4. During two special experiments, a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was coupled with the CCN instrument to examine the volatility-dependence of the CCN hygroscopicity of 40-nm particles. Heating particles in the VTDMA was observed to increase their

  8. The hygroscopic properties of dicarboxylic and multifunctional acids: measurements and UNIFAC predictions.

    PubMed

    Peng, C; Chan, M N; Chan, C K

    2001-11-15

    The role of water-soluble organic compounds on the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols has recently been the subject of many studies. In particular, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and some multifunctional organic acids have been found or are expected to exist in atmospheric aerosols in urban, semiurban, rural, and remote sites. Unlike for their inorganic counterparts, the hygroscopic properties of organic acids have not been well characterized. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of selected water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, and glutaric acid) and multifunctional acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid) were studied using single droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at 25 degrees C. The water activities of bulk samples of dilute solutions were also measured. Solute evaporation was observed in the dicarboxylic acids but not in the multifunctional acids. Oxalic acid, succinic acid, and glutaric acid droplets crystallize upon evaporation of water, but, except for glutaric acid droplets, do not deliquesce even at 90% relative humidity (RH). Mass transfer limitation of the deliquescence process was observed in glutaric acid. Neither crystallization nor deliquescence was observed in malonic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, or L-(+)-tartaric acid. Malonic acid and these three hydroxy-carboxylic acids absorb water even at RH much lower than their respective deliquescence RH. The growth factor (Gf), defined as the ratio of the particle diameter at RH = 10% to that at RH = 90%, of oxalic acid and succinic acid was close to unity, indicating no hygroscopicity in this range. The remaining acids (malonic acid, glutaric acid, citric acid, malic acid, and tartaric acid) showed roughly similar hygroscopicity of a Gf of 1.30-1.53, which is similar to that of "more hygroscopic" aerosols in field measurements reported in the literature. A generalized equation for these four acids, Gf

  9. Raman lidar observations of particle hygroscopicity during COPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelitano, D.; Di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.

    2012-04-01

    The characterization of particle hygroscopicity has primary importance for climate monitoring and prediction. Model studies have demonstrated that relative humidity (RH) has a critical influence on aerosol climate forcing. The relationship between aerosol backscattering and relative humidity has been investigated in numerous studies (among others, Pahlow et al., 2006; Wulfmeyer and Feingold, 2000; Veselovskii et al., 2009). Hygroscopic properties of aerosols influence particle size distribution and refractive index and hence their radiative effects. Aerosol particles tend to grow at large relative humidity values as a result of their hygroscopicity. Raman lidars with aerosol, water vapour and temperature measurement capability are potentially attractive tools for studying aerosol hygroscopicity as in fact they can provide continuous altitude-resolved measurements of particle optical, size and microphysical properties, as well as relative humidity, without perturbing the aerosols or their environment. Specifically, the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) considered for the present study, has the capability to perform all-lidar measurements of relative humidity based on the application of both the rotational and the vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64 ° N, Long: 8.06 ° E, Elev.: 140 m) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). During COPS, BASIL collected more than 500 hours of measurements, distributed over 58 measurement days and 34 intensive observation periods (IOPs). The present analysis is focused on selected case studies characterized by the presence of different aerosol types with different hygroscopic behaviour. The observed behaviour, dependent upon aerosol composition, may range from hygrophobic to strongly hygroscopic. Results from the different case studies will be illustrated and

  10. Biomass-burning impact on CCN number, hygroscopicity and cloud formation during summertime in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Bezantakos, Spiros; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kalivitis, Nikos; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Biskos, George; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopic properties of particles influenced by biomass burning in the eastern Mediterranean and their impacts on cloud droplet formation. Air masses sampled were subject to a range of atmospheric processing (several hours up to 3 days). Values of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, were derived from CCN measurements and a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA). An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was also used to determine the chemical composition and mass concentration of non-refractory components of the submicron aerosol fraction. During fire events, the increased organic content (and lower inorganic fraction) of the aerosol decreases the values of κ, for all particle sizes. Particle sizes smaller than 80 nm exhibited considerable chemical dispersion (where hygroscopicity varied up to 100 % for particles of same size); larger particles, however, exhibited considerably less dispersion owing to the effects of condensational growth and cloud processing. ACSM measurements indicate that the bulk composition reflects the hygroscopicity and chemical nature of the largest particles (having a diameter of ˜ 100 nm at dry conditions) sampled. Based on positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the organic ACSM spectra, CCN concentrations follow a similar trend as the biomass-burning organic aerosol (BBOA) component, with the former being enhanced between 65 and 150 % (for supersaturations ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 %) with the arrival of the smoke plumes. Using multilinear regression of the PMF factors (BBOA, OOA-BB and OOA) and the observed hygroscopicity parameter, the inferred hygroscopicity of the oxygenated organic aerosol components is determined. We find that the transformation of freshly emitted biomass burning (BBOA) to more oxidized organic aerosol (OOA-BB) can result in a 2-fold increase of the inferred organic hygroscopicity; about 10

  11. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  12. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  13. Ambient black carbon particle hygroscopic properties controlled by mixing state and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Whitehead, J.; Young, D.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Fleming, Z. L.; Bandy, B.

    2013-02-01

    The wet removal of black carbon aerosol (BC) in the atmosphere is a crucial factor in determining its atmospheric lifetime and thereby the vertical and horizontal distributions, dispersion on local and regional scales, and the direct, semi-direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The in-cloud scavenging and wet deposition rate of freshly emitted hydrophobic BC will be increased on acquisition of more-hydrophilic components by coagulation or coating processes. The lifetime of BC is still subject to considerable uncertainty for most of the model inputs, which is largely due to the insufficient constraints on the BC hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion process from observational field data. This study was conducted at a site along UK North Norfolk coastline, where the BC particles were transported from different regions within Western Europe. A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) was coupled with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) to measure the hygroscopic properties of BC particles and associated mixing state in real time. In addition, a Soot Particle AMS (SP-AMS) measured the chemical compositions of additional material associated with BC particles. The ensemble of BC particles persistently contained a less-hygroscopic mode at a growth factor (gf) of around 1.05 at 90% RH (dry diameter 163 nm). Importantly, a more-hygroscopic mode of BC particles was observed throughout the experiment, the gf of these BC particles extended up to ~1.4-1.6 with the minimum between this and the less hygroscopic mode at a gf ~1.25, or equivalent effective hygroscopicity parameter κ ~0.1. The gf of BC particles (gfBC) was highly influenced by the composition of associated soluble material: increases of gfBC were associated with secondary inorganic components, and these increases were more pronounced when ammonium nitrate was in the BC particles; however the presence of secondary organic matter suppressed the gfBC below that of pure inorganics. The

  14. Ambient black carbon particle hygroscopic properties controlled by mixing state and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Whitehead, J.; Young, D.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Fleming, Z.; Bandy, B.

    2012-11-01

    The wet removal of black carbon aerosol (BC) in the atmosphere is a crucial factor in determining its atmospheric lifetime and thereby the vertical and horizontal distributions, dispersion on local and regional scales, and the direct, semi-direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The in-cloud scavenging and wet deposition rate of freshly emitted hydrophobic BC will be increased on acquisition of more-hydrophilic components by coagulation or coating processes. The lifetime of BC is still subject to considerable uncertainty for most of the model inputs, which is largely due to the insufficient constraints on the BC hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion process from observational field data. This study was conducted at a site along UK North Norfolk coastline, where the BC particles were transported from different regions within Western Europe. A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) was coupled with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) to measure the hygroscopic properties of BC particles and associated mixing state in real time. In addition, a Soot Particle AMS (SP-AMS) measured the chemical compositions of additional material associated with BC particles. The ensemble of BC particles persistently contained a less-hygroscopic mode at a growth factor (gf) of around 1.05 at 90% RH (dry diameter 163 nm). Importantly, a more-hygroscopic mode of BC particles was observed throughout the experiment, the gf of these BC particles extended up to ~1.4-1.6 with the minimum between this and the less hygroscopic mode at a gf ~1.25, or equivalent effective hygroscopicity parameter κ = ~0.1. The gf of BC particles (gfBC) was highly influenced by the composition of associated soluble material: increases of gfBC were associated with secondary inorganic components, and these increases were more pronounced when ammonium nitrate was in the BC particles; however the presence of secondary organic matter suppressed the gfBC below that of pure inorganics. The

  15. Aerosol growth in Titan’s ionosphere

    PubMed Central

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J.; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J.; Snowden, Darci

    2013-01-01

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan’s upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  16. Influence of biomass burning on CCN number and hygroscopicity during summertime in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, A.; Bezantakos, S.; Stavroulas, I.; Kalivitis, N.; Kokkalis, P.; Biskos, G.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Papayannis, A.; Nenes, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the CCN activity and hygroscopic properties of particles influenced by biomass burning in the eastern Mediterranean. Air masses sampled were subject to a range of atmospheric processing (several hours up to 3 days). Values of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, were derived from cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA). An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was also used to determine the chemical composition and mass concentration of non-refractory components of the submicron aerosol fraction. During fire events, the increased organic content (and lower inorganic fraction) of the aerosol decreases the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, for all particle sizes. The reason, however, for this decrease was not the same for all size modes; smaller particle sizes appeared to be richer in less hygroscopic, less CCN-active components due to coagulation processes while larger particles become less hygroscopic during the biomass burning events due to condensation of less hygroscopic gaseous compounds. In addition, smaller particles exhibited considerable chemical dispersion (where hygroscopicity varied up to 100 % for particles of same size); larger particles, however, exhibited considerably less dispersion owing to the effects of aging and retained high levels of CCN activity. These conclusions are further supported by the observed mixing state determined by the HTDMA measurements. ACSM measurements indicate that the bulk composition reflects the hygroscopicity and chemical nature of the largest particles and a large fraction of the CCN concentrations sampled. Based on Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the organic ACSM spectra, CCN concentrations follow a similar trend with the BBOA component, with enhancements of CCN in biomass burning plumes ranging between 65 and 150 %, for supersaturations ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 %. Using multilinear regression, we determine the

  17. Application of the VH-TDMA technique to coastal ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Ristovski, Z.; Morawska, L.

    2004-08-01

    A newly developed VH-TDMA has been used for the first time to measure the volatile fractions and post volatilization hygroscopic growth factors of ambient aerosols in the coastal marine and urban environments. The results are compared with comparable data for laboratory generated aerosols of known composition. Measurements conducted on coastal Aitken mode particles showed volatilization behavior similar to laboratory generated aerosols composed of methane sulfonic acid and ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted on 60 nm particles during nucleation events contained a greater fraction of material with similar volatility to ammonium sulfate than was found at other times. These particles were hygroscopic but less so than pure ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted in the Brisbane central business district during sea breeze conditions show similar behavior to the coastal aerosol, but with additional low volatility species. This aerosol may originate from urban sources or from marine particles acquiring additional secondary aerosol species during transport.

  18. Impact of the aging process of black carbon aerosols on their spatial distribution, hygroscopicity, and radiative forcing in a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Oshima, N.; Nakajima, T.; Takemura, T.; Ohara, T.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) absorbs shortwave radiation more strongly than any other type of aerosol, and an accurate simulation of the aging processes of BC-containing particle is required to properly predict aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and climate change. However, BC aging processes have been simplified in general circulation models (GCMs) due to limited computational resources. In particular, differences in the representation of the mixing states of BC-containing particles between GCMs constitute one of main reasons for the uncertainty in ARF estimates. To understand an impact of the BC aging processes and the mixing state of BC on the spatial distribution of BC and ARF caused by BC (BC-ARF), we implemented three different methods of incorporating BC aging processes into a global aerosol transport model, SPRINTARS: (1) the "AGV" method, using variable conversion rates of BC aging based on a new type of parameterization depending on both BC amount and sulfuric acid; (2) the "AGF" method, using a constant conversion rate used worldwide in GCMs; and (3) the "ORIG" method, which is used in the original SPRINTARS. First, we found that these different methods produced different BC burden within 10% over industrial areas and 50% over remote oceans. Second, a ratio of water-insoluble BC to total BC (WIBC ratio) was very different among the three methods. Near the BC source region, for example, the WIBC ratios were estimated to be 80-90% (AGV and AGF) and 50-60% (ORIG). Third, although the BC aging process in GCMs had small impacts on the BC burden, they had a large impact on BC-ARF through a change in both the WIBC ratio and non-BC compounds coating on BC cores. As a result, possible differences in the treatment of the BC aging process between aerosol modeling studies can produce a difference of approximately 0.3 Wm-2 in the magnitude of BC-ARF, which is comparable to the uncertainty suggested by results from a global aerosol modeling intercomparison project, AeroCom. The

  19. CMAQ validation of optical parameters and PM2.5 based on lidar and sky radiometers: a sensitivity study of optical parameters to hygroscopic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladutescu, Daniela Viviana; Garofalo, Erika; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Samir

    2009-08-01

    With the dramatically climate changing we are facing today atmospheric monitoring is of major importance. Several atmospheric monitoring instruments are used for measuring atmospheric composition, optical coefficients, PM2.5, aerosol optical depth, size distribution, PBL height and many other parameters. However an inexpensive method of determining these parameters is by use of models and one model that depicts the aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere is the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Our paper is focused on converting CMAQ retrieval outputs into optical coefficients that can then be comparing the lidar, AERONET and TEOM measurements performed at City College of the City University of New York . Differences between the full approach and parameterized methods such as the MALM formula used in AIR-NOW are observed and comparisons with AERONET show the full modeling is in general superior to the MALM formula.

  20. Influence of air mass source region on nanoparticle events and hygroscopicity in central Virginia, U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Fuentes, J. D.; Collins, D. R.; Cleveland, M. J.; Keene, W. C.

    During autumn, 2006, variation in the frequency of aerosol nucleation events, as inferred from nanoparticle growth events, and associated hygroscopicity were investigated as a function of air mass transport history at a mixed deciduous forest in central Virginia, U.S. Above-canopy size distributions of aerosols between 0.012 and 0.700 μm diameter, size-resolved particle hygroscopicity at eight dry diameters between 0.012 and 0.400 μm, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity were characterized. Air mass back trajectories were clustered to identify source regions. Growth events were most frequent in fast-moving air masses (mean = 9 m s -1) that originated over the north central U.S. Under these flow regimes, mean values for preexisting sub-μm aerosol number concentrations (4700 cm -3), corresponding surface area (142 μm 2 cm -3), air temperature (6.2 °C), and relative humidity (RH, 49.4%) were relatively low compared to other regimes. Under stagnant flow conditions (mean = 3 m s -1), mean number concentrations were higher (>6000 cm -3) and size fractions <0.1 μm diameter exhibited enhanced hygroscopicity compared to other source regions. These results indicate that precursors emitted into relatively clean, cold, and dry air transported over the southeastern U.S. reacted to form condensable intermediates that subsequently produced new aerosols via nucleation and growth. This pathway was an important source for CCN. During events in October, nanoparticles were produced in greater numbers and grew more rapidly compared to November and December.

  1. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  2. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, the aerosol scattering coefficients at RH in the range of 40 to ~ 90 % were measured using a humidified nephelometer system in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation (SD) of enhancement factors at RH = 85 % for the scattering coefficient (f(85 %)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85 %)), and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85 %)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07, and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e., aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25 % as the RH increased from 40 to 85 %. Concurrently, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21 %. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) or inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH). The highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of OM, and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated with f(85 %), which suggests that NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass fraction of nitrate also had a close relationship to the curvature of the humidograms; higher mass fractions of nitrate were associated with humidograms that had the least curvature. Aerosol hygroscopic growth caused a 47 % increase in the calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing at 85 % RH, compared to the forcing at 40 % RH.

  3. Does the long-range transport of African mineral dust across the Atlantic enhance their hygroscopicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Caquineau, Sandrine; Desboeufs, Karine; Laurent, Benoit; Quiñones Rosado, Mariana; Vallejo, Pamela; Mayol-Bracero, Olga; Formenti, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Influence of mineral dust on radiation balance is largely dependent on their ability to interact with water. While fresh mineral dusts are highly hydrophobic, various transformation processes (coagulation, heterogeneous chemical reaction) can modify the dust physical and chemical properties during long-range transport, which, in turn, can change the dust hygroscopic properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of dust hygroscopic properties, and their temporal evolution during long-range transport. We present the first direct surface measurements of the hygroscopicity of Saharan dust after long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean, their relationship with chemical composition, their influence on particle size and shape and implications for optical properties. Particles were collected during the DUST Aging and TransporT from Africa to the Caribbean (Dust-AttaCk) campaign at the Cape San Juan Puerto Rico station in June-July 2012. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to analyze the size, shape, chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of individual particles. At different levels of concentrations in summertime, the coarse mode of atmospheric aerosols in Puerto Rico is dominated by Saharan mineral dust. Most of aged dust particles survived atmospheric transport intact with no observed internal mixture with other species and did not show hygroscopic growth up to 94% relative humidity. This is certainly due to the fact that in summertime dust is mostly transported above the marine boundary layer. A minor portion of mineral dust (approximately 19-28% by number) were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with acidic gases (likely SO2 and HCl) and sea salt aggregation. While sulfate- and chloride-coated dust remained extremely hydrophobic, dust particles in internal mixing with NaCl underwent profound changes in their hygroscopicity, therefore in size and shape. We

  4. Aerosol-induced mechanisms for cumulus congestus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Amanda M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.

    2015-09-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three cloud modes, the middle of which is cumulus congestus clouds. Congestus clouds act to moisten the tropical atmosphere, may be mixed-phase, and on occasion surpass the freezing level inversion from where they may develop into deeper convection. This study investigates the impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations on the growth of congestus clouds produced in idealized cloud-resolving model simulations run under a state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). High-resolution, long-duration simulations were completed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Aerosol concentrations between 2 and 4 km above ground level were varied from clean to polluted conditions in order to represent the advection of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The congestus populations within each aerosol simulation are statistically analyzed using 10 days of model output after the simulation reaches RCE. Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions produce greater amounts of cloud water and ice mass, enhanced updraft strengths, and an increase in the number of congestus cloud tops that extend above the freezing level. Enhanced vapor depositional growth on the populations of more numerous, smaller cloud droplets in the polluted conditions, and the subsequent increase in latent heat release in the warm phase regions of the cloud, is found to be important factors in convective invigoration of these cloud systems. Aerosol feedbacks associated with cold pools and condensate loading also influence the updraft strength and act in opposition to the warm phase invigoration processes.

  5. Characterization of particle hygroscopicity by Raman lidar: Selected case studies from the convective and orographically-induced precipitation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelitano, Dario; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato

    2013-05-01

    The characterization of particle hygroscopicity has primary importance for climate monitoring and prediction. Model studies have demonstrated that relative humidity (RH) has a critical influence on aerosol climate forcing. Hygroscopic properties of aerosols influence particle size distribution and refractive index and hence their radiative effects. Aerosol particles tend to grow at large relative humidity values as a result of their hygroscopicity. Raman lidars with aerosol, water vapor and temperature measurement capability are potentially attractive tools for studying aerosol hygroscopicity as in fact they can provide continuous altitude-resolved measurements of particle optical, size and microphysical properties, as well as relative humidity, without perturbing the aerosols or their environment. Specifically, the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) considered for the present study, has the capability to perform all-lidar measurements of relative humidity based on the application of both the rotational and the vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64° N, Long: 8.06° E, Elev.: 140 m) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The present analysis is focused on selected case studies characterized by the presence of different aerosol types with different hygroscopic behavior. The observed behavior, dependent upon aerosol composition, may range from hygrophobic to strongly hygroscopic.

  6. CCN Hygroscopicity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Jha, V.; Noble, S.

    2008-12-01

    Lack of variability of CCN sizes led Dusek et al. (2006) to suggest that CCN could be deduced from particle size measurements alone, which are easier, more readily available, less controversial and more amenable to remote sensing. However, Hudson and Da (1996) and Hudson (2007) showed much more CCN size variability that makes it impossible to deduce CCN concentrations from size distribution measurements using a single relationship between size and CCN. But Dusek et al. (2006) also suggested that CCN sizes may be consistent within various air masses. This was indeed suggested by Hudson and Da (2006) and Hudson (2007). CCN were generally found to be larger (less hygroscopic) in more polluted air masses. This led Andreae and Rosenfeld (2008) to reassert the claim by Dusek et al. that as long as the air mass can be characterized as maritime or continental/polluted then particle size measurements can be used to approximate CCN concentrations. Here we present further measurements of CCN sizes that discount even this. The recent measurements, all of which are from aircraft, come from the PASE project in Aug.-Sep., 2007 at Christmas Island 2 degrees N latitude directly south of Honolulu, the ICE-L project, Nov.-Dec., 2007 over Colorado and Wyoming, and the POST project July-Aug., 2008 off the central California coast. The extremely remote PASE measurements were generally consistent with previous maritime measurements in that the CCN were very hygroscopic, similar to soluble salts like ammonium sulfate. However, the larger particles (>~150nm) were consistently less hygroscopic. This mixture of hygroscopicities (B) where B decreased with particle size was unexpected and would complicate deductions of CCN concentrations from size distribution measurements. Although the POST measurements displayed nearly identical total particle (CN) and CCN concentrations to the PASE measurements, the CCN were significantly less hygroscopic than PASE. The POST B values were intermediate to

  7. What Causes Aerosol Growth and Ozone Production in Smoke Plumes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2006-12-01

    The growth of aerosol particles and production of ozone in smoke plumes is the result of a complex interaction between horizontal diffusion, gas-phase oxidation, coagulation, and mass transfer between phases. Models allow us to separate the effects of these processes and predict their impact on the global environment. We present the results of a new model of gas and aerosol chemistry applied to young biomass burning plumes. The model includes heterogeneous chemistry, kinetic mass transfer, coagulation and the formation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol. Comparison with measurements from SAFARI 2000 (Hobbs et al., 2003, JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JD002352) suggests the baseline model underpredicts ozone formation and the growth of aerosol within the plume. We explore whether the model predictions can be improved by (1) including heterogeneous HONO production, and (2) adding in surrogates for the uncharacterized organic compounds emitted by the biomass burning. Including the heterogeneous reaction NO2 => HONO greatly improves the match for ozone, OH, and aerosol nitrate concentration, but only when the uptake coefficient approaches 10-3, which is over an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values (Stemmler et al., 2006, doi:10.1038/nature04603). Using the reaction NO2 => 0.5 HONO + 0.5 HNO3 with an uptake coefficient of 10-3 (the top of the range recommended by Jacob, 2000, Atm. Env.,34, 2131-2159) provides an even better match for aerosol nitrate, but produces less O3 and OH than the first reaction. Direct measurements of HONO and OH in young biomass plumes would help determine if this chemistry is taking place. We used two surrogates to model the uncharacterized compounds: long chain alkanes and monoterpenes, representing primary and secondary sources of condensable compounds respectively. Complete condensation of the long-chain alkanes can account for nearly all of the observed increase in organic carbon. However, the accommodation coefficient

  8. Aerosol chemistry in Titan's ionosphere: simultaneous growth and etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Cernogora, Guy; Jomard, François; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Vigneron, Jackie

    2016-10-01

    Since the Cassini-CAPS measurements, organic aerosols are known to be present and formed at high altitudes in the diluted and partially ionized medium that is Titan's ionosphere [1]. This unexpected chemistry can be further investigated in the laboratory with plasma experiments simulating the complex ion-neutral chemistry starting from N2-CH4 [2]. Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere.The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions is explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes [3]. The impact for our understanding of Titan's aerosols chemical composition is important. Our study shows that chemical growth and etching process are simultaneously at stake in Titan's ionosphere. The more the aerosols stay in the ionosphere, the more graphitized they get through etching process. In order to infer Titan's aerosols composition, our work highlights a need for constraints on the residence time of aerosols in Titan's ionosphere. [1] Waite et al. (2009) Science , 316, p. 870[2] Szopa et al. (2006) PSS, 54, p. 394[3] Carrasco et al. (2016) PSS, 128, p. 52

  9. Comparison of Hygroscopicity, Volatility, and Mixing State of Submicrometer Particles between Cruises over the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibaek; Cho, Hee-Joo; Seo, Arom; Kim, Dohyung; Gim, Yeontae; Lee, Bang Yong; Yoon, Young Jun; Park, Kihong

    2015-10-20

    Ship-borne measurements of ambient aerosols were conducted during an 11 937 km cruise over the Arctic Ocean (cruise 1) and the Pacific Ocean (cruise 2). A frequent nucleation event was observed during cruise 1 under marine influence, and the abundant organic matter resulting from the strong biological activity in the ocean could contribute to the formation of new particles and their growth to a detectable size. Concentrations of particle mass and black carbon increased with increasing continental influence from polluted areas. During cruise 1, multiple peaks of hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of 1.1-1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 were found, and higher amounts of volatile organic species existed in the particles compared to that during cruise 2, which is consistent with the greater availability of volatile organic species caused by the strong oceanic biological activity (cruise 1). Internal mixtures of volatile and nonhygroscopic organic species, nonvolatile and less-hygroscopic organic species, and nonvolatile and hygroscopic nss-sulfate with varying fractions can be assumed to constitute the submicrometer particles. On the basis of elemental composition and morphology, the submicrometer particles were classified into C-rich mixture, S-rich mixture, C/S-rich mixture, Na-rich mixture, C/P-rich mixture, and mineral-rich mixture. Consistently, the fraction of biological particles (i.e., P-containing particles) increased when the ship traveled along a strongly biologically active area. PMID:26389581

  10. Comparison of Hygroscopicity, Volatility, and Mixing State of Submicrometer Particles between Cruises over the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibaek; Cho, Hee-Joo; Seo, Arom; Kim, Dohyung; Gim, Yeontae; Lee, Bang Yong; Yoon, Young Jun; Park, Kihong

    2015-10-20

    Ship-borne measurements of ambient aerosols were conducted during an 11 937 km cruise over the Arctic Ocean (cruise 1) and the Pacific Ocean (cruise 2). A frequent nucleation event was observed during cruise 1 under marine influence, and the abundant organic matter resulting from the strong biological activity in the ocean could contribute to the formation of new particles and their growth to a detectable size. Concentrations of particle mass and black carbon increased with increasing continental influence from polluted areas. During cruise 1, multiple peaks of hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of 1.1-1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 were found, and higher amounts of volatile organic species existed in the particles compared to that during cruise 2, which is consistent with the greater availability of volatile organic species caused by the strong oceanic biological activity (cruise 1). Internal mixtures of volatile and nonhygroscopic organic species, nonvolatile and less-hygroscopic organic species, and nonvolatile and hygroscopic nss-sulfate with varying fractions can be assumed to constitute the submicrometer particles. On the basis of elemental composition and morphology, the submicrometer particles were classified into C-rich mixture, S-rich mixture, C/S-rich mixture, Na-rich mixture, C/P-rich mixture, and mineral-rich mixture. Consistently, the fraction of biological particles (i.e., P-containing particles) increased when the ship traveled along a strongly biologically active area.

  11. Organic Aerosol Nucleation and Growth at the CERN CLOUD chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Lethipalo, Katrianne; Bianchi, Federico; Sipilä, Mikko; Nieminen, Tuomo; Wagner, Robert; Frege, Carla; Simon, Mario; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that atmospheric aerosols influence the climate by changing Earth's radiation balance (IPCC 2007 and 2013). Recent models have shown (Merikanto et al. 2009) that aerosol nucleation is one of the biggest sources of low level cloud condensation nuclei. Still, aerosol nucleation and growth are not fully understood. The driving force of nucleation and growth is sulfuric acid. However ambient nucleation and growth rates cannot be explained by solely sulfuric acid as precursor. Recent studies have shown that only traces of precursors like ammonia and dimethylamine enhance the nucleation rates dramatically (Kirkby et al. 2011, Almeida et al., 2013). Thus the role of different aerosol precursor needs to be studied not only in ambient but also in very well controlled chamber experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment enables conducting experiments very close to atmospheric conditions and with a very low contaminant background. The latest CLOUD experiments focus on the role of organics in aerosol nucleation and growth. For this purpose, numerous experiments with alpha-pinene have been conducted at the CERN CLOUD chamber. Several state-of-the-art instruments were used to cover the whole complexity of the experiment. Chamber conditions were set to 40% relative humidity and 5° C. Atmospheric concentrations of SO2, O3, HONO, H2O and alpha-pinene were injected to the chamber. Different oxidation conditions were used, yielding different levels of oxidized organics: (1) OH radicals, (2) Ozone with the OH scavenger H2 (pure ozonolysis) and (3) both. SO2 was injected to allow for sulfuric acid production. Optical UV fibers were used to enable photochemical reactions. A high field cage (30 kV) can be turned on to remove all charged particles in the chamber to enable completely neutral conditions. Comparing neutral conditions to the beam conditions using CERN's proton synchrotron, the fraction of ion-induced nucleation can be studied. Using

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of Size, Composition, Hygroscopicity, and Density of Single Ambient Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D. G.; Han, J.; Oatis, S.

    2003-12-01

    The holly grail in aerosol climate interaction is a roadmap that takes one from emissions of aerosol and aerosol precursors through aerosol transformations, to optical and cloud effects and finally to climate impacts. A critical element on this path must be the behavior of aerosol as a function of atmospheric relative humidity, which in turn requires an understanding of the correlation between aerosol composition and hygroscopicity. For single component particles this problem is tractable and reasonably understood. But, the vast majority of particles in the real atmosphere are internal mixtures of hygroscopic salts, organic acids and or bases, long chain hydrocarbons, soot, mineral dust and the list go on. Hundreds of organic compounds with highly varying hygroscopicities can be found in single particles. It would be unrealistic to expect global climate models to include and track each of these compounds. A similar problem faces the experimental world, where measuring the size, detailed molecular composition and hygroscopicity of individual particles although, in principle possible, is impractical. Single particle mass spectroscopy can be used to classify particles as organics mixed with sulfate, for example. Or in some cases pinpoint the class of some of the organics found in the mixture. But it cannot yield a quantitative measure of relative amounts. In an attempt to address this issue we have developed the method to measure simultaneously hygroscopicity, size, and composition of individual ambient particles. However, the data from Long Island NY, where the vast majority of particles were internally mixed sulfate with organics, the correlation between composition and hygroscopicity was rather weak. This is due to the fact that single-laser single particle mass spectra cannot quantitatively measure the ratio of organics to sulfates. In contrast, we found a very clear correlation between hygroscopicity and particle density for a given class of particles. In this

  13. Automated Measurements of Ambient Aerosol Chemical Composition and its Dry and Wet Size Distributions at Pittsburgh Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A. Y.; Stanier, C.; Chun, W.; Vayenas, D.; Mandiro, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2001-12-01

    Ambient aerosol particles change size with changes in ambient relative humidity. The magnitude of the size change depends on the hygroscopic properties of the particles, which is determined by their chemical composition. Hygroscopic properties of particles influence many environmentally important aerosol qualities, such as light scattering and partitioning between the gas and particle phases of semivolitile compounds. Studying the hygroscopic growth of ambient particles is thus of paramount importance. The highroscopic growth of ambient particles and their chemical composition are measured continuously within the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (EPA supersite program). The hygroscopic size changes are measured using an automated system built for this study. The system consists of two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.) and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI Inc.). The three instruments measure aerosol size distribution between 5 nanometers and 10 micrometers in diameter. The inlets of the instruments and the sheath air lines of the SMPS systems are equipped with computer controlled valves that direct air through Nafion dryers (PermaPure Inc.) or bypass them. The Nafion dryers are drying the air stream below 40% RH at which point ambient particles are expected to lose most or all water and thus be virtually dry. To avoid changes in relative humidity and evaporation of volatile particles due to temperature differences the system is kept at ambient temperature. The system measures alternatively dry (below 40% RH) and wet (actual ambient RH) aerosol size distributions every 6 minutes. The hygroscopic growth observed with the size-spectrometer system is compared with theoretic predictions based on the chemical composition of aerosol particles. A modified semi-continuous Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector provides the total available budget (particles and gas) of water-soluble species, which is used as an input to the thermodynamic model. The model calculates

  14. Temporal Variation of Aerosol Properties at a Rural Continental Site and Study of Aerosol Evolution through Growth Law Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jian; Collins, Don; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Gasparini, Roberto; Jonsson, Haflidi; Ogren, John; Sheridan, Patrick; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft during 16 flights at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern central Oklahoma as part of the Aerosol Intensive Operation period in May, 2003. During the same period a second SMPS was deployed at a surface station and provided continuous measurements. Combined with trace gas measurements at the SGP site and back-trajectory analysis, the aerosol size distributions provided insights into the sources of aerosols observed at the SGP site. High particle concentrations, observed mostly during daytime, were well correlated with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios, suggesting nucleation involving sulfuric acid is likely the main source of newly formed particles at the SGP. Aerosols within plumes originating from wildfires in Central America were measured at the surface site. Vertically compact aerosol layers, which can be traced back to forest fires in East Asia, were intercepted at altitudes over 3000 meters. Analyses of size dependent particle growth rates for four periods during which high cloud coverage was observed indicate growth dominated by volume controlled reactions. Sulfate accounts for 50% to 72% of the increase in aerosol volume concentration; the rest of the volume concentration increase was likely due to secondary organic species. The growth law analyses and meteorological conditions indicate that the sulfate was produced mainly through aqueous oxidation of SO2 in clouds droplets and hydrated aerosol particles.

  15. Measuring Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Atmospheric Particles through in Situ Imaging.

    PubMed

    Piens, Dominique S; Kelly, Stephen T; Harder, Tristan H; Petters, Markus D; O'Brien, Rachel E; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K

    2016-05-17

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental composition of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state of 158 other particles from the sample broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. These methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicrometer atmospheric particles.

  16. Measuring mass-based hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles through in situ imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Piens, Dominique S.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Harder, Tristan H.; Petters, Markus D.; O’Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2016-04-18

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental compositionmore » of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state of 158 other particles from the sample broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. As a result, these methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicrometer atmospheric particles.« less

  17. Measuring Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Atmospheric Particles through in Situ Imaging.

    PubMed

    Piens, Dominique S; Kelly, Stephen T; Harder, Tristan H; Petters, Markus D; O'Brien, Rachel E; Wang, Bingbing; Teske, Ken; Dowell, Pat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K

    2016-05-17

    Quantifying how atmospheric particles interact with water vapor is critical for understanding the effects of aerosols on climate. We present a novel method to measure the mass-based hygroscopicity of particles while characterizing their elemental and carbon functional group compositions. Since mass-based hygroscopicity is insensitive to particle geometry, it is advantageous for probing the hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric particles, which can have irregular morphologies. Combining scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis, and in situ STXM humidification experiments, this method was validated using laboratory-generated, atmospherically relevant particles. Then, the hygroscopicity and elemental composition of 15 complex atmospheric particles were analyzed by leveraging quantification of C, N, and O from STXM, and complementary elemental quantification from SEM/EDX. We found three types of hygroscopic responses, and correlated high hygroscopicity with Na and Cl content. The mixing state of 158 other particles from the sample broadly agreed with those of the humidified particles, indicating the potential to infer atmospheric hygroscopic behavior from a selected subset of particles. These methods offer unique quantitative capabilities to characterize and correlate the hygroscopicity and chemistry of individual submicrometer atmospheric particles. PMID:27088454

  18. Estimating aerosol light-scattering enhancement from dry aerosol optical properties at different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, Gloria; Jefferson, Anne; Sheridan, Patrick; Andrews, Elisabeth; Lyamani, Hassan; Ogren, John; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-05-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on the relative humidity (RH). Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. The scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is defined as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at a high and reference RH. Predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we explore the relationship between aerosol light-scattering enhancement and dry aerosol optical properties such as the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) at multiple sites around the world. The measurements used in this study were conducted by the US Department of Energy at sites where different aerosol types predominate (pristine marine, polluted marine, dust dominated, agricultural and forest environments, among others). In all cases, the scattering enhancement decreases as the SSA decreases, that is, as the contribution of absorbing particles increases. On the other hand, for marine influenced environments the scattering enhancement clearly increases as the contribution of coarse particles increases (SAE decreases), evidence of the influence of hygroscopic coarse sea salt particles. For other aerosol types the relationship between f(RH) and SAE is not so straightforward. Combining all datasets, f(RH) was found to exponentially increase with SSA with a high correlation coefficient.

  19. Neonatal hygroscopic condenser humidifier.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C; Palmer, K

    1987-01-01

    A hygroscopic condenser humidifier was developed for neonates on mechanical ventilation and was evaluated by laboratory tests and clinically. Humidification provided by the unit was measured in the 10- to 50-ml tidal-volume range at ambient temperatures of 24 degrees C and 38 degrees C. The effect of a leaking patient connection on device performance was investigated. Leakage rates were measured routinely in a neonatal ICU and surgery to determine the clinical significance. In the entire tidal volume and temperature range, the unit provided an inspiratory water content in excess of 30 g/m3 when the leak fraction (volume leaked/volume delivered at Y-piece) was less than 15%. This was found in three out of four cases. In about one out of ten cases, the leak exceeded 30%, which invariably led to corrective action, such as repositioning or changing the endotracheal tube. However, even at a 30% leak, a water content of about 26 g/m3 was still available for humidifying the inspired gas, which corresponds to normal physiologic conditions found in the trachea for nasal breathing of room air.

  20. Results of the South African Cloud-Seeding Experiments Using Hygroscopic Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, G. K.; Terblanche, D. E.; Steffens, F. E.; Fletcher, L.

    1997-11-01

    A new method of seeding convective clouds for the purpose of augmenting rainfall is being developed in South Africa. Flares that produce small salt particles (0.5-m mean diameter) are attached to the trailing edge of the wings of seeding aircraft and ignited in updrafts below the cloud base of convective storms. This method of delivery overcomes most of the difficulties encountered in the handling and the use of hygroscopic materials, difficulties that made seeding with ice nuclei (AgI) a more attractive option.The research that has led to the development of this new technique was prompted by an encounter with a storm with dramatically altered microphysics that was growing over a Kraft paper mill in the research area. Hygroscopic seeding flares were subsequently developed, and seeding trials began in October 1990. Successful seeding trials quickly led to the design and execution of a randomized convective cloud-seeding experiment, the results of which show convincing evidence of increases in the radar-measured rain mass from seeded storms when compared to the control or unseeded storms.Heightened reflectivities aloft seen by the real-time storm-tracking software and observed in the exploratory analysis raises the possibility of developing a radar-measured seeding algorithm that can recognize in almost real time a successful convective seeding event. The implications of such a development would have far-reaching effects on the conduct of future convective cloud-seeding experiments and operations.The authors' seeding hypothesis postulates that the hygroscopic seeding at cloud base accelerates the growth of large hydrometeors in the treated clouds, which harvest more of the available supercooled water before it is expelled into the anvils by the strong updrafts that are a characteristic of the local storms, thereby increasing the efficiency of the rainfall process. The validity of this hypothesis is supported by microphysical measurements made from an instrumented

  1. Aerosol Impacts on the Growth of Cumulus Congestus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, A. M.; van den Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three modes of convection, the middle mode of which is cumulus congestus clouds. This study investigates the impacts of aerosol, specifically those aerosols that can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, on the growth and development of congestus clouds observed within idealized cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations conducted under a state of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE). The model employed here is the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). RAMS CRM simulations were completed using a large two-dimensional domain (7200 km) at fine resolution (1 km) and long duration (100 days). Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions extend to greater heights more frequently than those developing in clean cases. Greater cloud water mass and ice mass forms in more polluted conditions, though ice forms at a fraction of the rate of the cloud mass. The importance of vapor diffusional growth of cloud droplets in the more polluted conditions is highlighted as one such process contributing to congestus development through latent heat release.

  2. Hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei activation of limonene-derived organosulfates and their mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Hong, J.; Raatikainen, T.; Kristensen, K.; Ylisirniö, A.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Glasius, M.; Prisle, N. L.

    2015-06-01

    Even though organosulfates have been observed as constituents of atmospheric aerosols in a wide range of environments spanning from the subtropics to the high Arctic, their hygroscopic properties have not been investigated prior to this study. Here, limonene-derived organosulfates with a molecular weight of 250 Da (L-OS 250) were synthesized and used for simultaneous measurements with a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) and a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) to determine the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, for pure L-OS 250 and mixtures of L-OS 250 with ammonium sulfate (AS) over a wide range of humidity conditions. The κ values derived from measurements with H-TDMA decreased with increasing particle dry size for all chemical compositions investigated, indicating size dependency and/or surface effects. For pure L-OS 250, κ was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, indicating dilution/solubility effects to be significant. Discrepancies in κ between the sub- and supersaturated measurements were observed for L-OS 250, whereas κ of AS and mixed L-OS 250/AS were similar. This discrepancy was primarily ascribed to limited dissolution of L-OS 250 at subsaturated conditions. In general, hygroscopic growth factor, critical activation diameter and κ for the mixed L-OS 250/AS particles converged towards the values of pure AS for mixtures with ≥ 20 % w/w AS. Surface tension measurements of bulk aqueous L-OS 250/AS solutions showed that L-OS 250 was indeed surface active, as expected from its molecular structure, decreasing the surface tension of solutions with 24 % from the pure water-value at a L-OS 250 concentration of 0.0025 mol L-1. Based on these surface tension measurements, we present the first concentration-dependent parametrisation of surface tension for aqueous L-OS 250, which was implemented to different process-level models of L-OS 250 hygroscopicity and CCN activation. The values of κ obtained from the

  3. Hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei activation of limonene-derived organosulfates and their mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Hong, J.; Raatikainen, T.; Kristensen, K.; Ylisirniö, A.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Glasius, M.; Prisle, N. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organosulfates have been observed as constituents of atmospheric aerosols in a wide range of environments; however their hygroscopic properties remain uncharacterised. Here, limonene-derived organosulfates with a molecular weight of 250 Da (L-OS 250) were synthesised and used for simultaneous measurements with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (H-TDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC) to determine the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, for pure L-OS 250 and mixtures of L-OS 250 with ammonium sulfate (AS) over a wide range of humidity conditions. The κ values derived from measurements with H-TDMA decreased with increasing particle dry diameter for all chemical compositions investigated, indicating that κH-TDMA depends on particle diameter and/or surface effects; however, it is not clear if this trend is statistically significant. For pure L-OS 250, κ was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, indicating dilution/solubility effects to be significant. Discrepancies in κ between the sub- and supersaturated measurements were observed for L-OS 250, whereas κ of AS and mixed L-OS 250/AS were similar. This discrepancy was primarily ascribed to limited dissolution of L-OS 250 at subsaturated conditions. In general, hygroscopic growth factor, critical particle diameter and κ for the mixed L-OS 250/AS particles converged towards the values of pure AS for mixtures with ≥ 20 % w / w AS. Surface tension measurements of bulk aqueous L-OS 250/AS solutions showed that L-OS 250 was indeed surface active, as expected from its molecular structure, decreasing the surface tension of solutions with 24 % from the pure water value at a L-OS 250 concentration of 0.0025 mol L-1. Based on these surface tension measurements, we present the first concentration-dependent parametrisation of surface tension for aqueous L-OS 250, which was implemented to different process-level models of L-OS 250 hygroscopicity and CCN activation. The values of κ

  4. Inorganic salts interact with organic di-acids in sub-micron particles to form material with low hygroscopicity and volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, G.; Woo, J.; Häkkinen, S. A. K.; Nenes, A.; McNeill, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    Volatility and hygroscopicity are two key properties of organic aerosol components, and both are strongly related to chemical identity. Here we show that inorganic-organic component interactions typically not considered in atmospheric models may strongly affect aerosol volatility and hygroscopicity. In particular, bi-dentate binding of di-carboxylic acids (DCA) to soluble inorganic ions can lead to very strongly bound metal-organic complexes with largely undetermined hygroscopicity and volatility. These reactions profoundly impact particle hygroscopicity, transforming hygroscopic components into irreversibly non-hygroscopic material. While the hygroscopicities of pure salts, DCA, and DCA salts are known, the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of hygroscopic salts and DCA, as they are typically found in the atmosphere, has not been fully characterized. We have studied the volatility of pure, dry organic salt particles and the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of oxalic acid (OxA, the dominant DCA in the atmosphere) and a number of salts, both mono- and di-valent. The formation of very low volatility organic salts was confirmed, with minimal evaporation of oxalate salt particles below 75 °C. Dramatic increases in the CCN activation diameter for particles with divalent salts (e.g. CaCl2) and relatively small particle mass fractions of OxA indicate that standard volume additivity rules for hygroscopicity do not apply. Thus small organic compounds with high O:C are capable of forming low volatility and very low hygroscopicity particles. Given current knowledge of the formation mechanisms of OxA and M-Ox salts, surface enrichment of insoluble M-Ox salts is expected. The resulting formation of an insoluble coating of metal-oxalate salts can explain low particle hygroscopicities. The formation of particles with a hard coating could offer an alternative explanation for observations of glass-like particles with very low viscosity.

  5. [Ecological effect of hygroscopic and condensate water on biological soil crusts in Shapotou region of China].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan-Xia; Wang, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hu, Rui

    2013-03-01

    By the method of field experiment combined with laboratory analysis, this paper studied the ecological significance of hygroscopic and condensate water on the biological soil crusts in the vegetation sand-fixing area in Shapotou region of China. In the study area, 90% of hygroscopic and condensate water was within the 3 cm soil depth, which didn' t affect the surface soil water content. The hygroscopic and condensate water generated at night involved in the exchange process of soil surface water and atmosphere water vapor, made up the loss of soil water due to the evaporation during the day, and made the surface soil water not reduced rapidly. The amount of the generated hygroscopic and condensate water had a positive correlation with the chlorophyll content of biological soil crusts, indicating that the hygroscopic and condensate water could improve the growth activity of the biological soil crusts, and thus, benefit the biomass accumulation of the crusts. PMID:23755477

  6. Influences of relative humidity and particle chemical composition on aerosol scattering properties during the 2006 PRD campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Yafang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Jung, Jinsang; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Chang, Shih-Yu; Kim, Young J.; Fan, Shaojia; Zeng, Limin

    In situ measurements of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols were carried out in Guangzhou city, China, from 1 to 31 July 2006 during the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Campaign. The light extinction coefficient of the ambient atmosphere, the aerosol scattering coefficient under dry conditions, the aerosol absorption coefficient under ambient conditions, NO 2 concentration, and relative humidity (RH) were measured by transmissionmeter, an integrating nephelometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), a NO X analyzer, and an automatic meteorological station, respectively. Meanwhile, the molecular scattering coefficient was calculated by the Rayleigh scattering function using the US Standard Atmosphere. A method to calculate the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor f(RH), defined as the ratio of the aerosol scattering coefficient under a wet condition to that under a dry condition (40% RH), is proposed based on these optical parameters. The mean and standard deviation aerosol hygroscopic growth factors at 80% RH ( f(RH)=80%) in Ganzhou were 2.04±0.28, 2.29±0.28, and 2.68±0.59 for urban aerosols, mixed aerosols, and marine aerosols, respectively, with the air mass classification being based on the air mass source region. The relationship between f(RH) and RH is fitted by empirical equations and the fitting parameters are calculated. The relationships between f(RH)=80% and total carbon mass fraction (TCF) in PM 2.5, the water-soluble mass fraction (WSF) in PM 10, and the sea-salt aerosol mass fraction (SSF) in PM 10 reveal that the hygroscopic properties of the observed aerosol have a good positive correlation with the WSF and SSF, but have a negative correlation with the TCF.

  7. Influence of relative humidity on aerosol composition: Impacts on light extinction and visibility impairment at two sites in coastal area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, D.; Sheng, L. F.

    2015-02-01

    Investigation on the aerosol characteristics, surface visibility (Vis) and meteorology at BGS (Baguanshan, Qingdao) and LNA (Lin'an, Zhejiang) shows that the ambient aerosol chemical composition and light extinction are relative humidity (RH) dependent. At higher RH, both the strengthened hygroscopic growth and the more efficient oxidization (of the precursor gases and formation of the secondary sulfate and nitrate) contribute to the increase of the mass fraction of the hygroscopic species, which consequently results in the increase of the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE) and Vis reduction at the two Chinese coastal sites. MEE and chemical composition of the aerosol vary significantly under different regional transport ways; the airmasses from the ocean directions are associated with higher RH, higher sulfate mass fraction and greater MEE at BGS, while MEEs are smaller and associated with lower RH and lower sulfate fraction for the airmasses from the continent directions. Vis shows better correlation with PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations when RH effect on aerosol hygroscopic growth is considered. At BGS, the sulfate mass fraction in PM2.5 and PM10 (in average 32.4% and 27.4%) can explain about 60.7% and 74.3% of the variance of the aerosol MEE, respectively; sulfate and nitrate contribute to about 61% of the light extinction. RH plays a key role in aerosol extinction and visibility variation over this coastal area of China. Formation of the secondary aerosol (especially sulfate and nitrate) as well as hygroscopic growth under favorable (more stable and humid) meteorological conditions should be paid adequate attention in regulation of air quality and Vis improvement over eastern China in addition to the routine emission control measurements.

  8. AEROSOL GROWTH IN A STEADY-STATE, CONTINUOUS FLOW CHAMBER: APPLICATION TO STUDIES OF SECONDARY AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical solution for the steady-state aerosol size distribution achieved in a steady-state, continuous flow chamber is derived, where particle growth is occurring by gas-to-particle conversion and particle loss is occurring by deposition to the walls of the chamber. The s...

  9. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  10. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  11. The single scattering properties of hygroscopic soot aggregates with water coated monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, W.; Tianhai, C.; Hao, C.; Lijuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols, such as soot, have modified the Earth's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing solar and long-wave radiative transmission, which have largely influenced the global climate change since the industrial era. Based on transmission electron microscope images (TEM), soot particles are shown as the complex, fractal-like aggregate structures. In humid atmospheric environments, these soot aggregates tend to acquire a water coating, which introduces further complexity to the problem of determining the optical properties of the aggregates. The hygroscopic growth of soot aggregates is important for the aging of these absorbing aerosols, which can significantly influence the optical properties of these kinds of soot particles. In this paper, according to the specific volume fractions of soot core in the water coated soot particle, the monomers of fractal soot aggregates are modeled as semi-external mixtures (physical contact) with constant radius of soot core and variable size of water coating. The single scattering properties of these hygroscopic soot particles, such as phase function, the cross sections of extinction, absorption and scatting, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (ASY), are calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The morphological effects are compared with different monomer numbers and fractal dimension of the soot aggregates, as well as different size of water coating for these spherical monomers. The results have shown that the extinction and absorption cross sections are decreased for the soot aggregates with more thick water coating on monomers, but the single scattering albedo is increased for the larger water coating. It is found that the SSA of aged soot aggregates with hygroscopic grown are remarkably (~50% for volume fraction of soot aggregates is 0.5) larger than fresh soot particles without the consideration of water coating, due to the size of water coating and the

  12. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Perraud, Veronique M.; Bruns, Emily A.; Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Alexander, M. L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Chang, W. L.; Dabdub, Donald; Pankow, James F.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-02-21

    Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) account for a significant portion of total airborne particles. They are formed in reactions of organic gases that produce low volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Current atmospheric models assume that SOA are liquids into which SVOCs undergo equilibrium partitioning and grow the particles. However a large discrepancy between model predictions and field measurements of SOA is commonly observed. We report here laboratory studies of the oxidation of a-pinene by ozone and nitrate radicals and show that particle composition is actually consistent with a kinetically determined growth mechanism, and not with equilibrium partitioning between the gas phase and liquid particles. If this is indeed a general phenomenon in air, the formulation of atmospheric SOA models will have to be revised to reflect this new paradigm. This will have significant impacts on quantifying the role of SOA in air quality, visibility, and climate.

  13. Copper aerosols inhibit phytoplankton growth in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Jordi, Antoni; Basterretxea, Gotzon; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol deposition plays an important role in climate and biogeochemical cycles by supplying nutrients to the open ocean, in turn stimulating ocean productivity and carbon sequestration. Aerosol particles also contain elements such as copper (Cu) that are essential in trace amounts for phytoplankton physiology but that can be toxic at high concentrations. Although the toxicity of Cu associated with aerosols has been demonstrated in bioassay experiments, extrapolation of these laboratory results to natural conditions is not straightforward. This study provides observational evidence of the negative effect of aerosols containing high Cu concentrations on marine phytoplankton over a vast region of the western Mediterranean Sea. Direct aerosol measurements were combined with satellite observations, resulting in the detection of significant declines in phytoplankton biomass after atmospheric aerosol events characterized by high Cu concentrations. The declines were more evident during summer, when nanoflagellates predominate in the phytoplankton population and stratification and oligotrophic conditions prevail in the study region. Together with previous findings concerning atmospheric Cu deposition, these results demonstrate that the toxicity of Cu-rich aerosols can involve large areas of the world’s oceans. Moreover, they highlight the present vulnerability of oceanic ecosystems to Cu-rich aerosols of anthropogenic origins. Because anthropogenic emissions are increasing, large-scale negative effects on marine ecosystems can be anticipated. PMID:23236141

  14. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of local pollutant sources and particle chemical composition on aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated by measuring cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factors and cloud droplet size distributions on an observation tower, with a special focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. The polluted air masses contained more particles than the clean air masses in all size classes, excluding the accumulation mode. This was caused by cloud processing, which was also observed for the polluted air but to a lesser extent. Some, mostly minor, differences in the particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail regarding emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. Clear differences in the total and accumulation mode particle concentrations, particle hygroscopicity and chemical composition during the cloud event were observed. Particularly, larger particles, higher hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganic constituents, especially SO4, were linked with the pollutant plumes. In the air masses affected by traffic and domestic wood combustion, a bimodal particle hygroscopicity distribution was observed, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions during the event had a clear impact on cloud droplet formation.

  15. Effect of growth media and washing on the spectral signatures of aerosolized biological simulants.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Christian; Simard, Jean-Robert; Buteau, Sylvie; Lahaie, Pierre; Nadeau, Denis; Déry, Bernard; Houle, Olivier; Mathieu, Pierre; Roy, Gilles; Ho, Jim; Duchaine, Caroline

    2011-02-20

    We have evaluated the influence of growth media and washing on the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of bacteria. Three different bacterial simulants were cultured in three types of growth media. Three kinds of samples were generated from each culture: the culture itself, the growth medium alone, and a triple-washed sample. The materials were injected as aerosols in a lab-sized lidar aerosol chamber to obtain their spectra. Using two different analysis approaches, signature variations were observed between the three kinds of samples for most combinations of growth media/bacteria. This study concludes that the culture media used influences the spectral signatures. PMID:21343956

  16. On the Water Uptake and CCN Activation of Tropospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Pajunoja, Aki; Acosta Navarro, Juan-Camilo; Leong, Yu Jun; Cerully, Kate M.; Nenes, Athanasios; Kirkevåg, Alf; Topping, David; Virtanen, Annele; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles introduce high uncertainties to radiative climate forcing. If exposed to a given relative humidity (RH), aerosol particles containing soluble material can absorb water and grow in size (hygroscopic growth). If RH is increased further beyond supersaturation (RH >100%) the particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol particles interactions with water vapour determine to a large extent their influence on climate. Organic aerosols (OA) contribute a large fraction (20-90%) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass, on the other hand they often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation of the organic particles. We investigate the hygroscopic behaviour of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. We use the SPARC method to estimate the solubility distributions of isoprene (IP) and monoterpene (MT) SOA based on their chemical composition, as predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Combining these solubility distributions with the adsorption theory along with the non-ideal behaviour of organic mixtures, we predict the expected hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs), CCN activation behaviour and the related hygroscopicity parameters kappa for these mixtures. The predictions are compared to laboratory measurements as well as field data from MT- and IP-dominated measurement sites. The predicted solubility distributions do a good job in explaining the water uptake of these two mixture types at high relative humidities (RH around 90%), as well as their CCN activation - including the potential differences between the kappa values derived from HGF vs. CCN data. At lower relative humidities, however, the observed water uptake is higher than predicted on solubility alone, particularly for the MT-derived SOA. The data from the low RHs are further

  17. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  18. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  19. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  20. Variability of CCN Activation Behaviour of Aerosol Particles in the Marine Boundary Layer of the Northern and Southern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Dieckmann, Katrin; Hartmann, Susan; Schäfer, Michael; Wu, Zhijun; Merkel, Maik; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The variability of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation behaviour and total CCN number concentrations was investigated during three ship cruises. Measurements were performed in a mobile laboratory on the German research vessel FS Polarstern cruising between Cape Town and Bremerhaven (April / May and October / November 2011) as well as between Punta Arenas and Bremerhaven (April / May 2012). CCN size distributions were measured for supersaturations between 0.1% and 0.4% using a Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (DMT, USA). Aerosol particle and CCN total number concentrations as well as the hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) were determined. Furthermore, size distribution data were collected. The hygroscopicity parameter κ featured a high variability during the cruises, with a median κ-value of 0.52 ± 0.26. The κ-values are depended on air mass origin; and are as expected mainly dominated by marine influences, but also long range transport of aerosol particles was detected. In the Celtic Sea, κ was found to be lower than that of clean marine aerosol particles (0.72 ± 0.24; Pringle et al., 2010) with κ-values ~0.2, possibly influenced by anthropogenic emissions from Europe. Close to the West African coast particle hygroscopicity was found to be influenced by the Saharan dust plume, resulting in low κ-values ~0.25. Petters, M.D. and S.M. Kreidenweis (2007), A single parameter representation of hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus activity, Atmos. Chem. and Phys., 7, 1961-1971. Pringle, K.J., H. Tost, A. Pozzer, U. Pöschl, and J. Lelieveld (2010), Global distribution of the effective aerosol hygroscopicity parameter for CCN activation, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 5241-5255.

  1. Optical Aerosol Properties Over the Asian Pacific Ocean during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, M. J.; Carrico, C. M.; Kus, P.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of aerosol particles on the atmospheric radiative-energy balance at critical locations around the globe is an area or research that to be better characterized. This research has allowed shipboard measurements of climatically relevant ambient-aerosol optical properties between Hawaii and the coast of China to characterize "clean marine conditions" and then along the coast of China to characterize "polluted conditions" and "mineral dust conditions." Aerosol light scattering properties and in particular the increase in light scattering coefficient with increasing controlled relative humidity (f(RH)) during ACE-Asia showed a wider diversity of profiles than during ACE-1, ACE-2 or at a U.S. continental site. During the Pacific crossing, the signature was clearly marine-seasalt dominated (very hygroscopic with large magnitude growth with a clear deliquescent/crystallization hysteresis loop) and quite similar to the background marine conditions of Cape Grim during ACE-1. Other times when flow was off the Asian continent, the dependence of scattering on controlled RH was quite similar to results obtained in Sagres Portugal during outflow of European air masses (ACE-2, hygroscopic with smoother changes in scattering with increasing RH conditions though some deliquescent/crystallization features). When the aerosol consisted of a large part mineral dust species, the hygroscopic growth in light scattering was quite suppressed. Mineral dust dominated aerosols showed very little growth in light scattering as a function of RH and at times was nearly hygrophobic. However, along with the suppressed hygroscopic growth, deliquescent (step-change) features were often more pronounced than the cases of the more hygroscopic urban-industrial influenced aerosols. These results will also be integrated with laboratory light scattering measurements and field absorption measurements for comparison of light scattering and albedo measurements made by other independent techniques

  2. Scanning supersaturation condensation particle counter applied as a nano-CCN counter for size-resolved analysis of the hygroscopicity and chemical composition of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Su, H.; Wang, X.; Ma, N.; Wiedensohler, A.; Poschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge about the chemical composition of aerosol particles is essential to understand their formation and evolution in the atmosphere. Due to analytical limitations, however, relatively little information is available for sub-10 nm particles. We present the design of a nano-cloud condensation nuclei counter (nano-CCNC) for measuring size-resolved hygroscopicity and inferring chemical composition of sub-10 nm aerosol particles. We extend the use of counting efficiency spectra from a water-based condensation particle counter (CPC) and link it to the analysis of CCN activation spectra, which provides a theoretical basis for the application of a scanning supersaturation CPC (SS-CPC) as a nano-CCNC. Measurement procedures and data analysis methods are demonstrated through laboratory experiments with monodisperse particles of diameter down to 2.5 nm, where sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, sucrose and tungsten oxide can be easily discriminated by different characteristic supersaturations of water droplet formation. A near-linear relationship between hygroscopicity parameter κ and organic mass fraction is also found for sucrose-ammonium sulfate mixtures. The design is not limited to the water CPC, but also applies to CPCs with other working fluids (e.g. butanol, perfluorotributylamine). We suggest that a combination of SS-CPCs with multiple working fluids may provide further insight into the chemical composition of nanoparticles and the role of organic and inorganic compounds in the initial steps of atmospheric new particle formation and growth.

  3. Modeling of aerosol properties related to direct climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloutsou-Vakakis, Sotiria; Rood, Mark J.; Nenes, Athanasios; Pilinis, Christodoulos

    1998-07-01

    A long-term local experiment was designed with the purpose to accurately quantify aerosol parameters needed in order to estimate aerosol climate forcing at an anthropogenically perturbed continental site. Total light-scattering σλ,sp and backscattering σλ,bsp coefficients at wavelength λ, the hygroscopic growth factors with respect to scattering, ƒ(RH)λ,s, and the backscatter ratio bλ are the parameters considered in the paper. Reference and controlled relative humidity nephelometry measurements were taken at a ground level field sampling station, located near Bondville Illinois (40°03'12″N, W 88°22'19″W). Aerosol particle chemical composition and mass particle size distributions were also measured. The target parameters were also estimated from models. The modeling approach involved a two-step process. In the first step, aerosol properties were parameterized with an approach that made use of a modified thermodynamic equilibrium model, published laboratory measurements of single hygroscopic particle properties, and empirical mixing rules. In the second step, the parameterized aerosol properties were used as inputs into a code that calculate σλ,sp and σλ,bsp as functions of λ, RH, particle size, and composition. Comparison between the measured and the modeled results showed that depending on the assumptions, the differences between the modeled and observed results were within 5 to 28% for ƒ(RH)λ,s and within 22-35% for bλ at low RH and 0-20% for bλ at high RH. The temporal variation of the particle size distribution, the equilibrium state of the particles, and the hygroscopicity of the material characterized as residual were the major factors limiting the predictive ability of the models.

  4. Early growth dynamical implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, François; Schallock, Jennifer; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol growth dynamics may have implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur particles. This paper derives a set of critical initial growth conditions that are analyzed as a function of two key parameters: the initial concentration of the injected sulfuric acid and its dilution rate with the surrounding air. Based upon this analysis, early aerosol growth dynamical regimes may be defined and classified in terms of their likelihood to serve as candidates for the controlled generation of a radiatively effective aerosol. Our results indicate that the regime that fulfills all critical conditions would require that airplane turbines be used to provide sufficient turbulence. The regime's parameter space is narrow and related to steep gradients, thus pointing to potential fine tuning requirements. More research, development, and testing would be required to refine our findings and determine their global-scale implications.

  5. The effects of hygroscopicity of fossil fuel BC on mixed-phase and cirrus ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil fuel burning BC aerosols are often emitted together with sulfate, which coats the surface of these BC particles and changes their hygroscopicity. The ice forming capability of the fossil fuel burning BC can differ widely as a result of the amount of soluble coating on their surface. Due to the abundance of fossil fuel burning BC particles, a small change in their activated fraction can produce a large difference in their climate forcing. To better quantify the role of fossil fuel burning BC in climate change, a 3-BC (hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hygroscopic BC) scheme is developed to replace the 1-BC scheme in a coupled climate and aerosol transport model (CAM-IMPACT). The new scheme explicitly calculates the condensation and coagulation of sulfate on BC particles and keeps track of their coating in the 3-BC states. The hygroscopicity of BC is determined by the layers of sulfate coating on their surface according to criteria developed in laboratory observations. The ice formation scheme in mixed-phase and cirrus clouds is also updated to treat the 3 hygroscopicity BC groups separately according to their different ice freezing capabilities. This paper will report the climate forcing associated with the new BC scheme as well as comparison with observations.

  6. The importance of aerosol water for air pollution effects on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    We apply a new concept to study air pollution effects on weather and climate, which is based on thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - including the required transformation of laboratory based concepts to atmospheric conditions. Under ambient conditions the equilibrium relative humidity (ERH) determines the saturation molality, solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), and the aerosol associated water mass, sine the water content is fixed by ERH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, aerosol water drives the gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning, ambient aerosol size-distributions and directly links aerosol hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds. Various modeling results indicate that a) our new concept is not limited to dilute binary solutions, b) sensitive aerosol properties such as the pH of binary and mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions up to saturation can be computed accurately, and c) that anthropogenic emissions can be directly linked to visibility reduction, cloud formation and climate forcing, if we explicitly account for the aerosol water mass. Our new concept is more explicit than the traditional CCN concept as it abandons the use of ambiguous terms such as "marine" and "continental" aerosols, and refines lumped categories such as mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, organic or sulfate aerosols currently used in atmospheric modeling. Despite, our concept is computationally very efficient as it allows solving the whole gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning analytically without numerical iterations. It is therefore especially suited for regional high resolution, or global climate applications.

  7. Determination of external and internal mixing of organic and inorganic aerosol components from equilibrium water uptake by sub-micrometer particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklilu, Y.; Mozurkewich, M.

    2002-12-01

    The ability of a particle to gain and lose water with changes in relative humidity is fundamental to particle's effectiveness as a cloud condensation nucleus, chemical reactivity, atmospheric residence time and influence on global radiation balance. We describe a method developed to measure particle hygroscopicity over a range of relative humidities (RH) from 50% to 85%. Ambient aerosol particles were dried, monodisperse particles with diameters of usually 50 and 114 nm were selected, and their size distribution following humidification was measured. We measured particle hygroscopicity at Golden Ears Provincial Park and Eagle Ridge Mountain as part of the Pacific 2001 field study in the lower Fraser Valley in August of 2001. The humidified size distributions were sometimes monomodal and sometimes bimodal distribution with less and more hygroscopic peaks. The hygroscopicity of the monomodal particles varied between that of the less and more hygroscopic particles. The less hygroscopic particles were probably almost entirely organic in composition; they had consistent growth curves with wet/dry diameter ratios that increased from 1.04 at 50% relative humidity to 1.09 at 80% RH. These less hygroscopic particles constituted almost all the sampled aerosol at the forested site in Golden Ears Park and during the rainy periods at Eagle Ridge. At other times there were more hygroscopic particles, either as a single mixed mode or as a distinct mode in addition to the less hygroscopic particles. These showed little growth below 70% RH and pronounced growth above 70%. The increased water sorption above 70% RH is likely due to the particles containing (NH4)3H(SO4)2 or (NH4)2(SO4), as these salts deliquesce at 70% and 80% RH, respectively. Since the growth of these particles was less than expected for the pure salts, we conclude that these particles consisted of a mixture of the organic and inorganic components. An estimate of the relative organic fraction was made using the

  8. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  9. Houston urban growth and associated aerosol effects on convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrio, G. G.; Cotton, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of the Houston Metropolitan Area on the characteristics and intensity of convection and precipitation, focusing on events triggered by the sea breeze circulation. For this purpose, we implemented the Town Energy Budget (TEB) urban model into the an improved version of RAMS that considers the explicit activation of CCN (and giant CCN), a bimodal representation of cloud droplets, a bin- emulation approach for droplet collection, ice-particle riming, and sedimentation, and direct radiative effects of aerosols. TEB is now coupled to run in parallel as to maximize the full potential of our computing resources. RAMS@CSU is configured to use four two-way interactive nested model grids with 42-vertical levels and horizontal grid spacings of 45.0, 15.0, 3.75, and 0.75 km centered over Houston. Grid 1 (50 X 50 grid points) and grid 2 (71 X 61 grid points) are used to simulate the synoptic and mesoscale environments, respectively. While Grids 3 and 4 (102 X 102 grid points and 202 X 202 grid points) are used to resolve deep convection as well and the sea breeze circulation . Numerical experiments cover the effects of perturbing both the urban land-use and the aerosol concentrations as well as variations of both. The Landsat Thematic Mapper National Land Cover Data (NLCD) for the Houston area corresponding to the years 2001 and 2006 were used as benchmarks for the experimental design of the land-use sensitivity experiments, including a run with no city and one of a future scenario. We use aerosol observations during the TexAQS/ GoMACCS field campaign for the initial CCN/GCCN sensitivity experiments. As expected, dramatic impact on the intensity of the convection and precipitation result for the selected case (for August 24, 2000). Additional numerical experiments will be performed by only perturbing the land-use input data as well as varying both aerosol concentration and land use. Sensitivity experiments with an older NCLD land

  10. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform

  11. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    In recent assessments of climate forcing, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change lists aerosol as one o f the most important anthropogenic agents that influence climate. Atmospheric aerosols directly affect the radiative fluxes at the surface and top of the Earth's atmosphere by scattering and/or absorbing radiation. Further, aerosols indirectly change cloud microphysical properties (such as cloud drop effective radius) that also affect the radiative fluxes. However, the estimate of the magnitude of aerosol climatic effect varies widely, and aerosol/cloud interactions remain one of the most uncertain aspects of climate models today. The Atmospheric Sciences Division has formulated a plan to enhance and expand our modeling expertise in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions. Under previous LDRD support, we successfully developed a computationally efficient version of IMPACT to simulate aerosol climatology. This new version contains a compact chemical mechanism for the prediction of sulfate and also predicts the distributions of organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), dust, and sea salt. Furthermore, we implemented a radiation package into IMPACT to calculate the radiative forcing and heating/cooling rates by aerosols. This accomplishment built the foundation of our currently funded projects under the NASA Global Modeling and Analysis Program as well as the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Program. Despite the fact that our research is being recognized as an important effort to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate, the major shortcoming of our previous simulations on aerosol climatic effects is the over simplification of spatial and temporal variations of aerosol size distributions that are shaped by complicated nucleation, growth, transport and removal processes. Virtually all properties of atmospheric aerosols and clouds depend strongly on aerosol size distribution. Moreover, molecular processing on aerosol surfaces alters the hygroscopic

  12. Measurements of physical and chemical properties of urban aerosols and their CCN activities in Seoul during the KORUS-AQ pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N.; Yum, S. S.; Park, M.; Shin, H. J.; Bae, G. N.; Kwak, K. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S. M.; Ahn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Interest in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) has been increasing for the last few decades due to their first order effects on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds. Particularly, scientific understanding of CCN from anthropogenic sources becomes important because it is now considered that large uncertainties in climate change predictions stem from insufficient understanding of CCN. CCN activity is influenced by size and chemical component of aerosols. The KORUS-AQ campaign, jointly organized by National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER) of Korea and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aims at understanding various aspects of air quality problem in Korea and will be held in spring, 2016. In preparation for this campaign, pre-campaign was held during May 18-June 13, 2015, in Seoul where numerous local anthropogenic sources exist and influence of Chinese continental outflow directly affects. Here we present some of the important results from the pre-campaign. Chemical properties of aerosols were measured with AMS. Aerosol and CCN number concentrations, aerosol size distribution and aerosol hygroscopic growth factor were measured by CPC, CCN counter, SMPS and H-TDMA, respectively. Average diurnal variation of aerosol number concentration showed three dominant peaks at around 0600_UTC and morning and evening rush hours. Each peak seemed to have different characteristics and therefore detailed analyses of physical and chemical properties of aerosols during the peaks as well as during some special events will be made. The hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, will be estimated by examining CCN activity, H-TDMA measured hygroscopic growth factor and mixing rule of aerosol chemical components, and the result will be compared as well.

  13. Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

    2012-09-14

    Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

  14. Predicted modification of the O/C ratio of SOA due to cloud and aerosol processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, A. G.; Ervens, B.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol formation in cloud and aerosol water (aqSOA) has attracted great attention over the past years and many laboratory data are available to describe such processes in detail. While it has been recognized that aqSOA formation might significantly contribute to the total SOA budget in humid and cloudy regions, the modification of individual aerosol properties, such as oxygenation state (O/C ratio), size (distribution), and light-absorbing properties has not been explored by means of model studies. Precursors of aqSOA are more highly oxidized and water-soluble than those for traditional (gas)SOA and thus aqSOA products have also distinctly higher O/C ratio. Since aqSOA occurs in clouds and in aerosol water at elevated RH, aerosols modified by such processes exhibit a unique vertical profile as compared to gasSOA and add to the organic carbon budget aloft. In this process model study, we will show the extent to which the O/C ratio of aerosols is modified due to aqSOA formation in cloud and aerosol water. The O/C ratio can be considered as a proxy for other aerosol properties such as hygroscopicity (particle growth and CCN activity) and interactions with light (scattering/absorption) which affect the direct and indirect aerosol effects on radiation. Implications of aqSOA formation on these aerosol properties as a function of vertical profile will be discussed.

  15. Particle growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic carbonyls on preexisting aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Carroll, Brian; Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Aerosol growth by the heterogeneous reactions of different aliphatic and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls in the presence/absence of acidified seed aerosols was studied in a 2 m long flow reactor (2.5 cm i.d.) and a 0.5-m3 Teflon film bag under darkness. For the flow reactor experiments, 2,4-hexadienal, 5-methyl-3-hexen-2-one, 2-cyclohexenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclohexenone, and octanal were studied. The carbonyls were selected based on their reactivity for acid-catalyzed reactions, their proton affinity, and their similarity to the ring-opening products from the atmospheric oxidation of aromatics. To facilitate acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hemiacetal/acetal formation, glycerol was injected along with inorganic seed aerosols into the flow reactor system. Carbonyl heterogeneous reactions were accelerated in the presence of acid catalysts (H2SO4), leading to higher aerosol yields than in their absence. Aldehydes were more reactive than ketones for acid-catalyzed reactions. The conjugated functionality also resulted in higher organic aerosol yieldsthan saturated aliphatic carbonyls because conjugation with the olefinic bond increases the basicity of the carbonyl leading to increased stability of the protonated carbonyl. Aerosol population was measured from a series of sampling ports along the length of the flow reactor using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of either an impacted liquid aerosol layer or direct reaction of carbonyls as a thin liquid layer on a zinc selenide FTIR disk was employed to demonstrate the direct transformation of chemical functional groups via the acid-catalyzed reactions. These results strongly indicate that atmospheric multifunctional organic carbonyls, which are created by atmospheric photooxidation reactions, can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions. Exploratory studies in 25- and 190-m3 outdoor chambers

  16. Heterogeneous photochemistry of imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde: HO2 radical formation and aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Palacios, Laura; Corral Arroyo, Pablo; Aregahegn, Kifle Z.; Steimer, Sarah S.; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Nozière, Barbara; George, Christian; Ammann, Markus; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    The multiphase chemistry of glyoxal is a source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), including its light-absorbing product imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC). IC is a photosensitizer that can contribute to additional aerosol ageing and growth when its excited triplet state oxidizes hydrocarbons (reactive uptake) via H-transfer chemistry. We have conducted a series of photochemical coated-wall flow tube (CWFT) experiments using films of IC and citric acid (CA), an organic proxy and H donor in the condensed phase. The formation rate of gas-phase HO2 radicals (PHO2) was measured indirectly by converting gas-phase NO into NO2. We report on experiments that relied on measurements of NO2 formation, NO loss and HONO formation. PHO2 was found to be a linear function of (1) the [IC] × [CA] concentration product and (2) the photon actinic flux. Additionally, (3) a more complex function of relative humidity (25 % < RH < 63 %) and of (4) the O2 / N2 ratio (15 % < O2 / N2 < 56 %) was observed, most likely indicating competing effects of dilution, HO2 mobility and losses in the film. The maximum PHO2 was observed at 25-55 % RH and at ambient O2 / N2. The HO2 radicals form in the condensed phase when excited IC triplet states are reduced by H transfer from a donor, CA in our system, and subsequently react with O2 to regenerate IC, leading to a catalytic cycle. OH does not appear to be formed as a primary product but is produced from the reaction of NO with HO2 in the gas phase. Further, seed aerosols containing IC and ammonium sulfate were exposed to gas-phase limonene and NOx in aerosol flow tube experiments, confirming significant PHO2 from aerosol surfaces. Our results indicate a potentially relevant contribution of triplet state photochemistry for gas-phase HO2 production, aerosol growth and ageing in the atmosphere.

  17. Organic Carbon: Correlating UV-Vis Absorption Spectral Patterns to Hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, A. M.; Bond, T. C.

    2005-12-01

    The complex composition of organic aerosols (OC) in the atmosphere results from an array of sources. Thousands of individual organic compounds within these aerosols are difficult to identify: however, studies suggest these mixtures affect the radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere. Therefore, it is at least as vital to study the absorption and scattering of incoming solar radiation by aerosols as it is to distinguish and quantify the myriad compounds. OC can represent significant fractions of atmospheric aerosol and can play a prominent role in atmospheric radiative forcing. My research focuses on identifying organic carbon with different hygroscopic and optical properties--both of which are affected by composition. We use gradient chromatographic elution with reverse-phase and ion-exchange chromatography columns. We examine aerosols from wood combustion generated within strict temperature regimes. Results demonstrate distinct clusters according to different water affinities. Furthermore, each cluster absorbs in staggered regimes of ultraviolet and visible light, depending on the combustion temperature at which the OC fraction is generated. The association between various absorbing features and hygroscopic properties may imply distinct climate forcing potentials for different fractions of the organic carbon.

  18. Cassini CAPS-ELS observations of carbon-based anions and aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ravindra; Coates, Andrew; Wellbrock, Anne; Kataria, Dhiren; Jones, Geraint; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J.

    2016-06-01

    Cassini observations of Titans ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively charged ions with masses up to > 350 amu and negatively charged ions and aerosols with mass over charge ratios as high as 13,800 amu/q. The detection of negatively charged molecules by the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) was particularly surprising and showed how the synthesis of large aerosol-size particles takes place at altitudes much greater than previously thought. Here, we present further analysis into this CAPS-ELS dataset, through an enhanced understanding of the instrument's response function. In previous studies the intrinsic E/E energy resolution of the instrument did not allow specific species to be identified and the detections were classified into broad mass ranges. In this study we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anions up to > 100 amu/q. The negatively charged ions and aerosols in Titans ionosphere increase in mass with decreasing altitude, the lightest species being observed close to Titan's exobase of ˜1,450km and heaviest species observed at altitudes < 950km. We identify key stages in this apparent growth process and report on key intermediaries which appear to trigger the rapid growth of the larger aerosol-size particles.

  19. Hexagonal ice stability and growth in the presence of glyoxal and secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Hadjicharalambous, Marios

    2014-09-01

    The presence of ice dominates the microphysics of formation of high altitude cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds, as well as the maturity of thunderstorms. We report on the hexagonal (1h) ice stability and growth in binary as well as multi-compound aerosols in atmospherically relevant conformations. The ubiquitous atmospheric trace gas glyoxal along with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) also in the presence of CO2 interacts with large ice 1h crystals of 1300-2000 water molecules. The crystals are subjected to phase transitions under superheating and supercooling conditions by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Density Functional Theory (DFT) based geometry optimization and vibrational frequency analysis are also employed for a smaller ice 1h cell of 12 water molecules. The interaction of the latter with each organic molecule reveals the extent of the mechanical stress exerted on the ordered ice structure. Full hydration of glyoxal promotes ice 1h stability and growth in wet aerosols, while partial hydration or full oxidation exerts a destabilizing effect on the ice 1h lattice. This behavior is associated with the ability of each organic phase to match the order of the ice 1h crystal. We propose that aqueous chemistry in wet aerosols may also have a strong effect on the microphysics of cloud formation.

  20. Hexagonal ice stability and growth in the presence of glyoxal and secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Hadjicharalambous, Marios

    2014-09-01

    The presence of ice dominates the microphysics of formation of high altitude cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds, as well as the maturity of thunderstorms. We report on the hexagonal (1h) ice stability and growth in binary as well as multi-compound aerosols in atmospherically relevant conformations. The ubiquitous atmospheric trace gas glyoxal along with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) also in the presence of CO2 interacts with large ice 1h crystals of 1300-2000 water molecules. The crystals are subjected to phase transitions under superheating and supercooling conditions by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Density Functional Theory (DFT) based geometry optimization and vibrational frequency analysis are also employed for a smaller ice 1h cell of 12 water molecules. The interaction of the latter with each organic molecule reveals the extent of the mechanical stress exerted on the ordered ice structure. Full hydration of glyoxal promotes ice 1h stability and growth in wet aerosols, while partial hydration or full oxidation exerts a destabilizing effect on the ice 1h lattice. This behavior is associated with the ability of each organic phase to match the order of the ice 1h crystal. We propose that aqueous chemistry in wet aerosols may also have a strong effect on the microphysics of cloud formation. PMID:25033409

  1. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility in the framework of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a~one year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0-180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically-influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically-influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air-masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine

  2. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during the TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 1-year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0 to 180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine if

  3. Speciation of Organic Aerosols in the Tropical Mid-Pacific and Their Relationship to Light Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crahan, Kathleen K.; Hegg, Dean A.; Covert, David S.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Khelif, Djamal; Brooks, Barbara J.

    2004-11-01

    Although the importance of the aerosol contribution to the global radiative budget has been recognized, the forcings of aerosols in general, and specifically the role of the organic component in these forcings, still contain large uncertainties. In an attempt to better understand the relationship between the background forcings of aerosols and their chemical speciation, marine air samples were collected off the windward coast of Oahu, Hawaii, during the Rough Evaporation Duct project (RED) using filters mounted on both the Twin Otter aircraft and the Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) research platform. Laboratory analysis revealed a total of 17 species, including 4 carboxylic acids and 2 carbohydrates that accounted for 74% ± 20% of the mass gain observed on the shipboard filters, suggesting a possible significant unresolved organic component. The results were correlated with in situ measurements of particle light scattering (σsp) at 550 nm and with aerosol hygroscopicities. Principal component analysis revealed a small but ubiquitous pollution component affecting the σsp and aerosol hygroscopicity of the remote marine air. The Princeton Organic-Electrolyte Model (POEM) was used to predict the growth factor of the aerosols based upon the chemical composition. This output, coupled with measured aerosol size distributions, was used to attempt to reproduce the observed σsp. It was found that while the POEM model was able to reproduce the expected trends when the organic component of the aerosol was varied, due to large uncertainties especially in the aerosol sizing measurements, the σsp predicted by the POEM model was consistently higher than observed.


  4. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  5. Determination of particle nucleation and growth rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheggen, B.; Mozurkewich, M.

    2003-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on atmospheric chemistry, health and climate are dependent on particle size and composition, and therefore on particle nucleation and growth. An analytical model has been developed to determine nucleation and growth rates from measurements of consecutive aerosol size distributions. The evolution of an aerosol population in time is described by the General Dynamic Equation (GDE). Wall loss, coagulation loss and coagulation production are determined, based on the measured aerosol size distributions. Taking their contributions into account, a non-linear regression analysis of the GDE is performed for each time interval to find the value of the growth rate, that gives best agreement between the measured and calculated change in the size distribution. Other parameters can also be verified and/or optimized by regression analysis. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time (and size) from the regression analysis, each measured cohort of particles is tracked backwards in time to their time of formation, where the radius of the critical cluster is assumed to be 0.5 nm. The number density of each cohort has decreased since their formation, due to wall losses and coagulation processes. Perturbation theory is used to approximate the contribution of within mode coagulation in decreasing the number density. Wall losses and coagulation scavenging are well characterized for each time interval. The integrated losses, from time of formation to time of measurement, are used to obtain the number of nucleated particles, and ultimately the -empirically determined- nucleation rate. The analysis is applied to measurements made in Calspan's 590 m3 smog chamber, following SO2 nucleation.

  6. Morphological characterization of soot aerosol particles during LACIS Experiment in November (LExNo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A.; Wennrich, C.; Stratmann, F.; Wex, H.; Henning, S.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Schneider, J.; Walter, S.; Lieberwirth, I.

    2010-06-01

    Combined mobility and aerodynamic measurements were used to characterize the morphology of soot particles in an experimental campaign on the hygroscopic growth and activation of an artificial biomass burning aerosol. A custom-made, single-stage low-pressure impactor and two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) operating in the free molecular regime were used to measure the vacuum aerodynamic diameter of mobility-selected artificial soot particles that were produced in a spark discharge generator and then modified by condensation of ammonium hydrogen sulfate or levoglucosan as a coating to change their hydroscopic activity. Transmission electron microscope images revealed a relationship between the electrical mobility diameter and the diameter of the enveloping sphere, thus enabling evaluation of the effective density of soot agglomerates. A fractal description of the morphology of the soot aggregates allowed for evaluation of the average mass of the hygroscopic material per particle. The average mass of the hygroscopic material per particle was also measured directly with the two AMS instruments, and the agreement between the two methods was found satisfactory. This tandem approach allows detection of small changes in the particle effective density and morphology caused by condensation of organic material.

  7. Growth of ultra long multiwall carbon nanotube arrays by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Heejun; Kim, Sang Yong; Koh, Ken Ha; Lee, Soonil

    2010-09-01

    Using a home-made aerosol nebulizer, we developed a new aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process that made it possible to synthesize vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays with heights over a few millimeters routinely. An essential part of this technique was in-situ formation of metal catalyst nanoparticles via pyrolysis of ferrocene-ethanol aerosol right before CNT synthesis. Through the optimization of aerosol supply and CVD process parameters, we were able to synthesize clean VACNT arrays as long as 4.38 mm with very low metal contents in 20 min. Furthermore, it is worthy noting that such an outstanding height is achieved very quickly without supporting materials and water-assistance. By taking advantage of almost complete inhibition of CNT growth on low melting-temperature metals, we were able to fabricate patterned VACNT arrays by combining AACVD process with a conventional photolithograpic patterning of gold lines. Characterizations of as-grown nanotubes such as morphology, purity, and metal contents are presented. PMID:21133158

  8. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing; Holben, Brent; Wang, Pucai; Eck, Tom; Chen, Hongbin; Cribb, Maureen; Zhao, Yanxia

    2007-11-01

    One year's worth of aerosol and surface irradiance data from September 2005 to August 2006 were obtained at Taihu, the second supersite for the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE). Aerosol optical properties derived from measurements by a Sun photometer were analyzed. The aerosol data were used together with surface irradiance data to quantitatively estimate aerosol effects on surface shortwave radiation (SWR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The annual mean aerosol optical depth at 500 nm is 0.77, and mean Ångstrom wavelength exponent is 1.17. The annual mean aerosol single scattering albedo and mean aerosol asymmetry factor at 440 nm are 0.90 and 0.72, respectively. Both parameters show a weak seasonal variation, with small values occurring during the winter and larger values during the summer. Clear positive relationships between relative humidity and aerosol properties suggest aerosol hygroscopic growth greatly modifies aerosol properties. The annual mean aerosol direct radiative forcing at the surface (ADRF) is -38.4 W m-2 and -17.8 W m-2 for SWR and PAR, respectively. Because of moderate absorption, the instantaneous ADRF at the top of the atmosphere derived from CERES SSF data is close to zero. Heavy aerosol loading in this region leads to -112.6 W m-2 and -45.5 W m-2 reduction in direct and global SWR, but 67.1 W m-2 more diffuse SWR reaching the surface. With regard to PAR, the annual mean differences in global, direct and diffuse irradiance are -23.1 W m-2, -65.2 W m-2 and 42.1 W m-2 with and without the presence of aerosol, respectively.

  9. Microphysical and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. D.; Moon, S.; Littleton, R.; Auvermann, B.

    2005-12-01

    Due to significant atmospheric loadings of agricultural dust aerosols, the aerosol's ability to contribute significantly to climate forcing on a regional to global level has been a topic of recent interest. Efforts have been made to quantify both the aerosol extinction of the total aerosol population and the hygroscopic and chemical properties of individual particles at a cattle feedyard near Canyon, Texas. Measurements of aerosol extinction are made using open-path transmissometry. Our results show that extinction varies significantly with relative humidity. To further explore the hygroscopic nature of the particles, size-resolved aerosol samples are collected using a cascade impactor system (7 stages ranging from 0.6 micron to 16 micron diameter) and hygroscopicity measurements are conducted on these using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). Complimentary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles is performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. Results of the optical properties, hygroscopicity and chemical composition of aerosols will be presented and atmospheric implications discussed.

  10. Importance of relative humidity in the oxidative ageing of organic aerosols: case study of the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, P. J.; Achakulwisut, P.; Pope, F. D.; Davies, J. F.; Spring, D. R.; Kalberer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Many important atmospheric aerosol processes depend on the chemical composition of the aerosol, e.g. water uptake and particle cloud interactions. Atmospheric ageing processes, such as oxidation reactions, significantly and continuously change the chemical composition of aerosol particles throughout their lifetime. These ageing processes are often poorly understood. In this study we utilize an aerosol flow tube set up and an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer to explore the effect of relative humidity (RH) in the range of <5-90% on the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol which is employed as model organic aerosol system. Due to the slow reaction kinetics relatively high ozone concentrations of 160-200 ppm were used to achieve an appreciable degree of oxidation of maleic acid. The effect of oxidative ageing on the hygroscopicity of maleic acid particles is also investigated using an electrodynamic balance and thermodynamic modelling. RH has a profound effect on the oxidation of maleic acid particles. Very little oxidation is observed at RH < 50% and the only observed reaction products are glyoxylic acid and formic acid. In comparison, when RH > 50% there are about 15 oxidation products identified. This increased oxidation was observed even when the particles were exposed to high humidities long after a low RH ozonolysis reaction. This result might have negative implications for the use of water as an extraction solvent for the analysis of oxidized organic aerosols. These humidity-dependent differences in the composition of the ozonolyzed aerosol demonstrate that water is both a key reactant in the oxidation scheme and a determinant of particle phase and hence diffusivity. The measured chemical composition of the processed aerosol is used to model the hygroscopic growth, which compares favourably with water uptake results from the electrodynamic balance measurements. A reaction mechanism is presented which takes into account the RH dependent observations. This

  11. Modeling of growth and evaporation effects on the extinction of 1.0-micron solar radiation traversing stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of growth and evaporation of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols on the extinction of solar radiation traversing such an aerosol medium are reported for the case of 1.0-micron solar radiation. Modeling results show that aerosol extinction is not very sensitive to the change of ambient water vapor concentration, but is sensitive to ambient temperature changes, especially at low ambient temperatures and high ambient water vapor concentration. A clarification is given of the effects of initial aerosol size distribution and composition on the change of aerosol extinction due to growth and evaporation processes. It is shown that experiments designed to observe solar radiation extinction of aerosols may also be applied to the determination of observed changes in aerosol optical properties, environmental parameters, or the physical and optical characteristics of sulfate aerosols.

  12. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MEASURED WATER VAPOR GROWTH AND CHEMISTRY OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL FOR GRAND CANYON, ARIZONA, IN WINTER 1990.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Size-resolved aerosol growth measurements (growth = moist particle diameter/dry particle diameter) and chemical composition monitoring were conducted during a 3 month period in the winter of 1990 at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ as part of the Navajo Generating ...

  14. CCN activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Price, D.; Praske, E.; Vu, D.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Silva, P. J.; Cocker, D. R., III; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA) and butylamine (BA) reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH) is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ ≤ 0.25). Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA) with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3), contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA) aerosol. TMA + N2O5 form semi-volatile organics in low RH conditions that have κ ~ 0.20, indicative of slightly soluble organic material. As RH increases, several inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) ideal mixing rules. Higher CCN activity (κ > 0.3) was also observed for humid BA+N2O5 aerosols compared with dry aerosol (κ ~ 0.2), as a result of the formation of inorganic salts such as NH4NO3 and butylamine nitrate (C4H11N · HNO3). Compared with TMA, BA+N2O5 reactions produce more volatile aerosols. The BA+N2O5 aerosol products under humid experiments were found to be very sensitive to the temperature within the stream-wise continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter. The CCN counter, when set above a 21 °C temperature difference, evaporates BA+N2O5 aerosol formed at RH ≥ 30%; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 and is dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss) settings. The aerosol behaves non-ideally, hence simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems κ ranges from 0.2 < κ < 0.7. This work indicates that

  15. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2014-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  16. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2015-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  17. Study of aerosol optical properties at Kunming in southwest China and long-range transport of biomass burning aerosols from North Burma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Che, H.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal variation of aerosol optical properties and dominant aerosol types at Kunming (KM), an urban site in southwest China, is characterized. Substantial influences of the hygroscopic growth and long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols on aerosol optical properties at KM are revealed. These results are derived from a detailed analysis of (a) aerosol optical properties (e.g. aerosol optical depth (AOD), columnar water vapor (CWV), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size distribution) retrieved from sunphotometer measurements during March 2012-August 2013, (b) satellite AOD and active fire products, (c) the attenuated backscatter profiles from the space-born lidar, and (d) the back-trajectories. The mean AOD440nm and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE440 - 870) at KM are 0.42 ± 0.32 and 1.25 ± 0.35, respectively. Seasonally, high AOD440nm (0.51 ± 0.34), low EAE440 - 870 (1.06 ± 0.34) and high CWV (4.25 ± 0.97 cm) during the wet season (May - October) contrast with their counterparts 0.17 ± 0.11, 1.40 ± 0.31 and 1.91 ± 0.37 cm during the major dry season (November-February) and 0.53 ± 0.29, 1.39 ± 0.19, and 2.66 ± 0.44 cm in the late dry season (March-April). These contrasts between wet and major dry season, together with the finding that the fine mode radius increases significantly with AOD during the wet season, suggest the importance of the aerosol hygroscopic growth in regulating the seasonal variation of aerosol properties. BB and Urban/Industrial (UI) aerosols are two major aerosol types. Back trajectory analysis shows that airflows on clean days during the major dry season are often from west of KM where the AOD is low. In contrast, air masses on polluted days are from west (in late dry season) and east (in wet season) of KM where the AOD is often large. BB air mass is found mostly originated from North Burma where BB aerosols are lifted upward to 5 km and then subsequently transported to southwest China via prevailing westerly winds.

  18. Hygroscopic salts and the potential for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davila, Alfonso F; Duport, Luis Gago; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Jänchen, Jochen; Valea, Sergio; de Los Rios, Asunción; Fairén, Alberto G; Möhlmann, Diedrich; McKay, Christopher P; Ascaso, Carmen; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Hygroscopic salts have been detected in soils in the northern latitudes of Mars, and widespread chloride-bearing evaporitic deposits have been detected in the southern highlands. The deliquescence of hygroscopic minerals such as chloride salts could provide a local and transient source of liquid water that would be available for microorganisms on the surface. This is known to occur in the Atacama Desert, where massive halite evaporites have become a habitat for photosynthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms that take advantage of the deliquescence of the salt at certain relative humidity (RH) levels. We modeled the climate conditions (RH and temperature) in a region on Mars with chloride-bearing evaporites, and modeled the evolution of the water activity (a(w)) of the deliquescence solutions of three possible chloride salts (sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride) as a function of temperature. We also studied the water absorption properties of the same salts as a function of RH. Our climate model results show that the RH in the region with chloride-bearing deposits on Mars often reaches the deliquescence points of all three salts, and the temperature reaches levels above their eutectic points seasonally, in the course of a martian year. The a(w) of the deliquescence solutions increases with decreasing temperature due mainly to the precipitation of unstable phases, which removes ions from the solution. The deliquescence of sodium chloride results in transient solutions with a(w) compatible with growth of terrestrial microorganisms down to 252 K, whereas for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride it results in solutions with a(w) below the known limits for growth at all temperatures. However, taking the limits of a(w) used to define special regions on Mars, the deliquescence of calcium chloride deposits would allow for the propagation of terrestrial microorganisms at temperatures between 265 and 253 K, and for metabolic activity (no growth) at

  19. Hygroscopic salts and the potential for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davila, Alfonso F; Duport, Luis Gago; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Jänchen, Jochen; Valea, Sergio; de Los Rios, Asunción; Fairén, Alberto G; Möhlmann, Diedrich; McKay, Christopher P; Ascaso, Carmen; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Hygroscopic salts have been detected in soils in the northern latitudes of Mars, and widespread chloride-bearing evaporitic deposits have been detected in the southern highlands. The deliquescence of hygroscopic minerals such as chloride salts could provide a local and transient source of liquid water that would be available for microorganisms on the surface. This is known to occur in the Atacama Desert, where massive halite evaporites have become a habitat for photosynthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms that take advantage of the deliquescence of the salt at certain relative humidity (RH) levels. We modeled the climate conditions (RH and temperature) in a region on Mars with chloride-bearing evaporites, and modeled the evolution of the water activity (a(w)) of the deliquescence solutions of three possible chloride salts (sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride) as a function of temperature. We also studied the water absorption properties of the same salts as a function of RH. Our climate model results show that the RH in the region with chloride-bearing deposits on Mars often reaches the deliquescence points of all three salts, and the temperature reaches levels above their eutectic points seasonally, in the course of a martian year. The a(w) of the deliquescence solutions increases with decreasing temperature due mainly to the precipitation of unstable phases, which removes ions from the solution. The deliquescence of sodium chloride results in transient solutions with a(w) compatible with growth of terrestrial microorganisms down to 252 K, whereas for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride it results in solutions with a(w) below the known limits for growth at all temperatures. However, taking the limits of a(w) used to define special regions on Mars, the deliquescence of calcium chloride deposits would allow for the propagation of terrestrial microorganisms at temperatures between 265 and 253 K, and for metabolic activity (no growth) at

  20. Size-dependent hygroscopicity parameter (κ) and chemical composition of secondary organic cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. F.; Buchholz, A.; Kortner, B.; Schlag, P.; Rubach, F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.; Watne, À. K.; Hallquist, M.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol components (SOA) contribute significantly to the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. The CCN activity of internally mixed submicron SOA particles is often parameterized assuming a size-independent single-hygroscopicity parameter κ. In the experiments done in a large atmospheric reactor (SAPHIR, Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction chamber, Jülich), we consistently observed size-dependent κ and particle composition for SOA from different precursors in the size range of 50 nm-200 nm. Smaller particles had higher κ and a higher degree of oxidation, although all particles were formed from the same reaction mixture. Since decreasing volatility and increasing hygroscopicity often covary with the degree of oxidation, the size dependence of composition and hence of CCN activity can be understood by enrichment of higher oxygenated, low-volatility hygroscopic compounds in smaller particles. Neglecting the size dependence of κ can lead to significant bias in the prediction of the activated fraction of particles during cloud formation.

  1. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Price, D.; Praske, E.; Vu, D. N.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Silva, P. J.; Cocker, D. R., III; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-06-01

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g., hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The particle can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The ratio of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA) and butylamine (BA) reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH) is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ≤ 0.25). Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA) with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3) contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA) aerosol. As relative humidity (RH) increases, inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) ideal mixing rules. The humid BA + N2O5 aerosol products were found to be very sensitive to the temperature at which the measurements were made within the streamwise continuous-flow thermal gradient CCN counter; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss) settings. The variance of the measured aerosol κ values indicates that simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems' κ ranges within 0.2 < κ < 0.7. This work indicates that aerosols formed via nighttime reactions with amines are likely to produce hygroscopic and volatile aerosol, whereas photochemical reactions with OH produce secondary organic aerosol of lower CCN activity. The contributions of semivolatile secondary organic and inorganic material from aliphatic amines must be considered for accurate hygroscopicity and CCN predictions from aliphatic amine systems.

  2. The Remarkable Condensational Growth of Cloud Droplets Grown on Giant Sea-salt Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.; Nugent, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Condensational growth of cloud drops is often assumed to be a well-understood process, using the drop growth equation: After activation of cloud condensation nuclei into cloud drops at cloud base, model studies often assume that drops quickly become dilute and consist of pure water. As a consequence, adiabatic ascent predicts that the growth rate of these drops is inversely proportional to their radius, and consequently that the drop spectrum will narrow with altitude. Here we demonstrate that drop growth on giant sea-salt aerosol particles (GCCN, dry radius > 0.5 μm) behaves very differently. For typical marine stratocumulus updrafts (0.4 m s-1), and for dry radius > 2 μm, these drops typically remain concentrated solution drops, and their condensational growth is so fast that they accelerate away from the main drop peak, and thus very rapidly attain precipitation drop sizes through condensation only. We show how many studies, that have attempted to include the effects of GCCN by initiating large pure water drops at cloud base, may have seriously underestimated the effects of GCCN on warm rain formation. We also speculate on possible solutions to this issue.

  3. Measurement, growth types and shrinkage of newly formed aerosol particles at an urban research platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Németh, Zoltán; Weidinger, Tamás; Kovács, Boldizsár; Kristóf, Gergely

    2016-06-01

    Budapest platform for Aerosol Research and Training (BpART) was created for advancing long-term on-line atmospheric measurements and intensive aerosol sample collection campaigns in Budapest. A joint study including atmospheric chemistry or physics, meteorology, and fluid dynamics on several-year-long data sets obtained at the platform confirmed that the location represents a well-mixed, average atmospheric environment for the city centre. The air streamlines indicated that the host and neighbouring buildings together with the natural orography play an important role in the near-field dispersion processes. Details and features of the airflow structure were derived, and they can be readily utilised for further interpretations. An experimental method to determine particle diffusion losses in the differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system of the BpART facility was proposed. It is based on CPC-CPC (condensation particle counter) and DMPS-CPC comparisons. Growth types of nucleated particles observed in 4 years of measurements were presented and discussed specifically for cities. Arch-shaped size distribution surface plots consisting of a growth phase followed by a shrinkage phase were characterised separately since they supply information on nucleated particles. They were observed in 4.5 % of quantifiable nucleation events. The shrinkage phase took 1 h 34 min in general, and the mean shrinkage rate with standard deviation was -3.8 ± 1.0 nm h-1. The shrinkage of particles was mostly linked to changes in local atmospheric conditions, especially in global radiation and the gas-phase H2SO4 concentration through its proxy, or to atmospheric mixing in few cases. Some indirect results indicate that variations in the formation and growth rates of nucleated particles during their atmospheric transport could be a driving force of shrinkage for particles of very small sizes and on specific occasions.

  4. Growth of organic aerosols by biogenic semi-volatile carbonyls in the forestal atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Sou; Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    Gas and aerosol samples were collected from 13 to 15 August 2001 in Quercus and Picea mixed forest located at Uryu Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University using an annular denuder air sampling system. Gaseous concentrations of biogenic semi-volatile compounds (glycolaldehyde, hydroxyacetone, n-nonanal and n-decanal) showed a rapid increase in the morning and showed a maximum (61-105 pptv) around noontime. Then their concentrations significantly decreased in the evening, and showed a minimum at mid-night. On the other hand, these compounds in the particulate phase also showed a diurnal variation pattern similar to the gaseous compounds. However, the concentrations continued to increase until the evening and showed the maximum at nearly mid-night. The time lag of several hours in the peak of concentrations of these carbonyls in gas phase and particles indicates a gas-to-particle conversion probably through condensation and adsorption of gaseous compounds onto the pre-existing particles (growth of the aerosols).

  5. Regional Haze from Forest Fires and San Joaquin Valley Pollution: Aerosol Properties at Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, C. M.; Day, D.; Heath, J.; Lee, T.; Herckes, P.; Engling, G.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Bench, G.; Malm, W.

    2002-12-01

    The impact of forest fire smoke on air quality and visibility in national parks is a growing concern, particularly in light of EPA's new Regional Haze rule. The summer of 2002 proved to be a very active year for wildfires in the western U.S. with double the average acres burned. To improve understanding of smoke aerosols, an intensive campaign to measure aerosol chemical, physical, optical, and in particular hygroscopic properties, was conducted in Yosemite National Park in July-September 2002. High time resolution chemical measurements allowed speciation of major ions and carbon with 15 and 60 minute time resolution, respectively. Preliminary results show a predominant contribution of organic carbon with concentrations ranging from ~5-15 μgm-3 while major ions were dominated by sulfate, nitrate and ammonium and totaled approximately 2 μgm-3. Carbon isotopic analysis showed that during the haziest periods most carbon had a biogenic source. Soluble potassium and UV light absorption were observed to be useful indicators of smoke impact. During smoky periods, dry light scattering coefficients ranged from roughly 50-200 Mm-1, comparable to the most polluted US cities. Measurements using light scattering and diameter growth techniques both showed limited aerosol hygroscopicity. Diameter and light scattering growth factors ranged from roughly 1.05-1.2 and 1.1-1.5, respectively, at RH = 80%. Measurements of the aerosol dry size distribution during hazy periods showed a mode in the optically efficient size of several hundred nm in addition to a typical number concentration mode around 100 nm. In general, the aerosol properties at Yosemite were observed to have strong influences from smoke likely transported from massive regional wildfires as well as pollution likely from agricultural and population centers of Central California.

  6. Cloud activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Jimenez, J.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    hygroscopicity (κ, Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007, ACP) derived from the size-resolved CCN measurements ranges from 0.2 to 0.3 under the range of measured supersaturations. The derived particle κ increases with increasing particle diameter, which is consistent with observed decrease in organics volume fraction as particle size increases from 100 nm to 300 nm. Based on the particle hygroscopicity and aerosol chemical composition, the organics hygroscopicity (κOrg) was derived as 0.18±0.06, in agreement with κ of organics with the same O:C ratio reported in earlier studies (Chang et al. 2010 ACP; Duplissy et.al 2010 ACPD). Whereas organics strongly influence particle critical supersaturation, size-classified organic particles exhibit similar growth kinetics when compared to (NH4)2SO4 particles with the same critical supersaturation, suggesting aerosol organics observed during CalNex do not inhibit droplet growth through reducing the mass accommodation coefficient of water vapor.

  7. Deliquescence: Hygroscopicity of Water-Soluble Crystalline Solids.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Anatoly G

    2015-11-01

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of hygroscopic properties of crystal-soluble solids is introduced. Isotherms of water vapor sorption by a pure substance and the products with a heterogeneous or homogeneous impurity are compared. Solubility diagrams of substances in water are used to evaluate the influence of impurities on the hygroscopic properties of the products. Evidence demonstrates that water vapor sorption by a chemical product below the hygroscopic point of a basic component is determined by heterogeneous impurities. The introduction of the term "a hygroscopically pure substance" removes inconsistencies between the experimental results related to water vapor sorption and abstract theorems. The paper discusses relevant publications, concerning hygroscopicity of soluble substances, where the impurities are ignored resulting in procedural and theoretical errors.

  8. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore, allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and pollution gradients near a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of atmospheric boundary layer (i.e. its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated mixing. Therefore, introducing ABL conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  9. Phase, composition and growth mechanism for secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of α-cedrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Wingen, L. M.; Perraud, V.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sesquiterpenes are an important class of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and have a high secondary organic aerosol (SOA) forming potential. However, SOA formation from sesquiterpene oxidation has received less attention compared to other BVOCs such as monoterpenes, and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, we present a comprehensive experimental investigation of the ozonolysis of α-cedrene both in a glass flow reactor (27-44 s reaction times) and in static Teflon chambers (30-60 min reaction times). The SOA was collected by impaction or filters, followed by analysis using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), or measured on line using direct analysis in real time (DART-MS) and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). The slow evaporation of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate that was incorporated into the SOA during its formation and growth gives an estimated diffusion coefficient of 3 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 and shows that SOA is a highly viscous semi-solid. Possible structures of four newly observed low molecular weight (MW ≤ 300 Da) reaction products with higher oxygen content than those previously reported were identified. High molecular weight (HMW) products formed in the early stages of the oxidation have structures consistent with aldol condensation products, peroxyhemiacetals, and esters. The size-dependent distributions of HMW products in the SOA, as well as the effects of stabilized Criegee intermediate (SCI) scavengers on HMW products and particle formation, confirm that HMW products and reactions of Criegee intermediates play a crucial role in early stages of particle formation. Our studies provide new insights into mechanisms of SOA formation and growth in α-cedrene ozonolysis and the important role of sesquiterpenes in new particle formation as suggested by field measurements.

  10. Phase, composition, and growth mechanism for secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of α-cedrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M.; Perraud, Véronique; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2016-03-01

    Sesquiterpenes are an important class of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and have a high secondary organic aerosol (SOA) forming potential. However, SOA formation from sesquiterpene oxidation has received less attention compared to other BVOCs such as monoterpenes, and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, we present a comprehensive experimental investigation of the ozonolysis of α-cedrene both in a glass flow reactor (27-44 s reaction times) and in static Teflon chambers (30-60 min reaction times). The SOA was collected by impaction or filters, followed by analysis using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), or measured online using direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). The slow evaporation of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate that was incorporated into the SOA during its formation and growth gives an estimated diffusion coefficient of 3 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 and shows that SOA is a highly viscous semisolid. Possible structures of four newly observed low molecular weight (MW ≤ 300 Da) reaction products with higher oxygen content than those previously reported were identified. High molecular weight (HMW) products formed in the early stages of the oxidation have structures consistent with aldol condensation products, peroxyhemiacetals, and esters. The size-dependent distributions of HMW products in the SOA, as well as the effects of stabilized Criegee intermediate (SCI) scavengers on HMW products and particle formation, confirm that HMW products and reactions of SCI play a crucial role in early stages of particle formation. Our studies provide new insights into mechanisms of SOA formation and growth in α-cedrene ozonolysis and the important role of sesquiterpenes in new particle formation as suggested by field measurements.

  11. A multi-model evaluation of aerosols over South Asia: common problems and possible causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Chin, M.; Gautam, R.; Bian, H.; Kim, D.; Colarco, P. R.; Diehl, T. L.; Takemura, T.; Pozzoli, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution over South Asia attracts special attention due to its effects on regional climate, water cycle and human health. These effects are potentially growing owing to rising trends of anthropogenic aerosol emissions. In this study, the spatio-temporal aerosol distributions over South Asia from seven global aerosol models are evaluated against aerosol retrievals from NASA satellite sensors and ground-based measurements for the period of 2000-2007. Overall, substantial underestimations of aerosol loading over South Asia are found systematically in most model simulations. Averaged over the entire South Asia, the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) is underestimated by a range 15 to 44% across models compared to MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), which is the lowest bound among various satellite AOD retrievals (from MISR, SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra). In particular during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods (i.e., October-January), when agricultural waste burning and anthropogenic emissions dominate, models fail to capture AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) compared to ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer measurements. The underestimations of aerosol loading in models generally occur in the lower troposphere (below 2 km) based on the comparisons of aerosol extinction profiles calculated by the models with those from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data. Furthermore, surface concentrations of all aerosol components (sulfate, nitrate, organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) from the models are found much lower than in situ measurements in winter. Several possible causes for these common problems of underestimating aerosols in models during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods are identified: the aerosol hygroscopic growth and formation of

  12. A Monodisperse Aerosol Dynamics Model Mono32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, L.

    A recently developed aerosol dynamics model MONO32 (and MULTIMONO) (Pir- jola and Kulmala, 2000) is a Lagrangian type box model which uses mondisperse representation for particle size distribution. The model takes into account gas-phase chemistry and aerosol dynamics including emissions and dry deposition of gases and particles, chemical reactions in the gas phase, homogeneous binary H2SO4-H2O or ternary H2SO4-H2O-NH3 nucleation, multicomponent condensation of H2SO4, H2O, HNO3, NH3 and some organic vapour onto particles as well as inter- and in- tramode coagulation of particles. Particles can consist of soluble material such as sul- phate, nitrate, ammonium, sodium cloride, as well as insoluble material such as or- ganic carbon, elemental carbon and mineral dust. Hygroscopic properties and growth of particles were studied by the model. Simulations predicted that nucleation mode particles grew with a growth rate of 2.5-3 nm/h if the source rate of a condensable nonvolatile organic vapour exceeded 10^5 cm^-3 s^-1 and the condensation sink of the pre-existing particles was 0.9x10^-3 s^-1. These results are in good agreemnet with the measurements in Southern Finland. Further, these particles are able to grow to CCN sizes, thus affecting climate. The model was compared very well with the sectional model AEROFOR2 (Pirjola and Kulmala, 2001). It is physically sound and computa- tionally efficient model also for using as a module for regional transport models. Pirjola, L. and Kulmala, M. (2000) Aerosol dynamical model MULTIMONO, Boreal research 5, 361-372. Pirjola, L. and Kulmala, M. (2001) Development of particle size and composition distribution with aerosol dynamics model AEROFOR2. Tellus 53B, 491-509. Pirjola, L., Korhonen, H. and Kulmala, M. (2002) Condensation/ evaporation of insoluble organic vapour as functions of source rate and saturation vapour pressure. J. Geophys. Res. (in press).

  13. Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Matthew James; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry in smoke plumes from three fires: the Otavi savannah fire in Namibia, an Alaska boreal forest fire, and the Timbavati savannah fire. Our model explained the observations of ozone in the Otavi and Alaska plumes fairly well, but our initial model simulation of the Timbavati plume underestimated the concentrations of ozone, OH, and secondary aerosol matter. The Timbavati simulation agrees with observations if we increase OH to equal its observed levels. Heterogeneous reactions of NO2 and SO2 could explain the needed higher concentrations of OH and the rapid formation of ozone, nitrate, and sulfate in the smoke plume if the uptake coefficients on smoke aerosols are large (O(10-3) and O(10-4), respectively). Uncharacterized organic species in the smoke plume were likely responsible for the rapid formation of aerosol organic carbon. The changes in the aerosol size distribution were dominated by plume dilution and condensational growth. The single scattering albedo of the modeled smoke increases from 0.866 to 0.902 over 1 h of aging. The change in aerosol scattering with relative humidity for the modeled fresh smoke matches observations up to 66% RH, but the model greatly overestimates the humidification factor at 80% RH (2.88 versus an observed value of 1.70-1.79). For the aged smoke, the modeled humidification factor is 1.22, slightly below the observed value of 1.40.

  14. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor: conceptual framework and experimental evidence for restructuring, phase transitions and kinetic limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Martin, S. T.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we present a conceptual framework for the interaction of amorphous aerosol particles with water vapor, outlining characteristic features and differences in comparison to crystalline particles. We used a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) to characterize the hydration and dehydration of crystalline ammonium sulfate, amorphous oxalic acid and amorphous levoglucosan particles (diameter ~100 nm, relative humidity 5-95% at 298 K). The experimental data and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following conclusions: (1) Many organic substances, including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids. (2) Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts. (3) In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supramolecular networks) and undergo transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures. (4) Organic gels or (semi-)solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous) with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water and may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN). Moreover, (semi-)solid amorphous phases may influence the uptake of gaseous photo-oxidants and the chemical transformation and aging of

  15. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  16. oVOC production from tropospheric alkyne oxidation and contribution to aerosol formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Ethyne (C2H2) is one of the simplest volatile organic compounds (VOC) and is predominantly emitted via anthropogenic processes and reacts with nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight to form tropospheric ozone (O3). The dominant oxidation product of ethyne is the dicarbonyl species glyoxal (CHOCHO), which is thought to be a significant contributor to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation via irreversible oligomerisation reactions upon the surface of hydrated aerosol particulates and within cloud droplets. A series of chamber experiments were performed at the EUPHORE facility (Valencia, Spain) to study the atmospheric oxidation of ethyne, to determine oxidation product yields and to monitor SOA formation and growth by dicarbonyl oligomerisation. A Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight- Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) was deployed by the University of Leicester to monitor precursor decay and the subsequent evolution of any gas-phase oxidised volatile organic compounds (oVOC). This was further complemented by a Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer (BBCEAS) for specific dicarbonyl and NO2 measurements. Aqueous extracts of chamber SOA were taken from filters collected during the experiments and subsequently analysed offline. The work explores the yields of low molecular weight products of ethyne oxidation for light and dark reactions, with varying levels of NOx and OH. Novel experiments were performed under atmospherically relevant conditions utilising natural lighting rather than artificial lighting. Reaction yields have been assessed with the aim of contributing to the ethyne and glyoxal mechanisms in the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM; http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCM), and have been compared with previously reported values determined from experiments performed under artificial lighting conditions.

  17. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  18. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie-Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-06-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October-May) and lower in the wet season (June-September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand.

  19. Inorganic aerosol formation and growth in the Earth's lower and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2006-12-01

    This chapter describes the photo-chemical production of aerosol particles in two very different regions of the atmosphere: iodine oxide particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL), and meteoric smoke particles that form in the upper mesosphere from the ablation of interplanetary dust. These two systems are surprisingly analogous the source of the condensable inorganic vapours is external to the atmosphere, being injected into the atmosphere from the ocean or from space and the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation. The purpose of the chapter is to describe a laboratory and modelling study to understand at a fundamental level how the nucleation and growth of the particles occurs. Iodine oxide particles were produced from the photo-oxidation of gaseous I{2} with O{3}, which is most likely the primary photo-chemical route to produce the bursts of new particles observed in the MBL at seaweed-rich coastal locations. The captured particles were observed to be fractal-like (i.e., with open or non-compact structures), and to be composed of the stable oxide I{2}O{5}. Meteoric smoke analogues of iron oxide, silicon oxide, and iron silicate composition were similarly formed from the photo-oxidation of iron- and silicon-containing gas-phase precursors in the presence of O{3}. Imaging of the iron-containing particles showed them to be extended, fractal aggregates. For each system, models were developed to elucidate the growth kinetics of the particles and to characterise them in terms of standard fractal parameters. I{2}O{5} particles were found to have a fractal dimension (Df) value of 2.5 at long growth times, consistent with a particle-cluster diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) mechanism, whereas smoke analogues had lower Df values (1.75) which appear to result from a magnetic aggregation process.

  20. Hygroscopic Properties and Respiratory System Deposition Behavior of Particulate Matter Emitted By Mining and Smelting Operations

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jong-sang; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Shingler, Taylor; Taylor, Mark Patrick; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.; Sorooshian, Armin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines size-resolved physicochemical data for particles sampled near mining and smelting operations and a background urban site in Arizona with a focus on how hygroscopic growth impacts particle deposition behavior. Particles with aerodynamic diameters between 0.056 – 18 μm were collected at three sites: (i) an active smelter operation in Hayden, AZ, (ii) a legacy mining site with extensive mine tailings in Iron King, AZ, and (iii) an urban site, inner-city Tucson, AZ. Mass size distributions of As and Pb exhibit bimodal profiles with a dominant peak between 0.32-0.56 μm and a smaller mode in the coarse range (> 3 μm). The hygroscopicity profile did not exhibit the same peaks owing to dependence on other chemical constituents. Sub-micrometer particles were generally more hygroscopic than super-micrometer ones at all three sites with finite water-uptake ability at all sites and particle sizes examined. Model calculations at a relative humidity of 99.5% reveal significant respiratory system particle deposition enhancements at sizes with the largest concentrations of toxic contaminants. Between dry diameters of 0.32 and 0.56 μm, for instance, ICRP and MPPD models predict deposition fraction enhancements of 171%-261% and 33%-63%, respectively, at the three sites. PMID:27700056

  1. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    dominated by organics. Particulate NH4NO3 and (NH4)2SO4 appear to be NH3-limited in regimes I and II, but a significant excess of particulate NH4+ in the hot, dry regime III suggests less marine SO42- and the presence of organic amines. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of C-ToF-AMS data resolved three factors, corresponding to a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), semivolatile OOA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). HOA appears to be a periodic plume source, while SV-OOA exhibits a strong diurnal pattern correlating with ozone. Peaks in SV-OOA concentration correspond to peaks in DMA number concentration and the appearance of a fine organic mode. LV-OOA appears to be an aged accumulation mode constituent that may be associated with aqueous-phase processing, correlating strongly with sulfate and representing the dominant background organic component. Filter analysis revealed a complex mixture of species during periods dominated by SV-OOA and LV-OOA, with LV-OOA periods characterized by shorter-chain dicarboxylic acids (higher O:C ratio), as well as appreciable amounts of nitrate- and sulfate-substituted organics. Phthalic acid was ubiquitous in filter samples, suggesting that PAH photochemistry may be an important SOA pathway in Los Angeles. Water uptake characteristics indicate that hygroscopicity is largely controlled by organic mass fraction (OMF). The hygroscopicity parameter κ averaged 0.31 ± 0.08, approaching 0.5 at low OMF and 0.1 at high OMF, with increasing OMF suppressing hygroscopic growth and increasing critical dry diameter for CCN activation (Dd). Finally, PACO will provide context for results forthcoming from the CalNex field campaign, which involved ground sampling in Pasadena during the spring and summer of 2010.

  2. Tracing impacts of local and regional emission sources on the aerosols over Central Himalayan region during GVAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Shivraj; Sagar, Ram; Pant, P.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Venkata Phanikumar, Devulapalli; Dumka, Umesh Chandra; Pant, Vimlesh; Singh, Narendra; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Naja, Manish; Satheesh, S. K.

    2012-07-01

    Observational site ARIES, Nainital (29.4°N, 79.5°E; 1950 m a.m.s.l) is ideally located to study the tropospheric background (TB) of various atmospheric components and their characteristics representing northern India. Observations at this site could provide useful information of the aerosol properties before, after and during the south-west monsoon. Higher levels of trace gases and aerosols surround this region during winter/spring period in space-borne observations. This period also coincides with the intensive crop residue burning season in the region. In view of this, extensive observation of aerosols, radiation and meteorological parameters are made at the site under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment-Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (RAWEX-GVAX) from June 2011. This experiment thus pose an unique opportunity to study the impact of local and regional pollution and study the influence of long-range transport to the pristine region of Central Himalayas. Results from collocated in-situ measurement of aerosol physical properties [absorption coefficient (σ ab), scattering coefficients (σ s), back scatter ratio (Bfr), aerosol number concentration (Ncn), Cloud condensation nuclei count (Nccn), single scattering albedo (ω ), angstrom exponent (α ), hygroscopic growth factor, f(RH)] with state of the art measurement techniques are presented here. Preliminary analyses of the measurements show that the site is mostly dominated by small size fraction of aerosol (mainly accumulation mode), whose number concentration varies from below 500 cm-3 to above 6000 cm-3 during the study period (upto November 2011). The 'ω ', 'α ' and hygroscopic property of the aerosol observed in GVAX indicate a lesser possibility of impact from fossil fuel combustion as compared to that from biomass/firewood burning. Though daily variations show dominance of local impact, possibility of long-range transport however, cannot be ruled out. Anticipating possibility of both local and long

  3. A Robust Computational Method for Coupled Liquid-liquid Phase Separation and Gas-particle Partitioning Predictions of Multicomponent Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Di Stefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    Providing efficient and reliable model predictions for the partitioning of atmospheric aerosol components between different phases (gas, liquids, solids) is a challenging problem. The partitioning of water, various semivolatile organic components, inorganic acids, bases, and salts, depends simultaneously on the chemical properties and interaction effects among all constituents of a gas + aerosol system. The effects of hygroscopic particle growth on the water contents and physical states of potentially two or more liquid and/or solid aerosol phases in turn may significantly affect multiphase chemistry, the direct effect of aerosols on climate, and the ability of specific particles to act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Considering the presence of a liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles, which typically leads to one phase being enriched in rather hydrophobic compounds and the other phase enriched in water and dissolved electrolytes, adds a high degree of complexity to the goal of predicting the gas-particle partitioning of all components. Coupled gas-particle partitioning and phase separation methods are required to correctly account for the phase behaviour of aerosols exposed to varying environmental conditions, such as changes to relative humidity. We present new theoretical insights and a substantially improved algorithm for the reliable prediction of gas-particle partitioning at thermodynamic equilibrium based on the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. We introduce a new approach for the accurate prediction of the phase distribution of multiple inorganic ions between two liquid phases, constrained by charge balance, and the coupling of the liquid-liquid equilibrium model to a robust gas-particle partitioning algorithm. Such coupled models are useful for exploring the range of environmental conditions leading to complete or incomplete miscibility of aerosol constituents which will affect

  4. Parameterization of the Cloud Nucleating Activity of Fresh, Aged, and Internally-Mixed Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreidenweis, S.; Petters, M.; Demott, P.; Prenni, A.; Ziemann, P.

    2006-12-01

    Carbonaceous particle types affect global climate, visibility, and human health, but their primary and secondary sources, sinks, and tropospheric lifetimes are highly uncertain. The size and hygroscopicity of particles, and in particular their activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), plays a large role in determining their atmospheric impacts and lifetimes. However, hygroscopicity is difficult to parameterize for many organic species for which no thermodynamic data exist, and for complex, multicomponent aerosols of undefined composition. We propose a simple method to describe the relationship between dry particle diameter and CCN activity using a single hygroscopicity parameter, κ. We derive values of κ from fitting of experimental CCN-activity data from the literature and from recent experiments, including oxidation-aged organic particles and secondary organic aerosols. Values of κ are between 0.5 and 2 for highly-CCN- active salts such as sodium chloride, between 0.01 and 0.5 for slightly to very hygroscopic organic aerosols such as those produced in biomass burning and as secondary organic aerosols, and 0 for nonhygroscopic components. The hygroscopicity of internal mixtures can be calculated as a volume fraction weighted average of the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual species comprising the mixture. Aging of aerosol, understood as changes in hygroscopicity due to condensation of hydrophilic species, coagulation of aerosol populations, or heterogeneous chemical reactions, are described conveniently by changes in κ. Our studies show that oxidative aging that proceeds by addition of functional groups to the CHx carbon backbone leads to only small changes in κ, and thus the process alone is inefficient at rendering small, initially- hydrophobic primary organic particles capable of being scavenged by cloud-drop nucleation. Other processes, such as coagulation and condensation, control the rate of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of primary

  5. A multi-model evaluation of aerosols over South Asia: Common problems and possible causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Chin, M.; Gautam, R.; Bian, H.; Kim, D.; Colarco, P. R.; Diehl, T. L.; Takemura, T.; Pozzoli, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.

    2014-07-01

    not considered in 4 out of 7 models or significantly lower than observations in other 2 models. Surprisingly, the near-surface relative humidity in these models is found significantly lower than observations in the winter, resulting in suppression of the hygroscopic growth of soluble aerosols and formations of sulfate and nitrate, and thereby underestimation of AOD. During the post-monsoon season, the deficiency of agricultural waste burning emissions in GFED2 biomass burning emission inventory, used by the models, partly contributes to the model underestimation of aerosol loading over South Asia in burning seasons.

  6. Cloud and Aerosol Characterization During CAEsAR 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Tesche, M.; Krejci, R.; Baumgardner, D.; Walther, A.; Rosati, B.; Widequist, U.; Tunved, P.; O'Connor, E.; Ström, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud and Aerosol Experiment at Åre (CAEsAR 2014) campaign took place from June to October 2014 at Mt. Åreskutan, Sweden, a remote mountain site in Northern Sweden. The campaign was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of clouds and aerosols under orographic forcing. A unique and comprehensive set-up allowed an in-situ characterization of both constituents at a mountain top station at 1200 m a.s.l. including instruments to measure cloud droplet size distribution, meteorological parameters, cloud residual properties (using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet), cloud water composition and various aerosol chemical and microphysical properties (e.g. size, optical and hygroscopic properties). At the same time, a remote sensing site was installed below the mountain site at 420 m a.s.l. in the immediate vicinity (< 3 km horizontally), with vertical profiling from an aerosol lidar, winds and turbulence from a scanning Doppler lidar, a Sun photometer measuring aerosol columnar optical properties, and a precipitation sampler taking rain water for chemical analysis. In addition, regular radiosoundings were performed from the valley. Here, we present the results of this intensive campaign which includes approx. 900 hours of in-cloud sampling. Various unique cloud features were frequently observed such as dynamically-driven droplet growth, bimodal droplet distributions, and the activation of particles down to approx. 20 nm in dry particle diameter. During the campaign, a forest fire smoke plume was transported over the site with measureable impacts on the cloud properties. This data will be used to constrain cloud and aerosol models, as well as to validate satellite retrievals. A first comparison to VIIRS and MODIS satellite retrievals will also be shown.

  7. Long-term observations of aerosol optical properties at Wuhan, an urban site in Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lunche; Gong, Wei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jun; Zhu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distribution and refractive index at urban Wuhan in Central China are investigated based on the measurements from a CIMEL sun-photometer during 2007-2013. AOD500 nm is found to be relatively high all year round and the highest value 1.52 occurs in June 2012 and the lowest (0.57) in November 2012. α shows a significant monthly variation, with the highest value in June 2010 (1.71) and the lowest value (0.78) in April 2012. Analysis of AOD and α frequencies indicate that this region is populated with fine-mode particles. Monthly variations of SSA for total, fine and coarse-mode particles are closely related to the aerosol hygroscopic growth, fossil fuel and biomass burning. The aerosol volume size distributions (bi-modal pattern) show distinct differences in particle radius for different seasons, the radius for fine-mode particles generally increase from spring to summer month, for example, the highest peak is around radius 0.15 μm in March, while the peak radius is around 0.25 μm in June. Finally, monthly statistics of real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index are analyzed, the highest averages of real (1.50) and imaginary parts (0.0395) are found in spring and autumn, respectively at wavelength 440-1020 nm.

  8. Influence of atmospheric relative humidity on ultraviolet flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Chen, Ling; Chen, Huizhong; Luo, Xuyu; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-01

    The atmospheric aerosols can absorb moisture from the environment due to their hydrophilicity and thus affect atmospheric radiation fluxes. In this article, the ultraviolet radiation and relative humidity (RH) data from ground observations and a radiative transfer model were used to examine the influence of RH on ultraviolet radiation flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing under the clear-sky conditions. The results show that RH has a significant influence on ultraviolet radiation because of aerosol hygroscopicity. The relationship between attenuation rate and RH can be fitted logarithmically and all of the R2 of the 4 sets of samples are high, i.e. 0.87, 0.96, 0.9, and 0.9, respectively. When the RH is 60%, 70%, 80% and 90%, the mean aerosol direct radiative forcing in ultraviolet is -4.22W m-2, -4.5W m-2, -4.82W m-2 and -5.4W m-2, respectively. For the selected polluted air samples the growth factor for computing aerosol direct radiative forcing in the ultraviolet for the RH of 80% varies from 1.19 to 1.53, with an average of 1.31.

  9. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed particles composed of NaCl and water-soluble organic acids.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water-soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray elemental microanalysis. Hygroscopic properties of internally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of sodium malonate and sodium glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles. PMID:24437520

  10. Hygroscopic Properties of Internally Mixed Particles Composed of NaCl and Water-Soluble Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suman; Wang, Bingbing; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric aging of naturally emitted marine aerosol often leads to formation of internally mixed particles composed of sea salts and water soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of the resulted particles, which are poorly understood. Here, we have studied chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated NaCl particles mixed with malonic acid (MA) and glutaric acid (GA) at different molar ratios using micro-FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray elemental microanalysis.Hygroscopic properties of inte rnally mixed NaCl and organic acid particles were distinctly different from pure components and varied significantly with the type and amount of organic compound present. Experimental results were in a good agreement with the AIM modeling calculations of gas/liquid/solid partitioning in studied systems. X-ray elemental microanalysis of particles showed that Cl/Na ratio decreased with increasing organic acid component in the particles with MA yielding lower ratios relative to GA. We attribute the depletion of chloride to the formation of Na-malonate and Na-glutarate salts resulted by HCl evaporation from dehydrating particles.

  11. Pulmonary function in mechanically-ventilated patients during 24-hour use of a hygroscopic condensor humidifier.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R; Anderson, H R; Silver, R M; Schuler, F R; Coleman, R E

    1983-11-01

    Hygroscopic condensor humidifiers (HCH) are reportedly capable of humidifying even the driest of ventilator source gases with at least 30 mg H2O/liter of ventilation. To assess the adequacy of the HCH during mechanical ventilation, we studied 26 patients over a 72-hour period (alternating 24-hour periods of humidification by a conventional cascade and the HCH). In these patients, we found no significant difference in static lung compliance, airway resistance, PaO2, and PaCO2 on either system. Additionally, estimates of sputum volume (over a four-hour collection period) and clearance of aerosolized 99mTc labelled DTPA (in five of these patients) also showed no significant differences between the two systems. We conclude that the HCH is capable of supplying necessary heat and moisture to most mechanically-ventilated patients for at least a period of 24 hours.

  12. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol and particle growth events at a national background site (3295 m a.s.l.) on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, W.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, Y. S.; Jiang, Q.; Wang, Q. Q.; Yang, W.; Wang, F.; Bai, Z. P.; Zhao, X. D.; Yang, Y. C.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exert highly uncertain impacts on radiative forcing and also have detrimental effects on human health. While aerosol particles are widely characterized in megacities in China, aerosol composition, sources and particle growth in rural areas in the Tibetan Plateau remain less understood. Here we present the results from an autumn study that was conducted from 5 September to 15 October 2013 at a national background monitoring station (3295 m a.s.l.) in the Tibetan Plateau. The submicron aerosol composition and particle number size distributions were measured in situ with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The average mass concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1) is 11.4 μg m-3 (range: 1.0-78.4 μg m-3) for the entire study, which is much lower than observed at urban and rural sites in eastern China. Organics dominated PM1, accounting for 43 % on average, followed by sulfate (28 %) and ammonium (11 %). Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of ACSM organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra identified an oxygenated OA (OOA) and a biomass burning OA (BBOA). The OOA dominated OA composition, accounting for 85 % on average, 17 % of which was inferred from aged BBOA. The BBOA contributed a considerable fraction of OA (15 %) due to the burning of cow dung and straw in September. New particle formation and growth events were frequently observed (80 % of time) throughout the study. The average particle growth rate is 2.0 nm h-1 (range: 0.8-3.2 nm h-1). By linking the evolution of particle number size distribution to aerosol composition, we found an elevated contribution of organics during particle growth periods and also a positive relationship between the growth rate and the fraction of OOA in OA, which potentially indicates an important role of organics in particle growth in the Tibetan Plateau.

  13. Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Q.; Kroll, J. H.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Docherty, K. S.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Collins, D. R.; Cubison, M. J.; Dunlea, J.; Huffman, J. A.; Onasch, T. B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, P. I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Y.; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, R.; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, S. C.; Trimborn, A. M.; Williams, L. R.; Wood, E. C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, U.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework describing the atmospheric evolution of OA that is constrained by high-time-resolution measurements of its composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), with concentrations comparable to those of sulfate aerosol throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Our model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in both the atmosphere and laboratory: It can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

  14. The dependence of aerosol light-scattering on RH over the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Crahan, K.; Jonssen, H.

    2002-04-01

    Measurements of the relative humidity dependence of aerosol light scattering are reported from three experimental venues over the Pacific Ocean. The measurement platform utilized was the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Results are compared with previous measurements at other locales and with theoretical models. The relatively low values of hygroscopicity obtained in marine air are consistent with a substantial organic component to the aerosol.

  15. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sedlacek, Art

    2011-08-30

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  16. Water uptake by organic aerosol and its influence on gas/particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Asher, William E.; Pankow, James F.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is at least partly hygroscopic, i.e., water partitions into the organic phase to a degree determined by the relative humidity (RH), the organic chemical composition, and the particle size. This organic-phase water increases the aerosol mass and provides a larger absorbing matrix while decreasing its mean molecular weight, which can encourage additional condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds. Most regional and global atmospheric models account for water uptake by inorganic salts but do not explicitly account for organic-phase water and its subsequent impact on gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile OA. In this work, we incorporated the organic-phase water model described by Pankow et al. (2015) into the UCD/CIT air quality model to simulate water uptake by OA and assessed its influence on total OA mass concentrations. The model was run for one summer month over two distinct regions: South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) surrounding Los Angeles, California and the eastern United States (US). In SoCAB where the OA was dominated by non-hygroscopic primary OA (POA), there was very little organic-phase water uptake (0.1-0.2 μg m-3) and consequently very little enhancement (or growth) in total OA concentrations (OA + organic-phase water): a 3% increase in total OA mass was predicted for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity. In contrast, in the eastern US where secondary OA (SOA) from biogenic sources dominated the OA, substantial organic-phase water uptake and enhancement in total OA concentrations was predicted, even in urban locations. On average, the model predicted a 20% growth in total OA mass for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity; the growth was equivalent to a 250 nm particle with a hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 0.15. Further, for the same relative humidity, the exact extent of organic-phase water uptake and total OA enhancement was found to be dependent on the particle mixing state. When the source-oriented mixing state of aerosols

  17. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axisa, Duncan; Kucera, Paul; Burger, Roelof; Li, Runjun; Collins, Don; Freney, Evelyn; Posada, Rafael; Buseck, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In recent advertent and inadvertent weather modification studies, a considerable effort has been made to understand the impact of varying aerosol properties and concentration on cloud properties. Significant uncertainties exist with aerosol-cloud interactions for which complex microphysical processes link the aerosol and cloud properties. Under almost all environmental conditions, increased aerosol concentrations within polluted air masses will enhance cloud droplet concentration relative to that in unperturbed regions. The interaction between dust particles and clouds are significant, yet the conditions in which dust particles become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are uncertain. In order to quantify this aerosol effect on clouds and precipitation, a field campaign was launched in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia as part of a Precipitation Enhancement Feasibility Study. Ground measurements of aerosol size distributions, hygroscopic growth factor, CCN concentrations as well as aircraft measurements of cloud hydrometeor size distributions were done in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia in August 2009. Research aircraft operations focused primarily on conducting measurements in clouds that are targeted for cloud top-seeding, on their microphysical characterization, especially the preconditions necessary for precipitation; understanding the evolution of droplet coalescence, supercooled liquid water, cloud ice and precipitation hydrometeors is necessary if advances are to be made in the study of cloud modification by cloud seeding. Non-precipitating mixed-phase clouds less than 3km in diameter that developed on top of the stable inversion were characterized by flying at the convective cloud top just above the inversion. Aerosol measurements were also done during the climb to cloud base height. The presentation will include a summary of the analysis and results with a focus on the unique features of the Asir region in producing convective clouds, characterization of the

  18. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode. PMID:24455916

  19. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode.

  20. Efficient Nose-to-Lung (N2L) Aerosol Delivery with a Dry Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Golshahi, Laleh; Behara, Srinivas R.B.; Tian, Geng; Farkas, Dale R.; Hindle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Delivering aerosols to the lungs through the nasal route has a number of advantages, but its use has been limited by high depositional loss in the extrathoracic airways. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nose-to-lung (N2L) delivery of excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation aerosols generated with a new inline dry powder inhaler (DPI). The device was also adapted to enable aerosol delivery to a patient simultaneously receiving respiratory support from high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. Methods: The inhaler delivered the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which was formulated as submicrometer combination particles containing a hygroscopic excipient prepared by spray-drying. Nose-to-lung delivery was assessed using in vitro and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in an airway model that continued through the upper tracheobronchial region. Results: The best performing device contained a 2.3 mm flow control orifice and a 3D rod array with a 3-4-3 rod pattern. Based on in vitro experiments, the emitted dose from the streamlined nasal cannula had a fine particle fraction <5 μm of 95.9% and mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.4 μm, which was considered ideal for nose-to-lung EEG delivery. With the 2.3-343 device, condensational growth in the airways increased the aerosol size to 2.5–2.7 μm and extrathoracic deposition was <10%. CFD results closely matched the in vitro experiments and predicted that nasal deposition was <2%. Conclusions: The developed DPI produced high efficiency aerosolization with significant size increase of the aerosol within the airways that can be used to enable nose-to-lung delivery and aerosol administration during HFNC therapy. PMID:25192072

  1. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  2. Aerosol water parameterization: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Abdelkader, M.; Klingmüller, K.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterize the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterize the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e., from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler-theory). Here we extend the νi-parameterization from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II, ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterization in EQSAM4clim, the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show: (i) that the νi-approach enables to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that, e.g., pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate - ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  3. Aerosol water parameterisation: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Swen; Steil, Benedikt; Abdelkader, Mohamed; Klingmüller, Klaus; Xu, Li; Penner, Joyce E.; Fountoukis, Christos; Nenes, Athanasios; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterise the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute-specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterise the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer-sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e. from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler theory). Here we extend the νi parameterisation from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II and ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterisation in the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 (EQSAM4clim) for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show (i) that the νi approach enables one to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, e.g. pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  4. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  5. Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering and its importance for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, Paul; Clemer, Katrijn; Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Irie, Hitoshi; Henzing, Bas; Fierz-Schmidhauser, Rahel; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Baltensperger, Urs; Weingartner, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    In the field, in-situ measurements of aerosol light scattering are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH < 30-40%) which differ from the ambient ones. Since ambient aerosol particles experience a hygroscopic growth at enhanced RH, their micro physical and optical properties - especially the aerosol light scattering - are strongly dependent on RH. The knowledge of this RH effect is of eminent importance for climate forcing calculations or for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. Here, we will present results from the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI, June-July 2009, Cabauw, The Netherlands). During this campaign different remote sensing and in-situ instruments were used to derive atmospheric parameters mainly NO2 but also aerosol properties. The aerosol in-situ measurements were performed in the basement of the Cabauw tower (inlet height 60 m). The aerosol scattering coefficient was measured dry and at various, predefined RH conditions between 20 and 95% with a recently developed humidified nephelometer (WetNeph) and with a second nephelometer measuring at dry conditions. In addition, the aerosol absorption coefficient was measured by a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). This combination of measurements allows the determination of the aerosol extinction coefficient at ambient RH. Three MAX-DOAS (multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy) instruments retrieved vertical profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficient during CINDI. The retrieved aerosol extinction corresponding to the lowest profile layer can now be directly compared to the in-situ value, which is now re-calculated to ambient RH.

  6. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os by cervical insertion of...

  7. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria...

  8. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria...

  9. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria...

  10. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria...

  11. Long-range transport across the Atlantic in summertime does not enhance the hygroscopicity of African mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Caquineau, S.; Desboeufs, K.; Laurent, B.; Maille, M.; Quiñones Rosado, M.; Vallejo, P.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Formenti, P.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first direct evidence that the hygroscopic properties of super micron (>1 µm) African dust particles did not change despite undergoing long-range transport across the Atlantic toward the Caribbean. Concurrent measurements of chemical composition show that most of mineral dust was chemically unprocessed and externally mixed. A minor portion of mineral dust was internally mixed with sulfate and chloride (~13-24% by number) or aggregated with sea-salt particles (~3-6%). Only dust particles aggregated with sea salt showed significant hygroscopic growth above 75% relative humidity (RH), resulting in a decrease in extinction mass efficiency by up to a factor 2.2. All other dust particles did not take up significant amounts of water when exposed to up to 94% RH. These results demonstrate that the direct radiative effect of African dust in this region remained independent of RH and an external mixing state could be considered for evaluating the climate effects of dust.

  12. Growth of upper tropospheric aerosols due to uptake of HNO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Kokkola, H.; Petzold, A.; Laaksonen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of nitric acid on the equilibrium size distributions of upper tropospheric aerosols is calculated as a function of relative humidity. It is shown that HNO3 concentrations above a few tenths of a ppb can cause substantial increases in haze mode particle concentrations at relative humidities at about 60% and above. The effect can be strongly magnified when letovicite particles are present in addition to sulfuric acid aerosols. This is mainly due to the lowering of the deliquescence RH of letovicite in the presence of gaseous nitric acid at low temperatures. We have also compared equilibrium calculations of the HNO3 effect with observations of increased haze mode concentrations at relative humidities above 50% (Petzold et al., 2000). Nitric acid mixing ratios on the order of 0.5-2 ppb may explain the observed increase of haze mode particles at least partially.

  13. Growth of BaTiO3-PVDF composite thick films by using aerosol deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Young Joon

    2016-01-01

    Barium titanate (BaTiO3)-polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) composite thick films were grown by using aerosol deposition at room temperature with BaTiO3 and PVDF powders. To produce a uniform composition in ceramic and polymer composite films, which show a substantial difference in specific gravity, we used PVDF-coated BaTiO3 powders as the starting materials. An examination of the microstructure confirmed that the BaTiO3 were well distributed in the PVDF matrix in the form of a 0 - 3 compound. The crystallite size in the BaTiO3-PVDF composite thick films was 5 ˜ 50 times higher than that in pure BaTiO3 thick films. PVDF plays a role in suppressing the fragmentation of BaTiO3 powder during the aerosol deposition process and in controlling the relative permittivity.

  14. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  15. The Role of Aerosols in Cloud Growth, Suppression, and Precipitation: Yoram Kaufman and his Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol particles are produced in the earth's atmosphere through both natural as well as manmade processes, and contribute profoundly to the (i) formation and characteristics of clouds, (ii) lifetime of clouds, (iii) optical and microphysical properties of clouds, (iv) human health through effects on air quality and the size of particulates as well as vectors for transport of pathogens, (v) climate response and feedbacks, (vi) precipitation, and (vii) harmful algal blooms. Without aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, there would be no fogs, no clouds, no mists, and probably no rain, as noted as far back as 1880 by Scottish physicist John Aitken. With the modern development of instrumentation, both ground-based, airborne, and satellite- based, much progress has been made in linking phenomena and processes together, and putting regional air quality characteristics and hypothesized cloud response into closer scrutiny and linkages. In this presentation I will summarize the wide ranging contributions that Yoram Kaufman has made in ground-based (AERONET), aircraft field campaigns (such as SCAR-B and TARFOX), and, especially, satellite remote sensing (Landsat, MODIS, POLDER) to shed new light on this broad ranging and interdisciplinary field of cloud-aerosol- precipitation interactions.

  16. The Role of Aerosols in Cloud Growth, Suppression, and Precipitation: Yoram Kaufman and his Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles are produced in the earth's atmosphere through both natural as well as manmade processes, and contribute profoundly to the (i) formation and characteristics of clouds, (ii) lifetime of clouds, (iii) optical and microphysical properties of clouds, (iv) human health through effects on air quality and the size of particulates as well as vectors for transport of pathogens, (v) climate response and feedbacks, (vi) precipitation, and (vii) harmful algal blooms. Without aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, there would be no fogs, no clouds, ,no mists, and probably no rain, as noted as far back as 1880 by Scottish physicist John Aitken. With the modern development of instrumentation, both groundbased, airborne, and satellite-based, much progress has been made in linkng phenomena and processes together, and putting regional air quality characteristics and hypothesized cloud response into closer scrutiny and linkages. In h s presentation I will summarize the wide ranging contributions that Yoram Kaufman has made in ground-based (AERONET), aircraft field campaigns (such as SCAR-B and TARFOX), and, especially, satellite remote sensing (Landsat, MODIS, POLDER) to shed new light on this broad ranging and interdisciplinary field of cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions.

  17. Particle hygroscopicity and its link to chemical composition in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, China during summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Zheng, J.; Shang, D. J.; Du, Z. F.; Wu, Y. S.; Zeng, L. M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Hu, M.

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distribution, particle hygroscopic properties, and size-resolved chemical composition were made during the summer of 2014 in Beijing, China. During the measurement period, the median hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 nm particles are respectively 0.15, 0.19, 0.22, 0.27, and 0.29, showing an increasing trend with increasing particle size. When PM2.5 mass concentration is greater than 50 μg m-3, the fractions of the hydrophilic mode for 150, 250, 350 nm particles increased towards 1 as PM2.5 mass concentration increased. This indicates that aged particles dominated during severe pollution periods in the atmosphere of Beijing. Particle hygroscopic growth can be well predicted using high time-resolution size-resolved chemical composition derived from AMS measurement on a basis of ZSR mixing rule. An empirical relationship between κ of organic fraction (κorg) and oxygen to carbon ratio (O : C) (κorg= 0.08·O : C+0.02) is obtained. During new particle formation event associating with strongly active photochemistry, the hygroscopic growth factor or κ of newly formed particles is greater than for particle with the same sizes during non-NPF periods. A quick transformation from external mixture to internal mixture for pre-existing particles (for example 250 nm particle) was observed. Such transformations can modify the state of mixture of pre-exiting particles and thus modify properties such as the light absorption coefficient and cloud condensation nuclei activation.

  18. Experimentally measured morphology of biomass burning aerosol and its impacts on CCN ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, M.; Espinoza, C.; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the morphological properties of freshly emitted and atmospherically aged aerosols from biomass burning. The impacts of particle morphology assumptions on hygroscopic predictions are examined. Chamber experiments were conducted at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Morphological data was obtained through the use of an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) system and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data from these instruments was used to calculate both a dynamic shape factor and a fractal-like dimension for the biomass burning emissions. This data was then used with κ-Köhler theory to adjust the calculated hygroscopicity for experimentally determined morphological characteristics of the aerosol. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning aerosol from two chaparral fuels show that particles are non-spherical with dynamic shape factors greater than 1.15 for aerosol sizes relevant to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation. Accounting for particle morphology can shift the hygroscopicity parameter κ by 0.15 or more. To our knowledge, this work provides the first laboratory chamber measurements of morphological characteristics for biomass burning cloud condensation nuclei and provides experimental particle shape evidence to support the variation in reported hygroscopicities of the complex aerosol.

  19. Experimentally measured morphology of biomass burning aerosol and its impacts on CCN ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, M.; Espinoza, C.; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the morphological properties of freshly emitted and atmospherically aged aerosols from biomass burning. The impacts of particle morphology assumptions on hygroscopic predictions are examined. Chamber experiments were conducted at the University of California, Riverside, Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) atmospheric processes lab using two biomass fuel sources: manzanita and chamise. Morphological data was obtained through the use of an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) system and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Data from these instruments was used to calculate both a dynamic shape factor and a fractal-like dimension for the biomass burning emissions. This data was then used with κ-Köhler theory to adjust the calculated hygroscopicity for experimentally determined morphological characteristics of the aerosol. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning aerosol from two chaparral fuels show that particles are nonspherical with dynamic shape factors greater than 1.15 for aerosol sizes relevant to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation. Accounting for particle morphology can shift the hygroscopicity parameter by 0.15 or more. To our knowledge, this work provides the first laboratory chamber measurements of morphological characteristics for biomass burning cloud condensation nuclei and provides experimental particle shape evidence to support the variation in reported hygroscopicities of the complex aerosol.

  20. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    Ice particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere existing as the sole constituents of glaciated cirrus clouds or coexisting with supercooled liquid droplets in mixed-phase clouds. Aerosol particles serving as heterogeneous ice nuclei for ice crystal formation impact the global radiative balance by modification of cloud radiative properties, and thus climate. Atmospheric ice formation is not a well understood process and represents great uncertainty for climate prediction. The oceans which cover the majority of the earth's surface host nearly half the total global primary productivity and contribute to the greatest aerosol production by mass. However, the effect of biological activity on particle aerosolization, particle composition, and ice nucleation is not well established. This dissertation investigates the link between marine biological activity, aerosol particle production, physical/chemical particle characteristics, and ice nucleation under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions of particles from bursting bubbles generated by plunging water jets and aeration through frits in a seawater mesocosm containing bacteria and/or phytoplankton cultures, were measured as a function of biological activity. Total particle production significantly increases primarily due to enhanced aerosolization of particles ≤100 nm in diameter attributable to the presence and growth of phytoplankton. Furthermore, hygroscopicity measurements indicate primary organic material associated with the sea salt particles, providing additional evidence for the importance of marine biological activity for ocean derived aerosol composition. Ice nucleation experiments show that these organic rich particles nucleate ice efficiently in the immersion and deposition modes, which underscores their importance in mixed-phase and cirrus cloud formation processes. In separate ice nucleation experiments employing pure cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nannochloris

  1. Internal Structure, Hygroscopic and Reactive Properties of Mixed Sodium Methanesulfonate-Sodium Chloride Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Minofar, Babak; Desyaterik, Yury; Dames, E. E.; Zhu, Zihua; Cain, Jeremy P.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Gilles, Marry K.; Wang, Hai; Jungwirth, Pavel; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Internal structures, hygroscopic properties and heterogeneous reactivity of mixed CH3SO3Na/NaCl particles were investigated using a combination of computer modeling and experimental approaches. Surfactant properties of CH3SO3 ions and their surface accumulation in wet, deliquesced particles were assessed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and surface tension measurements. Internal structures of dry CH3SO3Na/NaCl particles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) assisted with X-ray microanalysis mapping, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The combination of these techniques shows that dry CH3SO3Na/NaCl particles are composed of a NaCl core surrounded by a CH3SO3Na shell. Hygroscopic growth, deliquescence and efflorescence phase transitions of mixed CH3SO3Na/NaCl particles were determined and compared to those of pure NaCl particles. These results indicate that particles undergo a two step deliquescence transition: first at ~69% relative humidity (RH) the CH3SO3Na shell takes up water, and then at ~75% RH the NaCl core deliquesces. Reactive uptake coefficients for the particle HNO3 heterogeneous reaction were determined at different CH3SO3Na/NaCl mixing ratios and RH. The net reaction probability decreased notably with increasing CH3SO3Na and at lower RH.

  2. Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Minofar, B; Desyaterik, Y; Dames, E; Zhu, Z; Cain, J P; Hopkins, R J; Gilles, M K; Wang, H; Jungwirth, P; Laskin, A

    2011-07-01

    Internal structures, hygroscopic properties and heterogeneous reactivity of mixed CH(3)SO(3)Na/NaCl particles were investigated using a combination of computer modeling and experimental approaches. Surfactant properties of CH(3)SO(3)(-) ions and their surface accumulation in wet, deliquesced particles were assessed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and surface tension measurements. Internal structures of dry CH(3)SO(3)Na/NaCl particles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) assisted with X-ray microanalysis mapping, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The combination of these techniques shows that dry CH(3)SO(3)Na/NaCl particles are composed of a NaCl core surrounded by a CH(3)SO(3)Na shell. Hygroscopic growth, deliquescence and efflorescence phase transitions of mixed CH(3)SO(3)Na/NaCl particles were determined and compared to those of pure NaCl particles. These results indicate that particles undergo a two step deliquescence transition: first at ∼69% relative humidity (RH) the CH(3)SO(3)Na shell takes up water, and then at ∼75% RH the NaCl core deliquesces. Reactive uptake coefficients for the particle-HNO(3) heterogeneous reaction were determined at different CH(3)SO(3)Na/NaCl mixing ratios and RH. The net reaction probability decreased notably with increasing CH(3)SO(3)Na and at lower RH.

  3. CCN activation of ambient and "synthetic ambient" urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Julia; Reischl, Georg; Steiner, Gerhard; Bauer, Heidi; Leder, Klaus; Kistler, Magda; Puxbaum, Hans; Hitzenberger, R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activation properties of the urban aerosol in Vienna, Austria, were investigated in a long term (11 month) field study. Filter samples of the aerosol below 100 nm were taken in parallel to these measurements, and later used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosols. Activation parameters of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol were also obtained. Hygroscopicity parameters κ [1] were calculated both for the urban and the "synthetic ambient" aerosol and also from the chemical composition. Average κ for the "synthetic ambient" aerosol ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 with an average value of 0.24, while the κ from the chemical composition of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol was significantly higher (average 0.43). The full results of the study are given elsewhere [2,3].

  4. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode dominated by organics. Particulate NH4NO3 and (NH4)2SO4 appear to be NH3-limited in regimes I and II, but a significant excess of particulate NH4+ in the hot, dry regime III suggests less SO42- and the presence of either organic amines or NH4+-associated organic acids. C-ToF-AMS data were analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which resolved three factors, corresponding to a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), semivolatile OOA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). HOA appears to be a periodic plume source, while SV-OOA exhibits a strong diurnal pattern correlating with ozone. Peaks in SV-OOA concentration correspond to peaks in DMA number concentration and the appearance of a fine organic mode. LV-OOA appears to be an aged accumulation mode constituent that may be associated with aqueous-phase processing, correlating strongly with sulfate and representing the dominant background organic component. Periods characterized by high SV-OOA and LV-OOA were analyzed by filter analysis, revealing a complex mixture of species during periods dominated by SV-OOA and LV-OOA, with LV-OOA periods characterized by shorter-chain dicarboxylic acids (higher O:C ratio), as well as appreciable amounts of nitrate- and sulfate-substituted organics. Phthalic acid was ubiquitous in filter samples, suggesting that PAH photochemistry may be an important SOA pathway in Los Angeles. Aerosol composition was related to water uptake characteristics, and it is concluded that hygroscopicity is largely controlled by organic mass fraction (OMF). The hygroscopicity parameter κ averaged 0.31 ± 0.08, approaching 0.5 at low OMF and 0.1 at high OMF, with increasing OMF suppressing hygroscopic growth and increasing critical dry diameter for CCN activation (Dd). An experiment-averaged κorg of 0.14 was calculated, indicating that the highly-oxidized organic fraction of aerosol in Los Angeles is appreciably

  5. The Influence of topography on formation characteristics of hygroscopic and condensate water in Shapotou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yanxia; Li, Xinrong; Hui, Rong; Zhao, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The formation characteristics of hygroscopic and condensate water for different topographic positions were observed using the PVC pipes manual weighing and CPM method in the typical mobile dunes fixed by straw checkerboard barriers in Shapotou. The results indicated that the formation amounts and duration of hygroscopic and condensate water show moderate spatial heterogeneity at the influence of topography. The formation amounts of hygroscopic and condensate water at different aspects conform to the classical convection model, in which the hygroscopic and condensate water amounts are highest at hollow, and windward aspect gets more water than leeward aspect, the hygroscopic and condensate water amounts at different aspects are expressed as: hollow>Western-faced aspect>Northern-faced aspect>hilltop>Southern-faced aspect>Eastern-faced aspect. The hygroscopic and condensate water amounts at different slope positions for every aspect are as follows: the foot of slope>middle slope>hilltop. A negatively linear correlation is got between slope angles and hygroscopic and condensate water amounts, hygroscopic and condensate water amounts decrease gradually along with the increase of slope angles, the amounts of hygroscopic and condensate water at the vertical aspect are only half of horizontal aspect, which indicated topography were important influence factors for the formation of the hygroscopic and condensate water in arid area.

  6. Growth of upper tropospheric aerosols due to uptake of HNO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Kokkola, H.; Petzold, A.; Laaksonen, A.

    2004-03-01

    The effect of nitric acid on the equilibrium size distributions of upper tropospheric aerosols is calculated as a function of relative humidity. It is shown that HNO3 concentrations above a few tenths of a ppb can cause substantial increases in haze mode particle concentrations at relative humidities at about 60% and above. The effect can be strongly magnified when letovicite particles are present in addition to sulfuric acid aerosols. Letovicite particles are less acidic than the sulfuric acid particles and so more nitric acid can be absorbed. This effect can be seen even at RH below 50% due to the lowering of the deliquescence RH of letovicite in the presence of gaseous nitric acid at low temperatures. We have also compared equilibrium calculations of the HNO3 effect with observations of increased haze mode concentrations at relative humidities above 50% (Petzold et al., 2000). Nitric acid mixing ratios on the order of 0.5-2ppb may explain the observed increase of haze mode particles at least partially.

  7. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions at Puijo measurement station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2014-06-01

    Interactions between aerosols and liquid water clouds were studied during autumns 2010-2011 at a semiurban measurement station on Puijo tower in Kuopio, Finland. Cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopicity and cloud droplet size distribution were measured, with a focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. On average, the polluted air contained more particles than the clean air masses, and generally the concentrations decreased during cloud events. Cloud processing was found to take place, especially in the clean air masses, and to a lesser extent in the polluted air. Some, mostly minor, differences in the average particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail, with a special focus on the emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. This revealed larger variations in particle and cloud properties than the analysis of the whole data set. Clear differences in the total (between 214 and 2200 cm-3) and accumulation mode particle concentrations (between 62 and 169 cm-3) were observed. Particle chemical composition, especially the concentrations of organics (between 0.42 and 1.28 μg m-3) and sulfate (between 0.16 and 4.43 μg m-3), varied considerably. This affected the hygroscopic growth factor: for example, for 100 nm particles the range was from 1.21 to 1.45 at 90% relative humidity. Particularly, large particles, high hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganics were linked with the pollutant plumes. Moreover, the particle hygroscopicity distributions in the polluted air were clearly bimodal, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions also had an impact on cloud droplet

  8. Hygroscopicity of Chemically Aged, sub-micron Squalane Particles: On the Role of Size and Composition towards the Hygroscopicity Parameter κ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, C. W.; Smith, J. D.; Che, D. L.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements presented herein explore cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of sub-micron squalane particles chemically aged by hydroxyl radicals as a function of size and OH exposure. As squalane particles are exposed to OH radicals, size-selected 100, 150, and 200 nm particles monotically decrease in size with increasing OH exposure. Concurrently, their CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter values, κ, increase with OH exposure until saturating at 0.165 in the 100 nm data set, 0.140 in the 150 nm data set, and reach a maximum value of 0.075 in the 200 nm data set at the highest level of OH exposure. The critical super-saturation relative humidity (RH) at which CCN activity is achieved decreases initially with increasing OH exposure and then increases with OH exposure, most notably for the 100 nm data set and weakly with the 150 nm data set. Chemically aged squalane particles from the 200 nm data set show a monotonic decrease in critical super-saturation RH with all values of increasing OH exposure between 0.1-2.5 × 10^13 s molec./cc. The measured O:C ratios of 160 nm chemically aged squalane particles, which were reported previously, are compared to κ values by the CCN derived relationship reported in literature: κ = 0.30*O:C and reasonable agreement is attained in the size-selected 150 nm data set. These values are also compared with the hygroscopic growth factor derived relationship in literature: κ = 0.49*(O:C -0.25) and reasonable agreement is attained at O:C > 0.35.

  9. Aerosol-computational fluid dynamics modeling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion, and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and horizontal gradient of pollution concentrations perpendicular to a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, and (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of the atmospheric boundary layer (i.e., its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated dilution. Therefore, introducing atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  10. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  11. Phase state of ambient aerosol linked with water uptake and chemical aging in the southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Hu, Weiwei; Leong, Yu J.; Taylor, Nathan F.; Miettinen, Pasi; Palm, Brett B.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Collins, Don R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-09-01

    During the summer 2013 Southern Aerosol and Oxidant Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the southeastern United States, the effect of hygroscopicity and composition on the phase state of atmospheric aerosol particles dominated by the organic fraction was studied. The analysis is based on hygroscopicity measurements by a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA), physical phase state investigations by an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) and composition measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). To study the effect of atmospheric aging on these properties, an OH-radical oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was used to simulate longer atmospheric aging times of up to 3 weeks. Hygroscopicity and bounce behavior of the particles had a clear relationship showing higher bounce at elevated relative humidity (RH) values for less hygroscopic particles, which agrees well with earlier laboratory studies. Additional OH oxidation of the aerosol particles in the OFR increased the O : C and the hygroscopicity resulting in liquefying of the particles at lower RH values. At the highest OH exposures, the inorganic fraction starts to dominate the bounce process due to production of inorganics and concurrent loss of organics in the OFR. Our results indicate that at typical ambient RH and temperature, organic-dominated particles stay mostly liquid in the atmospheric conditions in the southeastern US, but they often turn semisolid when dried below ˜ 50 % RH in the sampling inlets. While the liquid phase state suggests solution behavior and equilibrium partitioning for the SOA particles in ambient air, the possible phase change in the drying process highlights the importance of thoroughly considered sampling techniques of SOA particles.

  12. Organic Nitrate Contribution to New Particle Formation and Growth in Secondary Organic Aerosols from α-Pinene Ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Mentel, Thomas F; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-06-21

    The chemical kinetics of organic nitrate production during new particle formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were investigated using the short-lived radioactive tracer (13)N in flow-reactor studies of α-pinene oxidation with ozone. Direct and quantitative measurements of the nitrogen content indicate that organic nitrates accounted for ∼40% of SOA mass during initial particle formation, decreasing to ∼15% upon particle growth to the accumulation-mode size range (>100 nm). Experiments with OH scavengers and kinetic model results suggest that organic peroxy radicals formed by α-pinene reacting with secondary OH from ozonolysis are key intermediates in the organic nitrate formation process. The direct reaction of α-pinene with NO3 was found to be less important for particle-phase organic nitrate formation. The nitrogen content of SOA particles decreased slightly upon increase of relative humidity up to 80%. The experiments show a tight correlation between organic nitrate content and SOA particle-number concentrations, implying that the condensing organic nitrates are among the extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) that may play an important role in the nucleation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles. PMID:27219077

  13. A case study of Asian dust storm particles: chemical composition, reactivity to SO2 and hygroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Liu, Chang; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Mineral dust comprises a great fraction of the global aerosol loading, but remains the largest uncertainty in predictions of the future climate due to its complexity in composition and physico-chemical properties. In this work, a case study characterizing Asian dust storm particles was conducted by multiple analysis methods, including SEM-EDS, XPS, FT-IR, BET, TPD/mass and Knudsen cell/mass. The morphology, elemental fraction, source distribution, true uptake coefficient for SO2, and hygroscopic behavior were studied. The major components of Asian dust storm particles are aluminosilicate, SiO2 and CaCO3, with organic compounds and inorganic nitrate coated on the surface. It has a low reactivity towards SO2 with a true uptake coefficient, 5.767 x 10(-6), which limits the conversion of SO2 to sulfate during dust storm periods. The low reactivity also means that the heterogeneous reactions of SO2 in both dry and humid air conditions have little effect on the hygroscopic behavior of the dust particles. PMID:22783615

  14. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type - such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity - and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH), and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35 ng m-3 in the free troposphere (above

  15. Characteristics and composition of atmospheric aerosols in Phimai, central Thailand during BASE-ASIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; Bell, Shaun W.

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols were made in Phimai, central Thailand (15.183°N, 102.565°E, elevation: 206 m) during the BASE-ASIA field experiment from late February to early May in 2006. The observed aerosol loading was sizable for this rural site (mean aerosol scattering: 108 ± 64 Mm-1; absorption: 15 ± 8 Mm-1; PM10 concentration: 33 ± 17 μg m-3), and dominated by submicron particles. Major aerosol compounds included carbonaceous (OC: 9.5 ± 3.6 μg m-3; EC: 2.0 ± 2.3 μg m-3) and secondary species (SO42-: 6.4 ± 3.7 μg m-3, NH4+: 2.2 ± 1.3 μg m-3). While the site was seldom under the direct influence of large forest fires to its north, agricultural fires were ubiquitous during the experiment, as suggested by the substantial concentration of K+ (0.56 ± 0.33 μg m-3). Besides biomass burning, aerosols in Phimai during the experiment were also strongly influenced by industrial and vehicular emissions from the Bangkok metropolitan region and long-range transport from southern China. High humidity played an important role in determining the aerosol composition and properties in the region. Sulfate was primarily formed via aqueous phase reactions, and hygroscopic growth could enhance the aerosol light scattering by up to 60%, at the typical morning RH level of 85%. The aerosol single scattering albedo demonstrated distinct diurnal variation, ranging from 0.86 ± 0.04 in the evening to 0.92 ± 0.02 in the morning. This experiment marks the first time such comprehensive characterization of aerosols was made for rural central Thailand. Our results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow.

  16. Dependence of the drizzle growth process on the cloud top height and its relevance to the aerosol vertical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Transitional processes among cloud droplets, drizzle and raindrops are still uncertain and more efforts are required for the better understanding. In this situation, difference in the drizzle growth process was examined according to the cloud top height using the CloudSat and MODIS synergetic datasets. From the CloudSat products such as 2B-GEOPROF, 2B-TAU, ECMWF-AUX, only one-layered water clouds whose top temperatures were warmer than 273K were extracted over China (a circular area having a diameter of 1800km of the center at 35°N and 120°E) and over ocean (a circular area having a diameter of 1500km of the center at 35°N and 150°E). Then a threshold of 3km of the cloud top height was adopted to divide the extracted clouds into upper and lower cases. First, the probability distribution functions (PDF) of the cloud droplet number density (Nc) and the effective particle radius (Re) were calculated for these four cases (land/ocean/upper/lower). Nc was obtained assuming the adiabatic liquid water content from MODIS-derived cloud optical depth and Re. Oceanic clouds had fewer Nc than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had more Nc for the lower case than for the higher case. On the other hand, oceanic clouds had larger Re than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had smaller Re for the lower case than for the higher case. These results quite agreed with our existing knowledge on the vertical profile of the aerosol number concentration over ocean (pristine) and land (polluted). Although the number of aerosol particles is fewer and almost the same regardless of the height over the ocean, it is more near the surface and it rapidly decreases according to the height over the land. Next, examining PDF of the radar reflectivity (Ze), we found that although PDFs of Ze were almost the same for oceanic clouds regardless of the cloud top height, PDF of land lower clouds were less frequent at around from

  17. The Effect Of Organic Surfactants On The Properties Of Common Hygroscopic Particles: Effective Densities, Reactivity And Water Evaporation Of Surfactant Coated Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrarodriguez, L.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Ellison, B.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric aerosol compositions routinely show that organic compounds account for a very large fraction of the particle mass. The organic compounds that make up this aerosol mass represent a wide range of molecules with a variety of properties. Many of the particles are composed of hygroscopic salts like sulfates, nitrates and sea-salt internally mixed with organics. While the properties of the hygroscopic salts are known, the effect of the organic compounds on the microphysical and chemical properties which include CCN activity is not clear. .One particularly interesting class of internally mixed particles is composed of aqueous salts solutions that are coated with organic surfactants which are molecules with long aliphatic chain and a water soluble end. Because these molecules tend to coat the particles' surfaces, a monolayer might be sufficient to drastically alter their hygroscopic properties, their CCN activity, and reactivity. The aliphatic chains, being exposed to the oxidizing atmosphere are expected to be transformed through heterogeneous chemistry, yielding complex products with mixed properties. We will report the results from a series of observations on ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sea salt particles coated with three types of surfactant molecules: sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium oleate and laurtrimonium chloride. We have been able to measure the effective densities of internally mixed particles with a range of surfactant concentration that start below a monolayer and extend all the way to particles composed of pure surfactant. For many of the measurements the data reveal a rather complex picture that cannot be simply interpreted in terms of the known pure-compound densities. For unsaturated hydrocarbons we observed and quantified the effect of oxidation by ozone on particle size, effective density and individual particle mass spectral signatures. One of the more important properties of these surfactants is that they can form a

  18. Characteristics and Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols in Phimai, Central Thailand During BASE-ASIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; Bell, Shaun W.

    2012-01-01

    +/- 8 Mm(exp -1); PM(sub 10) concentration: 33 +/- 17 miro-g/ cubic m and dominated by submicron particles. Major aerosol compounds included carbonaceous (OC: 9.5 +/- 3.6miro-g/ cubic m; EC: 2.0 2.3 miro-g/ cubic m and secondary species (SO4(2-): 6.4 +/- 3.7 miro-g/ cubic m, NH4(+): 2.2 +/- 1.3 miro-g/ cubic m). While the site was seldom under the direct influence of large forest fires to its north, agricultural fires were ubiquitous during the experiment, as suggested by the substantial concentration of K+ (0.56 +/- 0.33 micro-g/ cubic m). Besides biomass burning, aerosols in Phimai during the experiment were also strongly influenced by industrial and vehicular emissions from the Bangkok metropolitan region and long-range transport from southern China. High humidity played an important role in determining the aerosol composition and properties in the region. Sulfate was primarily formed via aqueous phase reactions, and hygroscopic growth could enhance the aerosol light scattering by up to 60%, at the typical morning RH level of 85%. The aerosol single scattering albedo demonstrated distinct diurnal variation, ranging from 0.86 +/- 0.04 in the evening to 0.92 +/- 0.02 in the morning. This experiment marks the first time such comprehensive characterization of aerosols was made for rural central Thailand. Our results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow.

  19. Volatility and oxidative aging of aqueous maleic acid aerosol droplets and the dependence on relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Marshall, Frances H; Miles, Rachael E H; Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-07-31

    The microphysical structure and heterogeneous oxidation by ozone of single aerosol particles containing maleic acid (MA) has been studied using aerosol optical tweezers and cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The evaporation rate of MA from aqueous droplets has been measured over a range of relative humidities and the pure component vapor pressure determined to be (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) Pa. Variation in the refractive index (RI) of an aqueous MA droplet with relative humidity (RH) allowed the subcooled liquid RI of MA to be estimated as 1.481 ± 0.001. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth are shown to be consistent with equilibrium model predictions from previous studies. Simultaneous measurements of the droplet composition, size, and refractive index have been made during ozonolysis at RHs in the range 50-80%, providing insight into the volatility of organic products, changes in the droplet hygroscopicity, and optical properties. Exposure of the aqueous droplets to ozone leads to the formation of products with a wide range of volatilities spanning from involatile to volatile. Reactive uptake coefficients show a weak dependence on ozone concentration, but no dependence on RH or salt concentration. The time evolving RI depends significantly on the RH at which the oxidation proceeds and can even show opposing trends; while the RI increases with ozone exposure at low relative humidity, the RI decreases when the oxidation proceeds at high relative humidity. The variations in RI are broadly consistent with a framework for predicting RIs for organic components published by Cappa et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 2011 , 116 , D15204 ). Once oxidized, particles are shown to form amorphous phases on drying rather than crystallization, with slow evaporation kinetics of residual water. PMID:25003240

  20. Secondary inorganic aerosol formation and its shortwave direct radiative forcing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin

    2015-04-01

    g/m3 in northern China, middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and the Sichuan Basin. We integrated the updated ammonia emission inventory and improved model to simulate SIA formation and its DRF over China in 2006. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the annual mean DRF of SIA was -2.5 W/m2, in which sulfate, nitrate and ammonium contributed -1.5 W/m2, -0.4 W/m2 and -0.6 W/m2 respectively. At the surface, the annual mean DRF of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were -2.1 W/m2, -0.5 W/m2 and -0.8 W/m2 respectively. In the atmosphere, the annual mean DRF of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were +0.6 W/m2, +0.1 W/m2 and +0.2 W/m2 respectively. The DRF of SIA at TOA displayed a distinct seasonal variation. The national mean DRF reached its maximum of -3.4 W/m2 in summer. There were several reasons for the summer maximum. Firstly, enhanced atmospheric oxidizing capacity and increased ammonia emission in summer accelerated the formation of sulfate and ammonium. Secondly, high humidity favored the hygroscopic growth of SIA in summer. Lastly, shortwave radiation flux at the TOA peaked in summer. On the contrary, the hygroscopic growth of SIA was limited in winter. Simultaneously, the shortwave radiation flux decreased to the minimum in winter. Consequently, the national mean DRF reached its minimum of -1.7 W/m2 in winter. SIA could play an important part in climate change by offsetting BC's radiative heating effect in China.

  1. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Hallar, Anna G.; McCubbin, Ian; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-09

    We present measurements of CCN concentrations and associated aerosol composition and size properties at a high-elevation research site in March 2011. CCN closure and aerosol hygroscopicity were assessed using simplified assumptions of bulk aerosol properties as well as a new method utilizing single particle composition and size to assess the importance of particle mixing state in CCN activation. Free troposphere analysis found no significant difference between the CCN activity of free tropospheric aerosol and boundary layer aerosol at this location. Closure results indicate that using only size and number information leads to adequate prediction, in the majority of cases within 50%, of CCN concentrations, while incorporating the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual aerosol components measured by single particle mass spectrometry adds to the agreement, in most cases within 20%, between predicted and measured CCN concentrations. For high-elevation continental sites, with largely aged aerosol and low amounts of local area emissions, a lack of chemical knowledge and hygroscopicity may not hinder models in predicting CCN concentrations. At sites influenced by fresh emissions or more heterogeneous particle types, single particle composition information may be more useful in predicting CCN concentrations and understanding the importance of particle mixing state on CCN activation.

  2. Pathophysiological and disease constraints on aerosol delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrity, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dose of inhaled particles to the respiratory tract depends upon many factors. These factors include the size of the particles, the pattern of breathing (flow and tidal volume), the physical properties of the articles (hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic), anatomy of the respiratory tract, and the pathophysiologic status of the respiratory tract. In addition to these factors, which are primarily related to the deposition of particles, the rate of particle clearance from the respiratory tract also influences the dose of particles. The paper is a review of the various factors influencing dose of inhaled particles to the respiratory tract. The emphasis of the paper is on therapeutic aerosol particles, though the principals discussed also apply to toxic particles as well. An important area of consideration is the influence of disease on the delivery of particle dose. From the point of view of toxic particles this is important when considering potential susceptible populations.

  3. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m‑3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (<20 μg m‑3), since the air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (<30 nm) at this stage, which can be explained by the new particle formation. In the succeeding days, both the particle mass and size continuously increased. The PM2.5concentration increased rapidly by >60 μg day‑1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm‑3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm‑3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm‑3, which is considered as external mixed organic

  4. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m-3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (<20 μg m-3), since the air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (<30 nm) at this stage, which can be explained by the new particle formation. In the succeeding days, both the particle mass and size continuously increased. The PM2.5concentration increased rapidly by >60 μg day-1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm-3, which is considered as external mixed organic particles or aged

  5. Aerosol Properties over the Eastern North Pacific based on Measurements from the MAGIC Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, E. R.; Senum, G.; Springston, S. R.; Kuang, C.

    2015-12-01

    The MAGIC field campaign, funded and operated by the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Climate Research Facility of the US Department of Energy, occurred between September 2012 and October, 2013 aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship Spirit making regular trips between Los Angeles, CA and Honolulu, HI. Along this route, which lies very near the GPCI (GCSS Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison) transect, the predominant cloud regime changes from stratocumulus near the California coast to trade-wind cumulus near Hawaii. The transition between these two regimes is poorly understood and not accurately represented in models. The goal of MAGIC was to acquire statistic of this transition and thus improve its representation in models by making repeated transects through this region and measuring properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, radiation, and atmospheric structure. To achieve these goals, the Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the Horizon Spirit as it ran its regular route between Los Angeles and Honolulu. AMF2 consists of three 20-foot SeaTainers and includes three radars and other instruments to measure properties of clouds and precipitation; the Aerosol Observing System (AOS), which has a suite of instruments to measure properties of aerosols; and other instruments to measure radiation, meteorological quantities, and sea surface temperature. Two technicians accompanied the AMF2, and scientists rode the ship as observers. MAGIC made nearly 20 round trips between Los Angeles and Honolulu (and thus nearly 40 excursions through the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition) and spent 200 days at sea, collecting an unprecedented data set. Aerosol properties measured with the AOS include number concentration and size distribution, CCN activity, hygroscopic growth, and light-scattering and absorption. Additionally, more than one hundred filter samples were collected. Aerosol properties and their spatial and temporal behavior are discussed

  6. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    observations are then compared to the near-surface in situ measurements, at dry and at ambient relative humidities. When in situ measurements are considered at dry state, the in situ fine mode diameters are 44 % higher than the sun-photometer-retrieved diameters and in situ volume concentrations are 20 % lower than those of the sun-photometer-retrieved fine mode concentration. Using a parameterised hygroscopic growth factor applied to aerosol diameters, the difference between in situ and retrieved diameters grows larger. Coarse mode in situ diameters and concentrations show a good correlation with retrieved PSDs from remote sensing.

  7. Remote continental aerosol characteristics in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ezra J. T.

    number concentrations were correlated with the frequency of events typical of new particle formation. Measured sub-micron organic mass fractions were between 70 -- 90% during the summer months, when new particle formation events were most frequent, suggesting the importance of organic species in the nucleation or growth process, or both. Aerosol composition derived from hygroscopicity measurements indicate organic mass fractions of 50 - 60% for particles with diameters larger than 0.15 mum during the winter. The composition of smaller diameter particles appeared to be organic dominated year-round. High organic mass fractions led to low values of aerosol hygroscopicity, described using the kappa parameter. Over the entire year-long BEACHON study, kappa had an average value of 0.16 +/- 0.08, similar to values determined during biologically active periods in tropical and boreal forests, and lower than the commonly assumed value of kappacontinental = 0.3. There was also an observed increase in kappa with size, due to external mixing of the fine mode aerosol. Incorrect representations of kappa or its size dependence led to erroneous values of calculated CCN concentrations, especially for supersaturation values less than 0.3%. At higher supersaturations, most of the measured variability in CCN concentrations was captured by changes in total measured aerosol number concentrations. While data from the three measurement sites were generally well correlated, indicating similarities in seasonal cycles and in total number concentrations, there were some variations between measurements made at different sites and during different years that may be partly due to the effects of local emissions. The averaged data provide reasonable, observationally-based parameters for modeling of aerosol number size distributions and corresponding CCN concentrations. Field observations clearly indicated the episodic influence of wildfire smoke on particle number concentrations and compositions. However

  8. Aerosol composition and variability in the Baltimore-Washington, DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-08-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type, such as composition, size and hygroscopicity, and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH) and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in-situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, DC region was performed during fourteen flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of ammonium sulfate (up to 49 %) due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of ammonium sulfate increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low aerosol loading days had lower ammonium sulfate and higher black carbon contributions causing lower single scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km decreasing to 35 ng m-3

  9. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    assumption then enters the estimate of the single scattering albedo at ambient relative humidity. To investigate the validity of this assumption we have carried out modeling studies of the absorption humidification factor, assuming that the aerosols contain an insoluble soot core and a coating which determines its hygroscopic growth behavior. The aerosol optical properties are then computed on the basis of the shell/core particle morphology using a Mie-code for concentric shells. From basic physical principles, it is conceivable that aerosol absorption increases when an atmospheric aerosol particle collects a non-absorbing shell, since the soot core is then exposed to an increased (focused) electric field strength. Indeed, our preliminary modeling studies show that the absorption of an atmospheric aerosol particle composed of a soot core and an aqueous sulfuric acid shell may increase by a factor of 50% due to a change in ambient relative humidity from 30 to 95%. We will show how this increased absorption is a function of the initial particle size and soot mass fraction.

  10. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    PubMed

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  11. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    PubMed

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  12. Optical properties of aerosols over a tropical rain forest in Xishuangbanna, South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yongjing; Xin, Jinyuan; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Observation and analysis of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols in a South Asian tropical rain forest showed that the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol Ångström exponent (α) at 500 nm were 0.47 ± 0.30 (± value represents the standard deviation) and 1.35 ± 0.32, respectively, from 2012 to 2014, similar with that of Amazon region. Aerosol optical properties in this region varied significantly between the dry and wet seasons. The mean AOD and α were 0.50 ± 0.32 and 1.41 ± 0.28, respectively, in the dry season and 0.41 ± 0.20 and 1.13 ± 0.41 in the wet season. Because of the combustion of the rich biomass in the dry season, fine modal smoke aerosols increased, which led to a higher AOD and smaller aerosol control mode than in the wet season. The average atmospheric humidity in the wet season was 85.50%, higher than the 79.67% during the dry season. In the very damp conditions of the wet season, the aerosol control mode was relatively larger, while AOD appeared to be lower because of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth and wet deposition. The trajectories were similar both in dry and wet, but with different effects on the aerosol concentration. The highest AOD values 0.66 ± 0.34 (in dry) and 0.45 ± 0.21 (in wet) both occurred in continental air masses, while smaller (0.38-0.48 in dry and 0.30-0.35 in wet) in oceanic air masses. The range of AOD values during the wet season was relatively narrow (0.30-0.45), but the dry season range was wider (0.38-0.66). For the Ångström exponent, the range in the wet season (0.74-1.34) was much greater than that in the dry season (1.33-1.54).

  13. Application of aerosol optical properties to estimate aerosol type from ground-based remote sensing observation at urban area of northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Huizheng; Zhao, Hujia; Wu, Yunfei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Dubovik, Oleg; Estelles, Victor; Ma, Yanjun; Wang, Yangfeng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were derived from ground-based sunphotometer observations between 2009-2013 at three urban sites of Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun in northeastern China. The annual means for extinction aerosol optical depths (EAOD) at 500 nm were 0.57±0.38, 0.52±0.35, and 0.41±0.31 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. The corresponding annual means for the extinction Angstrom exponents (EAE) computed for the wavelengths of 440 and 870 nm were 0.86±0.32, 0.86±0.34 and 0.91±0.35, respectively, indicating that urban area of Northeast China were affected by both coarse and fine particles. Hygroscopic growth in summer and incursions of dust aerosols in spring were evidently revealed from the analysis of the relationship between EAE and δEAE (the EAE difference, δEAE=EAE(440,670)-EAE(670,870)). The annual mean absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD440 nm) values at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun were 0.15±0.11, 0.10±0.07, 0.08±0.04, respectively. The annual mean absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE440-870 nm) values were 0.86±0.24, 1.19±0.39, 1.33±0.36 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. When the AAEs were close to unity at Anshan, the absorption aerosol particles evidently consisted of black carbon from coal combustion and motor vehicles. Larger AAEs at Fushun were indicative of absorbing aerosols mainly from biomass burning and mineral dust. The AAE at Shenyang was<1 which may be consistent with black carbon particles with absorbing or non-absorbing coatings. Analysis of the relationship between the AAEs and extinction Angstrom exponents showed that the aerosol populations at these three sites could be classified as "mixed-small particles" including anthropogenic particles and secondary organic aerosol with highly variable sphericity fractions.

  14. Role of Nucleation Mechanism on the Size Dependent Morphology of Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaf, M. B.; Freedman, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation is sensitive to the size, composition, and morphology of aerosol particles < 200 nm. The properties of particles can differ on the nanoscale compared to larger sizes, as observed in atmospheric chemistry for the crystallization of particles < 40 nm in diameter. We have applied cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for the study of the morphology of dry, submicron organic aerosol to explore whether nanoscale effects impact the morphology of particles. Specifically, we have characterized the morphology of the poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PEG-400)/ammonium sulfate system. We have shown that depending on the composition of the system and the mechanism of phase separation (i.e. nucleation and growth vs. spinodal decomposition), a size dependence of morphology is observed. Since phase separation by nucleation and growth should be a common occurrence in the atmosphere, we expect the majority of phase separating atmospheric particles to have a size dependent morphology, which may have important implications for CCN activation. Size dependent morphology may impact the hygroscopic properties of these particles which can affect CCN concentrations and further influence cloud formation, reflectivity, and precipitation, which will have consequences for Earth's radiation budget.

  15. A critique of the U.S. standard for industrial exposure to sodium hydroxide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D W; Underhill, D W; Ellenbecker, M J

    1979-05-01

    Published studies of the toxicity of sodium hydroxide aerosols are few. These studies were generally marred by inadequate characterization of particle size and chemical compositon and of the ambient humidity. Because NaOH aerosols can readily undergo reaction with carbon dioxide to form sodium carbonate, a much less alkaline (and less hygroscopic) compound, these shortcomings may warrant a reconsideration of the NaOH standard and the consideration of a Na2CO3 standard.

  16. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  17. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute

  18. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, E.; Youn, J.-S.; Balch, B.; Wonaschütz, A.; Shingler, T.; Wang, Z.; Conant, W. C.; Betterton, E. A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-06-01

    A 2-year data set of measured CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations at 0.2 % supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol composition data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data were collected over a period of 2 years (2012-2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm-3), highest in winter (430 cm-3) and have a secondary peak during the North American monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm-3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns, with extreme concentrations (1 and 99 % levels) ranging from 56 to 1945 cm-3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82 % of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemical composition are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that hygroscopicity can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41 % (pre-monsoon) and 36 % (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions and multi-phase chemistry during the North American monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Parameterized models typically exhibit improved predictive skill when there are strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol physicochemical processes, suggesting that similar findings could be

  19. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, E.; Youn, J.-S.; Balch, B.; Wonaschütz, A.; Shingler, T.; Wang, Z.; Conant, W. C.; Betterton, E. A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year data set of measured CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations at 0.2 % supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol composition data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data were collected over a period of 2 years (2012–2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm−3), highest in winter (430 cm−3) and have a secondary peak during the North American monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm−3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns, with extreme concentrations (1 and 99 % levels) ranging from 56 to 1945 cm−3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82% of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemical composition are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that hygroscopicity can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41% (pre-monsoon) and 36% (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions and multi-phase chemistry during the North American monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Parameterized models typically exhibit improved predictive skill when there are strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol physicochemical processes, suggesting that similar findings

  20. Anti-hygroscopic effect of dextrans in herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Henry H Y; Wong, Sammas Y S; Law, Marcus W L; Chu, Kevin K W; Chow, Albert H L

    2008-11-01

    Equilibrium moisture sorptions of two dried aqueous herbal extracts and their mixtures with dextrans of various molecular weights were investigated as a function of relative humidity at ambient temperature, and the data were analyzed by both the Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equations. Glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of the samples were measured by differential scanning calorimetry, and their dependence on the moisture contents of the extracts was analyzed by the linear, Fox and expanded Gordon-Taylor mathematical models. All dextran-extract mixtures exhibited single T(g) values, indicating that they existed as single homogeneous phases. The BET equation was found adequate for description of the moisture sorption isotherms for all samples. The dextrans appeared to reduce the hygroscopicity of the herbal extracts solely by a dilution effect. The observed increase in T(g) and accompanying decrease in tackiness of the herbal extracts in the presence of dextrans may be explained by the ability of dextrans to restrict the molecular mobility of simple sugars and to counteract the plasticizing effect of water in the extracts. The expanded Gordon-Taylor equation has proved useful in predicting the T(g) of hygroscopic amorphous herbal mixtures. PMID:18706495

  1. Anti-hygroscopic effect of dextrans in herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Henry H Y; Wong, Sammas Y S; Law, Marcus W L; Chu, Kevin K W; Chow, Albert H L

    2008-11-01

    Equilibrium moisture sorptions of two dried aqueous herbal extracts and their mixtures with dextrans of various molecular weights were investigated as a function of relative humidity at ambient temperature, and the data were analyzed by both the Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equations. Glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of the samples were measured by differential scanning calorimetry, and their dependence on the moisture contents of the extracts was analyzed by the linear, Fox and expanded Gordon-Taylor mathematical models. All dextran-extract mixtures exhibited single T(g) values, indicating that they existed as single homogeneous phases. The BET equation was found adequate for description of the moisture sorption isotherms for all samples. The dextrans appeared to reduce the hygroscopicity of the herbal extracts solely by a dilution effect. The observed increase in T(g) and accompanying decrease in tackiness of the herbal extracts in the presence of dextrans may be explained by the ability of dextrans to restrict the molecular mobility of simple sugars and to counteract the plasticizing effect of water in the extracts. The expanded Gordon-Taylor equation has proved useful in predicting the T(g) of hygroscopic amorphous herbal mixtures.

  2. Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2009-12-11

    Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

  3. Incorporation of new particle formation and early growth treatments into WRF/Chem: Model improvement, evaluation, and impacts of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changjie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Litao; Zhang, Qiang; Duan, Fengkui; He, Kebin; Yu, Shao-Cai

    2016-01-01

    New particle formation (NPF) provides an important source of aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei, which may result in enhanced cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and cloud shortwave albedo. In this work, several nucleation parameterizations and one particle early growth parameterization are implemented into the online-coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF/Chem) to improve the model's capability in simulating NPF and early growth of ultrafine particles over East Asia. The default 8-bin over the size range of 39 nm-10 μm used in the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry aerosol module is expanded to the 12-bin over 1 nm-10 μm to explicitly track the formation and evolution of new particles. Although model biases remain in simulating H2SO4, condensation sink, growth rate, and formation rate, the evaluation of July 2008 simulation identifies a combination of three nucleation parameterizations (i.e., COMB) that can best represent the atmospheric nucleation processes in terms of both surface nucleation events and the resulting vertical distribution of ultrafine particle concentrations. COMB consists of a power law of Wang et al. (2011) based on activation theory for urban areas in planetary boundary layer (PBL), a power law of Boy et al. (2008) based on activation theory for non-urban areas in PBL, and the ion-mediated nucleation parameterization of YU10 for above PBL. The application and evaluation of the improved model with 12-bin and the COMB nucleation parameterization in East Asia during January, April, July, and October in 2001 show that the model has an overall reasonably good skill in reproducing most observed meteorological variables and surface and column chemical concentrations. Relatively large biases in simulated precipitation and wind speeds are due to inaccurate surface roughness and limitations in model treatments of cloud formation and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

  4. Primary Biological Aerosol as Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Francis; Griffiths, Paul; Herzog, Michael; Kalberer, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Primary biological aerosols (PBAs) represent a significant fraction of the total atmospheric aerosol mass burden. The low number density of PBA precludes a significant direct effect on the radiative budget of the Earth. However, the large particle size of PBA should allow them to have a significant indirect radiative effect on cloud processes if they are wettable. In particular, PBA may preferentially activate as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) when compared to the smaller background aerosol. This effect will be most pronounced under pristine conditions where the background aerosol concentrations are small and of low hygroscopicity. Recent measurements of high PBA concentration within the Amazon (Huffman et al. 2012) suggest that this region may be particularly important for PBA-cloud interactions, and hence a potential feedback between the atmosphere and biosphere could be established (Pöschl et al. 2010). This study investigates the ability of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to influence cloud formation and precipitation dynamics. In particular, pollen grains and fungal spores have been studied using a combined laboratory and modelling approach. The laboratory studies assessed the hygroscopicity, wettability and activation of the particles. The model output data suggests that under certain atmospheric conditions the activation of PBA can significantly interfere with the activation of the fine aerosol mode thus changing cloud dynamics. This work expands upon our previously published results on pollen activation (Pope 2010, Griffiths et al. 2012). References Huffman et al. (2012) 12, 11997. doi:10.5194/acp-12-11997-2012 Pöschl et al. (2010) Science. 329(5998), 1513. doi:10.1126/science.1191056 Pope (2010) Environ. Res. Lett. 5, 004015. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/5/4/044015 Griffiths et al. (2012) Atmos. Sci. Lett. 13(4), 289. doi:10.1002/asl.397

  5. Cloud condensation nuclei activity of isoprene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Gabriella J.; Moore, Richard H.; Nenes, Athanasios; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2011-01-01

    This work explores the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), likely a significant source of global organic particulate matter and CCN, produced from the oxidation with OH from HONO/HOOH photolysis in a temperature-controlled SOA chamber. CCN concentrations, activation diameter, and droplet growth kinetic information were monitored as a function of supersaturation (from 0.3% to 1.5%) for several hours using a cylindrical continuous-flow streamwise thermal gradient CCN counter connected to a scanning mobility particle sizer. The initial SOA concentrations ranged from 2 to 30 μg m-3 and presented CCN activity similar to monoterpene SOA with an activation diameter of 35 nm for 1.5% supersaturation and 72 nm for 0.6% supersaturation. The CCN activity improved slightly in some experiments as the SOA aged chemically and did not depend significantly on the level of NOx during the SOA production. The measured activation diameters correspond to a hygroscopicity parameter κ value of 0.12, similar to κ values of 0.1 ± 0.04 reported for monoterpene SOA. Analysis of the water-soluble carbon extracted from filter samples of the SOA suggest that it has a κ of 0.2-0.3 implying an average molar mass between 90 and 150 g mol-1 (assuming a zero and 5% surface tension reduction with respect to water, respectively). These findings are consistent with known oxidation products of isoprene. Using threshold droplet growth analysis, the CCN activation kinetics of isoprene SOA was determined to be similar to pure ammonium sulfate aerosol.

  6. Dioxo-Fluoroalkoxide Tungsten(VI) Complexes for Growth of WOx Thin Films by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Bonsu, Richard O; Kim, Hankook; O'Donohue, Christopher; Korotkov, Roman Y; Abboud, Khalil A; Anderson, Timothy J; McElwee-White, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    The soluble bis(fluoroalkoxide) dioxo tungsten(VI) complexes WO2(OR)2(DME) [1, R = C(CF3)2CH3; 2, R = C(CF3)3] have been synthesized by alkoxide-chloride metathesis and evaluated as precursors for aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of WOx. The (1)H NMR and (19)F NMR spectra of 1 and 2 are consistent with an equilibrium between the dimethoxyethane (DME) complexes 1 and 2 and the solvato complexes WO2(OR)2(CD3CN)2 [1b, R = C(CF3)2CH3; 2b, R = C(CF3)3] in acetonitrile-d3 solution. Studies of the fragmentation of 1 and 2 by mass spectrometry and thermolysis resulted in observation of DME and the corresponding alcohols, with hexafluoroisobutylene also generated from 1. DFT calculations on possible decomposition mechanisms for 1 located pathways for hydrogen abstraction by a terminal oxo to form hexafluoroisobutylene, followed by dimerization of the resulting terminal hydroxide complex and dissociation of the alcohol. AACVD using 1 occurred between 100 and 550 °C and produced both substoichiometric amorphous WOx and a polycrystalline W18O49 monoclinic phase, which exhibits 1-D preferred growth in the [010] direction. The work function (4.9-5.6 eV), mean optical transmittance (39.1-91.1%), conductivity (0.4-2.3 S/cm), and surface roughness (3.4-7.9 nm) of the WOx films are suitable for charge injection layers in organic electronics. PMID:26172992

  7. Control of binder viscosity and hygroscopicity on particle aggregation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Delmelle, Pierre; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    In the course of explosive volcanic eruptions, large amounts of ash are released into the atmosphere and may subsequently pose a threat to infrastructure, such as aviation industry. Ash plume forecasting is therefore a crucial tool for volcanic hazard mitigation but may be significantly affected by aggregation, altering the aerodynamic properties of particles. Models struggle with the implementation of aggregation since external conditions promoting aggregation have not been completely understood; in a previous study we have shown the rapid generation of ash aggregates through liquid bonding via the use of fluidization bed technology and further defined humidity and temperature ranges necessary to trigger aggregation. Salt (NaCl) was required for the recovery of stable aggregates, acting as a cementation agent and granting aggregate cohesion. A numerical model was used to explain the physics behind particle aggregation mechanisms and further predicted a dependency of aggregation efficiency on liquid binder viscosity. In this study we proof the effect of viscosity on particle aggregation. HCl and H2SO4 solutions were diluted to various concentrations resulting in viscosities between 1 and 2 mPas. Phonolitic and rhyolitic ash samples as well as soda-lime glass beads (serving as analogue material) were fluidized in the ProCell Lab® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH and treated with the acids via a bottom-spray technique. Chemically driven interaction between acid liquids and surfaces of the three used materials led to crystal precipitation. Salt crystals (e.g. NaCl) have been confirmed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leachate analysis. Both volcanic ash samples as well as the glass beads showed a clear dependency of aggregation efficiency on viscosity of the sprayed HCl solution. Spraying H2SO4 provoked a collapse of the fluidized bed and no aggregation has been observed. This is accounted by the high hygroscopicity of H2SO4. Dissolving CaCl2 (known to be

  8. Aging of secondary organic aerosol generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene: effects of ozone, light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Formenti, P.; Picquet-Varrault, B.; Camredon, M.; Pangui, E.; Zapf, P.; Katrib, Y.; Giorio, C.; Tapparo, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Monod, A.; Aumont, B.; Doussin, J. F.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in the CESAM simulation chamber to investigate the evolution of the physical and chemical properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) during different forcing. The present experiments represent a first attempt to comprehensively investigate the influence of oxidative processing, photochemistry, and diurnal temperature cycling upon SOA properties. SOA generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene were exposed to (1) elevated ozone concentrations, (2) light (under controlled temperature conditions), or (3) light and heat (6 °C light-induced temperature increase), and the resultant changes in SOA optical properties (i.e. absorption and scattering), hygroscopicity and chemical composition were measured using a suite of instrumentation interfaced to the CESAM chamber. The complex refractive index (CRI) was derived from integrated nephelometer measurements at 525 nm wavelength, using Mie scattering calculations and measured number size distributions. The particle size growth factor (GF) was measured with a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA). An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was used for the determination of the f44 / f43 and O : C ratio of the particles bulk. No change in SOA size or chemical composition was observed during O3 and light exposure at constant temperature; in addition, GF and CRI of the SOA remained constant with forcing. By contrast, illumination of the SOA in the absence of temperature control led to an increase in the real part of the CRI from 1.35 (±0.03) to 1.49 (±0.03), an increase of the GF from 1.04 (±0.02) to 1.14 (±0.02) and an increase of the f44 / f43 ratio from 1.73 (±0.03) to 2.23 (±0.03). These surprising results suggest that SOA properties may be governed more by local temperature fluctuations than by oxidative processing and photochemistry.

  9. Studies on the effect of polymer coating on solution grown hygroscopic non-linear optical single crystal of L-lysine monohydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Rani, Neelam; Vijayan, N; Maurya, K K; Haranath, D; Saini, Parveen; Rathi, Brijesh; Wahab, M A; Bhagavanarayana, G

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical single crystals are getting attention because of its enormous applications in the area of fiber optic communication and optical signal processing. In this article, we are reporting the single crystal growth of l-lysine monohydrochloride by slow evaporation solution growth technique, by using double distilled water as the solvent. We found that the grown single crystal is bulk in size and fairly transparent. But after a period of time, due to its hygroscopic nature, the transparency is completely vanished and became opaque. Then we have attempted to coat the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer on the surface of l-lysine monohydrochloride (l-LMHCL) single crystal by dip coating method. This polymer coating is giving resistance to hygroscopic nature and also acting as thin protective covering layer without affecting the other properties. Then we have systematically studied the different properties of bare, polymer coated and hygroscopic l-LMCHL single crystals. Its crystalline perfection was examined by high resolution X-ray diffractometer and found major differences in crystalline quality. Its structural and optical behavior was assessed by powder X-ray diffraction, UV-vis and luminescence analyses. PMID:22902930

  10. X-Ray Microspectroscopic Investigations of Remote Aerosol Composition and Changes in Aerosol Microstructure and Phase State upon Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Bechtel, M.; Förster, J. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Saturno, J.; Weigand, M.; Wiedemann, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate system and hydrological cycle by scattering and absorbing sunlight and affecting the formation and development of clouds and precipitation. Our research focuses on aerosols in remote regions, in order to characterize the properties and sources of natural aerosol particles and the extent of human perturbations of the aerosol burden. The phase and mixing state of atmospheric aerosols, and particularly their hygroscopic response to relative humidity (RH) variations, is a central determinant of their atmospheric life cycle and impacts. We present an investigation using X-ray microspectroscopy on submicrometer aerosols under variable RH conditions, showing in situ changes in morphology, microstructure, and phase state upon humidity cycling. We applied Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) under variable RH conditions to standard aerosols for a validation of the experimental approach and to internally mixed aerosol particles from the Amazonian rain forest collected during periods with anthropogenic pollution. The measurements were conducted at X-ray microscopes at the synchrotron facilities Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley, USA, and BESSY II in Berlin, Germany. Upon hydration, we observed substantial and reproducible changes in microstructure of the Amazonian particles (internal mixture of secondary organic material, ammoniated sulfate, and soot), which appear as mainly driven by efflorescence and recrystallization of sulfate salts. Multiple solid and liquid phases were found to coexist, especially in intermediate humidity regimes (60-80% RH). This shows that X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH is a valuable technique to analyze the hygroscopic response of individual ambient aerosol particles. Our initial results underline that RH changes can trigger strong particle restructuring, in agreement with previous studies on

  11. Anisotropically functionalized carbon nanotube array based hygroscopic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Ge, Liehui; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Hart, Amelia H C; Yang, Hyunseung; Sridhar, Srividya; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2014-07-01

    Creating ordered microstructures with hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties that enable the collection and storage of small water droplets from the atmosphere, mimicking structures that exist in insects, such as the Stenocara beetle, which live in environments with limited amounts of water. Inspired by this approach, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube forests (NTFs) are asymmetrically end-functionalized to create hygroscopic scaffolds for water harvesting and storage from atmospheric air. One side of the NTF is made hydrophilic, which captures water from the atmosphere, and the other side is made superhydrophobic, which prevents water from escaping and the forest from collapsing. To understand how water penetrates into the NTF, the fundamentals of water/NTF surface interaction are discussed. PMID:24896731

  12. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  13. Hygroscopic particle behavior studied by interdigitated array microelectrode impedance sensors.

    PubMed

    Schindelholz, Eric; Tsui, Lok-kun; Kelly, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of soluble salts bears importance in many research fields including atmospheric sciences, corrosion, porous building materials, and pharmaceuticals. Several methods have been used to study deliquescence (solid to liquid) and efflorescence (liquid to solid) phase transitions of these salts. In this study, we measured the deliquescence and efflorescence RH values of single salt microparticles deposited on an interdigitated microelectrode sensor via electrical impedance. The salts examined were NaCl, LiCl, NaBr, KCl, and MgCl2. Measured values were in agreement with in situ optical microscopic observations and, with the exception of MgCl2, literature values. In the case of MgCl2, deliquescence occurred at 33% RH and 12-15% RH, with the latter range being previously unreported. The depressed deliquescence RH was hypothesized to be a result of the formation of a metastable MgCl2 hydrate. Incomplete efflorescence of MgCl2 was also observed after exposure to <1.5% RH for up to 22 h due to formation of solid shells which trapped fluid. The phenomena elucidated by these results provide an explanation for the anomalous water retention and uptake behavior of MgCl2 below 33% RH reported elsewhere in the literature. The results presented in this study validate the use of this method as an alternative or complementary method for study of bulk-phase transitions of substrate-deposited particles across a broad RH range. These findings also demonstrate the utility of this method for detection of fluid trapping which cannot be directly ascertained by gravimetric and line-of-sight techniques commonly used in the study of hygroscopic particles.

  14. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface. PMID:26651017

  15. The Hygroscopic Condenser Humidifier. A new device for general use in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C

    1979-01-01

    The design and performance of the Hygroscopic Condenser Humidifier (HCH) are described. In principle the HCH consists of two parts, a conventional Heat-Moisture-Exchanger (HME) and a hygroscopic unit. The hygroscopic action is shown to improve the water retention efficiency of the device by about a factor of two as compared with optimal HME designs. As a result, humidification levels corresponding to around 80% relative humidity at 37 degrees C are obtained in the trachea and this is also achieved when completely dry gases are delivered to the patient. The unit can therefore be used for all procedures in anaesthesia and in intensive care. PMID:539642

  16. Physical and Optical/Radiative Characteristics of Aerosol and Cloud Particles in Tropical Cirrus: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; Foster, T. C.; Hallett, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the relative importance of the cloud shortwave albedo effect and the cloud thermal greenhouse effect. Both are determined by the distribution of ice condensate with cloud particle size. The microphysics instrument package flown aboard the NASA DC-8 in TOGA/COARE included an ice crystal replicator, a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe. In combination, the electro-optical instruments permitted particle size measurements between 0.5 micrometer and 2.6 millimeter diameter. Ice crystal replicas were used to validate signals from the electrooptical instruments. Both optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to analyze aerosol and ice particle replicas between 0.1 micrometer and several 100 micrometer diameter. In first approximation, the combined aerosol-cloud particle spectrum in several clouds followed a power law N alpha D(sup -2.5). Thus, large cloud particles carried most of the condensate mass, while small cloud and aerosol particles determined the surface area. The mechanism of formation of small particles is growth of (hygroscopic, possibly ocean-derived) aerosol particles along the Kohler curves. The concentration of small particles is higher and less variable in space and time, and their tropospheric residence time is longer, than those of large cloud particles because of lower sedimentation velocities. Small particles shift effective cloud particle radii to sizes much smaller than the mean diameter of the cloud particles. This causes an increase in shortwave reflectivity and IR emissivity, and a decrease in transmissivity. Occasionally, the cloud reflectivity increased with altitude (decreasing temperature) stronger than did cloud emissivity, yielding enhanced radiative cooling at higher altitudes. Thus, cirrus produced by deep convection in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm

  17. A modeling study of the aerosol effects on ice microphysics in convective cloud and precipitation development under different thermodynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hannah; Yum, Seong Soo; Lee, Seoung-Soo

    2014-08-01

    An improved approach for cloud droplet activation process parameterization is proposed that can utilize the empirically determined hygroscopicity information and practically limit the sizes of newly activated droplets. With the implementation of the improved approach in a cloud model, the aerosol effects on ice microphysics in convective cloud and precipitation development under different thermodynamic conditions is investigated. The model is run for four different thermodynamic soundings and three different aerosol types, maritime (M), continental (C) and polluted (P). Warm rain suppression by increased aerosol (i.e., CCN) is clearly demonstrated when weakly convective warm clouds are generated but the results are mixed when relatively stronger convective warm clouds are generated. For one of the two soundings that generate strong convective cold clouds, the accumulated precipitation amount is larger for C and P than for M, demonstrating the precipitation enhancement by increased CCN. For the maritime cloud, precipitation is initiated by the warm rain processes but ice hydrometeor particles form fast, which leads to early but weak cloud invigoration. Another stronger cloud invigoration occurs later for M but it is still weaker than that for C and P. It is the delayed accumulation of more water drops and ice particles for a burst of riming process and the latent heat release during the depositional growth of rimed ice particles that invigorate the cloud strongly for C and P. For the other sounding where freezing level is low, ice particles form fast for all three aerosol types and therefore warm rain suppression is not clearly shown. However, there still is more precipitation for C and P than for M until the accumulated precipitation amount becomes larger for M than for C near to the end of the model run. The results demonstrate that the precipitation response to aerosols indeed depends on the environmental conditions.

  18. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Kollias, Pavlos; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Breed, Daniel W.

    2007-07-01

    Giant hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes was observed using an instrumented aircraft making 16 transects of the plumes. The cloud drop size distribution width increased in the plumes due to an increased number of small cloud drops (3-5 μm) on the earlier transects and a 5-fold increase in the number of large drops (20-40 μm) relative to the background cloud 30 minutes later. The cloud effective diameter increased from about 11 μm in the background to 13 μm in the plumes. Although the giant nuclei were only a small fraction of the total aerosols produced by the flares, they dominated the cloud response. The merit of the seeding approach for controlled observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus was demonstrated.

  19. Hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of latewood cell wall micropillars reveal ultrastructural anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Stiefel, Michael; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Mokso, Rajmund; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We document the hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of the central and the thickest secondary cell wall layer of wood (named S2) in response to changes in environmental humidity using synchrotron radiation-based phase contrast X-ray tomographic nanoscopy. The S2 layer is a natural fibre-reinforced nano-composite polymer and is strongly reactive to water. Using focused ion beam, micropillars with a cross section of few micrometres are fabricated from the S2 layer of the latewood cell walls of Norway spruce softwood. The thin neighbouring cell wall layers are removed to prevent hindering or restraining of moisture-induced deformation during swelling or shrinkage. The proposed experiment intended to get further insights into the microscopic origin of the anisotropic hygro-expansion of wood. It is found that the swelling/shrinkage strains are highly anisotropic in the transverse plane of the cell wall, larger in the normal than in the direction parallel to the cell wall's thickness. This ultrastructural anisotropy may be due to the concentric lamellation of the cellulose microfibrils as the role of the cellulose microfibril angle in the transverse swelling anisotropy is negligible. The volumetric swelling of the cell wall material is found to be substantially larger than the one of wood tissues within the growth ring and wood samples made of several growth rings. The hierarchical configuration in wood optimally increases its dimensional stability in response to a humid environment with higher scales of complexity. PMID:24671938

  20. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short

  1. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lack, Daniel A.; Liao, Jin; Markovic, Milos Z.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Perring, Anne E.; Richardson, Matthews S.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Welti, Andre; Ziemba, Luke D.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013 in the southeastern United States (US). Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed-layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation in these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ˜ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental air masses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 µm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  2. Impact of new particle formation on the concentrations of aerosol number and cloud condensation nuclei around Beijing

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Wiedensohler, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-10-13

    New particle formation (NPF) is one of the most important processes in controlling the concentrations of aerosol number (condensation nuclei, CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. In this study, we introduced a new aerosol model representation with 20 size bins between 1 nm and 10 {mu}m and activation-type and kinetic nucleation parameterizations into the WRF-chem model (called NPF-explicit WRF-chem). Model calculations were conducted in the Beijing region in China for the periods during the CARE-Beijing 2006 campaign conducted in August and September 2006. Model calculations successfully reproduced the timing of NPF and no-NPF days in the measurements (21 of 26 days). Model calculations also reproduced the subsequent rapid growth of new particles with a time scale of half a day. These results suggest that once a reasonable nucleation rate at a diameter of 1 nm is given, explicit calculations of condensation and coagulation processes can reproduce the clear contrast between NPF and no-NPF days as well as further growth up to several tens nanometers. With this reasonable representation of the NPF process, we show that NPF contributed 20-30% of CN concentrations (> 10 nm in diameter) in and around Beijing on average. We also show that NPF increases CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (S > 0.2%), while it decreases them at lower supersaturations (S < 0.1%). This is likely because NPF suppresses the increases in both the size and hygroscopicity of pre-existing particles through the competition of condensable gases between new particles and pre-existing particles. Sensitivity calculations show that a reduction of primary aerosol emissions, such as black carbon (BC), would not necessarily decrease CCN concentrations because of an increase in NPF. Sensitivity calculations also suggest that the reduction ratio of primary aerosol and SO2 emissions will be key in enhancing or damping the BC mitigation effect.

  3. Thermochemical, cloud condensation nucleation ability and optical properties of alkyl aminium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, A.; Bluvshtein, N.; Segre, E.; Segev, L.; Flores, J.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The increased interest in the chemistry of alkylamines and their possible roles in the atmosphere increased recently due to field observations of the correlation between new particle formation and post nucleation growth events and the presence of alkylamines in their cationic form. Due to their high saturation vapor pressure it is unlikely that short chain alkylamines will contribute to particle formation or growth by condensation. Therefore, it was previously suggested that their contribution to particulate phase is the result of acid-base reactions between the basic alkylamines and atmospherically relevant acids such as sulfuric and nitric acid. In this study we present laboratory data on the thermochemical, CCN activity and optical properties of selected atmospherically relevant alkyl aminium sulfate salts: Monomethyl aminium sulfate (MMAS), dimethyaminium sulfate (DMAS), trimethylaminium sulfate, monoethylaminium sulfate (MEAS), diethylaminium sulfate (DEAS) and triethylaminium sulfate (TEAS)). We found that the vapor pressure of these aminium salts is 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonium sulfate and as such they can contribute to new aerosols and secondary aerosols formation. We infer that these species have very high CCN activity, with hygroscopicity parameter that is lower but close to that ammonium sulfate. Finally, we present the optical properties of these alkyl aminium sulfate salts between 360 and 420 nm. These compounds are less scattering than ammonium sulfate and show minimal wavelength dependence in this range. These compounds also do not absorb light. These derived parameters can contribute to the better understanding and characterization of the role that these compounds play in atmospheric chemical reactions, gas-solid partitioning and their possible contribution to the microphysical and radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  4. Spatio-temporal variations of optical properties of aerosols in East Asia measured by MODIS and relation to the ground-based mass concentrations observed in central Korea during 2001˜2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Chung, Yong-Seung; Kim, Joon-Tae

    2014-02-01

    Long-term variations and trends of atmospheric aerosols in the East Asian region were analyzed by using aerosol optical depth (AOD or τ), and ångström exponent (AE or α) obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from 2001 to 2010. The increased emission of anthropogenic fine aerosols in east China resulted in the high AOD in this region during summer. The steady increasing emission of anthropogenic fine aerosols caused an increasing trend of AOD in east China, and the large-scale transport of sandstorms and smoke plume caused by forest fires affected intense inter-annual variations of AOD in the East Asian region. While in the central part of South Korea, located in the lee side of the East Asian continent, AE tended to rise to a level higher than in east China, the ground-based mass concentrations continued to decline. A noticeable decrease of PM10 mass concentration in spring and winter in central Korea is most likely attributable to decreases in sandstorms in the source region of East Asia. However, the ratio of PM2.5 mass concentration to PM10 increases overall with a high level in summer. Aerosol types were classified into dust, smoke plume, and sulphate by using satellite data over Cheongwon in central Korea. The columnar AOD, with different aerosol types, was compared with the ground-based mass concentrations at Cheongwon, and the relatively high level of the correlations presented between PM2.5 and AOD produced in sulphate. Growth and increases of fine hygroscopic aerosols generated as gas-to-particle conversion particularly in summer contribute to increases of columnar AOD in the East Asian region.

  5. Characterizing ultrafine particle growth at a pine forest site influenced by anthropogenic pollution during BEACHON-RoMBAS-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Hodzic, A.; Smith, J. N.; Ortega, J. V.; de Foy, B.

    2013-12-01

    suggest that anthropogenic SO2 trigger APEs, and that the condensation of monoterpene oxidation products onto freshly nucleated particles drives their growth. The simulated growth rate is 1.2 nm/hr which is comparable with 2 nm/hr in the measurement. Comparing with a sensitivity test excluding nucleation process in the model, model calculations with AN show the presence of APEs in the forest area tends to modify the composition of small aerosols (<100nm), leading to 2.3 times higher values of sulfate aerosols.Therefore, the predicted volume-averaged hygroscopicity parameter and CCN concentration are significantly influenced.

  6. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  7. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  8. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Day, D E; Malm, W C; Kreidenweis, S M

    2000-05-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric fine aerosol was investigated at a rural site in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park during July and August 1995. Passing the sample aerosol through an inlet, which housed an array of Perma Pure diffusion dryers, controlled the sample aerosol's relative humidity (RH). After conditioning the aerosol sample in the inlet, the light scattering coefficient and the aerosol size distribution were simultaneously measured. During this study, the conditioned aerosol's humidity ranged between 5% < RH < 95%. Aerosol response curves were produced using the ratio bspw/bspd; where bspw is the scattering coefficient measured at some RH greater than 20% and bspd is the scattering coefficient of the "dry" aerosol. For this work, any sample RH values below 15% were considered dry. Results of this investigation showed that the light scattering ratio increased continuously and smoothly over the entire range of relative humidity. The magnitude of the ratio at a particular RH value, however, varied considerably in time, particularly for RH values greater than approximately 60%. Curves of the scattering coefficient ratios as a function of RH were generated for each day and compared to the average 12-hour chemical composition of the aerosol. This comparison showed that for any particular RH value the ratio was highest during time periods of high sulfate concentrations and lowest during time periods of high soil or high organic carbon concentrations.

  9. Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 2. Three-dimensional Eulerian studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Matthew James; Wang, Chien; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2009-05-01

    Global-scale models of atmospheric chemistry (GACMs) "mix" biomass burning emissions into grid boxes with horizontal scales of 10-200 km. This ignores the complex nonlinear transformations that take place in the young smoke plumes. Here we use a new gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry model called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP) and a 3-D Eulerian smoke plume model to simulate the fluid dynamics, radiative transfer, gas-phase chemistry, and aerosol-phase chemistry of the Timbavati smoke plume observed during SAFARI 2000. We then compare the results of the 3-D plume model with those of an Eulerian box model, which is used as an analog for the large grid boxes of GACMs. The 3-D plume model matched the observed plume injection height but required a large minimum horizontal diffusion coefficient to match the observed horizontal dispersion of the plume. Absorption and scattering by smoke aerosols reduced the modeled photolysis rates in the plume by 10-20%. Increasing the heterogeneous production of HONO and H2SO4 in the model and including uncharacterized organic species using monoterpenes as a proxy compound improves the model-observation match. Direct measurements of OH in the smoke plumes would be an excellent way to determine if heterogeneous production of HONO is taking place. The automatic dilution of smoke plume emissions into the large grid boxes of global models can result in large errors in predicted concentrations of O3, NOx and aerosol species downwind. We discuss several potential approaches that could reduce these errors.

  10. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  11. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  12. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  13. Hygroscopic weight gain of pollen grains from Juniperus species.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Landon D; Levetin, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    Juniperus pollen is highly allergenic and is produced in large quantities across Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. The pollen negatively affects human populations adjacent to the trees, and since it can be transported hundreds of kilometers by the wind, it also affects people who are far from the source. Predicting and tracking long-distance transport of pollen is difficult and complex. One parameter that has been understudied is the hygroscopic weight gain of pollen. It is believed that juniper pollen gains weight as humidity increases which could affect settling rate of pollen and thus affect pollen transport. This study was undertaken to examine how changes in relative humidity affect pollen weight, diameter, and settling rate. Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, and Juniperus pinchotii pollen were applied to greased microscope slides and placed in incubation chambers under a range of temperature and humidity levels. Pollen on slides were weighed using an analytical balance at 2- and 6-h intervals. The size of the pollen was also measured in order to calculate settling rate using Stokes' Law. All pollen types gained weight as humidity increased. The greatest settling rate increase was exhibited by J. pinchotii which increased by 24 %.

  14. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically active awns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to humidity change of the surroundings. The seeds of Pelargonium species have hygroscopically active awns that play a critical role in the dispersal from the parent plant and burial in soil. While the awn uncoils to a linear shape in a highly humid condition, it recoils to a helical shape when dry. The rotation is driven by the structure of the cell walls that are comprised of cellulose microfibers aligned in a tilted helix. During uncoiling of the awn, the revolving tail generates thrust to burrow into soil, so that the seed is self-buried. We present the direct observation of the self-burial of the seed with the thrust into a soft substrate being measured at the same time. The elastica theory allows us to rationalize this botanical digging mechanics using the structural deformations of the hygroexpansive tissues. This work was supported by the Sogang University Research Grant of 2013 (201310009.01) and the National Research Foundation of Korea (grant no. 2012-008023).

  15. Review on hygroscopic aging of cellulose fibres and their biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mokhothu, Thabang H; John, Maya Jacob

    2015-10-20

    This review presents critical literature on effects of humidity and temperature on the properties of natural fibres and its composites. The drawback of moisture absorption on the mechanical properties of natural fibre and its composites is evaluated. Numerous researchers have been working to address the moisture absorption issue, with specific attention paid to the surface treatment of fibres and refining the fibre-matrix interface. Because of the natural fibre's positive commercial and environmental outcomes, as well as their desirable properties such as high specific strength, natural fibre reinforced composites are displaying a good potential to be used in various applications such as automotive, aerospace and packaging. This review addresses a comprehensive survey on hygroscopic factors (long term environmental aging) affecting natural fibres and their performance as reinforcement in polymer composites. The effects of cellulose surface chemistry and topography on hydrophobicity are addressed. Furthermore, the review also addresses the progress in the development of superhydrophobic materials based on cellulose material for better moisture resistance. In addition, recent investigations dealing with bio-based coatings prepared from renewable resources are also discussed.

  16. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically responsive awns.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to environmental changes in humidity. The seeds of Erodium and Pelargonium have hygroscopically responsive awns that play a critical role in their self-burial into soil. The awn, coiled in a dry state, uncoils to stretch linearly under highly humid condition because of a tilted arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in one of the layers of the awn's bilayered structure. By measuring the mechanical characteristics of the awns of Pelargonium carnosum, we find that the extensional force of the awn can be aptly modeled by the theory of elasticity for a coiled spring. We further show that although the resistance to the seed-head penetrating relatively coarse soils without spinning is large enough to block the digging seed, the rotation of the seed greatly reduces the soil's resistance down to a level the awn can easily overcome. Our mechanical analysis reveals that the self-burial of the seed is a sophisticated outcome of the helically coiled configuration of the awn. PMID:24760793

  17. Influence of Aerosol Chemical Composition on Heterogeneous Ice Formation under Mid-Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Chou, C.; Abbatt, J.; Stetzer, O.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosols are involved in cooling/warming the atmosphere directly via interaction with incoming solar radiation (aerosol direct effect), or via their ability to act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei (IN) and thus play a role in cloud formation (indirect effect). In particular, the physical properties of aerosols such as size and solubility and chemical composition can influence their behavior and fate in the atmosphere. Ice nucleation taking place via IN is termed as heterogeneous ice nucleation and can take place with via deposition (ice forming on IN directly from the vapor phase), condensation/immersion (freezing via formation of the liquid phase on IN) or condensation (IN colliding with supercooled liquid drops). This presentation shows how the chemical composition and surface area of various tropospherically relevant aerosols influence conditions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) required for heterogeneous ice formation conditions in the mid-upper troposphere regime (253 - 220K)? Motivation for this comes first from, the importance of being able to predict ice formation accurately so as to understand the hydrological cycle since the ice is the primary initiator of precipitation forming clouds. Second, the tropospheric budget of water vapour, an especially active greenhouse gas is strongly influenced by ice nucleation and growth. Third, ice surfaces in the atmosphere act as heterogeneous surfaces for chemical reactions of trace gases (e.g., SO2, O3, NOx and therefore being able to accurately estimate ice formation rates and quantify ice surface concentrations will allow a more accurate calculation of trace gas budgets in the troposphere. Ice nucleation measurements were conducted using a self-developed continuous flow diffusion chamber and static chamber. A number of tropospherically relevant particulates with naturally-varying and laboratory-modified surface chemistry/structure were investigated for their ice formation efficiency based on highest

  18. Study on optical and microphysical properties of mixed aerosols from lidar during the EMEP 2012 summer campaign at 45oN 26oE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Nicolae, Doina; Belegante, Livio; Marmureanu, Luminita

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols optical and chemical properties in the upper layers of the atmosphere and near ground are variable, as function of the different mixtures of aerosol components resulting from their origin and transport over polluted areas. Due to a complex dynamics of air masses, the Romanian atmosphere has strong influences from dust and biomass-burning transported from South, West or East Europe. The dominant transport, and consequently the dominant aerosol type, depends on the season. As a result of the transport distance from the source and depending on the chemical and physical characteristics of the particles, tropospheric aerosols detected at Magurele, Romania, show different optical and microphysical properties than at the originating source. The differences are caused by the mixing with local particles, and also by the ageing processes and hygroscopic growth during the transport. This paper presents a statistical analysis of tropospheric aerosol optical properties during the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) summer campaign (08 June - 17 July 2012), as retrieved from multiwavelength Raman and depolarization lidar data. Three elastic (1064, 532 and 355 nm), two Raman (607 and 387 nm) and one depolarization channel (532 nm parallel / 532 nm cross) are used to independently retrieve the backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols between 0.8 and 10 km altitude. Intensive optical parameters (Angstrom exponent, color ratios and color indexes) and microphysical parameters (effective radius, complex refractive index) from multiwavelength optical data inversion of the layer mean values are obtained. During the campaign, aerosol profiles were measured daily around sunset, following EARLINET standards. An intensive 3-days continuous measurements exercise was also performed. Layers were generally present above 2 km and bellow 6 km altitude, but descent of air masses from the free troposphere to the

  19. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  20. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  1. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each

  2. UManSysProp: An online and open-source facility for molecular property prediction and atmospheric aerosol calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Barley, Mark; McFiggans, Gordon; Aumont, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The many thousands of individual aerosol components ensure that explicit manual calculation of properties that influence their environmental impacts is laborious and time-consuming. The emergence of explicit automatic mechanism generation techniques, including up to many millions of individual gas phase products as aerosol precursors, renders manual calculations impossible and automation is necessary. It can be difficult to establish what factors are responsible for the outcome of a model prediction. This is particularly true when the number of components might be high in, for example, SOA mass partitioning simulations. It then becomes difficult for others in the community to assess the results presented. This might be complicated by the need to include pure component vapour pressures or activity coefficient predictions for a wide range of highly multifunctional compounds. It isn't clear to what extent replication of results is ever achieved for a range of aerosol simulations. Whilst this might also be an issue with results from instrumentation, the development of community driven software at least enables modellers to tackle this problem directly. Here we describe the development and application of a new web based facility, UManSysProp, to tackle such issues. Current facilities include: pure component vapour pressures, critical properties and sub-cooled densities of organic molecules; activity coefficient predictions for mixed inorganic-organic liquid systems; hygroscopic growth factors and CCN activation potential of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles with associated Kappa-Kohler values; absorptive partitioning calculations with/without a treatment of non-ideality. The website can be found here: http://umansysprop.seaes.manchester.ac.uk/

  3. Impeded ice nucleation in glassy and highly viscous aerosol particles: the role of water diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2010-05-01

    In situ and remote observations in the upper troposphere have disclosed the existence of water vapor pressures up to and even above water saturation. Under such conditions ice particle formation by homogeneous nucleation is expected to set in followed by ice crystal growth until the supersaturation is consumed. While the highest measured water vapor values might not withstand rigorous quality checks, values up to water saturation seem to be occurring. Since air masses appear to contain sufficient numbers of aerosol particles for cloud formation, the question arises why these aerosols are not successful at nucleating ice. The atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. The homogeneous ice nucleation threshold was established for atmospherically relevant salt solutions and sulfuric acid, but only for a few organic species. The organic aerosol fraction tends to remain liquid instead of crystallizing as the temperature is decreased and, thus, organic aerosol particles may form highly viscous liquids. When the viscosity of such liquids reaches values in the order of 1012 Pa s, the molecular motion becomes so slow, that the sample vitrifies at the glass transition temperature Tg. If aerosol particles were present as glasses, this would influence several physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere significantly: Water uptake from the gas phase would be drastically impeded and ice nucleation inhibited. We investigated the glass transition temperature of a series of aqueous organic solutions such as polyols, sugars and dicarboxylic acids as a function of the solute concentration using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These measurements show that the higher the molar mass of the organic solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. Aerosol particles containing larger (≥150 g mol-1) organic molecules

  4. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  5. Aerosol vertical distribution over east China from RIEMS-Chem simulation in comparison with CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Han, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    hygroscopic growth and consequently AEC increase.

  6. Lung deposition analyses of inhaled toxic aerosols in conventional and less harmful cigarette smoke: a review.

    PubMed

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu

    2013-09-23

    Inhaled toxic aerosols of conventional cigarette smoke may impact not only the health of smokers, but also those exposed to second-stream smoke, especially children. Thus, less harmful cigarettes (LHCs), also called potential reduced exposure products (PREPs), or modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) have been designed by tobacco manufacturers to focus on the reduction of the concentration of carcinogenic components and toxicants in tobacco. However, some studies have pointed out that the new cigarette products may be actually more harmful than the conventional ones due to variations in puffing or post-puffing behavior, different physical and chemical characteristics of inhaled toxic aerosols, and longer exposure conditions. In order to understand the toxicological impact of tobacco smoke, it is essential for scientists, engineers and manufacturers to develop experiments, clinical investigations, and predictive numerical models for tracking the intake and deposition of toxicants of both LHCs and conventional cigarettes. Furthermore, to link inhaled toxicants to lung and other diseases, it is necessary to determine the physical mechanisms and parameters that have significant impacts on droplet/vapor transport and deposition. Complex mechanisms include droplet coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, vapor formation and changes in composition. Of interest are also different puffing behavior, smoke inlet conditions, subject geometries, and mass transfer of deposited material into systemic regions. This review article is intended to serve as an overview of contributions mainly published between 2009 and 2013, focusing on the potential health risks of toxicants in cigarette smoke, progress made in different approaches of impact analyses for inhaled toxic aerosols, as well as challenges and future directions.

  7. New real-time technique to measure the size distribution of water-insoluble aerosols.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Roby; Bergin, Michael H; Carrico, Christian M; Grant, Don

    <