Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol imager cai

  1. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  2. Retrieval of UV Aerosol Index using backscattered monochromatic radiance measured by GOSAT CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Park, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    UV Aerosol Index(AI) using backscattered radiance at a single channel has been retrieved. In the current UV AI algorithm, two UV channels are used to contrast the absorbing aerosol loaded atmosphere to Rayleigh scattering condition. There have been needs to retrieve information of absorbing aerosol from a single UV channel, such as GOSAT CAI. 30-day minimum composite method, however, makes the process possible to construct the condition with the use of only single UV channel. Also, absorption by aerosol changes with respect to AOD and wavelength for different aerosol types. Therefore, single channel aerosol index(SAI) can detect absorbing aerosol qualitatively. Correlation coefficient of SAI to current UV AI indicate significant value, showing possibility of detecting highly absorbing aerosols. The application of a cloud screening makes the presence of absorbing aerosols even more clear. Radiative transfer calculations using VLIDORT were performed to test the sensitivity of SAI and UV AI to aerosol optical properties, showing that highly absorbing aerosol results in meaningful SAI. Results from dust case study in East Asia show reasonable performance of SAI for the region with single scattering albedo below 0.90. This study concludes with a comparison of SAI from GOSAT lv.1b data to OMI UVAI data, where reasonable agreement and low false detection was found for dust cases in East Asia. The SAI value of -0.2 to 0.0 from GOSAT-CAI was comparable to OMI dust threshold value of 0.7. These findings corroborate the suitability of SAI as a for detecting absorbing aerosols for satellite instrument with a single UV channel.

  3. Validation of Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties over Northeast Asia for Five Years from GOSAT TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, S.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Go, S.; Lim, H.; Goo, T. Y.; Nakajima, T.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution by look-up tables, which is used in retrieving optical properties of aerosol using inversion products from Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer observation. To improve the accuracy of aerosol algorithm, first, this algorithm considered the annually estimated radiometric degradation factor of TANSO-CAI suggested by Kuze et al. (2014). Second, surface reflectance was determined by two methods: one using the clear sky composite method from CAI measurements and the other the database from MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) surface reflectance data. At a given pixel, the surface reflectance is selected by using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) depending on season (Hsu et al., 2013). In this study, the retrieved AODs were compared with those of AERONET and MODIS dataset for different season over five years. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show reasonable agreement with correlation coefficients of 0.65 ~ 0.97 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.2 for the whole period, depending on season and sites. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show agreements with correlation coefficients of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.0, depending on season and regions. The results show reasonably good correlation, however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance of TANSO-CAI due to its 3-days revisit orbit characteristics.

  4. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  5. Skinner and CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Harry N.

    1984-01-01

    The author cites comments of B.F. Skinner supporting the benefits of carefully constructed computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs. Preliminary studies on military populations suggesting the value of CAI are discussed, as is the collection of information about software. (CL)

  6. Developing Large CAI Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jac M.; Smith, Lynn H.

    1983-01-01

    When developing large computer-assisted instructional (CAI) courseware packages, it is suggested that there be more attentive planning to the overall package design before actual lesson development is begun. This process has been simplified by modifying the systems approach used to develop single CAI lessons, followed by planning for the…

  7. Competition in Individualized CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the effects of competition and cooperation on learning through computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A questionnaire was administered to 457 Israeli fourth graders who used two CAI arithmetic systems. The characteristics of the systems are discussed, and the results of the survey are correlated to students' gender and achievement levels.…

  8. A Modular CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Mast, Charles

    The experimental CAI system which is being tested at Delft University of Technology is structured in a modular manner to account for high changeability. The concept formulated for this project was the outcome of research into technological, organizational, and educational developments in CAI, and the enumeration of the common aspects of the…

  9. Verification of new cloud discrimination algorithm using GOSAT TANSO-CAI in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishida, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) was launched in 2009 to measure the global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. GOSAT is equipped with two sensors: the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The presence of clouds in the instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV) of the FTS leads to incorrect estimates of the concentrations. Thus, the FTS data which are suspected to be cloud-contaminated must be identified using a CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and rejected. Conversely, overestimation of clouds leads to reduce the amount of the FTS data which can be used to estimate the greenhouse gases concentrations. It becomes a serious problem in the region of tropical rainforest such as the Amazon, where there are very few remaining FTS data by cloud cover. The preparation for the launch of the GOSAT-2 in fiscal 2017 has been progressing. To improve the accuracy of estimates of the greenhouse gases concentrations, we need to refine the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm. For the reason, a new cloud discrimination algorithm using support vector machines (SVM) was developed. Visual inspections can use the locally optimized thresholds, though the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm uses the common thresholds all over the world. Thus, it is certain that the accuracy of visual inspections is better than these algorithms in the limited region without areas such as ice and snow, where it is difficult to discriminate between clouds and ground surfaces. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of the new cloud discrimination algorithm by comparing with the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and visual inspections of the same CAI images in the Amazon. We will present our latest results.

  10. Global aerosol optical properties and application to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol retrieval over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-07-01

    As more information about global aerosol properties has become available from remotely sensed retrievals and in situ measurements, it is prudent to evaluate this new information, both on its own and in the context of satellite retrieval algorithms. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from global Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometer sites, we perform cluster analysis to determine aerosol type as a function of location and season. We find that three spherical-derived types (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol) and one spheroid-derived types (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally describe the range of AERONET observed global aerosol properties. The fine-dominated types are separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (ω0), ranging from nonabsorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to moderately absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We identify the dominant aerosol type at each site, and extrapolate to create seasonal 1° × 1° maps of expected aerosol types. Each aerosol type is bilognormal, with dynamic (function of optical depth) size parameters (radius, standard deviation, volume distribution) and complex refractive index. Not only are these parameters interesting in their own right, they can also be applied to aerosol retrieval algorithms, such as to aerosol retrieval over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Independent direct-Sun AERONET observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (τ) are consistent the spectral dependence of the models, indicating that our derived aerosol models are relevant.

  11. Experience with the CAIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tighe, Michael F.

    1986-01-01

    Intermetrics' experience is that the Ada package construct, which allows separation of specification and implementation allows specification of a CAIS that is transportable across varying hardware and software bases. Additionally, the CAIS is an excellent basis for providing operating system functionality to Ada applications. By allowing the Byron APSE to be moved easily from system to system, and allowing significant re-writes of underlying code. Ada and the CAIS provide portability as well as transparency to change at the application operating system interface level.

  12. Carbon, CAIs and chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. D.; Russell, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that C is present in CAI's and chondrules. It can be distinguished from matrix C both by its thermal stability and isotopic composition, which implies that it was not introduced after parent body accretion. It is concluded that C must have been present in the chondrule and CAI precursor material. Therefore any models of chondrule and CAI formation and inferences drawn about solar system conditions during these events must take into account the consequences of the presence of C on inclusion chemistry, mineralogy, and oxidation state.

  13. The CAIS 2 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue; Thall, Richard

    1986-01-01

    The Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) is a proposed MIL-STD intended to promote the portability of Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) tools written in Ada. The standardized interfaces define a virtual operating system, from which portable tools derive their basic services, e.g., file management, input/output, communications, and process control. In the Ada world, such a virtual operating system is called a Kernel Ada Programming Support Environment (KAPSE). The CAIS is a standardized interface between KAPSEs and tools. The CAIS has been proposed as a starting point for standard interfaces to be used in the NASA Software Support Environment (SSE) for the Space Station Program. The status of the CAIS standardization effort and plans for further development are described.

  14. Satellite Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imaging of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David; Macenka, Steven; Scherr, Lawrence; Seshadri, Suresh; Chipman, Russell; Keller, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A proposed remote-sensing instrument, to be carried aboard a spacecraft in orbit around the Earth, would gather data on the spatial distribution and radiative characteristics of tropospheric aerosols. These data are needed for better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic origins of aerosols, and of the effects of aerosols on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Comparison of Gosat CAI and SPOT Vgt Ndvi Data with Different Season and Land Cover in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, X.; Guo, M.; Tani, H.

    2011-08-01

    The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has become one of the most widely used indices in remote sensing applications in a variety of fields. Many studies have compared the NDVI values for different satellite sensors. Nowadays, the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) was successfully launched on January 23, 2009. It is used to monitor greenhouse gases on the Earth's surface and also has a sensor, the Cloud Aerosol Imager (CAI), that senses red and near infrared spectrums. It can also process NDVI data. Therefore, we are first compare GOSAT CAI and SPOT VGT NDVI data in different seasonal and land cover in East Asian, to explore the relationship between the two types of datasets, and to discuss the possibility of extending SPOT VGT data using GOSAT CAI NDVI data for the same area. We used GOSAT CAI Level 3 data to derive 10-day composite NDVI values for the East Asia region for November 2009 and January, April and July 2010 using the maximum value composite (MVC) method. We compared these values with 10-day composite SPOT VGT NDVI data for the same period. The results show that the correlation coefficients of regression analysis generally revealed a strong correlation between NDVI from the two sensors in November 2009 and January, April and July 2010 (0.88, 0.85, 0.77 and 0.74, respectively). The differences place may be affected by cloud cover. From the combined analysis of seasonal changes and land cover, we found that the correlations between the SPOT VGT and the GOSAT CAI NDVI data are less affected by seasonal change and the SPOT VGT data is more sensitive to high vegetation coverage than the GOSAT CAI data. In the future, through continued monitoring and processing by cloud removal technology, the accuracy of GOSAT CAI NDVI data will be further improved and thus be more widely used.

  16. The Ontario CAI Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, W. P.

    The evolution and current operation of the Ontario Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) Network are described. Sponsored by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and including 11 community colleges in Ontario, the network has computer installations and access devices throughout the province. Initial development work was done using a…

  17. Detecting Thin Cirrus in Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Davis, Matt R.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Thin cirrus clouds (optical depth (OD) < 03) are often undetected by standard cloud masking in satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms. However, the Mu]tiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol retrieval has the potential to discriminate between the scattering phase functions of cirrus and aerosols, thus separating these components. Theoretical tests show that MISR is sensitive to cirrus OD within Max{0.05 1 20%l, similar to MISR's sensitivity to aerosol OD, and MISR can distinguish between small and large crystals, even at low latitudes, where the range of scattering angles observed by MISR is smallest. Including just two cirrus components in the aerosol retrieval algorithm would capture typical MISR sensitivity to the natural range of cinus properties; in situations where cirrus is present but the retrieval comparison space lacks these components, the retrieval tends to underestimate OD. Generally, MISR can also distinguish between cirrus and common aerosol types when the proper cirrus and aerosol optical models are included in the retrieval comparison space and total column OD is >-0.2. However, in some cases, especially at low latitudes, cirrus can be mistaken for some combinations of dust and large nonabsorbing spherical aerosols, raising a caution about retrievals in dusty marine regions when cirrus is present. Comparisons of MISR with lidar and Aerosol Robotic Network show good agreement in a majority of the cases, but situations where cirrus clouds have optical depths >0.15 and are horizontally inhomogeneous on spatial scales shorter than 50 km pose difficulties for cirrus retrieval using the MISR standard aerosol algorithm..

  18. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  19. Atmospheric aerosol profiling with a bistatic imaging lidar system.

    PubMed

    Barnes, John E; Sharma, N C Parikh; Kaplan, Trevor B

    2007-05-20

    Atmospheric aerosols have been profiled using a simple, imaging, bistatic lidar system. A vertical laser beam is imaged onto a charge-coupled-device camera from the ground to the zenith with a wide-angle lens (CLidar). The altitudes are derived geometrically from the position of the camera and laser with submeter resolution near the ground. The system requires no overlap correction needed in monostatic lidar systems and needs a much smaller dynamic range. Nighttime measurements of both molecular and aerosol scattering were made at Mauna Loa Observatory. The CLidar aerosol total scatter compares very well with a nephelometer measuring at 10 m above the ground. The results build on earlier work that compared purely molecular scattered light to theory, and detail instrument improvements.

  20. Maxi CAI with a Micro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhold, George; And Others

    This paper describes an effective microprocessor-based CAI system which has been repeatedly tested by a large number of students and edited accordingly. Tasks not suitable for microprocessor based systems (authoring, testing, and debugging) were handled on larger multi-terminal systems. This approach requires that the CAI language used on the…

  1. A CAI in the Ivuna CI1 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M.; Martinez, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Satake, W.; Le, L.; Ross, D.; Peslier, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently discovered the first well-preserved calcium aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in a CI1 chondrite (Ivuna). Previously, all CI1 chondrites were thought to be devoid of preserved CAI and chondrules due to the near total aqueous alteration to which their parent body (bodies) have been subjected. The CAI is roughly spherical, but with a slight teardrop geometry and a maximum diameter of 170 microns (fig. 1). It lacks any Wark-Lovering Rim. Incipient aqueous alteration, and probably shock, have rendered large portions of the CAI poorly crystalline. It is extremely fine-grained, with only a few grains exceeding 10 microns. We have performed electron microprobe analyses (EPMA), FEG-SEM imaging and element mapping, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) in order to determine the fundamental characteristics of this apparently unique object.

  2. Calibrated sky imager for aerosol optical properties determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Shields, J. E.; Karr, M. E.; Burden, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2008-11-01

    The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), has been tested to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440 870, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01), in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1) in 50% for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  3. Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy Imaging of Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.; Fakra, S.; Robinson, M.; Chase, K.

    2003-12-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) are used to image a diversity of carbon and metal containing items such as biofilms in soils, magnetic materials, polymers and meteorites. Studies on particles collected on SiO2 filters from biomass burns in Flagstaff, Arizona and individual aerosols collected in South Africa on TEM grids are underway at beamlines 5.3.2 and 11.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sub micron particles are imaged in the transmission mode over the energy range of 280 - 1900 eV. Spectromicroscopic studies on individual particles using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) probe multiple species within or on the same particle. In (STXM) an X-ray beam is focused with a zone plate onto a sample and the transmitted radiation is detected. Since the signal is obtained in the transmission mode, optically thin samples are required. Hence, atmospheric aerosols with submicron thickness and diameter are well suited for this method. Near edge spectra of various elements were scanned in step sizes from 0.1-0.5 eV around characteristic absorption edges, creating 2 dimensional images at each energy. While STXM images are taken with a lower spatial resolution (currently 40 nm) than microscopies such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, detailed chemical information with spatial distributions, and oxidation states is obtained. A particular focus of this work is to obtain more detailed information on the type of carbons, multiply, or singly bonded and whether or not carbon is bonded to oxygen. The ultimate goal is discrimination between organic and black carbon within individual aerosol particles and determining if organic carbon, black carbon, and metal species are distributed homogeneously throughout aerosol particles. Initial scans of the samples from Flagstaff show spectral evidence of aromatic carbon, without distinct C=O signatures. NEXAFS

  4. Determination of cloud and aerosol layers using CALIPSO and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, A. N.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.

    2008-10-01

    The height of cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere is believed to affect climate change and air pollution because both of them have important direct effects on the radiation balance of the earth. In this paper, we study the ability of Cloud Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data to detect, locate and distinguish between cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere over Peninsula Malaysia. We also used image processing technique to differentiate between cloud and aerosol layers from the CALIPSO images. The cloud and aerosol layers mostly are seen at troposphere (>10 km) and lower stratosphere (>15km). The results shows that CALIPSO can be used to determine cloud and aerosol layers and image processing technique has successfully distinguished them in the atmosphere.

  5. Teacher's Handbook for CAI Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; And Others

    The handbooks for the most widely used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) courses now available on computer terminals at the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University are presented. Handbooks are included for the following courses: Strands Drill-and-practice (arithmetic fundamentals for fourth grade), Logic…

  6. Timing Students' Answers in CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of limiting response time for students' answers focuses on a study of Israeli elementary students that investigated the effects on their performance of increasing the response time in computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for arithmetic drill and practice. Effects on high- versus low-aptitude students, and younger versus older, are…

  7. CAI in Advanced Literature Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Norman

    1981-01-01

    Ways that computer assisted instruction (CAI) can be useful in teaching English at upperclass and graduate levels are considered, with illustrations from PLATO lessons that have been composed and programmed. One lesson takes advantage of PLATO's graphic design capabilities, which enabled the teacher to design the runic figures and to show them in…

  8. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and chlorophyll concentration from multiwavelength measurement over East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chong; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Hashimoto, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    A flexible inversion algorithm is proposed for simultaneously retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration from multiwavelength observation over the ocean. In this algorithm, forward radiation calculation is performed by an accurate coupled atmosphere-ocean model with a comprehensive bio-optical ocean module. Then, a full-physical nonlinear optimization approximation approach is used to retrieve AOT and Chl. For AOT retrieval, a global three-dimensional spectral radiation-transport aerosol model is used as the a priori constraint to increase the retrieval accuracy of aerosol. To investigate the algorithm's availability, the retrieval experiment is conducted using simulated radiance data to demonstrate that the relative errors in simultaneously determining AOT and Chl can be mostly controlled to within 10% using multiwavelength and angle covering in and out of sunglint. Furthermore, the inversion results are assessed using the actual satellite observation data obtained from Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI)/Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite GOSAT and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua instruments through comparison to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol and ocean color (OC) products over East China Sea. Both the retrieved AOT and Chl compare favorably to the reported AERONET values, particularly when using the CASE 2 ocean module in turbid water, even when the retrieval is performed in the presence of high aerosol loading and sunglint. Finally, the CAI and MODIS images are used to jointly retrieve the spatial distribution of AOT and Chl in comparison to the MODIS AOT and OC products.

  9. Diurnal variation of aerosol optical depth and angstrom exponent from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) Yonsei AErosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myungje; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa

    2015-04-01

    Over the East Asia, aerosol optical properties (AOPs) can be changed very quickly and diversely during a day because mineral dust or heavy anthropogenic aerosol events occur sporadically and frequently. When severe aerosol event occurs from source region, long-range transported can be appeared over East Asia within one day so that multi-temporal satellite observation during a day is essential to detect aerosol diurnal variation in East Asia. Although it has been possible from previous meteorological sensors in geostationary earth orbit, only aerosol optical depth (AOD) at one channel can be retrieved and accuracy of retrieved AOD is worse than those of multi-channel sensors such as MODIS, SeaWiFS, or VIIRS because appropriate aerosol model selection is difficult using single channel information. The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is one of sensor onboard COMS geostationary satellite. It has 8 channels in visible, which are similar with SeaWiFS and MODIS ocean color channels. It observes East Asia, including East China, Korean Peninsula, and Japan, hourly during the daytime (8 times observation in daytime). Because of geostationary and multi-channel characteristics, accurate AOPs such as AOD and Angstrom exponent (AE) can be retrieved from GOCI Yonsei Aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm as high spatial (6 km x 6 km) and temporal (1 hour) resolution. In this study, GOCI YAER AOD and AE are compared with those from AERONET (ground-based observation) and MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target and Deep Blue algorithm (satellite-based observation) as high frequency time series during a day and few days over AERONET sites. This can show the accuracy of GOCI YAER algorithm in compare with AERONET. In specific transport cases such as dust or haze, instantaneous increase of AOD and change of aerosol size from AE can be also detect from GOCI. These GOCI YEAR products can be used effectively as input observation data of air-quality monitoring and forecasting.

  10. Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight (CXIDB ID 16)

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N. Duane

    2012-06-20

    This deposition includes the aerosol diffraction images used for phasing, fractal morphology, and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Files in this deposition are ordered in subdirectories that reflect the specifics.

  11. What Causes Uneven Aerosol Deposition in the Bronchoconstricted Lung? A Quantitative Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, Elliot Eliyahu; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, Robert Scott; Kelly, Vanessa Jane; Kone, Mamary; Katz, Ira; Martin, Andrew R.; Caillibotte, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A previous PET-CT imaging study of 14 bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects showed that peripheral aerosol deposition was highly variable among subjects and lobes. The aim of this work was to identify and quantify factors responsible for this variability. Methods: A theoretical framework was formulated to integrate four factors affecting aerosol deposition: differences in ventilation, in how air vs. aerosol distribute at each bifurcation, in the fraction of aerosol escaping feeding airways, and in the fraction of aerosol reaching the periphery that is exhaled. These factors were quantified in 12 of the subjects using PET-CT measurements of relative specific deposition sD*, relative specific ventilation sV* (measured with dynamic PET or estimated as change in expansion between two static HRCTs), average lobar expansion FVOL, and breathing frequency measured during aerosol inhalation fN. Results: The fraction of the variance of sD* explained by sV* (0.38), by bifurcation effects (0.38), and by differences in deposition along feeding airways (0.31) were similar in magnitude. We could not directly estimate the contribution of aerosol that was exhaled. Differences in expansion did not explain any fraction of the variability in sD* among lobes. The dependence of sD* on sV* was high in subjects breathing with low fN, but weakened among those breathing faster. Finally, sD*/sV* showed positive dependence on FVOL among low fN subjects, while the dependence was negative among high fN subjects. Conclusion: The theoretical framework allowed us to analyze experimentally measured aerosol deposition imaging data. When considering bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects, a dynamic measurement of ventilation is required to evaluate its effect on aerosol transport. The mechanisms behind the identified effects of fN and FVOL on aerosol deposition need further study and may have important implications for aerosol therapy in subjects with heterogeneous ventilation

  12. Evaluating CAI Material for the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Timothy M.

    The relative worth of any evaluation instrument depends on user needs and the material being evaluated. Potential users of a good computer assisted instruction (CAI) instrument include purchasers, authors, reviewers, and publishers of CAI materials. Although each user has unique needs, a good instrument will serve both to educate and discriminate,…

  13. Some "Facts" about CAI: 1976 in Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    This report presents information about the state of the art in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in 1976. This information takes the form of quantitative data (mostly frequency distributions), on the number and average completion time of CAI programs according to subject matter, author, language, instructional strategies, sources, and central…

  14. The Screen Display Syntax for CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Boyd F.; Salisbury, David F.

    1987-01-01

    Describes four storyboard techniques frequently used in designing computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs, and explains screen display syntax (SDS), a new technique combining the major advantages of the storyboard techniques. SDS was developed to facilitate communication among designers, programmers, and editors working on a large CAI basic…

  15. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Chapman, Henry N.; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  16. A unified framework for producing CAI melting, Wark-Lovering rims and bowl-shaped CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liffman, Kurt; Cuello, Nicolas; Paterson, David A.

    2016-10-01

    Calcium-Aluminium inclusions (CAIs) formed in the Solar system, some 4567 million years ago. CAIs are almost always surrounded by Wark-Lovering rims (WLRs), which are a sequence of thin, mono/bi-mineralic layers of refractory minerals, with a total thickness in the range of 1-100 microns. Recently, some CAIs have been found that have tektite-like bowl-shapes. To form such shapes, the CAI must have travelled through a rarefied gas at hypersonic speeds. We show how CAIs may have been ejected from the inner solar accretion disc via the centrifugal interaction between the solar magnetosphere and the inner disc rim. They subsequently punched through the hot, inner disc rim wall at hypersonic speeds. This re-entry heating partially or completely evaporated the CAIs. Such evaporation could have significantly increased the metal abundances of the inner disc rim. High speed movement through the inner disc produced WLRs. To match the observed thickness of WLRs required metal abundances at the inner disc wall that are of order 10 times that of standard solar abundances. The CAIs cooled as they moved away from the protosun, the deduced CAI cooling rates are consistent with the CAI cooling rates obtained from experiment and observation. The speeds and gas densities required to form bowl-shaped CAIs are also consistent with the expected speeds and gas densities for larger, ˜1 cm, CAIs punching through an inner accretion disc wall.

  17. A risk management approach to CAIS development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Hal; Kerner, Judy; Alden, Tony; Belz, Frank; Tadman, Frank

    1986-01-01

    The proposed DoD standard Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) was developed as a framework set of interfaces that will support the transportability and interoperability of tools in the support environments of the future. While the current CAIS version is a promising start toward fulfilling those goals and current prototypes provide adequate testbeds for investigations in support of completing specifications for a full CAIS, there are many reasons why the proposed CAIS might fail to become a usable product and the foundation of next-generation (1990'S) project support environments such as NASA's Space Station software support environment. The most critical threats to the viability and acceptance of the CAIS include performance issues (especially in piggybacked implementations), transportability, and security requirements. To make the situation worse, the solution to some of these threats appears to be at conflict with the solutions to others.

  18. CAIS. Condition Assessment Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Oak, J.C.

    1996-09-30

    CAIS is used by Architects and Engineers to gather facility condition assessment data. This data consist of architectural, civil, structural, electrical, and mechanical systems and components that are a part of the inspected facility. Data is collected using a hand-held, pen-based computer system which is preprogrammed for detailed inventories of individual components. The program is deficiency based for collecting data for repair and replacement observations. Observations are recorded on checklists preformatted to individual site needs, allowing for comments on unusual conditions to be documented on site. Data is transferred to a central database, where it can be reviewed, costed, and reported on using different scenarios. Information can be transferred to the DOE operations offices as well as to the DOE FIMS database for each site.

  19. Looking back, looking forward: Scientific and technological advances in multiangle imaging of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, David J.; Garay, Michael J.

    2017-02-01

    Passive optical multiangle observations enable retrieval of information about atmospheric structure than cannot be obtained with single-angle sensors. This paper highlights several applications to studies of aerosols and clouds, using data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), currently in its 17th year in Earth orbit aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, and the airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flies aboard NASA's ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The recently selected Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA), which will launch into Earth orbit early in the next decade, is also discussed.

  20. Aerosol Source Plume Physical Characteristics from Space-based Multiangle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Li, W.-H.; Moroney, Catherine; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Fishbein, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Models that assess aerosol effects on regional air quality and global climate parameterize aerosol sources in terms of amount, type, and injection height. The multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite retrieves total column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and aerosol type over cloud-free land and water. A stereo-matching algorithm automatically retrieves reflecting-layer altitude wherever clouds or aerosol plumes have discernable spatial contrast, with about 500-m accuracy, at 1.1-km horizontal resolution. Near-source biomass burning smoke, volcanic effluent, and desert dust plumes are observed routinely, providing information about aerosol amount, particle type, and injection height useful for modeling applications. Compared to background aerosols, the plumes sampled have higher AOT, contain particles having expected differences in Angstrom exponent, size, single-scattering albedo, and for volcanic plume and dust cloud cases, particle shape. As basic thermodynamics predicts, thin aerosol plumes lifted only by regional winds or less intense heat sources are confined to the boundary layer. However, when sources have sufficient buoyancy, the representative plumes studied tend to concentrate within discrete, high-elevation layers of local stability; the aerosol is not uniformly distributed up to a peak altitude, as is sometimes assumed in modeling. MISR-derived plume heights, along with meteorological profile data from other sources, make it possible to relate radiant energy flux observed by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), also aboard the Terra spacecraft, to convective heat flux that plays a major role in buoyant plume dynamics. A MISR climatology of plume behavior based on these results is being developed.

  1. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  2. Determining Aerosol Plume Height from Two GEO Imagers: Lessons from MISR and GOES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol plume height is a key parameter to determine impacts of particulate matters generated from biomass burning, wind-blowing dust, and volcano eruption. Retrieving cloud top height from stereo imageries from two GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites) have been demonstrated since 1970's and the principle should work for aerosol plumes if they are optically thick. The stereo technique has also been used by MISR (Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) since 2000 that has nine look angles along track to provide aerosol height measurements. Knowing the height of volcano aerosol layers is as important as tracking the ash plume flow for aviation safety. Lack of knowledge about ash plume height during the 2010 Eyja'rjallajokull eruption resulted in the largest air-traffic shutdown in Europe since World War II. We will discuss potential applications of Asian GEO satellites to make stereo measurements for dust and volcano plumes.

  3. Aerosols, Lidar and IR Imaging During Duck and RED

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    continued in connection with the analysis of transmission measurements over Monterey bay (22 km) and San Diego Bay (7 and 15 km). The results from the...to be improved. 3 As discussed in the FY00 report, during EOPACE experiments in 1996 and 1997 transmission was measured across San Diego Bay ...collected at mid-path by Professor Davidson from NPS ( Monterey ). TNO-FEL also measured aerosol particle size distributions at the end of the 15 km

  4. Production of aerosols by optical catapulting: Imaging, performance parameters and laser-induced plasma sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhamid, M.; Fortes, F. J.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Harith, M. A.; Laserna, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) is a sampling and manipulation method that has been extensively studied in applications ranging from single cells in heterogeneous tissue samples to analysis of explosive residues in human fingerprints. Specifically, analysis of the catapulted material by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers a promising approach for the inspection of solid particulate matter. In this work, we focus our attention in the experimental parameters to be optimized for a proper aerosol generation while increasing the particle density in the focal region sampled by LIBS. For this purpose we use shadowgraphy visualization as a diagnostic tool. Shadowgraphic images were acquired for studying the evolution and dynamics of solid aerosols produced by OC. Aluminum silicate particles (0.2-8 μm) were ejected from the substrate using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, while time-resolved images recorded the propagation of the generated aerosol. For LIBS analysis and shadowgraphy visualization, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and 532 nm was employed, respectively. Several parameters such as the time delay between pulses and the effect of laser fluence on the aerosol production have been also investigated. After optimization, the particle density in the sampling focal volume increases while improving the aerosol sampling rate till ca. 90%.

  5. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from PROBA-CHRIS images acquired over a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Carmine; Leone, Antonio P.; Menenti, Massimo; Pippi, Ivan; Maselli, Fabio; Antonelli, Paolo

    2005-10-01

    In the present work we show the potential of multiangular hyperspectral PROBA-CHRIS data to estimate aerosol optical properties over dense dark vegetation. Data acquired over San Rossore test site (Pisa, Italy) have been used together with simultaneous ground measurements. Additionally, spectral measurement over the canopy have been performed to describe the directional behavior of a Pinus pinaster canopy. Determination of aerosol properties from optical remote sensing images over land is an under-determined problem, and some assumptions have to be made on both the aerosol and the surface being imaged. Radiance measured on multiple directions add extra information that help in reducing retrieval ambiguity. Nevertheless, multiangular observations don't allow to ignore directional spectral properties of vegetation canopies. Since surface reflectivity is the parameter we wish to determine with remote sensing after atmospheric correction, at least the shape of the bi-directional reflectance factor has to be assumed. We have adopted a Rahman BRF, and have estimated its geometrical parameters from ground spectral measurements. The inversion of measured radiance to obtain aerosol optical properties has been performed, allowing simultaneous retrieval of aerosol model and optical thickness together with the vegetation reflectivity parameter of the Rahman model.

  6. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function and the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (two elements of the phase matrix). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178°. (In some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). The PI-Neph measurement of phase function and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) retrievals have already been compared in some cases when the aircraft spiraled over AERONET sites, for example at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, on October 18 2011, as shown in Figure 1. The differences between the PI-Neph and the AERONET retrievals can be attributed to differences between the ambient size distribution and the one sampled inside the aircraft. The data that is resolved with respect to scattering angle is used to compute the volume scattering coefficient. The above mentioned October 18 flight data showed good agreement between the PI-Neph measurements of volume scattering coefficient and the parallel TSI integrating nephelometer measurements. On average the TSI measurements were 1.02 times the PI

  7. CAIs in Semarkona (LL3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.; Marhas, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the first forming solids of the Solar system. Their observed abundance, mean size, and mineralogy vary quite significantly between different groups of chondrites. These differences may reflect the dynamics and distinct cosmochemical conditions present in the region(s) of the protoplanetary disk from which each type likely accreted. Only about 11 such objects have been found in L and LL type while another 57 have been found in H type ordinary chondrites, compared to thousands in carbonaceous chondrites. At issue is whether the rare CAIs contained in ordinary chondrites truly reflect a distinct population from the inclusions commonly found in other chondrite types. Semarkona (LL3.00) (fall, 691 g) is the most pristine chondrite available in our meteorite collection. Here we report petrography and mineralogy of 3 CAIs from Semarkona

  8. Pollution and mineral dust aerosol retrievals over dark water from MISR multi-angle satellite imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R.; Kalashnikova, O.; Li, W.; McDonald, D.; Diner, D.; Martonchik, J.

    2003-04-01

    The MISR multi-angle imaging instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, makes measurements at nine view angles, in each of four wavelengths, near-simultaneously. MISR systematically covers a range of air mass factors from one to three, and in mid-latitudes, samples scattering angles extending from about 60^o to 160^o. We are quantifying the information these data provide about particle size distribution, shape, composition, and amount, with the help of field data acquired during the ACE-Asia and CLAMS campaigns. In both campaigns, we obtained high-resolution data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with observations by multiple instruments on two or more surface and airborne aerosol-measuring platforms. The cases obtained capture a range of clean, dusty, and polluted aerosol conditions. Initial characterization of the detailed environmental conditions for five of these cases, based on the field observations, has been completed. This presentation uses the field results as ground truth, to critically test the sensitivity of MISR aerosol retrievals to assumed particle micro-physical properties, a key step in refining the satellite multi-angle retrieval algorithms. We concentrate here on our ability to distinguish pollution aerosols from naturally occurring, non-spherical Asian dust, to measure the total aerosol column optical depth, and to determine the size distribution and single scattering albedo of the pollution component.

  9. Seasonal Variation of Aerosol Particle Size Using MER/Pancam Sky Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of the sky taken by the Pancam cameras on-board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) provide a useful tool for determining the optical depth and physcial properties of aerosols above the rover. Specifically, the brightness of the sky as a function of angle away from the Sun provides a powerful constraint on the size distribution and shape of dust and water ice aerosols. More than 100 Pancam "sky surveys" were taken by each of the two MER rovers covering a time span of several Mars years and a wide range of dust loading conditions including the planet-encirclind dust storm during Mars Year 28 (Earth year 2007). These sky surveys enable the time evolution of aerosol particle size to be determined including its relation to dust loading. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. Synthetic Pancam sky brightness is computed using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and spherical geometry by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. We find that Mie scattering from spheres is not a good approximation for describing the angular variation of sky brightness far from the Sun (at scattering angles greater than 45 degrees). Significant seasonal variations are seen in the retrieved effective radius of the aerosols with higher optical depth strongly correlated with larger particle size.

  10. Re-Os Systematics in the Allende CAI: Big AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1999-03-01

    A sample of coarse-grained Allende CAI, Big Al analyzed using reverse aqua regia, plots on the IIA iron meteorite reference isochron, suggesting a very small time difference between the formation of CAIs, chondrites, and iron.

  11. Evaluation of Aerosol Properties over Ocean from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Chern, J.-D.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P. B.; Xiong, X.; Ridgway, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) was conducted in March-May 2001 in the western North Pacific in order to characterize the complex mix of dust, smoke, urban/industrial pollution, and background marine aerosol that is observed in that region in springtime. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provides a large-scale regional view of the aerosol during the ACE-Asia time period. Focusing only on aerosol retrievals over ocean, MODIS data show latitudinal and longitudinal variation in the aerosol characteristics. Typically, aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) values at 0.55 micrometers are highest in the 30 deg. - 50 deg. latitude band associated with dust outbreaks. Monthly mean tau(sub a) in this band ranges approx. 0.40-70, although large differences between monthly mean and median values indicate the periodic nature of these dust outbreaks. The size parameters, fine mode fraction (eta), and effective radius (r(sub eff)) vary between monthly mean values of eta = 0.47 and r(sub eff)= 0.75 micrometers in the cleanest regions far offshore to approximately eta = 0.85 and r(sub eff) =.30 micrometers in near-shore regions dominated by biomass burning smoke. The collocated MODIS retrievals with airborne, ship-based, and ground-based radiometers measurements suggest that MODIS retrievals of spectral optical depth fall well within expected error (DELTA tau(sub a) = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau(sub a)) except in situations dominated by dust, in which cases MODIS overestimate both the aerosol loading and the aerosol spectral dependence. Such behavior is consistent with issues related to particle nonsphericity. Comparisons of MODIS-derived r(sub eff) with AERONET retrievals at the few occurrences of collocations show MODIS systematically underestimates particle size by 0.2 micrometers. Multiple-year analysis of MODIS aerosol size parameters suggests systematic differences between the year 2001 and the years 2000 and 2002

  12. Aerosol and Cloud Properties at the Huygens Entry Site as Derived from the Descent Imager/Spectral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doose, L. R.; Engel, S.; Tomasko, M. G.; Dafoe, L. E.; West, R.; Lemmon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe descended through Titan s atmosphere on January 14, 2005. The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument made optical measurements which constrain the nature and vertical distribution and of the aerosols in the atmosphere.

  13. The Relevance of AI Research to CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    This article provides a tutorial introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) research for those involved in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI). The general theme is that much of the current work in AI, particularly in the areas of natural language understanding systems, rule induction, programming languages, and socratic systems, has important…

  14. CAI Use by Developmental Studies Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumb, Glenn H.; Monroe, Eula Ewing

    This study, conducted with college developmental studies students, explored possible relationships between individualized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in basic mathematics skills and each of two variables; mathematics knowledge and anxiety toward mathematics. Both experimental (N=5) and control (N=12) groups made significant gains in…

  15. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols and Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    to a cloud;  Measurements made at the Mauna Loa Observatory (a mountaintop observatory in Hawaii) confirmed previous studies by Coulson and...on work supported by this grant: 1. Mr. Andrew Dahlberg – All-sky polarization imager deployment at Mauna Loa Observatory , Hawaii – M.S. Thesis...the Mauna Loa Observatory on the island of Hawaii (Dahlberg et al. 2009). The Atmospheric Polarization Imager (API) System The API instrument

  16. Simultaneous ion luminescence imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles with external proton or helium microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous microscopic imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles were performed with an external microbeam. Visible luminescence induced by the external microbeam was successfully used as a probe to detect organic contaminants in the targets. Combined ion luminescence (IL)/particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of the aerosol targets revealed microscopic chemical and elemental composition distributions under ambient atmospheric conditions. The simple confocal micro-optics for the IL spectroscopy and microscopic imaging were sufficiently sensitive for detecting these molecules at sub-parts per million concentrations and at a wavelength resolution of less than 5 nm. The IL spectra were monitored to prevent severe damage to the samples. Furthermore, our IL system has the advantage that it is simple to add to a conventional micro-PIXE system.

  17. Effect of the aerosol type uncertainty on the surface reflectance retrieval using CHRIS/PROBA hyperspectral images over land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2014-12-01

    The surface reflectance is crucial for the quantitative analysis of land surface properties in geological, agricultural and urban studies. The first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation is an accurate atmospheric correction obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol loading and type. The aerosol optical thickness at 550nm is widely used to describe the aerosol loading. Recent works have highlighted the relevant role of the aerosol types on the atmospheric correction process defined by their micro-physical properties. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land. CHRIS on PROBA satellite is an high resolution multi-angular imaging spectrometer, operating in the visible near-infrared spectral domain (400 to 1000 nm). As test case the urban site of Brussels has been selected. The physically-based algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) has been developed specifically for CHRIS data by using the vector version of 6S (6SV) radiative transfer model. The atmospheric data needed for the atmospheric correction were obtained from CIMEL CE-318 of the Brussels AERONET station. CHRIS images were selected if simultaneous AERONET data were available. Other specific requirements for imagery acquisition were high aerosol loading and high solar irradiation. The aerosol radiative impact has been investigated comparing the reflectance obtained by applying the CHRIS@CRI algorithm with different aerosol types: the three aerosol standard of 6SV and two characterized by specific microphysical properties provided by the AERONET station and calculated with FlexAOD code (a post-processing tool of the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem), respectively. The results show a clear dependence of the atmospheric correction results on the aerosol absorption properties.

  18. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  19. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols and Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    made at the Mauna Loa Observatory (a mountaintop observatory in Hawaii) confirmed previous studies by Coulson and extended them to partly cloudy...grant: 1. Mr. Andrew Dahlberg – All-sky polarization imager deployment at Mauna Loa Observatory , Hawaii – M.S. Thesis, May 2010 (http...surface albedo appear to explain a morning-to-afternoon asymmetry in the observed polarization pattern in the sky above the Mauna Loa Observatory on the

  20. Comparison between radioactive aerosol, technegas and krypton for ventilation imaging in healthy calves.

    PubMed

    Coghe, J; Votion, D; Lekeux, P

    2000-07-01

    The use of lung scintigraphy in calves necessitates the validation of a ventilation (V) imaging agent compatible with clinical applications. This study aimed at defining the value of an inhaled radioactive aerosol (99mTc-DTPA) and a 'pseudogas' (Technegas) in the assessment of regional V in healthy conscious calves by comparing 99mTc-DTPA and Technegas deposition (D) images to V(V) images obtained from the steady-state inhalation of the short half-life krypton 81 (81mKr) gas. Images were compared by analysis of radioactivity distribution in computer-generated regions of interest within the right lung and D to V ratio images were generated in order to highlight areas of mismatching between 99mTc-DTPA or Technegas and 81mKr distributions. Results of this analysis showed that the 99mTc-DTPA aerosol droplets were unable to reach the lung parenchyma because of significant particle impaction in the major conducting airways. Better definition of the ventilated lung was obtained when using Technegas because of minimal deposition in conducting airways. Furthermore, the Technegas and 81mKr distribution patterns were highly equivalent.

  1. Aerosol Properties Over Dark Water From MISR Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has been orbiting Earth for just under two years. It provides 36 simultaneous views of the planet, in an unprecedented combination of nine angles and four wavelengths, with spatial resolution as high as 275 m. Pre-launch theoretical studies indicated that MISR's well-calibrated spectral radiances, measured at precisely known air-mass factors ranging from one to three, could provide tight constraints on aerosol optical depth. And along with the wide range of scattering angles sampled (about 50o to 160 o at mid-latitudes), MISR would offer constraints on particle shape, size distribution, and composition, particularly over a dark, uniform ocean surface. We have participated in four major field campaigns during the past year, giving us opportunities to measure the actual performance of MISR standard and research aerosol retrieval approaches against near-simultaneous in situ atmospheric and surface observations. The analysis of these data is underway. MISR overflew the Puerto RIco Dust Experiment (PRIDE; July 2000) site when coordinated measurements were made of dusty as well as clean maritime air. At SAFARI 2000, MISR and AirMISR imaged air containing biomass burning and dust particles off the west coast of Namibia. ACE-Asia (April 2001) produced MISR aerosol validation data in air containing Gobi desert dust, biomass burning particles, marine aerosols, and pollution. And during the CLAMS campaign (July 2001), MISR and AirMISR viewed clean maritime and polluted air while detailed characterization of the atmosphere and ocean surface below was taking place. In addition to testing MISR aerosol retrieval approaches with these data and refining the component particle properties we assume in the climatological retrievals, ACE and CLAMS included volume closure experiments, allowing us to assess the contribution of scene variability to measurement uncertainty. Early results indicate that under many circumstances, MISR

  2. Aerosol Airmass Type Mapping Over the Urban Mexico City Region From Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of approx. 0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  3. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the Urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of ≈0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  4. Variability of Marine Aerosol Fine-Mode Fraction and Estimates of Anthropogenic Aerosol Component Over Cloud-Free Oceans from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine seasonal and geographical variability of marine aerosol fine-mode fraction (f(sub m)) and its impacts on deriving the anthropogenic component of aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) and direct radiative forcing from multispectral satellite measurements. A proxy of f(sub m), empirically derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 data, shows large seasonal and geographical variations that are consistent with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) and Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) model simulations. The so-derived seasonally and spatially varying f(sub m) is then implemented into a method of estimating tau(sub a) and direct radiative forcing from the MODIS measurements. It is found that the use of a constant value for fm as in previous studies would have overestimated Ta by about 20% over global ocean, with the overestimation up to 45% in some regions and seasons. The 7-year (2001-2007) global ocean average tau(sub a) is 0.035, with yearly average ranging from 0.031 to 0.039. Future improvement in measurements is needed to better separate anthropogenic aerosol from natural ones and to narrow down the wide range of aerosol direct radiative forcing.

  5. NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.H. ); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. ); Hunnum, W.H. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

  6. Reflections on current and future applications of multiangle imaging to aerosol and cloud remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, David

    2010-05-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument has been collecting global Earth data from NASA's Terra satellite since February 2000. With its 9 along-track view angles, 4 spectral bands, intrinsic spatial resolution of 275 m, and stable radiometric and geometric calibration, no instrument that combines MISR's attributes has previously flown in space, nor is there is a similar capability currently available on any other satellite platform. Multiangle imaging offers several tools for remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties, including bidirectional reflectance and scattering measurements, stereoscopic pattern matching, time lapse sequencing, and potentially, optical tomography. Current data products from MISR employ several of these techniques. Observations of the intensity of scattered light as a function of view angle and wavelength provide accurate measures of aerosol optical depths (AOD) over land, including bright desert and urban source regions. Partitioning of AOD according to retrieved particle classification and incorporation of height information improves the relationship between AOD and surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter, a regulated air pollutant), constituting an important step toward a satellite-based particulate pollution monitoring system. Stereoscopic cloud-top heights provide a unique metric for detecting interannual variability of clouds and exceptionally high quality and sensitivity for detection and height retrieval for low-level clouds. Using the several-minute time interval between camera views, MISR has enabled a pole-to-pole, height-resolved atmospheric wind measurement system. Stereo imagery also makes possible global measurement of the injection heights and advection speeds of smoke plumes, volcanic plumes, and dust clouds, for which a large database is now available. To build upon what has been learned during the first decade of MISR observations, we are evaluating algorithm updates that not only refine retrieval

  7. Retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from Imaging Polar Nephelometer scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed Espinosa, W.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg; Ziemba, Luke; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Orozco, Daniel; Schuster, Gregory; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Fuertes, David; Vanderlei Martins, J.

    2017-03-01

    A method for the retrieval of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from in situ light-scattering measurements is presented and the results are compared with existing measurement techniques. The Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) is applied to airborne and laboratory measurements made by a novel polar nephelometer. This instrument, the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph), is capable of making high-accuracy field measurements of phase function and degree of linear polarization, at three visible wavelengths, over a wide angular range of 3 to 177°. The resulting retrieval produces particle size distributions (PSDs) that agree, within experimental error, with measurements made by commercial optical particle counters (OPCs). Additionally, the retrieved real part of the refractive index is generally found to be within the predicted error of 0.02 from the expected values for three species of humidified salt particles, with a refractive index that is well established. The airborne measurements used in this work were made aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field campaign, and the inversion of this data represents the first aerosol retrievals of airborne polar nephelometer data. The results provide confidence in the real refractive index product, as well as in the retrieval's ability to accurately determine PSD, without assumptions about refractive index that are required by the majority of OPCs.

  8. An Integrated Multiangle, Multispectral, and Polarimetric Imaging Concept for Aerosol Remote Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J.; Chipman, Russell A.; Beaudry, Neil; Cairns, Brian; Foo, Leslie D.; Macenka, Steven A.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Keller, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Techniques for passive remote sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from space include visible, near and shortwave-infrared imaging (e.g., from MODIS), multiangle intensity imaging (e.g., ATSR-2, AATSR, MISR), near-ultraviolet mapping (e.g., TOMSIOMI), and polarimetry (e.g., POLDER, APS). Each of these methods has unique strengths. In this paper, we present a concept for integrating these approaches into a unified sensor. Design goals include spectral coverage from the near-UV to the shortwave infrared; intensity and polarimetric imaging simultaneously at multiple view angles; global coverage within a few days; kilometer to sub-kilometer spatial resolution; and measurement of the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) for a subset of the spectral complement with an uncertainty of 0.5% or less.

  9. Research on TRIZ and CAIs Application Problems for Technology Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong; Li, Qinghai; Bai, Zhonghang; Geng, Lixiao

    In order to realize application of invent problem solve theory (TRIZ) and computer aided innovation software (CAIs) , need to solve some key problems, such as the mode choice of technology innovation, establishment of technology innovation organization network(TION), and achievement of innovative process based on TRIZ and CAIs, etc.. This paper shows that the demands for TRIZ and CAIs according to the characteristics and existing problem of the manufacturing enterprises. Have explained that the manufacturing enterprises need to set up an open TION of enterprise leading type, and achieve the longitudinal cooperation innovation with institution of higher learning. The process of technology innovation based on TRIZ and CAIs has been set up from researching and developing point of view. Application of TRIZ and CAIs in FY Company has been summarized. The application effect of TRIZ and CAIs has been explained using technology innovation of the close goggle valve product.

  10. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  11. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-01

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinate system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.

  12. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    DOE PAGES

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-06

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinatemore » system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.« less

  13. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-06

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinate system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.

  14. Work Plan for the Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance Trial (MAPTIP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    providing two IR imagers, the AMBER AE4128 (3-5 microns) and the AN/TAS 4b (8-14 microns). A. AMBER AE4128 a. Detector: InSb, PV 128 x 128 array b...Helvey "Air Mass Parameterization in the Navy Aerosol Model." Geophysical Sciences Technicai Note no. 103, PMTC, Point Mugu, CA, 1985. 7. Gerber , H. E...Science Results 1989, D. S. McDougal, ed., NASA Conference Report no. 3079, pp. 191-196, 1990. 16. Gerber , H., S. G, Gathman, J. James, M. Smith, I

  15. Evaluation of the Aerosol Type Effect on the Surface Reflectance Retrieval Using Chris/proba Images Over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance has a central role in the analysis of land surface for a broad variety of agricultural, geological and urban studies. An accurate atmospheric correction, obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol type and loading, is the first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation. The aerosol type is defined by its micro-physical properties, while the aerosol loading is described by optical thickness at 550 nm. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol model on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land by using the specifically developed algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) based on the 6SV radiative transfer model. Five different aerosol models have been used: one provided by the AERONET inversion products (used as reference), three standard aerosol models in 6SV, and one obtained from the output of the GEOS-Chem global chemistry-transport model (CTM). As test case the urban site of Bruxelles and the suburban area of Rome Tor Vergata have been considered. The results obtained encourages the use of CTM in operational retrieval and provides an evaluation of the role of the aerosol model in the atmospheric correction process, considering the different microphysical properties impact.

  16. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  17. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2010-10-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 1012 photons per pulse, 20 µm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  18. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we demonstrate MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Four distinct aerosol air masses are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006; these results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having SSA558≈0.7 must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  19. Measurement of Aerosol and Cloud Particles with PACS and HARP Hyperangular Imaging Polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Remer, L. A.; Sparr, L.; Buczkowski, S.; Munchak, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    PACS is new hyper-angular imaging polarimeter for aeorosol and cloud measurerents designed to meet the requirements of the proposed ACE decadal survey mission. The full PACS system consists of three wide field of view (110deg cross track) telescopes covering the UV, VNIR, and SWIR spectral ranges with angular coverage between +55 deg forward to -55deg backwards. The angular density can be selected to cover up to 100 different viewing angles at selected wavelengths. PACS_VNIR is a prototype airborne instrument designed to demonstrate PACS capability by deploying just one of the three wavelength modules of the full PACS. With wavelengths at 470, 550, 675, 760 and 875nm, PACS_VNIR flew for the first time during the PODEX experiment in January/February 2013 aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. PACS SWIR (1.64, 1.88, 2.1, and 2.25um) is currently under construction and should be operational in the lab by Fall/2013. PACS_ UV has been fully designed, but is not yet under construction. During the PODEX flights PACS_VNIR collected data for aerosol and clouds over variable surface types including, water, vegetation, urban areas, and snow. The data is currently being calibrated, geolocated and prepared for the inversion of geophysical parameters including water cloud size distribution and aerosol microphysical parameters. The large density of angles in PACS allows for the characterization of cloudbow features in relatively high spatial resolution in a pixel to pixel basis. This avoids the need for assumptions of cloud homogeneity over any distance. The hyperangle capability also allows detailed observation of cloud ice particles, surface characterization, and optimum selection of the number of angles desired for aerosol retrievals. The aerosol and cloud retrieval algorithms under development for the retrieval of particle microphysical properties from the PACS data will be discussed in this presentation. As an extension of the PACS concept we are currently developing the HARP (Hyper

  20. Laser images recording on aerosol-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Mikheev, K. G.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Nasibulin, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that images on semitransparent conducting films of aerosol-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be recorded using focused low-power radiation of a He-Ne laser operating at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both free-standing films and those deposited on glass or polymer substrates can be used. Laser recording of images on the polymer-supported films is possible due to their transparency increased as a result of chemical reactions between iron nanoparticles encapsulated in SWCNTs and the products of local thermal decomposition of the polymer. Recording on the free-standing SWCNT films and those supported on glass substrates was performed upon acid treatment of the film surface.

  1. Physical properties of CAI-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Devogele, M.; Cellino, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.; Bus, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Some L-type asteroids (collectively called "Barbarians") are known to exhibit an anomalous polarimetric behavior, whose origin - still to be elucidated - can be related to compositional and/or scattering effects. The fact that these asteroids belong to the same taxonomic class (following the De Meo 2009 classification, including NIR) implies that composition must play a role. Sunshine et al. 2008 showed that these asteroids contain high amounts of CAIs, possibly hinting to a formation in an early proto-planetary environment, very rich in refractory material. On the base of this evidence, we started an observational campaign to increase the data coverage of these objects, by obtaining new NIR spectra, photometric and polarimetric measurements. Our first results show that the peculiar features are not restricted to polarimetry. In particular we show the existence of an anomalous distribution of the rotation periods, and a possible relation between CAI abundance and albedos determined by WISE. We tentatively discuss a possible scenario justifying the different observed features.

  2. Oxygen Isotopes of CAIs from Unequilibrated Enstatite Chondrites: Characteristics and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Y.; McKeegan, K. D.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe analyses of ten CAIs from enstatite chondrites show large O-16 excesses similar to CAIs in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites, supporting the idea that most CAIs formed in a restricted nebular locale.

  3. Data Fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy, Lidar, and In-Situ Laboratory Data for Detecting Aerosols from Biomass Burning Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Arnott, W. P.; Schläpfer, D.; McGill, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols absorb and scatter solar and thermal infrared radiation, thereby altering the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. This is called the aerosol direct effect. Remote sensing of aerosols from satellites is essential to obtain the contribution of anthropogenic emission to the radiative balance. It is necessary to be able to map their presence and abundance using remote measurements. If we can quantify the occurrence of aerosols from biomass burning using remote sensing, we can improve our understanding of the direct radiative effect. This study uses airborne remote sensing data to understand, identify, and quantify smoke aerosols in the atmosphere. In particular, using Imaging Spectroscopy and lidar data to detect the presence and abundance of aerosols. Airborne remote sensing data was collected over the active Simi Valley wildfire on October 27, 2003 in Southern California. The Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was flown on a commercially operated Twin Otter aircraft at an altitude of 6 km, and collected 224 channels of radiance data from 380 - 2400 nm with 10 nm spectral resolution. Shortly after the AVIRIS data collection, the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) was flown on the NASA ER-2 at an altitude of 20 km. CPL is a three wavelength instrument that operates at 1064, 532, and 355 nm, with a 30 m vertical and 200 m horizontal resolution. Controlled laboratory measurements of aerosol optics from burning various woods and grasses provide insight and refinement of our understanding of remote sensing data for biomass burning aerosol. In 2006 and 2007 a two-phase project was conducted at the US Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory to characterize particulate matter generated by biomass burning. The Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME) is supported by the Joint Fire Science Program and is a cooperative effort between the National Park Service, the Desert Research Institute, and Colorado State University. FLAME was a series

  4. A CAI Study of Learning Geologic Time and Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, James P.; Stolurow, Lawrence M.

    Twenty-two college students in science education were given an adjunctive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program by means of typewriter consoles and computer-controlled colored slide presentations of critical information. Students were pretested, told how to respond at the student console, taught by the Harvard CAI System, and posttested. The…

  5. Effect of CAI on Achievement of LD Students in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivaram, R. T.; Ramar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The present experimental study was undertaken with three objectives in view, (i) to identify students with language learning disabilities (ii) to develop CAI software to teach LD students through computer-assisted instruction and (iii) to measure the effectiveness of CAI with special reference to LD students. Two matched groups of LD students were…

  6. High School Students Participate in a CAI Study Skills Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    A 10-module computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program on study skills was field tested to determine its effectiveness with high school students, using 50 advanced seniors in a large Texas high school as subjects. The program consisted of a study skills pretest, the CAI modules, a notebook on study skills, and a posttest. The modules were…

  7. Marshall McLuhan and the Case Against CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvela, Alan

    1988-01-01

    Presents some of the conventional arguments against computer assisted instruction (CAI) in language education and explores humanistic concerns raised in the works of Marshall McLuhan. It is concluded that CAI is introduced into the instructional process before proper research has demonstrated that this method of teaching is not harmful for…

  8. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  9. Technical Note: Determination of aerosol optical properties by a calibrated sky imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Shields, J. E.; Karr, M. E.; Olmo, F. J.; Burden, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2009-09-01

    The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), has been tested with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) at the Southern Great Plain site (SGP) to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440-870 nm, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01), in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1) in 50% of the cases for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  10. Feasibility of anomaly occurrence in aerosols time series obtained from MODIS satellite images during hazardous earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, Mehdi; Jahani Chehrebargh, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Earthquake is one of the most devastating natural disasters that its prediction has not materialized comprehensive. Remote sensing data can be used to access information which is closely related to an earthquake. The unusual variations of lithosphere, atmosphere and ionosphere parameters before the main earthquakes are considered as earthquake precursors. To date the different precursors have been proposed. This paper examines one of the parameters which can be derived from satellite imagery. The mentioned parameter is Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) that this article reviews its relationship with earthquake. Aerosol parameter can be achieved through various methods such as AERONET ground stations or using satellite images via algorithms such as the DDV (Dark Dense Vegetation), Deep Blue Algorithm and SYNTAM (SYNergy of Terra and Aqua Modis). In this paper, by analyzing AOD's time series (derived from MODIS sensor on the TERRA platform) for 16 major earthquakes, seismic anomalies were observed before and after earthquakes. Before large earthquakes, rate of AOD increases due to the pre-seismic changes before the strong earthquake, which produces gaseous molecules and therefore AOD increases. Also because of aftershocks after the earthquake there is a significant change in AOD due to gaseous molecules and dust. These behaviors suggest that there is a close relationship between earthquakes and the unusual AOD variations. Therefore the unusual AOD variations around the time of earthquakes can be introduced as an earthquake precursor.

  11. Impacts of Cross-Platform Vicarious Calibration on the Deep Blue Aerosol Retrievals for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aboard Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hsu, N. Christina; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Franz, Bryan A.; Meister, Gerhard; Salustro, Clare E.

    2012-01-01

    The retrieval of aerosol properties from spaceborne sensors requires highly accurate and precise radiometric measurements, thus placing stringent requirements on sensor calibration and characterization. For the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spedroradiometer (MODIS), the characteristics of the detectors of certain bands, particularly band 8 [(B8); 412 nm], have changed significantly over time, leading to increased calibration uncertainty. In this paper, we explore a possibility of utilizing a cross-calibration method developed for characterizing the Terral MODIS detectors in the ocean bands by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ocean Biology Processing Group to improve aerosol retrieval over bright land surfaces. We found that the Terra/MODIS B8 reflectance corrected using the cross calibration method resulted in significant improvements for the retrieved aerosol optical thickness when compared with that from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, Aqua/MODIS, and the Aerosol Robotic Network. The method reported in this paper is implemented for the operational processing of the Terra/MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products.

  12. Individual Particle TOF-SIMS Imaging Analysis of Aerosol Collected During the April 2001 Asian Dust Event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy can provide information regarding the surface chemistry, including both organic and inorganic compounds, of individual atmospheric aerosol in themicrometer size range. X-ray analysis has commonly been used to analyze the composition of single particles but has several important limitations. Principally, X-ray analysis cannot be used to study organic compounds in the aerosol, it offers low sensitivity for light elements common in crustal material and it cannot distinguish isotopes. TOF-SIMS has the potential to provide superior performance in these areas. We have developed statistical image processing methods to allow extraction of individual particle mass spectra from TOF-SIMS images. In mid April 2001 a strong Asian dust event was tracked by the NASA TOMS satellite across the Pacific Ocean and into the continental United States. While Asian dust deposition is common in Hawaii, strong events characterized by significant visibility degradation have been much less frequently reported in the Rocky Mountain west. Samples were taken during and after the event at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC). Size segregated samples were collected on Al substrates using an 8 stage cascade impactor and total aerosol samples were collected with 47 mm Fluoropore filters. Surface and depth profile analysis of the particles was performed using a Phi Trift I TOF-SIMS instrument. Statistical methods, including PCA, mixture models and neural networks, were used to extract spectra of individual particles from the TOF-SIMS images and to classify particles based on their surface chemistry and depth profiles. Differences in both the chemistry and size distribution of the particles could be seen between the aerosol collected during the Asian dust event and aerosol collected post-event at the University of Utah site. Positive TOF-SIMS spectra of SLC urban aerosol were dominated by sub-micrometer organics, and negative spectra

  13. FIB-NanoSIMS-TEM Coordinated Study of a Wark-Lovering Rim in a Vigarano Type A CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, A.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Ross, D. K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi layered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Unaltered WL rims are composed of the same primary high temperature minerals as CAIs, such as melilite, spinel, pyroxene, hibonite, perovskite, anorthite and olivine. It is still unclear whether the rim minerals represent a different generation formed by a separate event from their associated CAIs or are a byproduct of CAI formation. Several models have been proposed for the origins of WL rims including condensation, flashheating, reaction of a CAI with a Mg-Si-rich reservoir (nebular gas or solid); on the basis of mineralogy, abundances of trace elements, O and Mg isotopic studies. Detailed mineralogical characterizations of WL rims at micrometer to nanometer scales have been obtained by TEM observations, but so far no coordinated isotopic - mineralogical studies have been performed. Thus, we have applied an O isotopic imaging technique by NanoSIMS 50L to investigate heterogeneous distributions of O isotopic ratios in minerals within a cross section of a WL rim prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. After the isotopic measurements, we determine the detailed mineralogy and microstructure of the same WL FIB section to gain insight into its petrogenesis. Here we present preliminary results from O isotopic and elemental maps by NanoSIMS and mineralogical analysis by FE-SEM of a FIB section of a WL rim in the Vigarano reduced CV3 chondrite.

  14. Creation and Distribution of CAIs in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Davis, S. S.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    CaAl rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1 - 10% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be several million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components in the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We assess a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times of 1 - 3 x 10(exp 6) years. To match the CAI abundances quantitatively, we advocate an enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, due to rapid inward migration of very primitive, silicate and carbon rich, meter-sized objects. 'Combustion' of the carbon into CO would make the CAI formation environment more reduced than solar, as certain observations imply. Abundant CO might also play a role in mass-independent chemical fractionation of oxygen isotopes as seen in CAIs and associated primitive, high-temperature condensates.

  15. Bridging the Gap Between Science and Clinical Efficacy: Physiology, Imaging, and Modeling of Aerosols in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, John S.; Katz, Ira; Martin, Andrew R.; Schroeter, Jeffry; Usmani, Omar S.; Venegas, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Development of a new drug for the treatment of lung disease is a complex and time consuming process involving numerous disciplines of basic and applied sciences. During the 2015 Congress of the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine, a group of experts including aerosol scientists, physiologists, modelers, imagers, and clinicians participated in a workshop aiming at bridging the gap between basic research and clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. This publication summarizes the current consensus on the topic. It begins with a short description of basic concepts of aerosol transport and a discussion on targeting strategies of inhaled aerosols to the lungs. It is followed by a description of both computational and biological lung models, and the use of imaging techniques to determine aerosol deposition distribution (ADD) in the lung. Finally, the importance of ADD to clinical efficacy is discussed. Several gaps were identified between basic science and clinical efficacy. One gap between scientific research aimed at predicting, controlling, and measuring ADD and the clinical use of inhaled aerosols is the considerable challenge of obtaining, in a single study, accurate information describing the optimal lung regions to be targeted, the effectiveness of targeting determined from ADD, and some measure of the drug's effectiveness. Other identified gaps were the language and methodology barriers that exist among disciplines, along with the significant regulatory hurdles that need to be overcome for novel drugs and/or therapies to reach the marketplace and benefit the patient. Despite these gaps, much progress has been made in recent years to improve clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. Also, the recent efforts by many funding agencies and industry to support multidisciplinary networks including basic science researchers, R&D scientists, and clinicians will go a long way to further reduce the gap between science and clinical efficacy. PMID:26829187

  16. Bridging the Gap Between Science and Clinical Efficacy: Physiology, Imaging, and Modeling of Aerosols in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Darquenne, Chantal; Fleming, John S; Katz, Ira; Martin, Andrew R; Schroeter, Jeffry; Usmani, Omar S; Venegas, Jose; Schmid, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Development of a new drug for the treatment of lung disease is a complex and time consuming process involving numerous disciplines of basic and applied sciences. During the 2015 Congress of the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine, a group of experts including aerosol scientists, physiologists, modelers, imagers, and clinicians participated in a workshop aiming at bridging the gap between basic research and clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. This publication summarizes the current consensus on the topic. It begins with a short description of basic concepts of aerosol transport and a discussion on targeting strategies of inhaled aerosols to the lungs. It is followed by a description of both computational and biological lung models, and the use of imaging techniques to determine aerosol deposition distribution (ADD) in the lung. Finally, the importance of ADD to clinical efficacy is discussed. Several gaps were identified between basic science and clinical efficacy. One gap between scientific research aimed at predicting, controlling, and measuring ADD and the clinical use of inhaled aerosols is the considerable challenge of obtaining, in a single study, accurate information describing the optimal lung regions to be targeted, the effectiveness of targeting determined from ADD, and some measure of the drug's effectiveness. Other identified gaps were the language and methodology barriers that exist among disciplines, along with the significant regulatory hurdles that need to be overcome for novel drugs and/or therapies to reach the marketplace and benefit the patient. Despite these gaps, much progress has been made in recent years to improve clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. Also, the recent efforts by many funding agencies and industry to support multidisciplinary networks including basic science researchers, R&D scientists, and clinicians will go a long way to further reduce the gap between science and clinical efficacy.

  17. Astrophysics of CAI formation as revealed by silicon isotope LA-MC-ICPMS of an igneous CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Young, Edward D.

    2007-05-01

    Silicon isotope ratios of a typical CAI from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite, obtained in situ by laser ablation MC-ICPMS, together with existing 25Mg/ 24Mg data, reveal a detailed picture of the astrophysical setting of CAI melting and subsequent heating. Models for the chemical and isotopic effects of evaporation of the molten CAI are used to produce a univariant relationship between PH 2 and time during melting. The result shows that this CAI was molten for a cumulative time of no more than 70 days and probably less than 15 days depending on temperature. The object could have been molten for an integrated time of just a few hours if isotope ratio zoning was eliminated after melting by high subsolidus temperatures (e.g., > 1300 K) for ˜ 500 yr. In all cases subsolidus heating sufficient to produce diffusion-limited isotope fractionation at the margin of the solidified CAI is required. These stable isotope data point to a two-stage history for this igneous CAI involving melting for a cumulative timescale of hours to months followed by subsolidus heating for years to hundreds of years. The thermobarometric history deduced from combining Si and Mg isotope ratio data implicates thermal processing in the disk, perhaps by passage through shockwaves, following melting. This study underscores the direct link between the meaning of stable isotope ratio zoning, or lack thereof, and the inferred astrophysical setting of melting and subsequent processing of CAIs.

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Chondrules and CAIs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Chondrules and CAI's" included the following reports:Metallic Chondrules in NWA 1390 (H3-6): Clues to Their History from Metallic Cu; Relationship Between Bulk Chemical Composition and Formation Age of Chondrules in Bishunpur and Krymka; Relict Forsterite in Chondrules: Implications for Cooling Rates; An Evaluation of Quantitative Methods of Determining the Degree of Melting Experienced by a Chondrule; Rare Earth Element Fractionation in Chondrules; Mineralogy and Petrology of Chondrules in Carbonaceous Chondrite NWA 770; Isotopic Cosmobarometry: A Synthesis of Concepts and Implications for Chondrule and CAI Formation Mechanisms; Further Investigations of Minor Element Distributions in Spinels in Type B CAIs; and Trace Element Compositions of the Sublayers Making Up W-L Rims on CAI .

  19. Evaluation of applicability of high-resolution multiangle imaging photo-polarimetric observations for aerosol atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Diner, David; Seidel, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Multiangle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool for better understanding and quantifying the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of this work is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on remote sensing reflectance measurement uncertainty caused by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. In this work a vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to quantitatively evaluate in water leaving radiances between atmospheres containing realistic UV-enhanced and non-spherical aerosols and the SEADAS carbonaceous and dust-like aerosol models. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach developed for modeling dust for the AERONET network of ground-based sunphotometers. As a next step, we have developed a retrieval code that employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) and adding/doubling radiative transfer method for joint retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager-1 (AirMSPI-1) polarimetric observations. The AirMSPI-1 instrument has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° at 10 m resolution. AirMSPI spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, and 865 nm, with 470, 660, and 865 reporting linear polarization. We

  20. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color is a critical tool for assessing the productivity of marine ecosystems and monitoring changes resulting from climatic or environmental influences. Yet water-leaving radiance comprises less than 10% of the signal measured from space, making correction for absorption and scattering by the intervening atmosphere imperative. Traditional ocean color retrieval algorithms utilize a standard set of aerosol models and the assumption of negligible water-leaving radiance in the near-infrared. Modern improvements have been developed to handle absorbing aerosols such as urban particulates in coastal areas and transported desert dust over the open ocean, where ocean fertilization can impact biological productivity at the base of the marine food chain. Even so, imperfect knowledge of the absorbing aerosol optical properties or their height distribution results in well-documented sources of error. In the UV, the problem of UV-enhanced absorption and nonsphericity of certain aerosol types are amplified due to the increased Rayleigh and aerosol optical depth, especially at off-nadir view angles. Multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of the work to be described is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on water leaving radiance measurement uncertainty by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard

  1. Assessment of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer algorithm for retrieval of aerosol parameters over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kexin; Li, Wei; Stamnes, Knut; Eide, Hans; Spurr, Robert; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2007-03-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol algorithm over the ocean derives spectral aerosol optical depth and aerosol size parameters from satellite measured radiances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). It is based on the adding of apparent optical properties (AOPs): TOA reflectance is approximated as a linear combination of reflectances resulting from a small particle mode and a large particle mode. The weighting parameter η is defined as the fraction of the optical depth at 550 nm due to the small mode. The AOP approach is correct only in the single scattering limit. For a physically correct TOA reflectance simulation, we create linear combinations of the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of small and large particle modes, in which the weighting parameter f is defined as the fraction of the number density attributed to the small particle mode. We use these IOPs as inputs to an accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model. We find that reflectance errors incurred with the AOP method are as high as 30% for an aerosol optical depth of 2 at 550 nm. The retrieved optical depth has a relative error of up to 8%, and the retrieved fraction η has an absolute error of ˜6%. We show that the use of accurate radiative transfer simulations and a bimodal fraction f yields accurate values for the retrieved optical depth and the fraction f.

  2. Aerosol Particle Size Retrievals from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    During the extended mission of the Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter, the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has made periodic limb-viewing geometry observations of the Martian atmosphere. Sufficient radiance is typically available to produce a vertical distribution of dust and water ice aerosols from the surface to approximately 50 km altitude. Radiative transfer modeling is conducted to achieve a best fit between the observed and modeled spectrum. The spherical geometry of the limb-viewing geometry is handled using a pseudo-spherical approximation that is computationally efficient and accurate to within a few percent of a Monte Carlo method for the geometries observed. Different particle sizes of dust and water ice have unique extinction coefficients across the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum observed by CRISM. We use a wide range of wavelengths across the CRISM spectrum to conduct the retrieval. Here we provide initial results on the retrieval of dust and water ice particle sizes over the duration of the CRISM limb-viewing observations.

  3. NEW TITANIUM ISOTOPE DATA FOR ALLENDE AND EFREMOVKA CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Leya, Ingo; Schoenbaechler, Maria; Kraehenbuehl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2009-09-10

    We measured the titanium (Ti) isotope composition, i.e., {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, in five calcium-rich-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) from the oxidized CV3 chondrite Allende and in two CAIs from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. Our data indicate that CAIs are enriched in {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and are slightly depleted in {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti compared to normal Ti defined by ordinary chondrites, eucrites, ureilites, mesosiderites, Earth, Moon, and Mars. Some CAIs have an additional {sup 50}Ti excess of {approx}8{epsilon} relative to bulk carbonaceous chondrites, which are enriched in {sup 50}Ti by {approx}2{epsilon} relative to terrestrial values, leading to a total excess of {approx}10{epsilon}. This additional {sup 50}Ti excess is correlated with nucleosynthetic anomalies found in {sup 62}Ni and {sup 96}Zr, all indicating an origin from a neutron-rich stellar source. Bulk carbonaceous chondrites show a similar trend, however, the extent of the anomalies is either less than or similar to the smallest anomalies seen in CAIs. Mass balance calculations suggest that bulk Allende Ti possibly consists of a mixture of at least two Ti components, anomalous Ti located in CAIs and a normal component possibly for matrix and chondrules. This argues for a heterogeneous distribution of Ti isotopes in the solar system. The finding that anomalous Ti is concentrated in CAIs suggests that CAIs formed in a specific region of the solar system and were, after their formation, not homogeneously redistributed within the solar system. Combining the CAI data with improved model predictions for early solar system irradiation effects indicates that a local production scenario for the relatively short lived radionuclides can be excluded, because the production of, e.g., {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 41}Ca, would result in a significant collateral shift in Ti isotopes, which is not seen in the

  4. Operational Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean using INSAT-3D/Imager product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rastogi, G.; Chauhan, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean region is derived operationally for the first time from the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite INSAT-3D Imager data at 0.65 μm wavelength. Single visible channel algorithm based on clear sky composites gives larger retrieval error in AOD than other multiple channel algorithms due to errors in estimating surface reflectance and atmospheric property. However, since MIR channel signal is insensitive to the presence of most aerosols, therefore in present study, AOD retrieval algorithm employs both visible (centred at 0.65 μm) and mid-infrared (MIR) band (centred at 3.9 μm) measurements, and allows us to monitor transport of aerosols at higher temporal resolution. Comparisons made between INSAT-3D derived AOD (τI) and MODIS derived AOD (τM) co-located in space (at 1° resolution) and time during January, February and March (JFM) 2014 encompasses 1165, 1052 and 900 pixels, respectively. Good agreement found between τI and τM during JFM 2014 with linear correlation coefficients (R) of 0.87, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively. The extensive validation made during JFM 2014 encompasses 215 co-located AOD in space and time derived by INSAT 3D (τI) and 10 sun-photometers (τA) that includes 9 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and 1 handheld sun-photometer site. INSAT-3D derived AOD i.e. τI, is found within the retrieval errors of τI = ±0.07 ±0.15τA with linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.90 and root mean square error equal (RMSE) to 0.06. Present work shows that INSAT-3D aerosol products can be used quantitatively in many applications with caution for possible residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  5. Numerical simulation and validation of SI-CAI hybrid combustion in a CAI/HCCI gasoline engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyan; Xie, Hui; Xie, Liyan; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Le; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SI-CAI hybrid combustion, also known as spark-assisted compression ignition (SACI), is a promising concept to extend the operating range of CAI (Controlled Auto-Ignition) and achieve the smooth transition between spark ignition (SI) and CAI in the gasoline engine. In this study, a SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) has been constructed on the basis of the 3-Zones Extended Coherent Flame Model (ECFM3Z). An ignition model is included to initiate the ECFM3Z calculation and induce the flame propagation. In order to precisely depict the subsequent auto-ignition process of the unburned fuel and air mixture independently after the initiation of flame propagation, the tabulated chemistry concept is adopted to describe the auto-ignition chemistry. The methodology for extracting tabulated parameters from the chemical kinetics calculations is developed so that both cool flame reactions and main auto-ignition combustion can be well captured under a wider range of thermodynamic conditions. The SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) is then applied in the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3-D CFD) engine simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data obtained from a single cylinder VVA engine. The detailed analysis of the simulations demonstrates that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion process is characterised with the early flame propagation and subsequent multi-site auto-ignition around the main flame front, which is consistent with the optical results reported by other researchers. Besides, the systematic study of the in-cylinder condition reveals the influence mechanism of the early flame propagation on the subsequent auto-ignition.

  6. Characterize Aerosols from MODIS MISR OMI MERRA-2: Dynamic Image Browse Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer; Yang, Wenli; Albayrak, Arif; Zhao, Peisheng; Zeng, Jian; Shen, Suhung; Johnson, James; Kempler, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Among the known atmospheric constituents, aerosols still represent the greatest uncertainty in climate research. To understand the uncertainty is to bring altogether of observational (in-situ and remote sensing) and modeling datasets and inter-compare them synergistically for a wide variety of applications that can bring far-reaching benefits to the science community and the broader society. These benefits can best be achieved if these earth science data (satellite and modeling) are well utilized and interpreted. Unfortunately, this is not always the case, despite the abundance and relative maturity of numerous satellite-borne sensors routinely measure aerosols. There is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) have developed a new visualization service (NASA Level 2 Data Quality Visualization, DQViz)supporting various visualization and data accessing capabilities from satellite Level 2(MODISMISROMI) and long term assimilated aerosols from NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2 displaying at their own native physical-retrieved spatial resolution. Functionality will include selecting data sources (e.g., multiple parameters under the same measurement), defining area-of-interest and temporal extents, zooming, panning, overlaying, sliding, and data subsetting and reformatting.

  7. Effects of CAI on the Academic Performance and Attitudes of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, Paul D.; Hipworth, Kristin; Pappas, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Although computer-assisted instruction (CAI) favorably affects academic performance and attitudes toward instruction, most CAI programs target mastery but not fluency. This study used a within-subjects, crossover design to compare the effects of CAI that included fluency training with traditional study (TS) conditions on test performance and…

  8. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Clinical Education: A Roadmap to Increasing CAI Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Norman B.; Fall, Leslie H.; Maloney, Christopher G.; Levine, David A.

    2008-01-01

    This reflection is based on the premise that clinical education can be improved by more widespread use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and that a roadmap will enable more medical educators to begin using CAI. The rationale for CAI use includes many of its inherent features such as incorporation of multimedia and interactivity yet the use of…

  9. Development of CAI Presentations for Science Teaching and Overview of Research Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Mridula D.

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that information and communication technologies (ICT) used in the form of computer assisted instruction (CAI) may benefit student learning. There is, however, limited research about the application of CAI in non-Western educational contexts. Here I describe the use of CAI in the learning of science in India. Evaluation of student…

  10. Effectiveness of CAI Package on Achievement in Physics of IX Standard Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheswari, I. Uma; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study is an experimental one in nature, to find out the effectiveness of CAI package on in Physics of IX std. students. For this purpose a CAI package was developed and validated. The validated CAI package formed an independent variable of this study. The dependent variable is students' achievements in physics content. In order to find…

  11. MONIFORMS as Authoring Aids for the PLATO IV CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Russel E.

    An analysis of portions of the HumRRO (Human Resources Research Organization) developed computer-assisted instruction (CAI) course in COBOL programing, and a survey of representatives from Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) PLATO IV installations indicated a need for authoring aids that could be prepared and programed easily and quickly. The…

  12. An Intelligent CAI Monitor and Generative Tutor. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffman, Elliot B.; And Others

    Design techniques for generative computer-assisted-instructional (CAI) systems are described in this report. These are systems capable of generating problems for students and of deriving and monitoring solutions; problem difficulty, instructional pace, and depth of monitoring are all individually tailored and parts of the solution algorithms can…

  13. Focal Manual for CAI Coding on the TSS/8 System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirbs, H. Dewey; And Others

    Basic information is provided in this manual for coding drill-and-practice CAI (computer-assisted instruction) applications in the language FOCAL (Formulating On-line Calculations in Algebraic Language). This language is available on the Digital Equipment Corporation Time-Sharing 8 system (TSS/8). While FOCAL is oriented toward solution of…

  14. Conjunctival mucin deficiency in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Moretti, Costanzo; Micera, Alessandra; Bonini, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Sex steroid hormones are essential for a healthy ocular surface and the androgen receptor impairment found in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has been described to cause meibomian gland dysfunction and functional dry eye for lipid tear film layer instability. However, it has not been reported if the mucous layer is also affected. A 37-year-old CAIS patient with persistent symptoms of dry eye underwent ophthalmological examination and was evaluated for qualitative and quantitative tear function tests and conjunctival cytology. Samples obtained from the conjunctival epithelium were stained for histology and immunohistochemistry and compared with three age-matched female controls. Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR for MUC1 and MUC5AC were also performed on these samples. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR showed a decrease in the expression of MUC1 and MUC5AC in CAIS. Changes in the tear film mucous layer were accompanied by a reduction in the tear film break up time test. This is the first report describing mucous layer alteration associated with androgen receptor impairment. Decreased mucin levels contribute in explaining the tear film instability in CAIS and should be considered an additional cause of dry eye in sex steroid hormone pathology.

  15. CAISYS-8- A CAI Language Developed For A Minicomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Cheryl; And Others

    The University of Texas Medical Branch developed a minicomputer-based computer-assisted instruction (CAI) system which employed a teacher oriented software package called CAISYS-8, consisting of a highly modularized teaching compiler and operating system. CAISYS-8 used instructional quanta which generalized the flow of information to and from the…

  16. Distribution and Origin of 36Cl In Allende CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J P; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Yin, Q; Ramon, E C; Weber, P; Wasserburg, G J

    2009-12-11

    The abundance of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in early solar system materials provide key information about their nucleosynthetic origin and can constrain the timing of early solar system events. Excesses of {sup 36}S ({sup 36}S*) correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S ratios provide direct evidence for in situ decay of {sup 36}Cl ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.3 Ma) and have been reported in sodalite (Na{sub 8}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24}Cl{sub 2}) and wadalite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 5}Si{sub 2}O{sub 16}Cl{sub 3}) in CAIs and chondrules from the Allende and Ningqiang CV carbonaceous chondrites. While previous studies demonstrate unequivocally that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system, no consensus on the origin or initial abundance of {sup 36}Cl has emerged. Understanding the origin of {sup 36}Cl, as well as the reported variation in the initial {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio, requires addressing when, where and how chlorine was incorporated into CAIs and chondrules. These factors are key to distinguishing between stellar nucleosynthesis or energetic particle irradiation for the origin of {sup 36}Cl. Wadalite is a chlorine-rich secondary mineral with structural and chemical affinities to grossular. The high chlorine ({approx}12 wt%) and very low sulfur content (<<0.01 wt%) make wadalite ideal for studies of the {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S system. Wadalite is present in Allende CAIs exclusively in the interior regions either in veins crosscutting melilite or in zones between melilite and anorthite associated with intergrowths of grossular, monticellite, and wollastonite. Wadalite and sodalite most likely resulted from open-system alteration of primary minerals with a chlorine-rich fluid phase. We recently reported large {sup 36}S* correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S in wadalite in Allende Type B CAI AJEF, yielding a ({sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl){sub 0} ratio of (1.7 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5}. This value is the highest reported {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio and is {approx}5 times

  17. Search for 41K Excess in Efremovka CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Ulyanov, A. A.; Goswami, J. N.

    1993-07-01

    We have used the ion microprobe to measure K isotopic composition of refractory phases in Efremovka CAIs to look for the possible presence of K excess from the decay of extinct radionuclide Ca (halflife = 0.13 Ma). The presence of Ca at the time of CAI formation, if established, will allow us to place a lower limit on the time interval between the last injection of freshly synthesized matter into the solar nebula and the formation of some of the first solid objects (CAIs) in the solar system. Several attempts have been made earlier to detect 41K excess in Allende CAIs [1-4]. We have further investigated this problem by analyzing the Efremovka CAIs for two reasons. First, both the petrographic and magnesium isotopic systematics suggest the Efremovka CAIs to be less altered compared to the Allende CAIs making them an ideal and perhaps better sample for this study. Second, the presence of large perovskite (~10 micrometers) allowed us to analyse this phase, which was not included in earlier studies. The major difficulty in accurately measuring 41K, which was identified in earlier studies, is the unresolvable (40Ca42Ca)++ interference, which was found to be matrix dependent [4]. In addition, one can also have interfernce from the (40CaH)+ peak. In our operating condition the interference from the hydride peak can be neglected (Fig. 1, which appears in the hard copy). We have analyzed terrestrial perovskite (K <= 20 ppm) to determine the (40Ca42Ca)++ correction term, and its equivalence with (40Ca43Ca)++ ion signal at mass 41.5 [4]. In perovskite, the (40Ca42Ca)++ signal constitutes ~80% of the signal at 41K and we could estimate this interference with confidence. A value of (2.7 +- 0.1) x 10^-5 was obtained for the ratio [(40Ca42Ca)++/42Ca+], which is similar to the measured [(40Ca43Ca)++/43Ca+] ratio of (2.4 +- 0.2) x 10^-5. We have therefore used the measured value for the latter ratio in the analyzed phases to correct for the doubly charged interference at mass 41

  18. Characterization of Meteorites by Focused Ion Beam Sectioning: Recent Applications to CAIs and Primitive Meteorite Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, Roy; Keller, Lindsay P.; Han, Jangmi; Rahman, Zia; Berger, Eve L.

    2015-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning has revolutionized preparation of meteorite samples for characterization by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and other techniques. Although FIB is not "non-destructive" in the purest sense, each extracted section amounts to no more than nanograms (approximately 500 cubic microns) removed intact from locations precisely controlled by SEM imaging and analysis. Physical alteration of surrounding material by ion damage, fracture or sputter contamination effects is localized to within a few micrometers around the lift-out point. This leaves adjacent material intact for coordinate geochemical analysis by SIMS, microdrill extraction/TIMS and other techniques. After lift out, FIB sections can be quantitatively analyzed by electron microprobe prior to final thinning, synchrotron x-ray techniques, and by the full range of state-of-the-art analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) techniques once thinning is complete. Multiple meteorite studies supported by FIB/FE-STEM are currently underway at NASA-JSC, including coordinated analysis of refractory phase assemblages in CAIs and fine-grained matrices in carbonaceous chondrites. FIB sectioning of CAIs has uncovered epitaxial and other overgrowth relations between corundum-hibonite-spinel consistent with hibonite preceding corundum and/or spinel in non-equilibrium condensation sequences at combinations of higher gas pressures, dust-gas enrichments or significant nebular transport. For all of these cases, the ability of FIB to allow for coordination with spatially-associated isotopic data by SIMS provides immense value for constraining the formation scenarios of the particular CAI assemblage. For carbonaceous chondrites matrix material, FIB has allowed us to obtain intact continuous sections of the immediate outer surface of Murchison (CM2) after it has been experimentally ion processed to simulate solar wind space weathering. The surface

  19. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  20. Observations from a prototype implementation of the Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclimens, M.; Bowerman, R.; Howell, C.; Gill, H.; Hutchison, R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS), its purpose, and its history. The paper describes an internal research and development effort at the Mitre Corporation to implement a prototype version of the current CAIS specification and to rehost existing Ada software development tools onto the CAIS prototype. Based on this effort, observations are made on the maturity and functionality of the CAIS. These observations support the government's current policy of publicizing the CAIS specification as a baseline for public review in support of its evolution into a standard which can be mandated for use as Ada is today.

  1. Nanoscale Images of Airborne PM2.5: Aerosol Dynamics with the LCLS X-ray Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is now possible to capture images of individual airborne PM2.5 particles - including soot, NaCl particles and engineered nanoparticles - with 20-40 nm resolution (Loh et al Nature 2012). Ions released during the imaging process provide information on the chemical content of the isolated particles. The scattering signal used to compose the image also provides the fractal dimension of individual particles. This new paradigm of aerosol dynamics is enabled by the incredible brightness and ultrashort pulses available at X-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the FLASH FEL facility in Hamburg. Femtosecond long x-ray pulses deliver sufficient photons (10^12 per pulse) to detect scattered X-rays off individual particles injected at >100 m/s into vacuum through an aerodynamic lens stack. The intensity of the scattered X-rays measured by an area detector is fed into lensless imaging algorithms to reconstruct an image of the particle that caused the scattering. X-ray FELs can peer inside the individual airborne particles and are a sensitive probe of particle crystallinity. The development of this method and applications to imaging micron-sized soot, water droplets and biological aerosols will be discussed. A primary long-term goal of the research is to take snapshots of airborne particles as they change their size, shape and chemical make-up in response to their environment. "Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight" ND Loh, C Hampton, A Martin, D Starodub, R Sierra, A Barty, A Aquila, J Schulz, L Lomb, J Steinbrener, R Shoeman, S Kassemeyer, C Bostedt, J. Bozek, S Epp, B. Erk, R Hartmann, D Rolles, A Rudenko, B Rudek, L Foucar, N Kimmel, G Weidenspointner, G Hauser, P Holl, E. Pedersoli, M Liang, M Hunter, L Gumprecht, N Coppola, C Wunderer, H Graafsma, F Maia, T Ekeberg, M Hantke, H Fleckenstein, H. Hirsemann, K Nass, T White, H Tobias, G Farquar, W Benner, S Hau

  2. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kirian, R. A.; Awel, S.; Eckerskorn, N.; Fleckenstein, H.; Wiedorn, M.; Adriano, L.; Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Bean, R.; Beyerlein, K. R.; Chavas, L. M. G.; Domaracky, M.; Heymann, M.; Horke, D. A.; Knoska, J.; Metz, M.; Morgan, A.; Oberthuer, D.; Roth, N.; Sato, T.; Xavier, P. L.; Yefanov, O.; Rode, A. V.; Küpper, J.; Chapman, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam. PMID:26798816

  3. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kirian, R A; Awel, S; Eckerskorn, N; Fleckenstein, H; Wiedorn, M; Adriano, L; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Bean, R; Beyerlein, K R; Chavas, L M G; Domaracky, M; Heymann, M; Horke, D A; Knoska, J; Metz, M; Morgan, A; Oberthuer, D; Roth, N; Sato, T; Xavier, P L; Yefanov, O; Rode, A V; Küpper, J; Chapman, H N

    2015-07-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  4. Opaque minerals in CAIs, and classification of the Axtell (CV3) chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, I.; Simon, S. B.

    1994-07-01

    Axtell is a new CV3 chondrite from Texas. Preliminary studies of its Ca-Al rich Inclusions (CAIs) were reported. The mineralogy and chemical compositions of opaque minerals in four Axtell CAIs are distinct from their analogs in other inclusions from CV3 chondrites. Metallic NiFe (awaruite) is the dominant phase in opaque assemblages from Axtell inclusions, and occurs as well-rounded particles of sizes between about 1 and 20 microns. Their compositions (in atom %) are N63-67Fe31-33Co2-3 in AX-4, AX-7, and AX-9, and Ni74Fe23Co2 in AX-5. None of the awaruite grains contains measurable amounts (greater than 200 ppm by weight) of the platinum-group elements analyzed for Ru, W, Mo, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. With very few exceptions, the awaruite particles studied are surrounded by or intergrown with V-free magnetite (detection limit = 400 ppm). In contrast with Allende, the dominant sulfide phase in Axtell inclusions is troilite (Ni less than or = 0.02-0.3%, by weight); pentlandite is scarce, occurring only sporadically as small grains associated with metallic FeNi (just a few particles of 5-15 microns were found in AX-5, AX-4, and AX-7, and none in AX-9). Also, an isolated 10-microns grain of millerite (NiS; Fe = 0.6 wt%) has been identified in AX-5. Unlike Allende inclusions, Axtell CAIs do not contain sulfide veins. Two remarkably large PGE-rich sulfide grains have been recognized: one spherical 12-microns particle in AX-4 (AX-4A, in melilite, close to the edge of the inclusion) and another irregularly shaped 25-microns grain in AX-9 (AX-9A, in melilite inside a spinel palisade). Study of the elemental distribution by wavelength-dispersive X-ray mapping and analysis and backscattered electron imaging suggests that these are single minerals and not multiphase assemblages. Microprobe analyses of chondrule olivines and low-Ca pyroxenes yield average Fa and Fs contents of 6.7 and 1.0 mol% respectively. These compositions suggest that Axtell is more similar to the CV3 chondrites

  5. Oxygen Isotope Measurements of a Rare Murchison Type A CAI and Its Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, J. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV chondrites commonly show oxygen isotope heterogeneity among different mineral phases within individual inclusions reflecting the complex history of CAIs in both the solar nebula and/or parent bodies. The degree of isotopic exchange is typically mineral-specific, yielding O-16-rich spinel, hibonite and pyroxene and O-16-depleted melilite and anorthite. Recent work demonstrated large and systematic variations in oxygen isotope composition within the margin and Wark-Lovering rim of an Allende Type A CAI. These variations suggest that some CV CAIs formed from several oxygen reservoirs and may reflect transport between distinct regions of the solar nebula or varying gas composition near the proto-Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions of CAIs from other, less-altered chondrites show less intra-CAI variability and 16O-rich compositions. The record of intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability in CM chondrites, which commonly show evidence for low-temperature aqueous alteration, is less clear, in part because the most common CAIs found in CM chondrites are mineralogically simple (hibonite +/- spinel or spinel +/- pyroxene) and are composed of minerals less susceptible to O-isotopic exchange. No measurements of the oxygen isotope compositions of rims on CAIs in CM chondrites have been reported. Here, we present oxygen isotope data from a rare, Type A CAI from the Murchison meteorite, MUM-1. The data were collected from melilite, hibonite, perovskite and spinel in a traverse into the interior of the CAI and from pyroxene, melilite, anorthite, and spinel in the Wark-Lovering rim. Our objectives were to (1) document any evidence for intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability; (2) determine the isotopic composition of the rim minerals and compare their composition(s) to the CAI interior; and (3) compare the MUM-1 data to oxygen isotope zoning profiles measured from CAIs in other chondrites.

  6. Desert dust aerosol air mass mapping in the western Sahara, using particle properties derived from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Müller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05-0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  7. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  8. Replacement textures in CAI and implications regarding planetary metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, G. P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Armstrong, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Formation by a secondary metamorphic event, rather than primary crystallization from a melt or a sequential nebular condensation, is indicated by textural and chemical features of five coarse grained, Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAI) from the Allende meteorite which contain embayed pyroxene surrounded by melilite. It is suggested that the most probable environment for a metamorphic process (requiring the addition of Ca derived from calcite or from the introduction of a fluid phase) is that of a small planetary body, rather than the solar nebula. These results are compatible with O isotopic heterogeneities within CAI, and offer a mechanism for the production of lower temperature alteration phases, together with the rim phases found in these inclusions.

  9. CAIS standard manual. System number 32. Central cooling plants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a specific list of components. Specific observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Central Cooling Plants.

  10. CAIS standard manual. System number 24. Natural gas distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed, including infrastructure, will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a related list of components. Detailed observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Natural Gas Distribution System.

  11. CAIS standard manual. System number 28. Central heating plants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a specific list of components. Specific observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Central Heating Plants.

  12. CAIS standard manual. System number 27. Petroleum fuel facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed, including infrastructure, will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a related list of components. Detailed observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Industrial Gas Storage and Distribution System.

  13. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  14. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de- livery protocol.

  15. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol. PMID:25767612

  16. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    DOE PAGES

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  17. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  18. MAPPING ANNUAL MEAN GROUND-LEVEL PM2.5 CONCENTRATIONS USING MULTIANGLE IMAGING SPECTRORADIOMETER AEROSOL OPTICAL THICKNESS OVER THE CONTIGUOUS UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a simple approach to estimating ground-level fine particle (PM2.5, particles smaller than 2.5 um in diameter) concentration using global atmospheric chemistry models and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the Multi- angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)...

  19. Aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign, and implications for a single-channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth in spring from Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Hong, H.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    An aerosol model optimized for northeast Asia is updated with the inversion data from the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-northeast (NE) Asia campaign which was conducted during spring from March to May 2012. This updated aerosol model was then applied to a single visible channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from a Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the geostationary meteorological satellite, Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate AOD from a single visible channel measurement. For the single-channel retrieval, sensitivity tests showed that perturbations by 4 % (0.926 ± 0.04) in the assumed single scattering albedo (SSA) can result in the retrieval error in AOD by over 20 %. Since the measured reflectance at the top of the atmosphere depends on both AOD and SSA, the overestimation of assumed SSA in the aerosol model leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion data sets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) were categorized by SSAs at 675 nm of 0.92 ± 0.035 for spring (March, April, and May). After the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign in 2012, the SSA during spring showed a slight increase to 0.93 ± 0.035. In terms of the volume size distribution, the mode radius of coarse particles was increased from 2.08 ± 0.40 to 2.14 ± 0.40. While the original aerosol model consists of volume size distribution and refractive indices obtained before 2011, the new model is constructed by using a total data set after the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. The large volume of data in high spatial resolution from this intensive campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the new AOD data sets retrieved from a single-channel algorithm, which uses a precalculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an

  20. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  1. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    DOE PAGES

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; ...

    2015-08-26

    In this study, a new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near themore » Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.« less

  2. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao -Ying; Alpert, Peter; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2015-08-26

    In this study, a new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  3. Oxygen Isotope Variations at the Margin of a CAI Records Circulation Within the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Simon, Steven B.; Matzel, Jennifer E. P.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Grossman, Lawrence; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-03-01

    Micrometer-scale analyses of a calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) and the characteristic mineral bands mantling the CAI reveal that the outer parts of this primitive object have a large range of oxygen isotope compositions. The variations are systematic; the relative abundance of 16O first decreases toward the CAI margin, approaching a planetary-like isotopic composition, then shifts to extremely 16O-rich compositions through the surrounding rim. The variability implies that CAIs probably formed from several oxygen reservoirs. The observations support early and short-lived fluctuations of the environment in which CAIs formed, either because of transport of the CAIs themselves to distinct regions of the solar nebula or because of varying gas composition near the proto-Sun.

  4. Oxygen isotope variations at the margin of a CAI records circulation within the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simon, Justin I; Hutcheon, Ian D; Simon, Steven B; Matzel, Jennifer E P; Ramon, Erick C; Weber, Peter K; Grossman, Lawrence; DePaolo, Donald J

    2011-03-04

    Micrometer-scale analyses of a calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) and the characteristic mineral bands mantling the CAI reveal that the outer parts of this primitive object have a large range of oxygen isotope compositions. The variations are systematic; the relative abundance of (16)O first decreases toward the CAI margin, approaching a planetary-like isotopic composition, then shifts to extremely (16)O-rich compositions through the surrounding rim. The variability implies that CAIs probably formed from several oxygen reservoirs. The observations support early and short-lived fluctuations of the environment in which CAIs formed, either because of transport of the CAIs themselves to distinct regions of the solar nebula or because of varying gas composition near the proto-Sun.

  5. Cloud Retrieval Information Content Studies with the Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Ocean Color Imager (OCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Platnick, Steven; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Science Definition Team (SDT) report released in 2012 defined imager stability requirements for the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) at the sub-percent level. While the instrument suite and measurement requirements are currently being determined, the PACE SDT report provided details on imager options and spectral specifications. The options for a threshold instrument included a hyperspectral imager from 350-800 nm, two near-infrared (NIR) channels, and three short wave infrared (SWIR) channels at 1240, 1640, and 2130 nm. Other instrument options include a variation of the threshold instrument with 3 additional spectral channels at 940, 1378, and 2250 nm and the inclusion of a spectral polarimeter. In this work, we present cloud retrieval information content studies of optical thickness, droplet effective radius, and thermodynamic phase to quantify the potential for continuing the low cloud climate data record established by the MOderate Resolution and Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) missions with the PACE OCI instrument (i.e., non-polarized cloud reflectances and in the absence of midwave and longwave infrared channels). The information content analysis is performed using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) methodology and the Collection 6 simulated cloud reflectance data for the common MODIS/VIIRS algorithm (MODAWG) for Cloud Mask, Cloud-Top, and Optical Properties. We show that using both channels near 2 microns improves the probability of cloud phase discrimination with shortwave-only cloud reflectance retrievals. Ongoing work will extend the information content analysis, currently performed for dark ocean surfaces, to different land surface types.

  6. Hypertext and three-dimensional computer graphics in an all digital PC-based CAI workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, D. L.; Wind, G. G.

    1991-01-01

    In the past several years there has been an enormous increase in the number of computer-assisted instructional (CAI) applications. Many medical educators and physicians have recognized the power and utility of hypertext. Some developers have incorporated simple diagrams, scanned monochrome graphics or still frame photographs from a laser disc or CD-ROM into their hypertext applications. These technologies have greatly increased the role of the microcomputer in education and training. There still remain numerous applications for these tools which are yet to be explored. One of these exciting areas involves the use of three-dimensional computer graphics. An all digital platform increases application portability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1807767

  7. Some "Facts" About CAI: A Quantitative Analysis of the 1976 Index to Computer Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    1976-01-01

    Descriptive quantitative data on various aspects of CAI are reported, including subject matter, author languages, instructional strategies, level of instruction, sources, and central processors. (Author)

  8. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-07-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer.

  9. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    PubMed Central

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer. PMID:26201867

  10. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  11. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  12. Development of a photophoretic optical guide for femtosecond x-ray diffractive imaging of aerosolized nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirian, Richard A.; Awel, Salah; Wiedorn, Max; Horke, Daniel; Roth, Nils; Eckerskorn, Niko O.; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.; Rode, Andrei V.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping of light-absorbing particles in a gas environment is usually dominated by laser-induced thermal or photophoretic forces, which can be orders of magnitude higher than the force due to radiation pressure. Particle guiding with photophoretic forces over large distances in open air was recently realised by an optical pipeline, formed by a vortex laser beam of doughnut-like intensity profile, with a high-intensity ring of light that surrounds a dark core. We are adapting the optical pipeline concept for the purpose of guiding aerosolized particles into the intense focus of a x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), in order to enable high-efficiency femtosecond x-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI). XFEL-based CDI allows single-shot nanometer-resolution imaging, and multi-shot Angstrom-resolution tomography in the case of reproducible nanoparticles, at a time resolution better than 10 femtoseconds. Remarkably, by imaging at timescales shorter than atomic motion, the crucial resolution-limiting effects of radiation damage may be overcome for radiation-sensitive targets such as viruses and biomolecules. Following on our previous work, we are developing an optical first-order Bessel-like beam with a variable-diameter hollow core and an axial-to-lateral aspect ratio up to 2000, that can be used to guide particles with a spatial precision of less than a few µm over centimetre-long distances. We present the ways to control the beam divergence aiming to focus the stream of particles by thermal forces and forces of radiation pressure, analyse the forces acting on the particle in the beam, and uncover the beam structure and intensity to apply for a real-time experiment with XFEL.

  13. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment. Technical Report 75-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    A study to test the effects of learner control of the sequencing of instructional tasks when using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems is described. Using a series of CAI modules to teach the COBOL programing language to military personnel, students were able to control various aspects of their learning environment. Among the research…

  14. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  15. Less Equals More: Coaching/Prompting CAI as a Tool Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ted L.

    Recent reviews of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in various journals suggest that the technological and economic barriers to its adoption and use may be overcome in the very near future, and that CAI will be feasible in a number of educational settings. Computer hardware costs have dropped dramatically in recent years, and a variety of…

  16. Student Conceptions of, and Attitudes toward, Specific Features of a CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira

    1989-01-01

    Describes study of Israeli elementary school students that examined student attitudes toward computer-assisted instruction (CAI) designed to provide drill and practice in arithmetic. Attitudes are compared in relation to students' aptitude, gender, grade level, and socioeconomic status, and implications for the design of CAI systems are discussed.…

  17. Distribution of vanadium and melting of opaque assemblages in Efremovka CAI's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.

    1993-01-01

    A petrographic and chemical study of compact Type A CAI's from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite strongly suggests that the opaque assemblages (OA's) that they contain were molten at temperatures below the CAI silicate solidus, and that the V-rich magnetite presently observed in association with OA's formed by in situ oxidation of their FeNi.

  18. Can CAI Help? The Crisis of Content in Educational Psychology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael C.

    Computer technology per se is not a solution to the problem of the current "crisis in content" in teacher education programs. Computer assisted instruction (CAI) is defined as the on-line interaction of a student with a computer program for purposes of instruction. The drill-and-practice and tutorial CAI programs serve merely as a medium for…

  19. The Effects of the Locus of CAI Control Strategies on the Learning of Mathematics Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetzfried, Leslie; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of the locus of computer assisted instruction (CAI) strategies on low achievers' learning accuracy and efficiency were studied. Externally controlled adaptive, individually based learner control with advisement, and linear control design strategies were used. Effects were examined for CAI strategy, prior achievement, and sex of student.…

  20. Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) on Secondary School Students' Performance in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Afolabi, Adedeji Olufemi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on secondary school students' performance in biology. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI in individualised or cooperative learning settings package was examined. The research was a quasi experimental involving a 3 x 2 factorial…

  1. Audio-Tutorial and CAI Aids for Problem Solving in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    1970-01-01

    Starting from a successful audio-tutorial program, the author initiated a computer assisted tutorial program in solving chemistry problems. Discusses the advantages of computer assisted instruction (CAI) over audiotapes and the advantages of both over conventional instructional methods. Presents a flow chart of a CAI program on a calorimetry…

  2. INAA of CAIs from the Maralinga CK4 chondrite: Effects of parent body thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Keller, L. P.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Maralinga is an anomalous CK4 carbonaceous chondrite which contains numerous Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) unlike the other members of the CK group. These CAI's are characterized by abundant green hercynitic spinel intergrown with plagioclase and high-Ca clinopyroxene, and a total lack of melilite. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to further characterize the meteorite, with special focus on the CAI's. High sensitivity INAA was done on eight sample disks about 100-150 microns in diameter obtained from a normal 30 micron thin section with a diamond microcoring device. The CAI's are enriched by 60-70X bulk meteorite values in Zn, suggesting that the substantial exchange of Fe for Mg that made the spinel in the CAI's hercynitic also allowed efficient scavenging of Zn from the rest of the meteorite during parent body thermal metamorphism. Less mobile elements appear to have maintained their initial heterogeneity.

  3. Coincident Aerosol and H2O Retrievals versus HSI Imager Field Campaign ReportH2O Retrievals versus HSI Imager Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Gail P.; Cipar, John; Armstrong, Peter S.; van den Bosch, J.

    2016-05-01

    Two spectrally calibrated tarpaulins (tarps) were co-located at a fixed Global Positioning System (GPS) position on the gravel antenna field at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Their placement was timed to coincide with the overflight of a new hyperspectral imaging satellite. The intention was to provide an analysis of the data obtained, including the measured and retrieved spectral albedos for the calibration tarps. Subsequently, a full suite of retrieved values of H2O column, and the aerosol overburden, were to be compared to those determined by alternate SGP ground truth assets. To the extent possible, the down-looking cloud images would be assessed against the all-sky images. Because cloud contamination above a certain level precludes the inversion processing of the satellite data, coupled with infrequent targeting opportunities, clear-sky conditions were imposed. The SGP site was chosen not only as a target of opportunity for satellite validation, but as perhaps the best coincident field measurement site, as established by DOE’s ARM Facility. The satellite team had every expectation of using the information obtained from the SGP to improve the inversion products for all subsequent satellite images, including the cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance assessment for subsequent and historic image collections. Coordinating with the SGP onsite team, four visits, all in 2009, to the Central Facility occurred: • June 6-8 (successful exploratory visit to plan tarp placements, etc.) • July 18-24 (canceled because of forecast for heavy clouds) • Sep 9-12 (ground tarps placed, onset of clouds) • Nov 7-9 (visit ultimately canceled because of weather predictions). As noted, in each instance, any significant overcast prediction precluded image collection from the satellite. Given the long task-scheduling procedures

  4. Design Specification for Test and Evaluation of the NATO Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS) Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-23

    testing (i.e., testing of individual interfaces) for a critical subset of the SWG CAIS interfaces. The second category of testing activities includes...for correctness in the functionality of critical interfaces. These critical interfaces are defined in Section 2.2. The second category, usability...QUEUE-MANAGEMENT CAM-.STANDARD None CAM- DEFENITIONS CAMSJO..DEINITJONS CAI IST-MANAGEMENT CAIS.ACCESS-.CONTROL- MANAGEMENT CAIS-SCROLL-TERMNAL-10 CA1S

  5. Image-Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Apple Image-Processing Educator (AIPE) explores ability of microcomputers to provide personalized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in digital image processing of remotely sensed images. AIPE is "proof-of-concept" system, not polished production system. User-friendly prompts provide access to explanations of common features of digital image processing and of sample programs that implement these features.

  6. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  7. Two Generations of Sodic Metasomatism in an Allende Type B CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-Aluminum rich inclusions (CAI) in Allende, along with other chondritic compo-nents, experienced variable amounts and types of alter-ation of their mineralogy and chemistry. In CAIs, one of the principal types of alteration led to the depo-sition of nepheline and sodalite. Here we extend initial obervations of alteration in an Allende CAI, focus-ing on occurences of nepheline and a nepheline-like phase with unusally high Ca (referred to as "calcic nepheline" in this abstract). Detailed petrographic and microchemical observations of alteration phases in an Allende Type B CAI (TS4) show that two separate generations of "nepheline", with very distinct composi-tions, crystallized around the margins and in the interi-or of this CAI. We use observations of micro-faults as potential temporal markers, in order to place constraints on the timing of alteration events in Allende. These observa-tions of micro-faulting that truncate and offset one gen-eration of "nepheline" indicate that some "nepheline" crystallized before incorporation of the CAI into the Allende parent-body. Some of the sodic metasomatism in some Allende CAIs occurred prior to Allende par-ent-body assembly. The earlier generation of "calcic-nepheline" has a very distinctive, calcium-rich compo-sition, and the second generation is low in calcium, and matches the compositions of nephelines found in near-by altered chondrules, and in the Allende matrix.

  8. Microstructural Investigation of a Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J.; Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.; Simon, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi-layered mineral sequences that surround many CAIs. These rim layers consist of the primary minerals found in the CAI interiors, but vary in their mineralogy. Several models for their origin have been proposed including condensation, reaction with a nebular gas, evaporation, or combinations of these. However, there still is little consensus on how and when the rims formed. Here, we describe the microstructure and mineralogy of a WL rim on a type B CAI from the Vigarano CV(sub red) chondrite using FIB/TEM to better understand the astrophysical significance of WL rim formation.

  9. Exploring the effects of landscape structure on aerosol optical depth (AOD) patterns using GIS and HJ-1B images.

    PubMed

    Ye, Luping; Fang, Linchuan; Tan, Wenfeng; Wang, Yunqiang; Huang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    A GIS approach and HJ-1B images were employed to determine the effect of landscape structure on aerosol optical depth (AOD) patterns. Landscape metrics, fractal analysis and contribution analysis were proposed to quantitatively illustrate the impact of land use on AOD patterns. The high correlation between the mean AOD and landscape metrics indicates that both the landscape composition and spatial structure affect the AOD pattern. Additionally, the fractal analysis demonstrated that the densities of built-up areas and bare land decreased from the high AOD centers to the outer boundary, but those of water and forest increased. These results reveal that the built-up area is the main positive contributor to air pollution, followed by bare land. Although bare land had a high AOD, it made a limited contribution to regional air pollution due to its small spatial extent. The contribution analysis further elucidated that built-up areas and bare land can increase air pollution more strongly in spring than in autumn, whereas forest and water have a completely opposite effect. Based on fractal and contribution analyses, the different effects of cropland are ascribed to the greater vegetation coverage from farming activity in spring than in autumn. The opposite effect of cropland on air pollution reveals that green coverage and human activity also influence AOD patterns. Given that serious concerns have been raised regarding the effects of built-up areas, bare land and agricultural air pollutant emissions, this study will add fundamental knowledge of the understanding of the key factors influencing urban air quality.

  10. On relationship between aerosols and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko

    2015-04-01

    Since aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is a key parameter of aerosols and description of the Earth's radiation budget, it is widely measured from ground sun photometer network NASA/AERONET [Holben et al., 1998] and from satellite. Fine and surface level aerosol particle called PM2.5, whose diameter is 2.5 μ m or less, is a well-known parameter for understanding polluted level of air. Smirnov et al. reported a good agreement between ground based AERONET AOT (870 nm) and dust concentrations at Barbados [Smirnov et al., 2000]. Wang and Christopher founded a good correlation between satellite based MODIS AOT product and PM2.5 in Alabama area [Wang and 2003]. Long range transported dusts, particularly Asian dust events, are easy to change the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. The vertical profile is important to estimate PM information because both AOT information measured from ground or satellite are integrated value of aerosol extinction from ground to space, i.e. columnar AOT. Thus, we have also proposed correlations between ground level PM2.5 and AERONET AOT (670 nm) in two cases of ordinary air condition and dusty days [Sano et al., 2010]. In this work, we investigate the relationship between PM2.5 and AERONET AOT considering LIDAR measurements. Note that all of instruments are set up at the roof of the University building (50 m) and collocated in 10 m area. Surface-level AOT is derived from AERONET AOT multiplied by an averaged vertical aerosol extinction given by LIDAR. Note that the definition of surface-level AOT in this work is assumed as AOT up to 500 m height. Introduction of surface-level AOT enables to avoid the contamination of dusty aerosol signal existing at high altitude from columnar AOT. The cloud aerosol imager (CAI) on GOSAT satellite has four observing wavelengths, 380, 670, 870 nm, and 1.6 μ m. In this work three channels are selected to estimate aerosol information. Look-up table (LUT) method is applied to estimate the optical properties

  11. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIs Record Varying Composition of Protosolar Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-03-01

    High-resolution O-isotopic zoning profiles obtained by NanoSIMS indicate a progressive and cyclic record of exchange between CAIs and distinct nebular gases. Numerical models are used to constrain conditions and duration of these exchange events.

  12. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging of the morphology of submicrometer aerosol containing organic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Veghte, Daniel P; Bittner, Danielle Rae; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-03-04

    The effects of aerosol particles on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate are determined in part by the internal arrangement of compounds within the particles. To characterize the morphology of internally mixed aerosol particles in the accumulation mode size regime, we have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the phase separation behavior of dry, submicrometer particles composed of ammonium sulfate mixed with carboxylic acids (adipic, azelaic, citric, glutaric, malonic, pimelic, suberic, and succinic acid). Determining the morphology of dry particles is important for understanding laboratory studies of aerosol optical properties, reactivity, and cloud condensation nucleus activity, results from field instruments where aerosol particles are dried prior to analysis, and atmospheric processes like deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation that occur on dried particles. We observe homogeneous morphologies for highly soluble organic compounds. For organic compounds with limited aqueous solubility, partially engulfed structures are observed. At intermediate aqueous solubilities, small particles are homogeneous and larger particles are partially engulfed. Results are compared to previous studies of liquid-liquid phase separation in supermicrometer particles and the impact of these dry particle morphologies on aerosol-climate interactions are discussed.

  13. I. The effect of volcanic aerosols on ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica. II. A novel method for enhancing subsurface radar imaging using radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitas, Steven Ronald

    The theory of radiative transfer is used to explain how a stratospheric aerosol layer may, for large solar zenith angles, increase the flux of UV-B light at the ground. As previous explanations are heuristic and incomplete, I first provide a rigorous and complete explanation of how this occurs. I show that an aerosol layer lying above Antarctica during spring will decrease the integrated daily dose of biologically weighted irradiance, weighted by the erythema action spectrum, by only up to 5%. Thus after a volcanic eruption, life in Antarctica during spring will suffer the combined effects of the spring ozone hole and ozone destruction induced by volcanic aerosols, with the latter effect only slightly offset by aerosol scattering. I extend subsurface radar imaging by considering the additional information that may be derived from radar interferometry. I show that, under the conditions that temporal and spatial decorrelation between observations is small so that the effects of these decorrelations do not swamp the signature expected from a subsurface layer, the depth of burial of the lower surface may be derived. Also, the echoes from the lower and upper surfaces may be separated. The method is tested with images acquired by SIR-C of the area on the Egypt/Sudan border where buried river channels were first observed by SIR-A. Temporal decorrelation between the images, due to some combination of physical changes in the scene, changes in the spacecraft attitude and errors in the processing by NASA of the raw radar echoes into the synthetic aperture radar images, swamps the expected signature for a layer up to 40 meters thick. I propose a test to determine whether or not simultaneous observations are required, and then detail the radar system requirements for successful application of the method for both possible outcomes of the test. I also describe in detail the possible applications of the method. These include measuring the depth of burial of ice in the polar

  14. Aerosol retrieval in hazy atmosphere by using polarization and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Nakata, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in the Earth atmosphere model. This work intends to propose an algorithm for multiple light scattering simulations in the hazy polarized radiation field. We have already solved the scalar radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols by the method of successive order of scattering, which is named scalar-MSOS. The term "scalar" indicates radiance alone in the treatment of radiative transfer problem against "vector" involving polarized radiation field. The satellite polarimetric sensor POLDER-1, 2, 3 has shown that the spectro-photopolarimetry of terrestrial atmosphere is very useful for observation of the Earth, especially for aerosols. JAXA has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM satellite. GCOM-C will board the polarimetric sensor SGLI in 2017. It is highly likely that large-scale aerosol episodes will continue to occur, because the air pollution becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Then many potential applications for the kind of radiation simulation by MSOS considering the polarization information denoted by Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V), named vector-MSOS, are desired. It is shown here that dense aerosol episodes can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation model composed of the proposed aerosol models. In addition our vector-MSOS is examined in practice by combination use of PARASOL/POLDER, GOSAT/CAI and Aqua/MODIS data.

  15. Single-particle investigation of summertime and wintertime Antarctic sea spray aerosols using low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry, and ATR-FTIR imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Cho, Hye-Rin; Hwang, Hee Jin; Do Hur, Soon; Gim, Yeontae; Ro, Chul-Un

    2016-11-01

    Two aerosol samples collected at King Sejong Korean scientific research station, Antarctica, on 9 December 2011 in the austral summer (sample S1) and 23 July 2012 in the austral winter (sample S2), when the oceanic chlorophyll a levels on the collection days of the samples were quite different, by ˜ 19 times (2.46 vs. 0.13 µg L-1, respectively), were investigated on a single-particle basis using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry (RMS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging techniques to obtain their characteristics based on the elemental chemical compositions, molecular species, and mixing state. X-ray analysis showed that the supermicron summertime and wintertime Antarctic aerosol samples have different elemental chemical compositions, even though all the individual particles analyzed were sea spray aerosols (SSAs); i.e., the contents of C, O, Ca, S, and Si were more elevated, whereas Cl was more depleted, for sample S1 than for sample S2. Based on qualitative analysis of the chemical species present in individual SSAs by the combined application of RMS and ATR-FTIR imaging, different organic species were observed in samples S1 and S2; i.e., Mg hydrate salts of alanine were predominant in samples S1 and S2, whereas Mg salts of fatty acids internally mixed with Mg hydrate salts of alanine were significant in sample S2. Although CaSO4 was observed significantly in both samples S1 and S2, other inorganic species, such as Na2SO4, NaNO3, Mg(NO3)2, SiO2, and CH3SO3Mg, were observed more significantly in sample S1, suggesting that those compounds may be related to the higher phytoplankton activity in summer.

  16. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) on 11th Graders' Attitudes to Biology and CAI and Understanding of Reproduction in Plants and Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola; Hudson, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the use of the combination of lecture, discussion, and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) significantly improved students' attitudes toward biology and their understanding of reproduction in plants and animals. Studies grade 11 Jamaican female students (n=77) from two traditional high schools in Kingston. (Contains 19…

  17. A Discussion of Behavioral Technology Laboratories CAI Projects In Relation to a CAI Test-Bed Concept. Technical Report Number 71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigney, Joseph W.

    The elements of an instructional system are discussed and some literature bearing on these is reviewed. The discussion is intended to stimulate thought about an instructional system as a computer-assisted instructional (CAI) test-bed and to point out some noteworthy laboratory research results, particularly in cognitive psychology. Following this,…

  18. Formation of halogen-induced secondary organic aerosol (XOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, Katharina; Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Held, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) are very important due to their potential of stratospheric ozone depletion and surface ozone destruction. RHS seem to interact with precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) similarly to common atmospheric oxidants like OH radicals and ozone. The potential interaction of RHS with preformed SOA has recently been studied (Ofner et al., 2012). Although aerosol formation from reaction of RHS with typical SOA precursors was previously studied (e.g. Cai et al., 2006), no data are available on bromine-induced aerosol formation from organic precursors yet. An aerosol smog-chamber was used to examine the halogen-induced secondary organic aerosol (XOA) formation under atmospheric conditions using simulated sunlight. With a concentration of 10 ppb for the organic precursor, 2 ppb for molecular chlorine, and 10 ppb for molecular bromine, the experimental setup is close to ambient conditions. By combined measurements of the aerosol size distribution, ozone and NOx mixing ratios, as well as the decay of the organic precursor, aerosol yields and aerosol growth rates were determined. The decay of the organic precursor was analyzed by capillary gas chromatography coupled with flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) and the aerosol size distribution was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Additionally, with the decay rate of the precursor and the calculated photolysis rates of molecular halogen species, based on the well-known spectrum of the solar simulator, mechanistic details on the XOA formation pathways can be determined. We observed XOA formation even at very low precursor and RHS concentrations with a diameter mode at 10-20 nm and a number concentration up to 1000000 particles cm-3. While the XOA formation from chlorine is very rapid, the interaction of bromine with the organic precursors is about five times slower. The aerosol yield reached maximum values of 0.01 for the reaction of chlorine with α-pinene and 0.0004 for

  19. Fine-Gained CAIs in Comet Samples: Moderate Refractory Character and Comparison to Small Refractory Inclusions in Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S

    2017-01-01

    Examination of >200 comet Wild 2 particles collected by the Stardust (SD) mission shows that the CAI abundance of comet Wild 2's rocky material is near 1% and that nearly 50% of all bulbous tracks will contain at least one recognizable CAI fragment. A similar abundance to Wild 2 is found in a giant cluster IDP thought to be of cometary origin. The properties of these CAIs and their comparison with meteoritic CAIs provide important clues on the role of CAIs in the early Solar System (SS) and how they were transported to the edge of the solar nebula where Kuiper Belt comets formed. Previously, only two CAIs in comet Wild 2 had been identified and studied in detail. Here we present 2 new Wild 2 CAIs and 2 from a giant cluster cometary IDP, describe their mineralogical characteristics and show that they are most analogous to nodules in spinel-rich, fine-grained inclusions (FGIs) observed in CV3 and other chondrites. Additionally, we present new O isotope measurements from one CAI from comet Wild 2 and show that its oxygen isotopic composition is similar to some FGIs. This is only the second CAI from Wild 2 in which O isotopes have been measured.

  20. Evidence for extinct 135Cs from Ba isotopes in Allende CAIs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Mezger, K.; Desch, S. J.; Scherer, E. E.; Horstmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    The abundance and distribution of isotopes throughout the Solar System can be used to constrain the number and type of nucleosynthetic events that contributed material to the early nebula. Barium is particularly well suited to quantifying the degree of isotope heterogeneity in the Solar System because it comprises seven stable isotopes that were synthesized by three different nucleosynthetic processes (s-, r-, and p-processes), all of which contributed material to the Solar System. There is also potential contribution to 135Ba from short-lived radioisotope 135Cs, conclusive evidence for which is yet to be reported. Four Allende (CV3) Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAI 1, CAI 2, CAI 4, CAI 5) and one Allende dark inclusion (DI) were analyzed for Ba isotope variability. Two CAIs (CAI 2 and CAI 5) display 135Ba excesses that are not accompanied by 137Ba anomalies. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion 1 displays a 135Ba excess that is possibly coupled with a 137Ba excess, and the remaining refractory inclusions (CAI 2 and DI) have terrestrial Ba isotope compositions. These Ba isotope data are presented in conjunction with published whole rock Ba isotope data from individual Allende CAIs. The enrichment in 135Ba and absence of coupled 137Ba excesses in CAI 2 and CAI 5 is interpreted to indicate that the anomalies are not purely nucleosynthetic in origin but also contain contributions (16-48 ppm) from the decay of short-lived 135Cs. The majority of Allende CAIs studied to date may also have similar contributions from 135Cs on the basis of higher than expected 135Ba excesses if the Ba isotope anomalies were purely nucleosynthetic in origin. The 135Ba anomalies appear not to be coupled with superchondritic Cs/Ba, which may imply that the contribution to 135Ba did not occur via in situ decay of live 135Cs. However, it is feasible that the CAIs had a superchondritic Cs/Ba during decay of 135Cs, but Cs was subsequently removed from the system during aqueous alteration on the parent body

  1. The ethnoecology of Caiçara metapopulations (Atlantic Forest, Brazil): ecological concepts and questions

    PubMed Central

    Begossi, Alpina

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is represented on the coast of Brazil by approximately 7,5% of remnants, much of these concentrated on the country's SE coast. Within these southeastern remnants, we still find the coastal Caiçaras who descend from Native Indians and Portuguese Colonizers. The maintenance of such populations, and their existence in spite of the deforestation that occurred on the Atlantic Forest coast, deserves especial attention and analysis. In this study, I address, in particular, the Caiçaras who live on the coast of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, illustrating with examples of coastal inhabitants from other areas, such as Bahia State (NE coast) and of other forested areas (riverine caboclos of the Amazon). The major focus of this study, based on previous research, performed since 1986 in several populations or villages of the Atlantic Forest coast, is to understand the resilience of the Caiçaras, which is analyzed using ecological concepts, such as metapopulation, resilience and adaptive cycles. The Caiçara populations are located on islands (Búzios, Comprida, Grande, Ilhabela, Jaguanum, Gipóia) and on the coast (Bertioga, Puruba, Picinguaba, among others). Information gathered about the Caiçaras regarding the economic cycles of the local regions, along with ecological, historical and economic data available, are used to understand such resilience, and are complemented with comparative examples from the Brazilian Amazon and with variables such as the local restrictions imposed by environmental governmental agencies. PMID:17010204

  2. Do comets have chondrules and CAIs? Evidence from the Leonid meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Campins, Humberto

    2004-10-01

    Chondrules, silicate spheres typically 0.1 to 1 mm in diameter, are the most abundant constituents in the most common meteorites falling on Earth, the ordinary chondrites. In addition, many primitive meteorites have calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). The question of whether comets have chondrules or CAIs is relevant to understanding what the interior of a comet is like and what a cometary meteorite might be like. In addition, one prominent model for forming chondrules and CAIs, the X-wind model, predicts their presence in comets, while most other models do not. At present, the best way to search for chondrules and CAIs in comets is through meteor showers derived from comets, in particular, the Leonid meteor shower. Evidence potentially could be found in the overall mass distribution of the shower, in chemical analyses of meteors, or in light curves. There is no evidence for a chondrule abundance in the Leonid meteors similar to that found in chondritic meteorites. There is intriguing evidence for chondrule- or CAI-sized objects in a small fraction of the light curves, but further work is required to generate a definitive test.

  3. Mineralogy and Petrology of EK-459-5-1, A Type B1 CAI from Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are a type of coarse-grained clast composed of Ca-, Al-, and Mg-rich silicates and oxides found in chondrite meteorites. Type B (CAIs) are exclusively found in the CV chondrite meteorites and are the most well studied type of inclusion found in chondritic meteorites. Type B1 CAIs are distinguished by a nearly monomineralic rim of melilite that surrounds an interior predominantly composed of melilite, fassaite (Ti and Al-rich clinopyroxene), anorthite, and spinel with varying amounts of other minor primary and secondary phases. The formation of Type B CAIs has received considerable attention in the course of CAI research and quantitative models, experimental results and observations from Type B inclusions remain largely in disagreement. Recent experimental results and quantitative models have shown that the formation of B1 mantles could have occurred by the evaporative loss of Si and Mg during the crystallization of these objects. However, comparative studies suggest that the lower bulk SiO2 compositions in B1s result in more prior melilite crystallization before the onset of fassaite and anorthite crystallization leading to the formation of thick melilite rich rims in B1 inclusions. Detailed petrographic and cosmochemical studies of these inclusions will further our understanding of these complex objects.

  4. The Formation Of The First Solids In The Solar System: An Investigation Of CAI Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillifet, Esther; Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Aléon, J.

    2012-10-01

    Chondritic meteorites are primitive bodies and therefore an important source of information on the first moments of planets formation. Chondrites contain several materials especially calcium and aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs), known to be the oldest objects of the solar system (4.567 Gyr - Amelin et al., 2002; Connelly et al., 2008) and thus the first solids to be formed. CAIs appear in various textures, sizes and compositions in chondrites. Though, all of them should have formed at high temperature (1300-1800 K) in the same region of the solar nebula by condensation from the gas (e.g. Grossman, 1972; Yoneda & Grossman, 1995; Petaev & Wood, 1998; Ebel & Grossman 2000). To answer this problem we study the CAI formation within the solar nebula using numerical simulations. For this work we developed a self consistent thermodynamical model of the solar nebula (see associated talk from Baillié et. al ) based on previous works (Calvet et. al, 1991; Hueso & Guillot, 2005; Dullemond, Dominik and Natta, 2001). Using this model, we simulate the young system with Lagrangian Implicit Disk Transport code (LIDT - Charnoz et. al, 2010). We will focus on the very first instants of the CAIs within the few years following their condensation. We will report our first results in terms of thermal history and investigate if turbulence-driven transport may explain the CAI diversity.

  5. Experimental Determination of Li, Be and B Partitioning During CAI Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Brenan, J M; Phinney, D L

    2005-01-12

    The main focus of the work is to develop a better understanding of the distribution of the elements B, Be and Li in melilite, fassaitic clinop clinopy-roxene, anorthite and spinel, which are the primary constituents of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). These elements are the parent or decay products of short-lived nuclides (specifically, {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be) formed by cosmic ray spallation reactions on silicon and oxygen. Recent observations suggest that some CAIs contain ''fossil'' {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be in the form of ''excess'' amounts of their decay products (B and Li). The exact timing of {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be production is unknown, but if it occurred early in CAI history, it could constrain the birthplace of CAIs to be within a limited region near the infant sun. Other interpretations are possible, however, and bear little significance to early CAI genesis. In order to interpret the anomalies as being ''primary'', and thus originating at high temperature, information on the intermineral partitioning of both parent and daughter elements is required.

  6. The ethnoecology of Caiçara metapopulations (Atlantic Forest, Brazil): ecological concepts and questions.

    PubMed

    Begossi, Alpina

    2006-09-29

    The Atlantic Forest is represented on the coast of Brazil by approximately 7.5% of remnants, much of these concentrated on the country's SE coast. Within these southeastern remnants, we still find the coastal Caiçaras who descend from Native Indians and Portuguese Colonizers. The maintenance of such populations, and their existence in spite of the deforestation that occurred on the Atlantic Forest coast, deserves special attention and analysis. In this study, I address, in particular, the Caiçaras who live on the coast of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, illustrating with examples of coastal inhabitants from other areas, such as Bahia State (NE coast) and of other forested areas (riverine caboclos of the Amazon). The major focus of this study, based on previous research, performed since 1986 in several populations or villages of the Atlantic Forest coast, is to understand the resilience of the Caiçaras, which is analyzed using ecological concepts, such as metapopulation, resilience and adaptive cycles. The Caiçara populations are located on islands (Búzios, Comprida, Grande, Ilhabela, Jaguanum, Gipóia) and on the coast (Bertioga, Puruba, Picinguaba, among others). Information gathered about the Caiçaras regarding the economic cycles of the local regions, along with ecological, historical and economic data available, are used to understand such resilience, and are complemented with comparative examples from the Brazilian Amazon and with variables such as the local restrictions imposed by environmental governmental agencies.

  7. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  8. A FIB/TEM Study of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multilayered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Several processes have been proposed for WL rim formation, including condensation, flash-heating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these [e.g. 1-7], but no consensus exists. Our previous coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and NanoSIMS O isotopic measurements showed that a WL rim experienced flash heating events in a nebular environment with planetary O isotopic composition, distinct from the (16)O-rich formation environment [6]. Our efforts have focused on CAIs from the CV(sub red) chondrites, especially Vigarano, because these have escaped much of the parent body alteration effects that are common in CAIs from CV(sub ox) group.

  9. Arginine oscillation explains Na+ independence in the substrate/product antiporter CaiT.

    PubMed

    Kalayil, Sissy; Schulze, Sabrina; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2013-10-22

    Most secondary-active transporters transport their substrates using an electrochemical ion gradient. In contrast, the carnitine transporter (CaiT) is an ion-independent, l-carnitine/γ-butyrobetaine antiporter belonging to the betaine/carnitine/choline transporter family of secondary transporters. Recently determined crystal structures of CaiT from Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis revealed an inverted five-transmembrane-helix repeat similar to that in the amino acid/Na(+) symporter LeuT. The ion independence of CaiT makes it unique in this family. Here we show that mutations of arginine 262 (R262) make CaiT Na(+)-dependent. The transport activity of R262 mutants increased by 30-40% in the presence of a membrane potential, indicating substrate/Na(+) cotransport. Structural and biochemical characterization revealed that R262 plays a crucial role in substrate binding by stabilizing the partly unwound TM1' helix. Modeling CaiT from P. mirabilis in the outward-open and closed states on the corresponding structures of the related symporter BetP reveals alternating orientations of the buried R262 sidechain, which mimic sodium binding and unbinding in the Na(+)-coupled substrate symporters. We propose that a similar mechanism is operative in other Na(+)/H(+)-independent transporters, in which a positively charged amino acid replaces the cotransported cation. The oscillation of the R262 sidechain in CaiT indicates how a positive charge triggers the change between outward-open and inward-open conformations as a unifying critical step in LeuT-type transporters.

  10. Airborne Open Polar/Imaging Nephelometer for Ice Particles in Cirrus Clouds and Aerosols Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, JV

    2016-04-01

    The Open Imaging Nephelometer (O-I-Neph) instrument is an adaptation of a proven laboratory instrument built and tested at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The instrument design of both imaging nephelometers uses a narrow-beam laser source and a wide-field-of-view imaging camera to capture the entire scattering-phase function in one image, quasi-instantaneously.

  11. Oxygen reservoirs in the early solar nebula inferred from an Allende CAI.

    PubMed

    Young, E D; Russell, S S

    1998-10-16

    Ultraviolet laser microprobe analyses of a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite suggest that a line with a slope of exactly 1.00 on a plot of delta (17)O against delta (18)O represents the primitive oxygen isotope reservoir of the early solar nebula. Most meteorites are enriched in (17)O and (18)O relative to this line, and their oxygen isotope ratios can be explained by mass fractionation or isotope exchange initiating from the primitive reservoir. These data establish a link between the oxygen isotopic composition of the abundant ordinary chondrites and the primitive (16)O-rich component of CAIs.

  12. Oxygen reservoirs in the early solar nebula inferred from an allende CAI

    PubMed

    Young; Russell

    1998-10-16

    Ultraviolet laser microprobe analyses of a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite suggest that a line with a slope of exactly 1.00 on a plot of delta17O against delta18O represents the primitive oxygen isotope reservoir of the early solar nebula. Most meteorites are enriched in 17O and 18O relative to this line, and their oxygen isotope ratios can be explained by mass fractionation or isotope exchange initiating from the primitive reservoir. These data establish a link between the oxygen isotopic composition of the abundant ordinary chondrites and the primitive 16O-rich component of CAIs.

  13. Processing of refractory meteorite inclusions (CAIs) in parent-body atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, Morris; Bunch, T. E.; Cassen, Pat; Reynolds, Ray T.; Chang, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in refractory meteorites are shown to have been subject to partial melting during a suitably high gas density/small scale height regime arising during gasdynamic deceleration in a temporary atmosphere around an accreting parent body. The presence of dust in such an atmosphere would have increased the pressure gradient with height, lowering the boiloff rate, and permitting dust particles to become trapped in the partially melted material. CAIs may therefore be studied as probes of a primitive atmosphere.

  14. What we Hope to Learn about Global Mineral Dust Aerosols from EOS Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    On global scales, just a few broad atmospheric aerosol compositional groups are commonly observed. Of these, "mineral dust" is the only group which both contains non-spherical particles, and typically has size distributions with enough large particles for particle shape to affect its visible-light-scattering properties. The MISR instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM sun-synchronous, polar orbit aboard the EOS Terra satellite in 1999. MISR will measure the upwelling visible radiance from Earth in 4 spectral bands centered at 446, 558, 672, and 866 nm, at each of 9 emission angles spread out in the forward and aft directions along the flight path at +/-70.5 deg, +/-60.0 deg, +/-45.6 deg, +/-26.1deg, and nadir. Over a period of 7 minutes, as the spacecraft flies along, a 360 km wide swath of Earth will successively be viewed by each of the cameras, allowing MISR to sample a very large range of scattering angles; in mid latitudes, the instrument will observe scattering angles between about 60 deg and 160 deg. Global coverage will be acquired about once in 9 days at the equator; the nominal mission lifetime is 6 years. The distinction in single scattering phase function between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles, with a broad range of aspect ratios, shows up strongly for scattering angles ranging from about 90 deg to near 180 deg. For non-spherical particle distributions, single scattering phase functions tend to be much flatter in this region than for spherical particles. Since MISR samples the relevant range of scattering angles very well, we expect to be able to make critical distinctions between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles with MISR data. We anticipate that the new multiangle, multispectral data from MISR will also contain other information about particle properties, a major step beyond current spacecraft remote sensing retrievals, which obtain aerosol

  15. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  16. Thermal and chemical evolution in the early solar system as recorded by FUN CAIs: Part I - Petrology, mineral chemistry, and isotopic composition of Allende FUN CAI CMS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. D.; Ushikubo, T.; Bullock, E. S.; Janney, P. E.; Hines, R. R.; Kita, N. T.; Hervig, R. L.; MacPherson, G. J.; Mendybaev, R. A.; Richter, F. M.; Wadhwa, M.

    2017-03-01

    Detailed petrologic, geochemical and isotopic analyses of a new FUN CAI from the Allende CV3 meteorite (designated CMS-1) indicate that it formed by extensive melting and evaporation of primitive precursor material(s). The precursor material(s) condensed in a 16O-rich region (δ17O and δ18O ∼ -49‰) of the inner solar nebula dominated by gas of solar composition at total pressures of ∼10-3-10-6 bar. Subsequent melting of the precursor material(s) was accompanied by evaporative loss of magnesium, silicon and oxygen resulting in large mass-dependent isotope fractionations in these elements (δ25Mg = 30.71-39.26‰, δ29Si = 14.98-16.65‰, and δ18O = -41.57 to -15.50‰). This evaporative loss resulted in a bulk composition similar to that of compact Type A and Type B CAIs, but very distinct from the composition of the original precursor condensate(s). Kinetic fractionation factors and the measured mass-dependent fractionation of silicon and magnesium in CMS-1 suggest that ∼80% of the silicon and ∼85% of the magnesium were lost from its precursor material(s) through evaporative processes. These results suggest that the precursor material(s) of normal and FUN CAIs condensed in similar environments, but subsequently evolved under vastly different conditions such as total gas pressure. The chemical and isotopic differences between normal and FUN CAIs could be explained by sorting of early solar system materials into distinct physical and chemical regimes, in conjunction with discrete heating events, within the protoplanetary disk.

  17. Gender Role, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in CAIS ("XY-Women") Compared With Subfertile and Infertile 46,XX Women.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Franziska; Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2016-01-01

    The perception of gender development of individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) as unambiguously female has recently been challenged in both qualitative data and case reports of male gender identity. The aim of the mixed-method study presented was to examine the self-perception of CAIS individuals regarding different aspects of gender and to identify commonalities and differences in comparison with subfertile and infertile XX-chromosomal women with diagnoses of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study sample comprised 11 participants with CAIS, 49 with MRKHS, and 55 with PCOS. Gender identity was assessed by means of a multidimensional instrument, which showed significant differences between the CAIS group and the XX-chromosomal women. Other-than-female gender roles and neither-female-nor-male sexes/genders were reported only by individuals with CAIS. The percentage with a not exclusively androphile sexual orientation was unexceptionally high in the CAIS group compared to the prevalence in "normative" women and the clinical groups. The findings support the assumption made by Meyer-Bahlburg ( 2010 ) that gender outcome in people with CAIS is more variable than generally stated. Parents and professionals should thus be open to courses of gender development other than typically female in individuals with CAIS.

  18. Revision of the Oriental leafhopper genus Destinoides Cai & He (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Ledrinae), with a new synonym and two new combinations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Webb, Michael D; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-04-08

    The leafhopper genus Destinoides Cai & He is revised to include two species D. latifrons (Walker 1851, Ledra) n. comb. and D. conspicuus (Distant 1907, Petalocephala) n. comb. Destinoides fasciata Cai & He, 2000 is placed as a junior synonym of D. latifrons, syn. nov. These two species are redescribed and illustrated in detail and a key is given based on the males.

  19. Stable Magnesium Isotope Variation in Melilite Mantle of Allende Type B1 CAI EK 459-5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Jeffcoat, C. R.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the earliest formed crystalline material in our solar system and they record early Solar System processes. Here we present petrographic and delta Mg-25 data of melilite mantles in a Type B1 CAI that records early solar nebular processes.

  20. A novel method to retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness from high-resolution optical satellite images using an extended version of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOTBAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robin; Milton, Edward; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data has many important applications including atmospheric correction of satellite imagery and monitoring of particulate matter air pollution. Current data products are generally available at a kilometre-scale resolution, but many applications require far higher resolutions. For example, particulate matter concentrations vary on a metre-scale, and thus data products at a similar scale are required to provide accurate assessments of particle densities and allow effective monitoring of air quality and analysis of local air quality effects on health. A novel method has been developed which retrieves per-pixel AOT values from high-resolution (~30m) satellite data. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers - including both bright and dark surfaces - and requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT). The HOT was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to provide AOT data instead. Significant extensions include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values through radiative transfer modelling. This novel method will enable many new applications of AOT data that were impossible with previously available low-resolution data, and has the potential to contribute significantly to our understanding of the air quality on health, the accuracy of satellite image atmospheric correction and the role of aerosols in the climate system.

  1. Remote Sensing of Aerosol and Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate from EOS Terra MODIS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Tanre, Didier; Remer, Lorraine; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent launch of EOS-Terra into polar orbit has begun to revolutionize remote sensing of aerosol and their effect on climate. Terra has five instruments, two of them,Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) are designed to monitor global aerosol in two different complementary ways. Here we shall discuss the use of the multispectral measurements of MODIS to derive: (1) the global distribution of aerosol load (and optical thickness) over ocean and land; (2) to measure the impact of aerosol on reflection of sunlight to space; and (3) to measure the ability of aerosol to absorb solar radiation. These measurements have direct applications on the understanding of the effect of aerosol on climate, the ability to predict climate change, and on the monitoring of dust episodes and man-made pollution. Principles of remote sensing of aerosol from MODIS will be discussed and first examples of measurements from MODIS will be provided.

  2. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  3. Performance assessment of the cellulose absorption index (CAI) method for estimating crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and quick field estimation of crop residues are important for carbon sequestration and biofuel production programs. Landscape-scale assessment of this vital information has promoted the use of remote sensing technology. The cellulose absorption index (CAI) technique has outperformed other ...

  4. Heterogeneity of Mg Isotopes and Variable ^26Al/^27Al Ratio in FUN CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Nagashima, K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Davis, A. M.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    We report high-precision Mg-isotope data of individual minerals from the Axtell 2271, BG82DH8, EK1-4-1, C1, TE, and CG14 FUN CAIs, which shows variations in both Mg-isotope ratio and ^26Al/^27Al ratio.

  5. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing Within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test effects of a specified degree of learner control over the sequencing of instructional materials in a self contained tutorial CAI course in COBOL programming. Findings describe contributions and interactions of learner controlled variables with respect to instructional effectiveness and efficiency. (RAO)

  6. Role of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in an Introductory Computer Concepts Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in undergraduate education via a survey of related literature and specific applications. Describes an undergraduate computer concepts course and includes appendices of instructions, flowcharts, programs, sample student work in accounting, COBOL instructional model, decision logic in a…

  7. Using CAI To Enhance the Peer Acceptance of Mainstreamed Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliver, Concetta; Obi, Sunday

    This study applied computer-assisted instruction (CAI) techniques to improve peer acceptance among 92 mainstreamed students with mild disabilities from 10 to 13 years of age. Participants in the treatment group received their generalized curriculum program (including mathematics, language arts, reading, health, social studies, and science)…

  8. C.A.I. as a Means for Educational Justice in Primary Schools: A Greek Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Nicos

    This study examines the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on the inequalities in education among children of less privileged backgrounds. A natural science lesson was taught to 116 children at the fifth level of the Greek primary school. Subjects went to two different public schools, one of which was in a privileged area, and the…

  9. Making C.A.I. Make a Difference in College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    An explanation for the failure of technology and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in particular to make much headway in education is that even when innovations are introduced in the classroom, their potentials are not exploited; rather, they are used in traditional ways. The integration of new technologies with other classroom activities is…

  10. Socioeconomic Status, Aptitude, and Gender Differences in CAI Gains of Arithmetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; Shorer, Dvora

    1989-01-01

    A report is given of a study which examined the effects of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in mathematics on 99 disadvantaged and 112 advantaged Israeli students. Higher performance levels and larger gains were found for advantaged over disadvantaged students, for high achievers over low achievers, and for boys over girls. (IAH)

  11. A Cross-National CAI Tool To Support Learning Operations Decision-Making and Market Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Robert J.; Afanasiev, Mikhail Y.; Dologite, Dorothy G.

    1999-01-01

    Describes bicultural (United States and Russia) development of a computer-aided instruction (CAI) tool to learn management decision-making using information systems technologies. The program has been used with undergraduate and graduate students in both countries; it integrates free and controlled market concepts and combines traditional computer…

  12. The Use of C.A.I. in the Language Program at Gallaudet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madachy, James L.; Miller, J. Douglas

    Employing an English-as-a-second-language approach, Gallaudet College has developed 101 computer assisted instruction (CAI) lessons to help deaf students master basic English structures. These lessons begin with a pretest and then branch to appropriate explanations and drills. Some are accompanied by coordinated presentations in sign language. In…

  13. Melilite-Rich CAIs and Wark-Lovering Rims Formed from a Common Oxygen Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodénan, J.-D.; Starkey, N. A.; Russell, S. S.; Wright, I. P.; Franchi, I. A.

    2013-09-01

    O isotopic ratio profiles in CAIs from the unaltered meteorites Léoville and QUE 99177 and their Wark-Lovering rims show no variation, indicating that they sampled the same O isotopic reservoir that persisted until the end of WL rim formation.

  14. Consumption of fa cai Nostoc soup: a potential for BMAA exposure from Nostoc cyanobacteria in China?

    PubMed

    Roney, Britton R; Renhui, Li; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan; Honegger, Rosmarie; Cox, Paul Alan

    2009-01-01

    Grown in arid regions of western China the cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme--called fa cai in Mandarin and fat choy in Cantonese--is wild-harvested and used to make soup consumed during New Year's celebrations. High prices, up to $125 USD/kg, led to overharvesting in Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Gansu, Qinghai, and Xinjiang. Degradation of arid ecosystems, desertification, and conflicts between Nostoc harvesters and Mongol herdsmen concerned the Chinese environmental authorities, leading to a government ban of Nostoc commerce. This ban stimulated increased marketing of a substitute made from starch. We analysed samples purchased throughout China as well as in Chinese markets in the United States and the United Kingdom. Some were counterfeits consisting of dyed starch noodles. A few samples from California contained Nostoc flagelliforme but were adulterated with starch noodles. Other samples, including those from the United Kingdom, consisted of pure Nostoc flagelliforme. A recent survey of markets in Cheng Du showed no real Nostoc flagelliforme to be marketed. Real and artificial fa cai differ in the presence of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Given its status as a high-priced luxury food, the government ban on collection and marketing, and the replacement of real fa cai with starch substitutes consumed only on special occasions, it is anticipated that dietary exposure to BMAA from fa cai will be reduced in the future in China.

  15. Toward a Market Success for CAI; An Overview of the TICCIT Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetten, Kenneth J.

    A new computer-assisted instruction (CAI) system for college teaching is being tested in two locations by the MITRE Corporation. The system, called TICCIT (Time-Share Interactive Computer-Controlled Information Television), now interacts with more than 100 students, each moving at his own pace, for four semesters of community college math and…

  16. The Effect of Adaptive, Advisement, and Linear CAI Control Strategies on the Learning of Mathematics Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetzfried, Leslie; Hannafin, Michael

    This study examined the effects of the locus of three computer assisted instruction (CAI) strategies on the accuracy and efficiency of mathematics rule and application learning of 47 low-achieving seventh grade students in remedial mathematics classes. The instructional task was a mathematics rule lesson concerning divisibility by the numbers two,…

  17. CAI for the Visually Handicapped: Promising Collaboration Between Two and Four-Year Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, William K.; And Others

    This report describes the efforts of the Office of Research and Extension of the North Carolina State University (NCSU) School of Education to develop vocal computer-assisted instruction (CAI) tutorials for blind junior college students, the rationale behind those efforts, the costs and means of funding for the project, and suggested ways in which…

  18. A Pseudo-Language for Creating CAI Programs on APL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucker, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Encourages the use of APL as a language for computer assisted instruction (CAI) instead of such languages as BASIC or COURSEWRITER. Describes a set of APL functions that can simulate to some extent the features of COURSEWRITER, while permitting a more experienced course author to use the full mathematical power of APL. (Author/JF)

  19. Web Pages: An Effective Method of Providing CAI Resource Material in Histology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Presents research that introduces computer-aided instruction (CAI) resource material as an integral part of the second-year histology course at the University of Natal Medical School. Describes the ease with which this software can be developed, using limited resources and available skills, while providing students with valuable learning…

  20. Case Study: Using VDO or CAI in Studying Methods of Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chundang, Ungsana; Setteechaichana, Patcharin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research is to study the effectiveness of the students' performance and the attitude of the students towards using VDO (MTH 225 principle of mathematics) or CAI (MTH 225 principle of mathematics) in studying the topic "Methods of Proof", of 74 students. The students would be categorized into: group A, students who…

  1. Has Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) Been a Financial Failure? Studies in Economic Education No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daellenbach, Lawrence A.; And Others

    A course in macroeconomics was used to investigate the cost effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). The experimental design used an experimental section in which the students had the opportunity to use the computer to the intensity of their choice, choosing from tutorial lessons, games, and simulations. The students in the control…

  2. CHARGE Image Generator: Theory of Operation and Author Language Support.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CAI(Computer Administered Instruction), Computer administered instruction, CHARGE(Color Halftone Area Graphics Environment), Color halftone area...graphics environment, *Image generators, Halftones , Gray scales, Catalist project, Impact project

  3. Chronology of chrondrule and CAI formation: Mg-Al isotopic evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Davis, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Details of the chondrule and Ca-Al-rich inclusion (CAI) formation during the earliest history of the solar system are imperfectly known. Because CAI's are more 'refractory' than ferromagnesian chondrules and have the lowest recorded initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of any solar system materials, the expectation is that CAI's formed earlier than chondrules. But it is not known, for example, if CAI formation had stopped by the time chondrule formation began. Conventional (absolute) age-dating techniques cannot adequately resolve small age differences (less than 10(exp 6) years) between objects of such antiquity. One approach has been to look at systematic differences in the daughter products of short-lived radionuclides such as Al-26 and I-129. Unfortunately, neither system appears to be 'well-behaved.' One possible reason for this circumstance is that later secondary events have partially reset the isotopic systems, but a viable alternative continues to be large-scale (nebular) heterogeneity in initial isotopic abundances, which would of course render the systems nearly useless as chronometers. In the past two years the nature of this problem has been redefined somewhat. Examination of the Al-Mg isotopic database for all CAI's suggests that the vast majority of inclusions originally had the same initial Al-26/Al-27 abundance ratio, and that the ill-behaved isotopic systematics now observed are the results of later partial reequilibration due to thermal processing. Isotopic heterogeneities did exist in the nebula, as demonstrated by the existence of so-called FUN inclusions in CV3 chondrites and isotopically anomalous hibonite grains in CM2 chondrites, which had little or no live Al-26 at the time of their formation. But, among the population of CV3 inclusions at least, FUN inclusions appear to have been a relatively minor nebular component.

  4. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  5. High-Throughput Proteomic Approaches to the Elucidation of Potential Biomarkers of Chronic Allograft Injury (CAI)

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Hilary; Slyne, Jennifer; Frain, Helena; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of OMICs technologies, concentrating in particular on proteomics, in biomarker discovery in chronic allograft injury (CAI). CAI is the second most prevalent cause of allograft dysfunction and loss in the first decade post-transplantation, after death with functioning graft (DWFG). The term CAI, sometimes referred to as chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), describes the deterioration of renal allograft function and structure as a result of immunological processes (chronic antibody-mediated rejection), and other non-immunological factors such as calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) induced nephrotoxicity, hypertension and infection. Current methods for assessing allograft function are costly, insensitive and invasive; traditional kidney function measurements such as serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) display poor predictive abilities, while the current “gold-standard” involving histological diagnosis with a renal biopsy presents its own inherent risks to the overall health of the allograft. As early as two years post-transplantation, protocol biopsies have shown more than 50% of allograft recipients have mild CAN; ten years post-transplantation more than 50% of the allograft recipients have progressed to severe CAN which is associated with diminishing graft function. Thus, there is a growing medical requirement for minimally invasive biomarkers capable of identifying the early stages of the disease which would allow for timely intervention. Proteomics involves the study of the expression, localization, function and interaction of the proteome. Proteomic technologies may be powerful tools used to identify novel biomarkers which would predict CAI in susceptible individuals. In this paper we will review the use of proteomics in the elucidation of novel predictive biomarkers of CAI in clinical, animal and in vitro studies. PMID:28250402

  6. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  7. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  8. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Mattoo, S.; Chu, D. A.; Martins, J. V.; Li, R.-R.; Ichoku, C.; Levy, R. C.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites is making near global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range. These measurements are used to derive spectral aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size parameters over both land and ocean. The aerosol products available over land include aerosol optical thickness at three visible wavelengths, a measure of the fraction of aerosol optical thickness attributed to the fine mode and several derived parameters including reflected spectral solar flux at top of atmosphere. Over ocean, the aerosol optical thickness is provided in seven wavelengths from 0.47 microns to 2.13 microns. In addition, quantitative aerosol size information includes effective radius of the aerosol and quantitative fraction of optical thickness attributed to the fine mode. Spectral aerosol flux, mass concentration and number of cloud condensation nuclei round out the list of available aerosol products over the ocean. The spectral optical thickness and effective radius of the aerosol over the ocean are validated by comparison with two years of AERONET data gleaned from 133 AERONET stations. 8000 MODIS aerosol retrievals colocated with AERONET measurements confirm that one-standard deviation of MODIS optical thickness retrievals fall within the predicted uncertainty of delta tauapproximately equal to plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau over ocean and delta tay equal to plus or minus 0.05 plus or minus 0.15 tau over land. 271 MODIS aerosol retrievals co-located with AERONET inversions at island and coastal sites suggest that one-standard deviation of MODIS effective radius retrievals falls within delta r_eff approximately equal to 0.11 microns. The accuracy of the MODIS retrievals suggests that the product can be used to help narrow the uncertainties associated with aerosol radiative forcing of global climate.

  9. Aerosol Blanket Likely Thinned During 1990s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Each day, a blanket of tiny particles drifting through the Earth's atmosphere filters out some of the sunlight headed for the planet's surface. These aerosols, including dust, smoke, and human-produced pollution, can reflect incoming light or absorb it, directly affecting the Earth's energy balance and climate. Aerosols also influence the climate indirectly, by affecting the brightness and amount of clouds. Research by NASA scientists on global aerosol patterns since the 1990s indicate the global aerosol blanket has likely thinned, allowing more sunlight to reach the Earth's surface over the past decade. The thinning of the blanket is shown by this trio of images based on satellite observations of aerosol optical thickness, a measurement that scientists use to describe how much the aerosols filter the incoming sunlight. Higher optical thickness (orange and red) means more sunlight blocking. The globes show average aerosol optical thickness for 1988-1991 (top), 2002-2005 (middle), and the change between the two time periods (bottom). Overall, the 1988-1991 image appears redder, a sign that aerosols were blocking more incoming sunlight; the 2002-2005 image has more light yellow areas. In the bottom image, small pockets of red (increased aerosol optical thickness), mostly near land masses in the Northern Hemisphere, are far outnumbered by blue areas (decreased aerosol optical thickness). Because they block incoming sunlight from reaching Earth's surface, aerosols may counterbalance greenhouse gas warming. The decline in the dimming power of aerosols over the past decade may have made the greenhouse warming trend more evident in the past decade than in previous decades. The scientists describe their results as a 'likely' trend because the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite sensors they used in their analysis were not specifically designed to observe aerosols, and may contain some errors. However, specific, major aerosol events, such as large

  10. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Retrieval Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didier; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ichoku, Charles; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert; Chu, D. Allen; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithm for determining aerosol characteristics over ocean is performing with remarkable accuracy. A two-month data set of MODIS retrievals co-located with observations from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based sunphotometer network provides the necessary validation. Spectral radiation measured by MODIS (in the range 550 - 2100 nm) is used to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness, effective particle radius and ratio between the submicron and micron size particles. MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness at 660 nm and 870 nm fall within the expected uncertainty, with the ensemble average at 660 nm differing by only 2% from the AERONET observations and having virtually no offset. MODIS retrievals of aerosol effective radius agree with AERONET retrievals to within +/- 0.10 micrometers, while MODIS-derived ratios between large and small mode aerosol show definite correlation with ratios derived from AERONET data.

  11. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the South African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  12. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  13. A global aerosol classification algorithm incorporating multiple satellite data sets of aerosol and trace gas abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Beirle, S.; Hörmann, C.; Kaiser, J. W.; Stammes, P.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.

    2015-09-01

    Detecting the optical properties of aerosols using passive satellite-borne measurements alone is a difficult task due to the broadband effect of aerosols on the measured spectra and the influences of surface and cloud reflection. We present another approach to determine aerosol type, namely by studying the relationship of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with trace gas abundance, aerosol absorption, and mean aerosol size. Our new Global Aerosol Classification Algorithm, GACA, examines relationships between aerosol properties (AOD and extinction Ångström exponent from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), UV Aerosol Index from the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment, GOME-2) and trace gas column densities (NO2, HCHO, SO2 from GOME-2, and CO from MOPITT, the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere instrument) on a monthly mean basis. First, aerosol types are separated based on size (Ångström exponent) and absorption (UV Aerosol Index), then the dominating sources are identified based on mean trace gas columns and their correlation with AOD. In this way, global maps of dominant aerosol type and main source type are constructed for each season and compared with maps of aerosol composition from the global MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) model. Although GACA cannot correctly characterize transported or mixed aerosols, GACA and MACC show good agreement regarding the global seasonal cycle, particularly for urban/industrial aerosols. The seasonal cycles of both aerosol type and source are also studied in more detail for selected 5° × 5° regions. Again, good agreement between GACA and MACC is found for all regions, but some systematic differences become apparent: the variability of aerosol composition (yearly and/or seasonal) is often not well captured by MACC, the amount of mineral dust outside of the dust belt appears to be overestimated, and the abundance of secondary organic aerosols is underestimated in comparison

  14. Teaching earth sciences: should we implement teacher-directed or student-controlled CAI in the secondary classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Yen

    2003-04-01

    While previous studies and meta analyses have primarily focused on the comparative efficacy of computer assisted instruction (CAI) versus traditional instruction, there have been relatively fewer examples of research exploring how various teaching formats of CAI influence student science learning outcomes in the secondary classroom. In this paper this issue is addressed by comparing teacher-directed CAI (TDCAI) and student-controlled CAI (SCCAI) in a compulsory earth science course in a secondary school in Taiwan. Data collection instruments included the Earth Science Achievement Test and the Attitudes Toward Earth Science Inventory. A multivariate analysis of covariance suggested that TDCAI students had significantly higher score gains than SCCAI students on the set of achievement and attitude measures. It is therefore suggested that TDCAI-based instruction is an alternative in teaching basic science concepts in the secondary classroom.

  15. Heterogeneity of a metal particle enriched with refractory elements in the CAI Efremovka CV chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Ignatenko, K. I.; Lavrukhina, A. K.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes the morphology and mineral composition of a macroscopic-size (about 0.5 mm) metallic particle found in a type-B1 CAI fragment from the Efremovka chondrite. Results of mineralographic and chemical analyses showed that the particle consists of two different metallic particles. One of these (EM1A), which is of a hypidiomorphic shape, is composed mainly of taenite and kamacite and contains micron-size inclusions of vanadium oxide. The other particle (EM1) is of ellipsoidal form and, besides taenite and kamacite, is enriched by phosphides; it also contains inclusions of vanadium sulfide and oxide. The EM particle is surrounded by a border of opaque minerals including kulsonite, chromite, and Ca phosphate. The characteristics of this particle have no analogs among the known metal particles in CAI or other carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Alternative communication network designs for an operational Plato 4 CAI system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, R. E., Jr.; Eastwood, L. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The cost of alternative communications networks for the dissemination of PLATO IV computer-aided instruction (CAI) was studied. Four communication techniques are compared: leased telephone lines, satellite communication, UHF TV, and low-power microwave radio. For each network design, costs per student contact hour are computed. These costs are derived as functions of student population density, a parameter which can be calculated from census data for one potential market for CAI, the public primary and secondary schools. Calculating costs in this way allows one to determine which of the four communications alternatives can serve this market least expensively for any given area in the U.S. The analysis indicates that radio distribution techniques are cost optimum over a wide range of conditions.

  17. Al-rich Chondrules: Petrologic Basis for Their Diversity, and Relation to Type C CAIs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Huss, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    Al-rich chondrules share mineralogical and chemical properties with, and are intermediate in a volatility sense between, CAIs and ferromagnesian chondrules. In some way they must be petrogenetic links between the two. A recent upsurge of interest in Al-rich chondrules is due to their constituent plagioclase feldspar and Al-rich glass being amenable to successful ion microprobe searches for radiogenic Mg-26, the decay product of Al-26 (t(sub 1/2) = 720,000 y). This has allowed estimates to be made of the time duration between CAI formation and the onset of Al-rich (and possibly, by extension, ferromagnesian) chondrule formation, on the order of 1.5-2.5 million years.

  18. CAIS standard manual. System number 26. Industrial gas storage and distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed, including infrastructure, will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a related list of components. Detailed observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Industrial Gas Storage and Distribution System.

  19. CAIS standard manual. System number 25. Coal site handling and storage

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-28

    At this installation the list of facilities to be surveyed, including infrastructure, will be addressed on the basis of 32 unique systems that form the CAIS Engineering Deficiency Standards and Inspection Methods document. Each system deals with a specific technical aspect of the facility to be surveyed. Within each system a further breakdown is made to subsystems, each having a related list of components. Detailed observations of the listed defects are provided so as to allow the entry of observed quantification data. A DOD CAIS manual is provided for each of the 32 systems with an internal organization. The System Tree is a graphical representation of the Work Breakdown Structure, showing system, subsystem and component relationships for the Coal Site Handling and Storage Svstem.

  20. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  1. Aerosol retrieval algorithm for the characterization of local aerosol using MODIS L1B data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, A. M.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in radiation budget, climate change, hydrology and visibility. However, it has immense effect on the air quality, especially in densely populated areas where high concentration of aerosol is associated with premature death and the decrease of life expectancy. Therefore, an accurate estimation of aerosol with spatial distribution is essential, and satellite data has increasingly been used to estimate aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosol product (AOD) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data is available at global scale but problems arise due to low spatial resolution, time-lag availability of AOD product as well as the use of generalized aerosol models in retrieval algorithm instead of local aerosol models. This study focuses on the aerosol retrieval algorithm for the characterization of local aerosol in Hong Kong for a long period of time (2006-2011) using high spatial resolution MODIS level 1B data (500 m resolution) and taking into account the local aerosol models. Two methods (dark dense vegetation and MODIS land surface reflectance product) were used for the estimation of the surface reflectance over land and Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code was used to construct LUTs for calculating the aerosol reflectance as a function of AOD. Results indicate that AOD can be estimated at the local scale from high resolution MODIS data, and the obtained accuracy (ca. 87%) is very much comparable with the accuracy obtained from other studies (80%-95%) for AOD estimation.

  2. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  3. Genesis of elevated aerosol loading over the Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijith, S. S.; Rao, P. V. N.; Mohan, Mannil

    2016-05-01

    Elevated aerosols assume importance as the diabatic heating due to aerosol absorption is more intense at higher altitudes where the atmosphere becomes thinner. Indian region, especially its central and northern latitudes, experiences significant loading of elevated aerosols during pre-monsoon and summer months. Genesis of elevated aerosol loading over Indian region is investigated in the present study, using multi-year satellite observations from Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) along with reanalysis winds from MERRA. Central India is observed to have prominent aerosols loading at higher altitudes during pre-monsoon season, whereas it is during summer months over north-west India. Further analysis reveals that the elevated aerosols over Indian region in pre-monsoon and summer months are significantly contributed by transported mineral dust from the arid continental regions at west. In addition to the mineral dust advection, aerosols at higher altitudes over Indian region are enriched by strong convection and associated vertical transport of surface level aerosols. Vertical transport of aerosols observed over Indian region during pre-monsoon and summer months is aided by intense convergence at the surface level and divergence at the upper level. Moreover, aerosol source/sink strength estimated using aerosol flux continuity equation show significant aerosol production over central India during pre-monsoon. Strong vertical transport prevails during pre-monsoon uplifts the locally produced aerosols, with considerable anthropogenic fraction, to higher altitudes where their impacts would be more intense.

  4. Evaluation of the Vesicating Properties of Neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Set (CAIS) Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    euthanasia, 17 TABLE 2. SYNOPSIS OF PHASE II AND PHASE 111 TESTING PROCEDURES Phase II. A total of I I hairless guinea pigs ( HGPs ) were used in this...24 HGPs were used, dosing six to eight sites per animal with a 1 hr duration of exposure. All animals were examined 24 hr following exposure and...The "blue" wastestream, that CAIS component containing neat HD neutralized with DCDMH, has been found to cause microvesication in HGPs at dosing

  5. Limited subsolidus diffusion in type B1 CAI: Evidence from Ti distribution in spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, G. P.; Quick, J. E.; Paque, Julie M.

    1993-01-01

    Most models of calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAI) have focused on early stages of formation by equilibrium crystallization of a homogeneous liquid. Less is known about the subsolidus cooling history of CAI. Chemical and isotopic heterogeneties on a scale of tens to hundreds of micrometers (e.g. MacPherson et al. (1989) and Podosek, et al. (1991)) suggest fairly rapid cooling with a minimum of subsolidus diffusion. However, transmission electron microscopy indicates that solid state diffusion may have been an important process at a smaller scale (Barber et al. 1984). If so, chemical evidence for diffusion could provide constraints on cooling times and temperatures. With this in mind, we have begun an investigation of the Ti distribution in spinels from two type B1 CAI from Allende to determine if post-crystallization diffusion was a significant process. The type B1 CAIs, 3529Z and 5241 have been described by Podosek et al. (1991) and by El Goresy et al. (1985) and MacPherson et al. (1989). We have analyzed spinels in these inclusions using the electron microprobe. These spinels are generally euhedral, range in size from less than 10 to 15 micron and are poikilitically enclosed by millimeter-sized pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite. Analyses were obtained from both the mantles and cores of the inclusions. Compositions of pyroxene in the vicinity of individual spinel grains were obtained by analyzing at least two points on opposite sides of the spinel and averaging the compositions. The pyroxene analyses were obtained within 15 microns of the spinel-pyroxene interface. No compositional gradients were observed within single spinel crystals. Ti concentrations in spinels included within pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite are presented.

  6. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  7. Numerical investigation of CAI Combustion in the Opposed- Piston Engine with Direct and Indirect Water Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszczek, R.; Mazuro, P.; Teodorczyk, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the CAI combustion control in a turbocharged 2-stroke Opposed-Piston (OP) engine. The barrel type OP engine arrangement is of particular interest for the authors because of its robust design, high mechanical efficiency and relatively easy incorporation of a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR). The other advantage of such design is that combustion chamber is formed between two moving pistons - there is no additional cylinder head to be cooled which directly results in an increased thermal efficiency. Furthermore, engine operation in a Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) mode at high compression ratios (CR) raises a possibility of reaching even higher efficiencies and very low emissions. In order to control CAI combustion such measures as VCR and water injection were considered for indirect ignition timing control. Numerical simulations of the scavenging and combustion processes were performed with the 3D CFD multipurpose AVL Fire solver. Numerous cases were calculated with different engine compression ratios and different amounts of directly and indirectly injected water. The influence of the VCR and water injection on the ignition timing and engine performance was determined and their application in the real engine was discussed.

  8. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    materials determine the range of applicability of each method. A useful microencapsulation method, based on coagulation by inertial force was developed...The generation apparatus, consisting of two aerosol generators in series, was utilized to produce many kinds of microcapsules . A fluid energy mill...was found useful for the production of some microcapsules . The permeability of microcapsule films and the effect of exposure time and humidity were

  9. Rare Earth Element Measurements of Melilite and Fassaite in Allende Cai by Nanosims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, M.; Messenger, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) are concentrated in CAIs by approx. 20 times the chondritic average [e.g., 1]. The REEs in CAIs are important to understand processes of CAI formation including the role of volatilization, condensation, and fractional crystallization [1,2]. REE measurements are a well established application of ion microprobes [e.g., 3]. However the spatial resolution of REE measurements by ion microprobe (approx.20 m) is not adequate to resolve heterogeneous distributions of REEs among/within minerals. We have developed methods for measuring REE with the NanoSIMS 50L at smaller spatial scales. Here we present our initial measurements of REEs in melilite and fassaite in an Allende Type-A CAI with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. We found that the key parameters for accurate REE abundance measurements differ between the NanoSIMS and conventional SIMS, in particular the oxide-to-element ratios, the relative sensitivity factors, the energy distributions, and requisite energy offset. Our REE abundance measurements of the 100 ppm REE diopside glass standards yielded good reproducibility and accuracy, 0.5-2.5 % and 5-25 %, respectively. We determined abundances and spatial distributions of REEs in core and rim within single crystals of fassaite, and adjacent melilite with 5-10 m spatial resolution. The REE abundances in fassaite core and rim are 20-100 times CI abundance but show a large negative Eu anomaly, exhibiting a well-defined Group III pattern. This is consistent with previous work [4]. On the other hand, adjacent melilite shows modified Group II pattern with no strong depletions of Eu and Yb, and no Tm positive anomaly. REE abundances (2-10 x CI) were lower than that of fassaite. These patterns suggest that fassaite crystallized first followed by a crystallization of melilite from the residual melt. In future work, we will carry out a correlated study of O and Mg isotopes and REEs of the CAI in order to better understand the nature and timescales of its

  10. Oxygen isotopes in the early protoplanetary disk inferred from pyroxene in a classical type B CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aléon, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    A major unanswered question in solar system formation is the origin of the oxygen isotopic dichotomy between the Sun and the planets. Individual Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV chondrites exhibit almost the full isotopic range, but how their composition evolved is still unclear, which prevents robust astrochemical conclusions. A key issue is notably the yet unsolved origin of the 16O-rich isotopic composition of pyroxene in type B CAIs. Here, I report an in-situ oxygen isotope study of the archetypal type B CAI USNM-3529-Z from Allende with emphasis on the isotopic composition of pyroxene and its isotopic and petrographic relationships with other major minerals. The O isotopic composition of pyroxene is correlated with indicators of magmatic growth, indicating that the pyroxene evolved from a 16O-poor composition and became progressively enriched in 16O during its crystallization, contrary to the long held assumption that pyroxene was initially 16O-rich. This variation is well explained by isotopic exchange between a 16O-poor partial melt having the isotopic composition of melilite and a 16O-rich gas having the isotopic composition of spinel, during pyroxene crystallization. The isotopic evolution of 3529-Z is consistent with formation in an initially 16O-rich environment where spinel and gehlenitic melilite crystallized, followed by a 16O-depletion associated with melilite partial melting and recrystallization and finally a return to the initial 16O-rich environment before pyroxene crystallization. This strongly suggests that the environment of CAI formation was globally 16O-rich, with local 16O-depletions systematically associated with high temperature events. The Al/Mg isotopic systematics of 3529-Z further indicates that this suite of isotopic changes occurred in the first 150 000 yr of the solar system, during the main CAI formation period. A new astrophysical setting is proposed, where the 16O-depletion occurs in an optically thin surface

  11. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  12. Brain responses to sexual images in 46,XY women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome are female-typical.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Stephan; Stevens, Jennifer; Vick, Janice Hassett; Bryk, Kristina; Quigley, Charmian A; Berenbaum, Sheri A; Wallen, Kim

    2014-11-01

    Androgens, estrogens, and sex chromosomes are the major influences guiding sex differences in brain development, yet their relative roles and importance remain unclear. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) offer a unique opportunity to address these issues. Although women with CAIS have a Y chromosome, testes, and produce male-typical levels of androgens, they lack functional androgen receptors preventing responding to their androgens. Thus, they develop a female physical phenotype, are reared as girls, and develop into women. Because sexually differentiated brain development in primates is determined primarily by androgens, but may be affected by sex chromosome complement, it is currently unknown whether brain structure and function in women with CAIS is more like that of women or men. In the first functional neuroimaging study of (46,XY) women with CAIS, typical (46,XX) women, and typical (46, XY) men, we found that men showed greater amygdala activation to sexual images than did either typical women or women with CAIS. Typical women and women with CAIS had highly similar patterns of brain activation, indicating that a Y chromosome is insufficient for male-typical human brain responses. Because women with CAIS produce male-typical or elevated levels of testosterone which is aromatized to estradiol these results rule out aromatization of testosterone to estradiol as a determinate of sex differences in patterns of brain activation to sexual images. We cannot, however, rule out an effect of social experience on the brain responses of women with CAIS as all were raised as girls.

  13. A velocity map imaging photoelectron spectrometer for the study of ultrafine aerosols with a table-top VUV laser and Na-doping for particle sizing applied to dimethyl ether condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bruce L; West, Adam H C; Schläppi, Bernhard; Chasovskikh, Egor; Signorell, Ruth

    2013-01-28

    We present a new experimental configuration for the study of size-dependent, angle-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectra of weakly bound ultrafine aerosol particles targeted at particle sizes below ~20 nm. It combines single photon ionization by a tunable, table-top vacuum ultraviolet laser at energies up to 18 eV with velocity map imaging detection and independent size determination of the aerosol particles using the Na-doping method. As an example, the size-dependence of the valence photoelectron spectrum of dimethyl ether clusters and ultrafine aerosols is investigated. Up to a mean particle diameter of ~3-4 nm, the first ionization energy (value at band maximum) decreases systematically (up to ~1 eV) and the corresponding band broadens systematically (up to a factor of ~3) with increasing aggregate size. Plateau values for band positions and bandwidths are reached beyond a diameter of ~3-4 nm. Experimental evidence for the dominance of the fast intermolecular proton transfer over monomer fragmentation reactions upon ionization is presented via photoion imaging.

  14. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unknown nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): I. Mineralogy, petrology, and oxygen isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Wasserburg, Gerald J.; Huss, Gary R.; Papanastassiou, Dimitri; Davis, Andrew M.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed characterization of the mineralogy, petrology, and oxygen isotopic compositions of twelve FUN CAIs, including C1 and EK1-4-1 from Allende (CV), that were previously shown to have large isotopic fractionation patterns for magnesium and oxygen, and large isotopic anomalies of several elements. The other samples show more modest patterns of isotopic fractionation and have smaller but significant isotopic anomalies. All FUN CAIs studied are coarse-grained igneous inclusions: Type B, forsterite-bearing Type B, compact Type A, and hibonite-rich. Some inclusions consist of two mineralogically distinct lithologies, forsterite-rich and forsterite-free/poor. All the CV FUN CAIs experienced postcrystallization open-system iron-alkali-halogen metasomatic alteration resulting in the formation of secondary minerals commonly observed in non-FUN CAIs from CV chondrites. The CR FUN CAI GG#3 shows no evidence for alteration. In all samples, clear evidence of oxygen isotopic fractionation was found. Most samples were initially 16O-rich. On a three-oxygen isotope diagram, various minerals in each FUN CAI (spinel, forsterite, hibonite, dmisteinbergite, most fassaite grains, and melilite (only in GG#3)), define mass-dependent fractionation lines with a similar slope of ∼0.5. The different inclusions have different Δ17O values ranging from ∼-25‰ to ∼-16‰. Melilite and plagioclase in the CV FUN CAIs have 16O-poor compositions (Δ17O ∼-3‰) and plot near the intercept of the Allende CAI line and the terrestrial fractionation line. We infer that mass-dependent fractionation effects of oxygen isotopes in FUN CAI minerals are due to evaporation during melt crystallization. Differences in Δ17O values of mass-dependent fractionation lines defined by minerals in individual FUN CAIs are inferred to reflect differences in Δ17O values of their precursors. Differences in δ18O values of minerals defining the mass-dependent fractionation lines in several FUN CAIs

  15. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  16. OXYGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF THE ALLENDE TYPE C CAIs: EVIDENCE FOR ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE DURING NEBULAR MELTING AND ASTEROIDAL THERMAL METAMORPHISM

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, A N; Chaussidon, M; Yurimoto, H; Sakamoto, N; Nagashima, K; Hutcheon, I D; MacPherson, G J

    2008-02-21

    Based on the mineralogy and petrography, coarse-grained, igneous, anorthite-rich (Type C) calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende have been recently divided into three groups: (i) CAIs with melilite and Al,Ti-diopside of massive and lacy textures (coarse grains with numerous rounded inclusions of anorthite) in a fine-grained anorthite groundmass (6-1-72, 100, 160), (ii) CAI CG5 with massive melilite, Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite, and (iii) CAIs associated with chondrule material: either containing chondrule fragments in their peripheries (ABC, TS26) or surrounded by chondrule-like, igneous rims (93) (Krot et al., 2007a,b). Here, we report in situ oxygen isotopic measurements of primary (melilite, spinel, Al,Ti-diopside, anorthite) and secondary (grossular, monticellite, forsterite) minerals in these CAIs. Spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -25{per_thousand} to -20{per_thousand}), massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -20{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}) and fine-grained anorthite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -15{per_thousand} to -2{per_thousand}) in 100, 160 and 6-1-72 are {sup 16}O-enriched relative spinel and coarse-grained Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite in ABC, 93 and TS26 ({Delta}{sup 17}O ranges from -20{per_thousand} to -15{per_thousand}, from -15{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}, and from -5{per_thousand} to 0{per_thousand}, respectively). In 6-1-72, massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside grains are {sup 16}O-depleted ({Delta}{sup 17}O {approx} -13{per_thousand}) relative to spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -23{per_thousand}). Melilite is the most {sup 16}O-depleted mineral in all Allende Type C CAIs. In CAI 100, melilite and secondary grossular, monticellite and forsterite (minerals replacing melilite) are similarly {sup 16}O-depleted, whereas grossular in CAI 160 is {sup 16}O-enriched ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -10{per_thousand} to -6{per_thousand}) relative to melilite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -5{per_thousand} to -3{per_thousand}). We infer

  17. Temporal and Spatial Heterogeneities in the Solar Nebula Reflected in Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Systematics of Al3S4, an Allende Type B CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, N. E.; Borg, L. E.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the Rb-Sr, ^1^7^4Sm-^1^4^3Nd and ^1^4^7Sm-^1^4^2Nd isotope compositions of a type B CAI. These data indicate that CAIs and Earth have the same ^1^4^2Nd/^1^4^4Nd composition and that carbonaceous chondrites are distinct from both Earth and CAIs.

  18. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  19. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  20. An oxygen isotope study of Wark-Lovering rims on type A CAIs in primitive carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodénan, Jean-David; Starkey, Natalie A.; Russell, Sara S.; Wright, Ian P.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2014-09-01

    Calcium-aluminium-rich Inclusions (CAIs) and the thin Wark-Lovering (WL) rims of minerals surrounding them offer a record of the nature of changing conditions during the earliest stages of Solar System formation. Considerable heterogeneity in the gas composition in the immediate vicinity of the proto-Sun had previously been inferred from oxygen isotopic variations in the WL rim of a CAI from Allende (Simon et al., 2011). However, high precision and high spatial resolution oxygen isotope measurements presented in this study show that WL rim and pristine core minerals of individual CAIs from meteorites that had experienced only low degrees of alteration or low grade metamorphism (one from Léoville (reduced CV3), two in QUE 99177 (CR3.0) and two in ALHA 77307 (CO3.0)) are uniformly 16O-rich. This indicates that the previously observed variations are the result of secondary processes, most likely on the asteroid parent body, and that there were no temporal or spatial variations in oxygen isotopic composition during CAI and WL rim formation. Such homogeneity across three groups of carbonaceous chondrites lends further support for a common origin for the CAIs in all chondrites. 16O-poor oxygen reservoirs such as those associated with chondrule formation, were probably generated by UV photo-dissociation involving self-shielding mechanisms and must have occurred elsewhere in outer regions of the solar accretion disk.

  1. Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and CAIs from Short-Lived and Long-Lived Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, N T; Huss, G R; Tachibana, S; Amelin, Y; Nyquist, L E; Hutcheon, I D

    2005-10-24

    The high time resolution Pb-Pb ages and short-lived nuclide based relative ages for CAIs and chondrules are reviewed. The solar system started at 4567.2 {+-} 0.6Ma inferred from the high precision Pb-Pb ages of CAIs. Time scales of CAIs ({le}0.1Myr), chondrules (1-3Myr), and early asteroidal differentiation ({ge}3Myr) inferred from {sup 26}Al relative ages are comparable to the time scale estimated from astronomical observations of young star; proto star, classical T Tauri star and week-lined T Tauri star, respectively. Pb-Pb ages of chondrules also indicate chondrule formation occur within 1-3 Myr after CAIs. Mn-Cr isochron ages of chondrules are similar to or within 2 Myr after CAI formation. Chondrules from different classes of chondrites show the same range of {sup 26}Al ages in spite of their different oxygen isotopes, indicating that chondrule formed in the localized environment. The {sup 26}Al ages of chondrules in each chondrite class show a hint of correlation with their chemical compositions, which implies the process of elemental fractionation during chondrule formation events.

  2. Problem Solving Process Research of Everyone Involved in Innovation Based on CAI Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Shao, Yunfei; Tang, Xiaowo

    It is very important that non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee serve as innovators under the requirements of everyone involved in innovation. According the view of this paper, it is feasible and necessary to build everyone involved in innovation problem solving process under Total Innovation Management (TIM) based on the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). The tools under the CAI technology: How TO mode and science effects database could be very useful for all employee especially non-technical department and bottom line for innovation. The problem solving process put forward in the paper focus on non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee for innovation.

  3. New Evidence for 26Al in CAI and Chondrules from Type 3 Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Russell, S. S.; MacPherson, G. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1996-03-01

    We have known since 1976 that 26A1 (tl/2 = 7.2 x 105 yrs) was alive in the early solar system, at a level of (26Al/27Al)o z 5 x 10-5 in calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI). However, several outstanding questions remain. Little evidence for 26A1 has been found in other chondritic material, and none has been found in differentiated meteorites. These results might imply that 26A1 was heterogeneously distributed in the nebula or by mineralogic site in nebular dust, or they might reflect differences in time of formation. There are strict limitations on finding evidence of 26A1 in normal chondrules with bulk Al/Mg ~ 0.1, since even quenched, perfectly preserved, late-stage glasses would have low Al/Mg. Primary plagioclase crystals provide the only possibility, but these only crystallize rarely in melts within the compositional range of normal chondrules. Also, metamorphism can erase the evidence in high-AI/Mg phases. To address these issues, we have conducted a search for chondrules and CAI with high-Al/Mg phases suitable for ion-probe measurement in type 3 ordinary chondrites. Previous work has revealed evidence for 26Al in a plagioclase bearing, olivine-pyroxene class from Semarkona (LL3.0; (26Al/27Al)o = 7.7+/-2.1 x 10-6)), a plagioclase-rich object from Bovedy (L3.7?; 2.5+/-1.2 x 10-7), in separated plagioclase from St. Marguerite (H4; 2.0+/-0.6 x 10-7), an isolated hibonite grain from Dhajala (H3.8; 8.4+0.5 x 10-6), and in Al2O3 and hibonite grains ((26Al/27Al)o = 2-5 x 10-5; [GRH, unpublished]) from acid residues of Semarkona, Bishunpur (LL3.1), and Krymka (LL3.1). We have identified and measured Al-Mg isotope systematics in two CAI and seven chondrules from ordinary chondrites of low metamorphic grade and have found clear evidence for 26A1 in both CAI and in two chondrules.

  4. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  5. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  6. A COMPARISON OF CMAQ-BASED AEROSOL PROPERTIES WITH IMPROVE, MODIS, AND AERONET DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare select aerosol Properties derived from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model-simulated aerosol mass concentrations with routine data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer...

  7. Airflow Dynamics of Coughing in Healthy Human Volunteers by Shadowgraph Imaging: An Aid to Aerosol Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre; Pantelic, Jovan; Koh, Gerald C.; Wang, Liang De; Amin, Muhammad; Klettner, Christian A.; Cheong, David K. W.; Sekhar, Chandra; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2012-01-01

    Cough airflow dynamics have been previously studied using a variety of experimental methods. In this study, real-time, non-invasive shadowgraph imaging was applied to obtain additional analyses of cough airflows produced by healthy volunteers. Twenty healthy volunteers (10 women, mean age 32.2±12.9 years; 10 men, mean age 25.3±2.5 years) were asked to cough freely, then into their sleeves (as per current US CDC recommendations) in this study to analyze cough airflow dynamics. For the 10 females (cases 1–10), their maximum detectable cough propagation distances ranged from 0.16–0.55 m, with maximum derived velocities of 2.2–5.0 m/s, and their maximum detectable 2-D projected areas ranged from 0.010–0.11 m2, with maximum derived expansion rates of 0.15–0.55 m2/s. For the 10 males (cases 11–20), their maximum detectable cough propagation distances ranged from 0.31–0.64 m, with maximum derived velocities of 3.2–14 m/s, and their maximum detectable 2-D projected areas ranged from 0.04–0.14 m2, with maximum derived expansion rates of 0.25–1.4 m2/s. These peak velocities were measured when the visibility of the exhaled airflows was optimal and compare favorably with those reported previously using other methods, and may be seen as a validation of these previous approaches in a more natural setting. However, the propagation distances can only represent a lower limit due to the inability of the shadowgraph method to visualize these cough airflows once their temperature cools to that of the ambient air, which is an important limitation of this methodology. The qualitative high-speed video footage of these volunteers coughing into their sleeves demonstrates that although this method rarely completely blocks the cough airflow, it decelerates, splits and redirects the airflow, eventually reducing its propagation. The effectiveness of this intervention depends on optimum positioning of the arm over the nose and mouth during coughing, though unsightly stains

  8. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  9. Intelligent CAI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    of industria !, technological, and sociological interest- invaluable information for executives and professionals who must keep up to date. The...BEVERAGE 1A HOT CHOCOLATE MB TEA IBI WITH LEMON HB2 WITH SUGAR AND CREAM 1C COFFEE 11 SUBSTITUTE WOR’ JN &TATCIKMT Before we end this

  10. Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B CAI: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-Fe and alkali-halide alteration of CAIs is often attributed to aqueous alteration by fluids circulating on asteroidal parent bodies after the various chondritic components have been assembled, although debate continues about the roles of asteroidal vs. nebular modification processes [1-7]. Here we report de-tailed observations of alteration products in a large Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende, one of the oxidized subgroup of CV3s, and propose a speculative model for aqueous alteration of CAIs in a nebular setting. Ca-Fe alteration in this CAI consists predominantly of end-member hedenbergite, end-member andradite, and compositionally variable, magnesian high-Ca pyroxene. These phases are strongly concentrated in an unusual "nodule" enclosed within the interior of the CAI (Fig. 1). The Ca, Fe-rich nodule superficially resembles a clast that pre-dated and was engulfed by the CAI, but closer inspection shows that relic spinel grains are enclosed in the nodule, and corroded CAI primary phases interfinger with the Fe-rich phases at the nodule s margins. This CAI also contains abundant sodalite and nepheline (alkali-halide) alteration that occurs around the rims of the CAI, but also penetrates more deeply into the CAI. The two types of alteration (Ca-Fe and alkali-halide) are adjacent, and very fine-grained Fe-rich phases are associated with sodalite-rich regions. Both types of alteration appear to be replacive; if that is true, it would require substantial introduction of Fe, and transport of elements (Ti, Al and Mg) out of the nodule, and introduction of Na and Cl into alkali-halide rich zones. Parts of the CAI have been extensively metasomatized.

  11. Extending the granularity of representation and control for the MIL-STD CAIS 1.0 node model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Kathy L.

    1986-01-01

    The Common APSE (Ada 1 Program Support Environment) Interface Set (CAIS) (DoD85) node model provides an excellent baseline for interfaces in a single-host development environment. To encompass the entire spectrum of computing, however, the CAIS model should be extended in four areas. It should provide the interface between the engineering workstation and the host system throughout the entire lifecycle of the system. It should provide a basis for communication and integration functions needed by distributed host environments. It should provide common interfaces for communications mechanisms to and among target processors. It should provide facilities for integration, validation, and verification of test beds extending to distributed systems on geographically separate processors with heterogeneous instruction set architectures (ISAS). Additions to the PROCESS NODE model to extend the CAIS into these four areas are proposed.

  12. In Situ Trace Element Analysis of an Allende Type B1 CAI: EK-459-5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Variations in refractory major and trace element composition of calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) provide constraints on physical and chemical conditions and processes in the earliest stages of the Solar System. Previous work indicates that CAIs have experienced complex histories involving, in many cases, multiple episodes of condensation, evaporation, and partial melting. We have analyzed major and trace element abundances in two core to rim transects of the melilite mantle as well as interior major phases of a Type B1 CAI (EK-459-5-1) from Allende by electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to investigate the behavior of key trace elements with a primary focus on the REEs Tm and Yb.

  13. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  14. Thermal maturity patterns in New York State using CAI and %Ro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, D.J.; Ryder, R.T.; Nyahay, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    New conodont alteration index (CAI) and vitrinite reflectance (%Ro) data collected from drill holes in the Appalachian basin of New York State allow refinement of thermal maturity maps for Ordovician and Devonian rocks. CAI isotherms on the new maps show a pattern that approximates that published by Harris et al. (1978) in eastern and western New York, but it differs in central New York, where the isotherms are shifted markedly westward by more than 100 km and are more tightly grouped. This close grouping of isograds reflects a steeper thermal gradient than previously noted by Harris et al. (1978) and agrees closely with the abrupt west-to-east increase in thermal maturity across New York noted by Johnsson (1986). These data show, in concordance with previous studies, that thermal maturity levels in these rocks are higher than can be explained by simple burial heating beneath the present thickness of overburden. The Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian Basin in New York must have been buried by very thick post-Devonian sediments (4-6 km suggested by Sarwar and Friedman 1995) or were exposed to a higher-than-normal geothermal flux caused by crustal extension, or a combination of the two.

  15. An experimental study of fuel injection strategies in CAI gasoline engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hunicz, J.; Kordos, P.

    2011-01-15

    Combustion of gasoline in a direct injection controlled auto-ignition (CAI) single-cylinder research engine was studied. CAI operation was achieved with the use of the negative valve overlap (NVO) technique and internal exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR). Experiments were performed at single injection and split injection, where some amount of fuel was injected close to top dead centre (TDC) during NVO interval, and the second injection was applied with variable timing. Additionally, combustion at variable fuel-rail pressure was examined. Investigation showed that at fuel injection into recompressed exhaust fuel reforming took place. This process was identified via an analysis of the exhaust-fuel mixture composition after NVO interval. It was found that at single fuel injection in NVO phase, its advance determined the heat release rate and auto-ignition timing, and had a strong influence on NO{sub X} emission. However, a delay of single injection to intake stroke resulted in deterioration of cycle-to-cycle variability. Application of split injection showed benefits of this strategy versus single injection. Examinations of different fuel mass split ratios and variable second injection timing resulted in further optimisation of mixture formation. At equal share of the fuel mass injected in the first injection during NVO and in the second injection at the beginning of compression, the lowest emission level and cyclic variability improvement were observed. (author)

  16. Characterizing Pyroxene Reaction Space in Calcium-Aluminum Rich Inclusions: Oxidation During CAI Rim Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyl, K. A.; Young, E. D.

    2009-12-01

    We define the reaction space that controls changes in pyroxene composition in CAIs and Wark-Lovering (WL) rims in an oxidizing solar nebula. Ti-rich pyroxenes in CAIs record a sub-solar oxygen fugacity (Ti3+/Ti4+~1.5). WL rim pyroxenes in the CAI Leoville 144A have a distinctly lower oxidation state.This difference supports WL rim condensation in an environment of increasing O2(g) and Mg(g) (Simon et al. 2005). We used the following phase components to identify four linearly independent reactions (Thompson 1982): diopside, CaTs (Al2Mg-1Si-1), T3 (Ti3+AlMg-1Si-1), T4 (Ti4+Al2Mg-1Si-2), En (MgCa-1), perovskite, O(g), Mg(g), SiO(g), and Ca(g). Compositional variation in this system is dominated by two reactions. The first is oxidation of Ti3+ via reaction with O and Mg in the gas phase: 1.5 O(g) + Mg(g) → ¼ Di + [Ti4+Mg3/4Ti3+-1Ca-1/4Si-1/2] (1). Pyroxene is produced and En is introduced. The second reaction (2) is perovskite formation. It is observed in the WL rim of Leoville 144A, and experiments confirm that an elevated Ti component converts pyroxene to perovskite(Gupta et al. 1973). MgCa-1 is the third linearly independent reaction (3). They combine to give: ½ Di + x Ca(g)→ x Mg(g)+ Pv + [Mg1/2-xSiTi4+-1Ca-1/2+x](2,3). Unlike (1), pyroxene is consumed in this reaction. The parameter x defines the extent of Mg-Ca exchange. When x > 0.5, WL rim formation occurs in an environment where Mg is volatile and Ca condenses. The reaction space defined by reactions (1) and (2,3) describes the transition from CAI interior to WL rims. WL rim pyroxene Ti contents, [CaTs], and Ca < 1 pfu are all explained in this space. The fourth linearly independent reaction is SiO(g):1/8 Di + ¼ Mg(g)→ ¾ SiO(g) + [Mg3/8Ca1/8Ti4+Ti3+-1Si-1/2](4). Silica reduction forms Ti4+, releasing SiO(g). (4) does not describe the oxidation of Ti3+ in WL rim pyroxene, but (1) - (4) results in En formation directly from the gas phase. This may explain WL rim analyses that have Si contents in excess

  17. High precision Al-Mg systematics of forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs from CV3 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Bullock, E. S.; Tenner, T. J.; Nakashima, D.; Kita, N. T.; Ivanova, M. A.; Krot, A. N.; Petaev, M. I.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2017-03-01

    In order to further elucidate possible temporal relationships between different varieties of calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), we measured the aluminum-magnesium isotopic systematics of seven examples of the rare type known as forsterite-bearing Type B (FoB) inclusions from four different CV3 carbonaceous chondrites: Allende, Efremovka, NWA 3118, and Vigarano. The primary phases (forsterite, Al-Ti-rich diopside, spinel, melilite, and anorthite) in each inclusion were analyzed in situ using high-precision secondary ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). In all cases, minerals with low Al/Mg ratios (all except anorthite) yield well-defined internal Al-Mg isochrons, with a range of initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] ranging from (5.30 ± 0.22) × 10-5 down to (4.17 ± 0.43) × 10-5. Anorthite in all cases is significantly disturbed relative to the isochrons defined by the other phases in the same CAIs, and in several cases contains no resolved excesses of radiogenic 26Mg (δ26Mg∗) even at 27Al/24Mg ratios greater than 1000. The fact that some FoBs preserve (26Al/27Al)0 of ∼5.2 × 10-5, close to the canonical value of (5.23 ± 0.13) × 10-5 inferred from bulk magnesium-isotope measurements of CV CAIs (B. Jacobsen et al., 2008), demonstrates that FoBs began forming very early, contemporaneous with other more-refractory CAIs. The range of (26Al/27Al)0 values further shows that FoBs continued to be reprocessed over ∼200,000 years of nebular history, consistent with results obtained for other types of igneous CAIs in CV chondrites. The absence of any correlation between of CAI + FoB formation or reprocessing times with bulk composition or CAI type means that there is no temporal evolutionary sequence between the diverse CAI types. The initial δ26Mg∗ value in the most primitive FoB (SJ101) is significantly lower than the canonical solar system value of -0.040 ± 0.029‰.

  18. Calcium and Titanium Isotope Fractionation in CAIS: Tracers of Condensation and Inheritance in the Early Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) can be used to understand the conditions present in the protoplantary disk where they formed. The isotopic compositions of these early-formed nebular materials are largely controlled by chemical volatility. The isotopic effects of evaporation/sublimation, which are well explained by both theory and experimental work, lead to enrichments of the heavy isotopes that are often exhibited by the moderately refractory elements Mg and Si. Less well understood are the isotopic effects of condensation, which limits our ability to determine whether a CAI is a primary condensate and/or retains any evidence of its primordial formation history.

  19. Microstructures of Hibonite From an ALH A77307 (CO3.0) CAI: Evidence for Evaporative Loss of Calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jangmi; Brearley, Adrian J.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2014-01-01

    Hibonite is a comparatively rare, primary phase found in some CAIs from different chondrite groups and is also common in Wark-Lovering rims [1]. Hibonite is predicted to be one of the earliest refractory phases to form by equilibrium condensation from a cooling gas of solar composition [2] and, therefore, can be a potential recorder of very early solar system processes. In this study, we describe the microstructures of hibonite from one CAI in ALH A77307 (CO3.0) using FIB/TEM techniques in order to reconstruct its formational history.

  20. Developing the Coach Analysis and Intervention System (CAIS): establishing validity and reliability of a computerised systematic observation instrument.

    PubMed

    Cushion, Christopher; Harvey, Stephen; Muir, Bob; Nelson, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We outline the evolution of a computerised systematic observation tool and describe the process for establishing the validity and reliability of this new instrument. The Coach Analysis and Interventions System (CAIS) has 23 primary behaviours related to physical behaviour, feedback/reinforcement, instruction, verbal/non-verbal, questioning and management. The instrument also analyses secondary coach behaviour related to performance states, recipient, timing, content and questioning/silence. The CAIS is a multi-dimensional and multi-level mechanism able to provide detailed and contextualised data about specific coaching behaviours occurring in complex and nuanced coaching interventions and environments that can be applied to both practice sessions and competition.

  1. A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) versus Class Room Lecture (CRL) for Computer Science at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kausar, Tayyaba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with class room lecture and computer assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypothesis of…

  2. A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) versus Class Room Lecture (RL) for Computer Science at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kausar, Tayyaba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with class room lecture and computer assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypothesis of…

  3. A One Year Post-program Assessment of a Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) Weight Management Program for Industrial Employees: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Kathryn F.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study examined whether a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) nutrition program would help employees maintain weight loss and dietary intake improvements over time. Subjects received either no nutrition education, education with microcomputer use, or education without microcomputers. Posttesting found greater weight loss for CAI participants,…

  4. Aerosol/Radiation, VNIR/NIR/TIR Imaging, Net Solar and Longwave Radiation, Meteorological Fluxes, Atmospheric Dropsonde, and Ocean Temperature/Salinity Microbuoy Payloads for Earth Observations Using a Manta Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Gao, R. S.; Murphy, D. M.; Telg, H.; Brown, S.; Dhakai, T.; Zappa, C. J.; Stalin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Several new payloads have been developed for use in the Manta UAS. The NOAA/PMEL aerosol payload (Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013) has been expanded to include a printed optical particle spectrometer to obtain aerosol size distributions and an upward looking radiometer to measure radiant flux densities through aerosol layers. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) has improved its visible and infrared imaging payload to provide precise measurements of ice/snow/ocean surface temperatures accurate to 0.1°C. LDEO has also developed a number of new payloads that include: i) hyperspectral aberration-corrected imaging spectrometers to measure VNIR (400-1000 nm) and NIR (900-1700 nm) spectral radiance of the upper-ocean and sea ice to determine ocean color, ice-age distributions and ice-surface type; ii) up- and downward-looking hemispheric pyrgeometers and pyranometers to measure the net longwave and net shortwave radiation for ice-ocean albedo studies with an onboard visible camera to determine the sea ice fraction and whitecapping; iii) meteorological measurements of turbulent momentum, sensible, and latent fluxes as well as wave height, ice freeboard, and surface roughness with a LIDAR; iv) four dropsonde-microbuoys (DMB) that can be deployed from the Manta. The four DMB measure temperature, pressure, and relative humidity as they descend through the atmosphere. Once they land on the ocean's surface, they deploy a string of sensors that measures temperature and salinity of the upper three meters of the ocean. The ocean sensors telemeter data back to the UAS on subsequent flights. The DMB can also be dropped on an ice flow to measure the rate of the ice movement. Details of these payloads and example data will be reported.

  5. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, complementing field and modeling efforts to produce a comprehensive picture of aerosol characteristics. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations. MODIS-derived size parameters are also compared with AERONET retrievals and found to agree well for fine-mode dominated aerosol regimes. Aerosol regimes dominated by dust aerosol are less accurate, attributed to what is thought to be nonsphericity. Errors due to nonsphericity will be reduced by introducing a new set of empirical phase functions, derived without any assumptions of particle shape. The major innovation that MODIS bring to the field of remote sensing of aerosol is the measure of particle size and the separation of finemode and coarsemode dominated aerosol regimes. Particle size can separate finemode man-made aerosols created during combustion, from larger natural aerosols originating from salt spray or wind erosion. This separation allows for the calculation of aerosol radiative effect and the estimation of the man-made aerosol radiative forcing. MODIS can also be used in regional studies of aerosol-cloud interaction that affect the global radiative and hydrological cycles.

  6. 3D radiative transfer effects in multi-angle/multispectral radio-polarimetric signals from a mixture of clouds and aerosols viewed by a non-imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Garay, Michael J.; Xu, Feng; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    When observing a spatially complex mix of aerosols and clouds in a single relatively large field-of-view, nature entangles their signals non-linearly through polarized radiation transport processes that unfold in the 3D position and direction spaces. In contrast, any practical forward model in a retrieval algorithm will use only 1D vector radiative transfer (vRT) in a linear mixing technique. We assess the difference between the observed and predicted signals using synthetic data from a high-fidelity 3D vRT model with clouds generated using a Large Eddy Simulation model and an aerosol climatology. We find that this difference is signal—not noise—for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an instrument developed by NASA. Moreover, the worst case scenario is also the most interesting case, namely, when the aerosol burden is large, hence hase the most impact on the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Based on our findings, we formulate a mitigation strategy for these unresolved cloud adjacency effects assuming that some spatial information is available about the structure of the clouds at higher resolution from "context" cameras, as was planned for NASA's ill-fated Glory mission that was to carry the APS but failed to reach orbit. Application to POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data from the period when PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) was in the A-train is briefly discussed.

  7. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  8. Linking CAI abundance to polarimetric response in a population of ancient asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devogele, Maxime; Tanga, Paolo; Bendjoya, Philippe; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Surdej, Jean; Bus, Schelte J.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Cellino, Alberto; Campins, Humberto; Licandro, Javier; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Carry, Benoit

    2016-10-01

    Polarimetry constitutes one of the fundamental tools for characterizing the surface texture and composition of airless Solar System bodies. In 2006, polarimetric observations led to the discovery of a new type of asteroids, which displays a peculiar polarimetric response. These asteroids are collectively known as "Barbarians", from (234) Barbara the first discovered one.The most commonly accepted explanation for this perculiar polarization response seems to be the presence of a high percentage of fluffy-type Calcium Aluminium-rich Inclusions (CAIs), whose optical properties could produce the observed polarization. Their reflectance spectra also exibit an absorption feature in the near-infrared around 2.1-2.2 microns, that is characteristic of this peculiar group.Based on these results, we organized a systematic polarimetric and near-infrared observational campaign of known Barbarians or candidate asteroids. These campaigns include members of the family of 1040 Klumpkea, 2085 Henan and 729 Watsonia, which are known to contain Barbarian and/or L-type asteroids also suspected to have such a polarimetric behaviour. We have made use of the ToPo polarimeter at the 1m telescope of the Centre pédagogique Planète et Univers (C2PU, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France). The spectroscopic observations in the near-infrared were obtained with the SpeX instrument at the NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF).By combining polarimetry and spectroscopy we find a correlation between the abundance of CAIs and the inversion angle of the phase-polarization curve of Barbarian asteroids. This is the first time that a direct link has been established between a specific polarimetric response and the surface composition of asteroids. In addition, we find a considerable variety of CAI abundance from one object to the other, consistent with a wide range of possible albedos. Since these asteroids constitute a reservoir of primitive Solar System material, understanding their origin can

  9. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  10. Improvement of MODIS aerosol retrievals near clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb, Norman G.; Várnai, Tamás.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2013-08-01

    retrieval of aerosol properties near clouds from reflected sunlight is challenging. Sunlight reflected from clouds can effectively enhance the reflectance in nearby clear regions. Ignoring cloud 3-D radiative effects can lead to large biases in aerosol retrievals, risking an incorrect interpretation of satellite observations on aerosol-cloud interaction. Earlier, we developed a simple model to compute the cloud-induced clear-sky radiance enhancement that is due to radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and the molecular layer above. This paper focuses on the application and implementation of the correction algorithm. This is the first time that this method is being applied to a full Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) granule. The process of the correction includes converting Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System broadband flux to visible narrowband flux, computing the clear-sky radiance enhancement, and retrieving aerosol properties. We find that the correction leads to smaller values in aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent, and the small mode aerosol fraction of the total AOD. It also makes the average aerosol particle size larger near clouds than far away from clouds, which is more realistic than the opposite behavior observed in operational retrievals. We discuss issues in the current correction method as well as our plans to validate the algorithm.

  11. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  12. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  13. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  14. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  15. Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the CAI microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (CAI) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the CAI genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the CAI locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the CAI microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans.

  16. Teaching Critical Thinking Skills with CAI: A Design by Two Researchers Shows Computers Can Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, George M., Jr.; Perkins, Harvey W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a project which involved designing a nine-week course utilizing computer assisted instruction (CAI) to teach seventh graders critical thinking skills. Results indicate measurable gains were made in the critical thinking skills of verbal analogy and inductive/deductive reasoning, although no consistent gains were made in logical reasoning…

  17. Changes in flavour and microbial diversity during natural fermentation of suan-cai, a traditional food made in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rina; Yu, Meiling; Liu, Xiaoyu; Meng, Lingshuai; Wang, Qianqian; Xue, Yating; Wu, Junrui; Yue, Xiqing

    2015-10-15

    We measured changes in the main physical and chemical properties, flavour compounds and microbial diversity in suan-cai during natural fermentation. The results showed that the pH and concentration of soluble protein initially decreased but were then maintained at a stable level; the concentration of nitrite increased in the initial fermentation stage and after reaching a peak it decreased significantly to a low level by the end of fermentation. Suan-cai was rich in 17 free amino acids. All of the free amino acids increased in concentration to different degrees, except histidine. Total free amino acids reached their highest levels in the mid-fermentation stage. The 17 volatile flavour components identified at the start of fermentation increased to 57 by the mid-fermentation stage; esters and aldehydes were in the greatest diversity and abundance, contributing most to the aroma of suan-cai. Bacteria were more abundant and diverse than fungi in suan-cai; 14 bacterial species were identified from the genera Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Lactobacillus. The predominant fungal species identified were Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida tropicalis and Penicillium expansum.

  18. Hunting and use of terrestrial fauna used by Caiçaras from the Atlantic Forest coast (Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is considered one of the hotspots for conservation, comprising remnants of rain forest along the eastern Brazilian coast. Its native inhabitants in the Southeastern coast include the Caiçaras (descendants from Amerindians and European colonizers), with a deep knowledge on the natural resources used for their livelihood. Methods We studied the use of the terrestrial fauna in three Caiçara communities, through open-ended interviews with 116 native residents. Data were checked through systematic observations and collection of zoological material. Results The dependence on the terrestrial fauna by Caiçaras is especially for food and medicine. The main species used are Didelphis spp., Dasyprocta azarae, Dasypus novemcinctus, and small birds (several species of Turdidae). Contrasting with a high dependency on terrestrial fauna resources by native Amazonians, the Caiçaras do not show a constant dependency on these resources. Nevertheless, the occasional hunting of native animals represents a complimentary source of animal protein. Conclusion Indigenous or local knowledge on native resources is important in order to promote local development in a sustainable way, and can help to conserve biodiversity, particularly if the resource is sporadically used and not commercially exploited. PMID:19930595

  19. A Model Driven Question-Answering System for a CAI Environment. Final Report (July 1970 to May 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John S.; And Others

    A question answering system which permits a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) student greater initiative in the variety of questions he can ask is described. A method is presented to represent the dynamic processes of a subject matter area by augmented finite state automata, which permits efficient inferencing about dynamic processes and…

  20. From Corporate Social Responsibility, through Entrepreneurial Orientation, to Knowledge Sharing: A Study in Cai Luong (Renovated Theatre) Theatre Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Luu Trong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the role of antecedents such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and entrepreneurial orientation in the chain effect to knowledge sharing among members of Cai Luong theatre companies in the Vietnamese context. Knowledge sharing contributes to the depth of the knowledge pool of both the individuals and the…

  1. Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) in Language Arts: Investigating the Influence of Teacher Knowledge and Attitudes on the Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) into the language arts classroom can greatly assist teachers meet the needs of diverse literacy learners. However, this new technology does not come without some concerns, including but not limited to ease of implementation, funding for new hardware and software, appropriate teacher support,…

  2. Investigating Learning Achievements of Thai High School Students in a Sequences and Series Lesson Delivered on CAI-Based Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chundang, Ungsana; Singhaprink, Wipawaan; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Tantipisalkul, Tasanee; Praekhaow, Puchong

    2012-01-01

    The current experimental research aims to investigate students' learning outcomes in classes in which the interactive CAI (computer-assisted instruction)-based materials were implemented. It also aims to compare the learning outcomes of the students based on regions in which their school is located. The participants were 326 Matthayom-4 students…

  3. Two years since SSAMS: Status of 14C AMS at CAIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Prasad, G. V.; Cherkinsky, Alexander; Culp, Randy A.; Dvoracek, Doug K.

    2015-10-01

    The NEC 250 kV single stage AMS accelerator (SSAMS) was installed two years ago at the Center for Applied Isotope Studies (CAIS), University of Georgia. The accelerator is primarily being used for radiocarbon measurements to test the authenticity of natural and bio-based samples while all other samples such as geological, atmospheric, marine and archaeological. are run on the 500 kV, NEC 1.5SDH-1 model tandem accelerator, which has been operating since 2001. The data obtained over a six months period for OXI, OXII, ANU sucrose and FIRI-D are discussed. The mean value of ANU sucrose observed to be slightly lower than the consensus value. The processed blanks on SSAMS produce lower apparent age compared to the tandem accelerator as expected.

  4. A FIB/TEM/Nanosims Study of a Wark-Lovering Rim on an Allende CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ca- Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are commonly surrounded by Wark-Lovering (WL) rims - thin (approx. 50 micrometers) multilayered sequences - whose mineralogy is dominated by high temperature minerals similar to those that occur in the cores of CAIs [1]. The origins of these WL rims involved high temperature events in the early nebula such as condensation, flashheating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these processes. These rims formed after CAI formation but prior to accretion into their parent bodies. We have undertaken a coordinated mineralogical and isotopic study of WL rims to determine the formation conditions of the individual layers and to constrain the isotopic reservoirs they interacted with during their history. We focus here on the spinel layer, the first-formed highest- temperature layer in the WL rim sequence. Results and Discussion: We have performed mineralogical, chemical and isotopic analyses of an unusual ultrarefractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) consisting of an approx. 500 micrometers long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarsegrained perovskite. SHAL is partially surrounded by WL rim. We previously reported on the mineralogy, isotopic compositions and trace elements in SHAL [2-4]. The spinel layer in the WL rim is present only on the hibonite and terminates abruptly at the contact with the coarse perovskite. This simple observation shows that the spinel layer is not a condensate in this case (otherwise spinel would have condensed on the perovskite as well). The spinel layer appears to have formed by gas-phase corrosion of the hibonite by Mg-rich vapors such that the spinel layer grew at the expense of the hibonite. We also found that the spinel layer has the same 16Orich composition as the hibonite. The spinel layer is polycrystalline and individual crystals do not show a crystallographic relationship with the hibonite. An Al-diopside layer overlies the spinel layer, and is present on both

  5. Secondary processing of chondrules and refractory inclusions (CAIs) by gasdynamic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.; Prialnik, D.; Bunch, T. E.; Cassen, P.; Reynolds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Results of calculations performed to determine the conditions necessary for producing the opaque rims on chondrules and CAI rims by high-speed entry into the transient atmosphere of an accreting meteorite parent body are presented. The sensitivity of these results to variations in critical parameters is investigated. The range of entry velocities which can produce such rims is shown to depend on the size, melting temperature, and thermal conductivity of the particles. For particles greater than 2 mm in radius, with thermal conductivities of 20,000 ergs/sm s K or lower, entry velocities of about 3 km/s suffice. For particle sizes less than 1 mm in radius, the range of encounter velocities that can produce rims is narrow or vanishing, regardless of the thermal conductivity, unless the melting temperature in the outer part of the chondrule has been reduced by compositional heterogeneity.

  6. Global Aerosol Remote Sensing from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Levy, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Jose V.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, spatial distribution and dynamics of global aerosols are still very poorly known, and new data from satellite sensors have long been awaited to improve current understanding and to give a boost to the effort in future climate predictions. The derivation of aerosol parameters from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensors aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua polar-orbiting satellites ushers in a new era in aerosol remote sensing from space. Terra and Aqua were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002 respectively, with daytime equator crossing times of approximately 10:30 am and 1:30 pm respectively. Several aerosol parameters are retrieved at 10-km spatial resolution (level 2) from MODIS daytime data. The MODIS aerosol algorithm employs different approaches to retrieve parameters over land and ocean surfaces, because of the inherent differences in the solar spectral radiance interaction with these surfaces. The parameters retrieved include: aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.47, 0.55 and 0.66 micron wavelengths over land, and at 0.47, 0.55, 0.66, 0.87, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 micron over ocean; Angstrom exponent over land and ocean; and effective radii, and the proportion of AOT contributed by the small mode aerosols over ocean. To ensure the quality of these parameters, a substantial part of the Terra-MODIS aerosol products were validated globally and regionally, based on cross correlation with corresponding parameters derived from ground-based measurements from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun photometers. Similar validation efforts are planned for the Aqua-MODIS aerosol products. The MODIS level 2 aerosol products are operationally aggregated to generate global daily, eight-day (weekly), and monthly products at one-degree spatial resolution (level 3). MODIS aerosol data are used for the detailed study of local, regional, and global aerosol concentration

  7. The NASA GEOS-5 Aerosol Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Darmenov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System modeling and data assimilation environment (GEOS-5) is maintained by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Near-realtime meteorological forecasts are produced to support NASA satellite and field missions. We have implemented in this environment an aerosol module based on the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) model. This modeling system has previously been evaluated in the context of hindcasts based on assimilated meteorology. Here we focus on the development and evaluation of the near-realtime forecasting system. We present a description of recent efforts to implement near-realtime biomass burning emissions derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire radiative power products. We as well present a developing capability for improvement of aerosol forecasts by assimilation of aerosol information from MODIS.

  8. Aerosol algorithm evaluation within aerosol-CCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael; Griesfeller, Jan

    Properties of aerosol retrievals from space are difficult. Even data from dedicated satellite sensors face contaminations which limit the accuracy of aerosol retrieval products. Issues are the identification of complete cloud-free scenes, the need to assume aerosol compositional features in an underdetermined solution space and the requirement to characterize the background at high accuracy. Usually the development of aerosol is a slow process, requiring continuous feedback from evaluations. To demonstrate maturity, these evaluations need to cover different regions and seasons and many different aerosol properties, because aerosol composition is quite diverse and highly variable in space and time, as atmospheric aerosol lifetimes are only a few days. Three years ago the ESA Climate Change Initiative started to support aerosol retrieval efforts in order to develop aerosol retrieval products for the climate community from underutilized ESA satellite sensors. The initial focus was on retrievals of AOD (a measure for the atmospheric column amount) and of Angstrom (a proxy for aerosol size) from the ATSR and MERIS sensors on ENVISAT. The goal was to offer retrieval products that are comparable or better in accuracy than commonly used NASA products of MODIS or MISR. Fortunately, accurate reference data of ground based sun-/sky-photometry networks exist. Thus, retrieval assessments could and were conducted independently by different evaluation groups. Here, results of these evaluations for the year 2008 are summarized. The capability of these newly developed retrievals is analyzed and quantified in scores. These scores allowed a ranking of competing efforts and also allow skill comparisons of these new retrievals against existing and commonly used retrievals.

  9. What is the "Clim-Likely" aerosol product?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... as an initial step in identifying a range of components and mixtures for the MISR Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm climatology, and as ... (2001). The sensitivity of multi-angle imaging to natural mixtures of aerosols over ocean. J. Geophysical Res. , 106 (D16), ...

  10. Aerosol optical depths and their contributing sources in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Chan, K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a quantitative investigation of the contributions of different aerosols to the aerosol optical depths (AODs) in Taiwan using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and remote sensing measurements. The study focus is on the period from June 2012 to October 2013. Five different types of aerosols are investigated: sea salt, dust, sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon. Three of these aerosols, namely sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon, have significant anthropogenic sources. Model simulation results were compared with both ground based sun photometer measurements and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The model data shows good agreement with satellite observations (R = 0.72) and moderate correlation with sun photometer measurements (R = 0.52). Simulation results show the anthropogenic aerosols contribute ∼65% to the total AOD in Taipei, while natural originated aerosols only show a minor impact (∼35%). Among all the aerosols, sulfate is the dominating species, contributing 62.4% to the annual average total AOD. Organic carbon and black carbons respectively contribute 7.3% and 1.5% to the annual averaged total AOD. The annual average contributions of sea salt and dust aerosols to the total AOD are 26.4% and 2.4%, respectively. A sensitivity study was performed to identify the contributions of anthropogenic aerosol sources in each region to the AODs in Taipei. North-East Asia was identified as the major contributing source region of anthropogenic aerosols to Taipei, accounting for more than 50% of total sulfate, 32% of total organic carbon and 51% of total black carbon aerosols. South-East Asia is the second largest contributing source region, contributing 35%, 24% and 34% of total sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon aerosols, respectively. The aerosols from continents other than Asia only show minor impacts to the aerosol load in Taipei. In addition, a case study of a biomass

  11. Single-particle characterization of summertime Antarctic aerosols collected at King George Island using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Maskey, Shila; Geng, Hong; Song, Young-Chul; Hwang, Heejin; Yoon, Young-Jun; Ahn, Kang-Ho; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-08-01

    Single-particle characterization of Antarctic aerosols was performed to investigate the impact of marine biogenic sulfur species on the chemical compositions of sea-salt aerosols in the polar atmosphere. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis was used to characterize 2900 individual particles in 10 sets of aerosol samples collected between March 12 and 16, 2009 at King Sejong Station, a Korean scientific research station located at King George Island in the Antarctic. Two size modes of particles, i.e., PM(2.5-10) and PM(1.0-2.5), were analyzed, and four types of particles were identified, with sulfur-containing sea-salt particles being the most abundant, followed by genuine sea-salt particles without sulfur species, iron-containing particles, and other species including CaCO(3)/CaMg(CO(3))(2), organic carbon, and aluminosilicates. When a sulfur-containing sea-salt particle showed an atomic concentration ratio of sulfur to sodium of >0.083 (seawater ratio), it is regarded as containing nonsea-salt sulfate (nss-SO(4)(2-)) and/or methanesulfonate (CH(3)SO(3)(-)), which was supported by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared imaging measurements. These internal mixture particles of sea-salt/CH(3)SO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-) were very frequently encountered. As nitrate-containing particles were not encountered, and the air-masses for all of the samples originated from the Pacific Ocean (based on 5-day backward trajectories), the oxidation of dimethylsulfide (DMS) emitted from phytoplanktons in the ocean is most likely to be responsible for the formation of the mixed sea-salt/CH(3)SO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-) particles.

  12. Measuring Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Aerosol Profiles Simultaneously with a Camera Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, John; Pipes, Robert; Sharma, Nimmi C. P.

    2016-06-01

    CLidar or camera lidar is a simple, inexpensive technique to measure nighttime tropospheric aerosol profiles. Stars in the raw data images used in the CLidar analysis can also be used to calculate aerosol optical depth simultaneously. A single star can be used with the Langley method or multiple star pairs can be used to reduce the error. The estimated error from data taken under clear sky conditions at Mauna Loa Observatory is approximately +/- 0.01.

  13. VARIABLE AND EXTREME IRRADIATION CONDITIONS IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM INFERRED FROM THE INITIAL ABUNDANCE OF {sup 10}Be IN ISHEYEVO CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Rollion-Bard, Claire

    2013-02-01

    A search for short-lived {sup 10}Be in 21 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from Isheyevo, a rare CB/CH chondrite, showed that only 5 CAIs had {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B ratios higher than chondritic correlating with the elemental ratio {sup 9}Be/{sup 11}B, suggestive of in situ decay of this key short-lived radionuclide. The initial ({sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be){sub 0} ratios vary between {approx}10{sup -3} and {approx}10{sup -2} for CAI 411. The initial ratio of CAI 411 is one order of magnitude higher than the highest ratio found in CV3 CAIs, suggesting that the more likely origin of CAI 411 {sup 10}Be is early solar system irradiation. The low ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al){sub 0} [{<=} 8.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}] with which CAI 411 formed indicates that it was exposed to gradual flares with a proton fluence of a few 10{sup 19} protons cm{sup -2}, during the earliest phases of the solar system, possibly the infrared class 0. The irradiation conditions for other CAIs are less well constrained, with calculated fluences ranging between a few 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} protons cm{sup -2}. The variable and extreme value of the initial {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios in carbonaceous chondrite CAIs is the reflection of the variable and extreme magnetic activity in young stars observed in the X-ray domain.

  14. A compound Ca-, Al-rich inclusion from CV3 chondrite Northwest Africa 3118: Implications for understanding processes during CAI formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Marina A.; Lorenz, Cyril A.; Krot, Alexander N.; MacPherson, Glenn J.

    2015-09-01

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion 3N from the Northwest Africa (NWA) 3118 CV3 carbonaceous chondrite is a unique cm-sized compound object, primarily a forsterite-bearing type B (FoB) CAI, that encloses at least 26 smaller CAIs of different types, including compact type A (CTA), B, C, and an ultra-refractory inclusion. Relative to typical type A and B CAIs found elsewhere, the bulk compositions of the types A and B CAIs within 3N more closely match the bulk compositions predicted by equilibrium condensation of a gas of solar composition. Being trapped within the FoB melt may have protected them from melt evaporation that affected most "stand-alone" CAIs. 3N originated either as an aggregate of many smaller (mostly types A, B, C) CAIs plus accreted Fo-bearing material (like an amoeboid olivine aggregate) which experienced partial melting of the whole, or else as a FoB melt droplet that collided with and trapped many smaller solid CAIs. In the former case, 3N recorded the earliest accretion of pebble-sized bodies known. In the latter case, the presence of a large number of individual refractory inclusions within 3N suggests a very high local density of refractory solids in the immediate region of the host CAI during the brief time while it was melted. Collisions would have occurred on time scales of hours at most, assuming a melt solidification interval for the host CAI of 300-400 °C (maximum) and a cooling rate of ~10 °C/h.

  15. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation influence aerosol variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Baijun; Waliser, Duane E.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Li, Qinbin; Yung, Yuk L.; Tyranowski, Tomasz; Geogdzhayev, Igor V.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Torres, Omar; Smirnov, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the modulation of aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using multiple, global satellite aerosol products: aerosol index (AI) from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus-7, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites. A composite MJO analysis indicates that large variations in the TOMS AI and MODIS/AVHRR AOT are found over the equatorial Indian and western Pacific Oceans where MJO convection is active, as well as the tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean where MJO convection is weak but the background aerosol level is high. A strong inverse linear relationship between the TOMS AI and rainfall anomalies, but a weaker, less coherent positive correlation between the MODIS/AVHRR AOT and rainfall anomalies, were found. The MODIS/AVHRR pattern is consistent with ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network data. These results indicate that the MJO and its associated cloudiness, rainfall, and circulation variability systematically influence the variability in remote sensing aerosol retrieval results. Several physical and retrieval algorithmic factors that may contribute to the observed aerosol-rainfall relationships are discussed. Preliminary analysis indicates that cloud contamination in the aerosol retrievals is likely to be a major contributor to the observed relationships, although we cannot exclude possible contributions from other physical mechanisms. Future research is needed to fully understand these complex aerosol-rainfall relationships.

  16. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  17. Monitoring the Impacts of Wildfires on Forest Ecosystems and Public Health in the Exo-Urban Environment Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Amy K; Kondragunta, Shobha; Zhang, Hai; Hoff, Raymond M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing development of exo-urban environments and the spread of urbanization into forested areas is making humans and forest ecosystems more susceptible to the risks associated with wildfires. Larger and more damaging wildfires are having a negative impact on forest ecosystem services, and smoke from wildfires adversely affects the public health of people living in exo-urban environments. Satellite aerosol measurements are valuable tools that can track the evolution of wildfires and monitor the transport of smoke plumes. Operational users, such as air quality forecasters and fire management officials, can use satellite observations to complement ground-based and aircraft measurements of wildfire activity. To date, wildfire applications of satellite aerosol products, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), have been limited by the relatively coarse resolution of available AOD data. However, the new Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has high-resolution AOD that is ideally suited to monitoring wildfire impacts on the exo-urban scale. Two AOD products are available from VIIRS: the 750-m × 750-m nadir resolution Intermediate Product (IP) and the 6-km × 6-km resolution Environmental Data Record product, which is aggregated from IP measurements. True color (red, green, and blue [RGB]) imagery and a smoke mask at 750-m × 750-m resolution are also available from VIIRS as decision aids for wildfire applications; they serve as counterparts to AOD measurements by providing visible information about areas of smoke in the atmosphere. To meet the needs of operational users, who do not have time to process raw data files and need access to VIIRS products in near-real time (NRT), VIIRS AOD and RGB NRT imagery are available from the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) web site. A key feature of IDEA is an interactive visualization tool that allows users to

  18. Monitoring the Impacts of Wildfires on Forest Ecosystems and Public Health in the Exo-Urban Environment Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS).

    PubMed

    Huff, Amy K; Kondragunta, Shobha; Zhang, Hai; Hoff, Raymond M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing development of exo-urban environments and the spread of urbanization into forested areas is making humans and forest ecosystems more susceptible to the risks associated with wildfires. Larger and more damaging wildfires are having a negative impact on forest ecosystem services, and smoke from wildfires adversely affects the public health of people living in exo-urban environments. Satellite aerosol measurements are valuable tools that can track the evolution of wildfires and monitor the transport of smoke plumes. Operational users, such as air quality forecasters and fire management officials, can use satellite observations to complement ground-based and aircraft measurements of wildfire activity. To date, wildfire applications of satellite aerosol products, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), have been limited by the relatively coarse resolution of available AOD data. However, the new Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has high-resolution AOD that is ideally suited to monitoring wildfire impacts on the exo-urban scale. Two AOD products are available from VIIRS: the 750-m × 750-m nadir resolution Intermediate Product (IP) and the 6-km × 6-km resolution Environmental Data Record product, which is aggregated from IP measurements. True color (red, green, and blue [RGB]) imagery and a smoke mask at 750-m × 750-m resolution are also available from VIIRS as decision aids for wildfire applications; they serve as counterparts to AOD measurements by providing visible information about areas of smoke in the atmosphere. To meet the needs of operational users, who do not have time to process raw data files and need access to VIIRS products in near-real time (NRT), VIIRS AOD and RGB NRT imagery are available from the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) web site. A key feature of IDEA is an interactive visualization tool that allows users to

  19. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  20. Operational aerosol and dust storm forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Liu, M.; Walker, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    The U. S. Navy now conducts operational forecasting of aerosols and dust storms on global and regional scales. The Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) is run four times per day and produces 6-day forecasts of sulfate, smoke, dust and sea salt aerosol concentrations and visibility for the entire globe. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) is run twice daily for Southwest Asia and produces 3-day forecasts of dust, smoke, and visibility. The graphical output from these models is available on the Internet (www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol/). The aerosol optical properties are calculated for each specie for each forecast output time and used for sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval corrections, regional electro-optical (EO) propagation assessments, and the development of satellite algorithms. NAAPS daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are compared with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD values. Visibility forecasts are compared quantitatively with surface synoptic reports.

  1. Overview of Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate. I shall discuss these topics and application of the data to air quality monitoring.

  2. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  3. Aerosol indirect effect dictated by liquid clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew W.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols have been shown to enhance the solar reflection from warm liquid clouds and mask part of the warming due to the buildup of greenhouse gases. However, very little is known about the effects of aerosol on mixed-phase stratiform clouds as well as other cloud regimes including cumulus, altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection, and anvil cirrus. These additional cloud categories are ubiquitous and typically overlooked in satellite-based assessments of the global aerosol indirect forcing. Here we provide their contribution to the aerosol indirect forcing estimate using satellite data collected from several colocated sensors in the A-train for the period 2006-2010. Cloud type is determined according to the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR CloudSat product, and the observations are matched to the radiative flux measurements from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and aerosol retrievals from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). The oceanic mean aerosol indirect forcing is estimated to be -0.20 ± 0.31 W m-2 with warm low-level cloud largely dictating the strength of the response (-0.36 ± 0.21 W m-2) due to their abundance and strong cloud albedo effect. Contributions from mixed-phase low-level cloud (0.01 ± 0.06 W m-2) and convective cloud (0.15 ± 0.23 W m-2) are positive and buffer the system due to strong aerosol-cloud feedbacks that reduce the cloud albedo effect and/or lead to convective invigoration causing a countering positive longwave warming response. By combining all major cloud categories together, aerosol indirect forcing decreases and now contains positive values in the uncertainty estimate.

  4. Spatiotemporal variability and contribution of different aerosol types to the aerosol optical depth over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Alexandri, Georgia; Kourtidis, Konstantinos A.; Lelieveld, Jos; Zanis, Prodromos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Levy, Robert; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Tsikerdekis, Athanasios

    2016-11-01

    This study characterizes the spatiotemporal variability and relative contribution of different types of aerosols to the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Eastern Mediterranean as derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra (March 2000-December 2012) and Aqua (July 2002-December 2012) satellite instruments. For this purpose, a 0.1° × 0.1° gridded MODIS dataset was compiled and validated against sun photometric observations from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The high spatial resolution and long temporal coverage of the dataset allows for the determination of local hot spots like megacities, medium-sized cities, industrial zones and power plant complexes, seasonal variabilities and decadal averages. The average AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) for the entire region is ˜ 0.22 ± 0.19, with maximum values in summer and seasonal variabilities that can be attributed to precipitation, photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols, transport of pollution and smoke from biomass burning in central and eastern Europe and transport of dust from the Sahara and the Middle East. The MODIS data were analyzed together with data from other satellite sensors, reanalysis projects and a chemistry-aerosol-transport model using an optimized algorithm tailored for the region and capable of estimating the contribution of different aerosol types to the total AOD550. The spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic, dust and fine-mode natural aerosols over land and anthropogenic, dust and marine aerosols over the sea is examined. The relative contribution of the different aerosol types to the total AOD550 exhibits a low/high seasonal variability over land/sea areas, respectively. Overall, anthropogenic aerosols, dust and fine-mode natural aerosols account for ˜ 51, ˜ 34 and ˜ 15 % of the total AOD550 over land, while, anthropogenic aerosols, dust and marine aerosols account ˜ 40, ˜ 34 and ˜ 26 % of the total AOD550 over the sea, based on

  5. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  6. Reconstruction of Aerosol Properties from Forward-scattering Intensities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    image aerosol particles using digital holography in a flow- through, contact-free manner. Particles in an aerosol stream are illuminated by a...triggered, pulsed laser and the pattern produced by the interference of this light with that scattered by the particles is recorded by a digital camera...The recorded pattern constitutes a digital hologram from which an image of the particles is computationally reconstructed using a fast Fourier

  7. Aerosol, radiation, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne, spaceborne, and ground-based measurements are used to study the radiative and climatic effects of aerosols. The data, which are modelled with a hierarchy of radiation and climate models, and their implications are summarized. Consideration is given to volcanic aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds, and the Arctic haze. It is shown that several types of aerosols (volcanic particles and the Arctic haze) cause significant alterations to the radiation budget of the regions where they are located.

  8. Ratio imaging: practical considerations for measuring intracellular Ca2+ and pH in living cells.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Nathan; Silver, Randi B

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of ratiometric fluorescent probes for measuring intracellular pH (pHi) and Cai(2+) concentration at the single cell level. The development of sensitive and stable probes for monitoring pHi and Cai(2+) in living cells has provided the scientists with invaluable tools for studying a multitude of cellular processes. These probes afford a noninvasive and semiquantitative assessment of pHi and Cai(2+), eliminating the need to impale cells with microelectrodes. The development and availability of membrane permeant Cai(2+)- and pH-specific fluorescent probes coupled to major advances in the technology and design of low-light-level charge-coupled devices geared toward biological applications, and improved microscope optics, have made it possible to visualize a two-dimensional fluorescence signal that is related to Cai(2+) and pHi. The chapter describes the basis for using dual excitation ratio imaging and tries to provide a framework for understanding and developing the technique for investigating the roles of Cai(2+) and pHi in cellular processes. The technique of quantitative ratio imaging for the measurement of pHi and Cai(2+) has revolutionized the field of cell physiology. Using the proper equipment and choosing the right dyes for the experimental needs should provide reliable and reproducible results. More importantly, the amount of data produced from each experiment, when analyzing pHi and Cai(2+) on an individual cell basis, yields valuable information on the heterogeneity of cellular responses.

  9. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical properties were observed from 21 to 27 September 2009 over Bozeman, Montana, during a transitional period in which background polluted rural continental aerosols and well-aged biomass-burning aerosols were the dominant aerosol types of extremely fresh biomass-burning aerosols resulting from forest fires burning in the northwestern United States and Canada. Aerosol optical properties and relative humidity profiles were retrieved using an eye-safe micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) (MP-DIAL), a single-channel backscatter lidar, a CIMEL solar radiometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a ground-based integrating nephelometer, and aerosol products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured during the case study ranged between 0.03 and 0.17 (0.015 and 0.075) at 532 nm (830 nm) as episodic combinations of fresh and aged biomass-burning aerosols dominated the optical depth of the pristinely clean background air. Here, a pristinely clean background refers to very low AOD conditions, not that the aerosol scattering and absorption properties are necessarily representative of a clean aerosol type. Diurnal variability in the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa) of the background atmosphere derived from the two lidars, which ranged between 55 and 95 sr (50 and 90 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm), showed good agreement with retrievals from AERONET sun and sky measurements over the same time period but were consistently higher than some aerosol models had predicted. Sa measured during the episodic smoke events ranged on average from 60 to 80 sr (50 to 70 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm) while the very fresh biomass-burning aerosols were shown to exhibit significantly lower Sa ranging between 20 and 40 sr. The shortwave direct radiative forcing that was due to the intrusion of biomass-burning aerosols was calculated to be on average -10 W/m2 and was

  10. Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B CAI: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2012-03-01

    Petrographic and chemical observations of secondary alteration products in a CAI constrain the physical and temporal setting of the alteration. Andradite, hedenbergite, sodalite, and nepheline alteration pre-dated assembly of the Allende chondrite parent body.

  11. An experimental study of the combustion characteristics in SCCI and CAI based on direct-injection gasoline engine

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.

    2007-08-15

    Emissions remain a critical issue affecting engine design and operation, while energy conservation is becoming increasingly important. One approach to favorably address these issues is to achieve homogeneous charge combustion and stratified charge combustion at lower peak temperatures with a variable compression ratio, a variable intake temperature and a trapped rate of the EGR using NVO (negative valve overlap). This experiment was attempted to investigate the origins of these lower temperature auto-ignition phenomena with SCCI and CAI using gasoline fuel. In case of SCCI, the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-fueled stratified-charge compression ignition (SCCI) engine according to intake temperature and compression ratio was examined. We investigated the effects of air-fuel ratio, residual EGR rate and injection timing on the CAI combustion area. In addition, the effect of injection timing on combustion factors such as the start of combustion, its duration and its heat release rate was also investigated. (author)

  12. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  13. Willy: A prize noble Ur-Fremdling - Its history and implications for the formation of Fremdlinge and CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. T.; El Goresy, A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and composition of Willy, a 150-micron-diameter Fremdling in CAI 5241 from the Allende meteorite, are investigated using optical, secondary-electron, and electron-backscatter microscopy and electron-microprobe analysis. The results are presented in diagrams, maps, tables, graphs, and micrographs and compared with those for other Allende Fremdlinge. Willy is found to have a concentric-zone structure comprising a complex porous core of magnetite, metal, sulfide, scheelite, and other minor phases; a compact magnetite-apatite mantle; a thin (20 microns or less) reaction-assemblage zone; and a dense outer rim of fassaite with minor spinel. A multistage formation sequence involving changes in T and fO2 and preceding the introduction of Willy into the CAI (which itself preceded CAI spinel and silicate formation) is postulated, and it is inferred from the apparent lack of post-capture recrystallization that Willy has not been subjected to temperatures in excess of 600 C and may represent the precursor material for many other Fremdlinge.

  14. Numerical Investigation Into Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on CAI/HCCI Combustion in a Four-Stroke GDI Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li; Zhao, Hua; Jiang, Xi; Kalian, Navin

    2006-02-01

    The Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), was achieved by trapping residuals with early exhaust valve closure in conjunction with direct injection. Multi-cycle 3D engine simulations have been carried out for parametric study on four different injection timings in order to better understand the effects of injection timings on in-cylinder mixing and CAI combustion. The full engine cycle simulation including complete gas exchange and combustion processes was carried out over several cycles in order to obtain the stable cycle for analysis. The combustion models used in the present study are the Shell auto-ignition model and the characteristic-time combustion model, which were modified to take the high level of EGR into consideration. A liquid sheet breakup spray model was used for the droplet breakup processes. The analyses show that the injection timing plays an important role in affecting the in-cylinder air/fuel mixing and mixture temperature, which in turn affects the CAI combustion and engine performance.

  15. Heating during solar nebula formation and Mg isotopic fractionation in precursor grains of CAIs and chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Nagahara, H.; Kitagami, K.; Nakagawa, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In some Ca-Al-rich inclusion (CAI) grains, mass-dependent isotopic fractionations of Mg, Si, and O are observed and large Mg isotopic fractionation is interpreted to have been produced by cosmochemical processes such as evaporation and condensation. Mass-dependent Mg isotopic fractionation was found in olivine chondrules of Allende meteorites. Presented is an approximate formula for the temperature of the solar nebula that depends on heliocentric distance and the initial gas distribution. Shock heating during solar nebula formation can cause evaporative fractionation within interstellar grains involved in a gas at the inner zone (a less than 3 AU) of the disk. Alternatively collision of late-accreting gas blobs might cause similar heating if Sigma(sub s) and Sigma are large enough. Since the grain size is small, the solid/gas mass ratio is low and solar (low P(sub O2)), and the ambient gas pressure is low, this heating event could not produce chondrules themselves. Chondrule formation should proceed around the disk midplane after dust grains would grow and sediment to increase the solid/gas ratio there. The heating source there is uncertain, but transient rapid accretion through the disk could release a large amount of heat, which would be observed as FU Orionis events.

  16. I-Xe measurements of CAIs and chondrules from the CV3 chondrites Mokoia and Vigarano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, J. A.; Russell, S. S.; Turner, G.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2004-08-01

    I-Xe analyses were carried out for chondrules and refractory inclusions from the two CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Mokoia and Vigarano (representing the oxidized and reduced subgroups, respectively). Although some degree of disturbance to the I-Xe system is evident in all of the samples, evidence is preserved of aqueous alteration of CAIs in Mokoia 1 Myr later than the I-Xe age of the Shallowater standard and of the alteration of a chondrule (V3) from Vigarano ~0.7 Myr later than Shallowater. Other chondrules in Mokoia and Vigarano experienced disturbance of the I-Xe system millions of years later and, in the case of one Vigarano chondrule (VS1), complete resetting of the I-Xe system after decay of essentially all 129I, corresponding to an age more than 80 Myr after Shallowater. Our interpretation is that accretion and processing to form the Mokoia and Vigarano parent bodies must have continued for at least 4 Myr and 80 Myr, respectively. The late age of a chondrule that shows no evidence for any aqueous alteration or significant thermal processing after its formation leads us to postulate the existence of an energetic chondrule-forming mechanism at a time when nebular processes are not expected to be important.

  17. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    applications. The HSRL products are used to apportion AOT by type and vertical location in the column, and to characterize the frequency of cases where multiple types are present in the column. Resolving scenes with multiple types in the column is not possible with passive imaging radiometer and polarimeter measurements. The HSRL aerosol type also has higher resolution than the CALIPSO layer-wise product and provides insight into the performance of CALIPSO layer separation. Information about the vertical distribution of aerosol types is useful for estimating radiative forcing, understanding aerosol lifetime and transport, and assessing the predictions of transport models. CALIPSO has been a pathfinder, providing the first long-term global data set of aerosol vertical distribution. Based on our results, a future satellite lidar similar to CALIPSO, but with the addition of polarization sensitivity at 1064 nm and the HSRL technique at 532 nm, could provide a significant advance in characterizing the vertical distribution of aerosol.

  18. The Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using the MERIS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Levy, R. C.; Lotz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Retrieval of aerosol properties for satellite instruments without shortwave-IR spectral information, multi-viewing, polarization and/or high-temporal observation ability is a challenging problem for spaceborne aerosol remote sensing. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm (XBAER: eXtensible Bremen AErosol Retrieval) is presented. XBAER utilizes the global surface spectral library database for the determination of surface properties while the MODIS collection 6 aerosol type treatment is adapted for the aerosol type selection. In order to take the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect into account for the MERIS reduce resolution (1km) retrieval, a modified Ross-Li mode is used. The AOT is determined in the algorithm using lookup tables including polarization created using Radiative Transfer Model SCIATRAN3.4, by minimizing the difference between atmospheric corrected surface reflectance with given AOT and the surface reflectance calculated from the spectral library. The global comparison with operational MODIS C6 product, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) product, Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aerosol product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results. The current XBAER algorithm is only valid for aerosol remote sensing over land and a similar method will be extended to ocean later.

  19. Assessment of the global impact of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Madronich, Sasha; Walters, Stacy; Edwards, David P.; Ginoux, Paul; Mahowald, Natalie; Zhang, Renyi; Lou, Chao; Brasseur, Guy

    2005-02-01

    We present here a fully coupled global aerosol and chemistry model for the troposphere. The model is used to assess the interactions between aerosols and chemical oxidants in the troposphere, including (1) the conversion from gas-phase oxidants into the condensed phase during the formation of aerosols, (2) the heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosols, and (3) the effect of aerosols on ultraviolet radiation and photolysis rates. The present study uses the global three-dimensional chemical/transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), in which aerosols are coupled with the model. The model accounts for the presence of sulfate, soot, primary organic carbon, ammonium nitrate, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust particles. The simulated global distributions of the aerosols are analyzed and evaluated using satellite measurements (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)) and surface measurements. The results suggest that in northern continental regions the tropospheric aerosol loading is highest in Europe, North America, and east Asia. Sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, and ammonium nitrate are major contributions for the high aerosol loading in these regions. Aerosol loading is also high in the Amazon and in Africa. In these areas the aerosols consist primarily of organic carbon and black carbon. Over the southern high-latitude ocean (around 60°S), high concentrations of sea-salt aerosol are predicted. The concentration of mineral dust is highest over the Sahara and, as a result of transport, spread out into adjacent regions. The model and MODIS show similar geographical distributions of aerosol particles. However, the model overestimates the sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol in the eastern United States, Europe, and east Asia. In the region where aerosol loading is high, aerosols have important impacts on tropospheric ozone and other oxidants. The model suggests that

  20. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Influence Aerosol Variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Kahn, R. A.; Li, Q.; Yung, Y. L.; Tyranowski, T.; Geogdzhayev, I. V.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Torres, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the modulation of aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using satellite-based global aerosol products, including aerosol index (AI) from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus-7, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites. A composite analysis is performed for boreal winter, and the global pentad rainfall data from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) are used to identify MJO events. The MJO composites exhibit large variations in the TOMS AI and MODIS/AVHRR AOT over the equatorial Indian and western Pacific Oceans where MJO convection is active, as well as the tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean where MJO convection is relatively weak but the background aerosol level is relatively high. A strong inverse linear relationship between the TOMS AI and rainfall anomalies, but a weaker, less coherent positive correlation between the MODIS/AVHRR AOT and rainfall anomalies, were found. The Aerosol Robotic Network AOT pattern at Kaashidoo (73.5°E, 4.9°N) and Nauru (167°E, 0.5°S) is more consistent with MODIS and AVHRR. These results indicate a connection between the MJO, its associated rainfall and circulation variability, and the observed aerosol variations. Several physical and non-physical factors that may contribute to the observed aerosol-rainfall relationship, such as aerosol humidification effect, wet deposition, surface wind speed, phytoplankton, different sensor sensitivities (absorbing versus non-absorbing aerosols and upper versus lower tropospheric aerosols), sampling issue, and cloud contamination, are discussed. However, a clear causal explanation for the observed patterns remains elusive. Further investigation is needed to unravel this complex aerosol-rainfall relationship.

  1. Aerosol types and radiative forcing estimates over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawar, Rohini L.; Lee, Woo-Seop; Rahul, P. R. C.

    2016-09-01

    Using the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data sets along with the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations, we analyzed the aerosol optical depth (AOD) variability during March-May (MAM), June-August (JJA) along with their annual mean variability over East Asia for the period 2006-2012. The CALIPSO measurements correlated well with the MODIS measurements and the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations over the spatial distribution patterns of the aerosols, but CALIPSO underestimated the magnitudes of the AOD. Maximum smoke aerosol loading is observed to occur during JJA, as a result of wind transport from Southern China while dust loading dominated during MAM via the transport from desert region. The vertical distribution profiles revealed that there is uniform distribution of smoke aerosols during both MAM and JJA, only differing at the altitude at which they peak; while the dust aerosols during MAM showed a significant distribution from the surface to 10 km altitude and JJA was marked with lower dust loading at the same altitudes. Both dust and smoke aerosols warm the atmosphere in MAM but due to the absorbing nature of smoke aerosols, they cause considerable cooling at the surface which is double when compared to the dust aerosols. The top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) due to smoke and dust aerosols is positive in MAM which indicates warming over East Asia. During MAM a consistent declining trend of the surface ARF due to smoke aerosols persisted over the last three decades as conspicuously evidenced from model analysis; the decline is ∼10 W/m2 from 1980 to 2012.

  2. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA) formation and decarboxylation of carboxylic acids by reactive halogen species - a time-resolved aerosol flow-reactor study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) are released to the atmosphere from various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol and salt lakes. Recent studies (Cai et al., 2006 and 2008, Ofner et al., 2012) indicate that RHS are able to interact with SOA precursors similarly to common atmospheric oxidizing gases like OH radicals and ozone. The reaction of RHS with SOA precursors like terpenes forms so-called halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA). On the other hand, RHS are also able to change the composition of functional groups, e.g. to initiate the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids (Ofner et al., 2012). The present study uses a 50 cm aerosol flow-reactor, equipped with a solar simulator to investigate the time-resolved evolution and transformation of vibrational features in the mid-infrared region. The aerosol flow-reactor is coupled to a home-made multi-reflection cell (Ofner et al., 2010), integrated into a Bruker IFS 113v FTIR spectrometer. The reactor is operated with an inlet feed (organic compound) and a surrounding feed (reactive halogen species). The moveable inlet of the flow reactor allows us to vary reaction times between a few seconds and up to about 3 minutes. Saturated vapours of different SOA precursors and carboxylic acids were fed into the flow reactor using the moveable inlet. The surrounding feed inside the flow reactor was a mixture of zero air with molecular chlorine as the precursor for the formation of reactive halogen species. Using this setup, the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol could be monitored with a high time resolution using FTIR spectroscopy. XOA formation is characterized by hydrogen-atom abstraction, carbon-chlorine bond formation and later, even formation of carboxylic acids. Several changes of the entire structure of the organic precursor, caused by the reaction of RHS, are visible. While XOA formation is a very fast process, the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids, induced by RHS is rather slow. However, XOA formation

  3. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  4. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  5. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  6. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  7. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  8. A spectroscopic tour through the liquid aerosol interface: Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Xiang; Aiello, Denise; Aker, Pamela M.

    1994-12-01

    A novel nonlinear Raman spectroscopic technique has been used to image the extent of hydrogen bonding at water aerosol interfaces. The aerosols probed were generated in the laboratory using the vibrating orifice technique. The spectroscopic results show that the aerosols suffer severe hydrogen bond disruption and that the structural impairment is more pronounced at the surface. Laboratory aerosols generated this way do not mimic those found naturally. Thus mass accommodation coefficients measured using such aerosols should not be used in global climate modeling calculations.

  9. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  10. Impact of assimilated and interactive aerosol on tropical cyclogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reale, O; Lau, K M; da Silva, A; Matsui, T

    2014-05-16

    This article investigates the impact of Saharan dust on the development of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. A global data assimilation and forecast system, the NASA GEOS-5, is used to assimilate all satellite and conventional data sets used operationally for numerical weather prediction. In addition, this new GEOS-5 version includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. The analysis so obtained comprises atmospheric quantities and a realistic 3-D aerosol and cloud distribution, consistent with the meteorology and validated against Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation and CloudSat data. These improved analyses are used to initialize GEOS-5 forecasts, explicitly accounting for aerosol direct radiative effects and their impact on the atmospheric dynamics. Parallel simulations with/without aerosol radiative effects show that effects of dust on static stability increase with time, becoming highly significant after day 5 and producing an environment less favorable to tropical cyclogenesis.

  11. Impact of assimilated and interactive aerosol on tropical cyclogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Reale, O; Lau, K M; da Silva, A; Matsui, T

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of Saharan dust on the development of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. A global data assimilation and forecast system, the NASA GEOS-5, is used to assimilate all satellite and conventional data sets used operationally for numerical weather prediction. In addition, this new GEOS-5 version includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. The analysis so obtained comprises atmospheric quantities and a realistic 3-D aerosol and cloud distribution, consistent with the meteorology and validated against Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation and CloudSat data. These improved analyses are used to initialize GEOS-5 forecasts, explicitly accounting for aerosol direct radiative effects and their impact on the atmospheric dynamics. Parallel simulations with/without aerosol radiative effects show that effects of dust on static stability increase with time, becoming highly significant after day 5 and producing an environment less favorable to tropical cyclogenesis. PMID:26074648

  12. Impact of Assimilated and Interactive Aerosol on Tropical Cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, K. M.; daSilva, A.; Matsui, T.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the impact 3 of Saharan dust on the development of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. A global data assimilation and forecast system, the NASA GEOS-5, is used to assimilate all satellite and conventional data sets used operationally for numerical weather prediction. In addition, this new GEOS-5 version includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The analysis so obtained comprises atmospheric quantities and a realistic 3-d aerosol and cloud distribution, consistent with the meteorology and validated against Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data. These improved analyses are used to initialize GEOS-5 forecasts, explicitly accounting for aerosol direct radiative effects and their impact on the atmospheric dynamics. Parallel simulations with/without aerosol radiative effects show that effects of dust on static stability increase with time, becoming highly significant after day 5 and producing an environment less favorable to tropical cyclogenesis.

  13. Evidence for divalent vanadium in Allende CAI fassaite and implications for formation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Simon, S.; Grossman, L.; Delaney, J.S.; Beckett, J.; Newville, M.; Eng, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-04-22

    Fassaite, a Ti-rich, Al-rich clinopyroxene, is a major mineral in Type B refractory inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Stoichiometric treatment of electron microprobe data reveals that Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} is {approx}1 in the fassaite, and experimental work shows that this implies crystallization at fO{sub 2} of {approx}10{sup -19} at 1200 C, very close to the fO{sub 2} of a gas of solar composition. Many fassaite grains are strongly zoned in Ti, whose abundance decreases from core to rim, probably as a result of the compatibility of Ti{sup 3+} in fassaite during crystallization of the molten Ca-rich, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Superimposed on these profiles are zones where Ti and V contents spike upward together, within which the Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} ratio also increases significantly. Because Ti{sup 3+} is more compatible than Ti{sup 4+}, the spikes are thought to be caused by variable fO{sub 2} during crystallization. Thermodynamic calculations show that VO and V{sub 2}O{sub 3} are in equilibrium at approximately the same T-fO{sub 2} conditions as Ti{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+}, but whether variable fO{sub 2} can be responsible for the V spikes is unclear, since V{sup 2+} would not be expected to be more compatible than V{sup 3+} in clinopyroxene. We report here on our initial results from using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to determine the oxidation state of V in the zoned Allende fassaite and synthetic pyroxene. The ultimate goal is to place constraints on the oxygen fugacity history of the nebular environment during the crystallization of individual fassaite grains by also determining the pyroxene/liquid partitioning behavior of V as a function of oxidation state.

  14. Chemical aerosol detection using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Dennis R.; Rohlfs, Mark L.; Stauffer, John C.

    1997-07-01

    Many chemical warfare agents are dispersed as small aerosol particles. In the past, most electro-optical excitation and detection schemes have used continuous or pulsed lasers with pulse lengths ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. In this paper, we present interesting ongoing new results on femtosecond imaging and on the time dependent solutions to the scattering problem of a femtosecond laser pulse interacting with a single small aerosol particle. Results are presented for various incident pulse lengths. Experimental imaging results using femtosecond pulses indicate that the diffraction rings present when using nanosecond laser pulses for imaging are greatly reduced when femtosecond laser pulses are used. Results are presented in terms of the internal fields as a function of time and the optical size parameter.

  15. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  16. An investigative study into the effectiveness of using computer-aided instruction (CAI) as a laboratory component of college-level biology: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Joan Beverly

    Community colleges serve the most diverse student populations in higher education. They consist of non-traditional, part-time, older, intermittent, and mobile students of different races, ethnic backgrounds, language preferences, physical and mental abilities, and learning style preferences. Students who are academically challenged may have diverse learning characteristics that are not compatible with the more traditional approaches to the delivery of instruction. With this need come new ways of solving the dilemma, such as Computer-aided Instruction (CAI). This case study investigated the use of CAI as a laboratory component of college-level biology in a small, rural community college setting. The intent was to begin to fill a void that seems to exist in the literature regarding the role of the faculty in the development and use of CAI. In particular, the investigator was seeking to understand the practice and its effectiveness, especially in helping the under prepared student. The case study approach was chosen to examine a specific phenomenon within a single institution. Ethnographic techniques, such as interviewing, documentary analysis, life's experiences, and participant observations were used to collect data about the phenomena being studied. Results showed that the faculty was primarily self-motivated and self-taught in their use of CAI as a teaching and learning tool. The importance of faculty leadership and collegiality was evident. Findings showed the faculty confident that expectations of helping students who have difficulties with mathematical concepts have been met and that CAI is becoming the most valuable of learning tools. In a traditional college classroom, or practice, time is the constant (semesters) and competence is the variable. In the CAI laboratory time became the variable and competence the constant. The use of CAI also eliminated hazardous chemicals that were routinely used in the more traditional lab. Outcomes showed that annual savings

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  18. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  19. Satellite remote sensing of Asian aerosols: a case study of clean, polluted and dust storm days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. H.; Kim, Y. J.

    2010-06-01

    Satellite-based aerosol observation is a useful tool for the estimation of microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosol during more than three decades. Until now, a lot of satellite remote sensing techniques have been developed for aerosol detection. In East Asian region, the role of satellite observation is quite important because aerosols originating from natural and man-made pollution in this region have been recognized as an important source for regional and global scale air pollution. However, it is still difficult to retrieve aerosol over land because of the complexity of the surface reflection and complex aerosol composition, in particular, aerosol absorption. In this study, aerosol retrievals using Look-up Table (LUT) based method was applied to MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level 1 (L1) calibrated reflectance data to retrieve aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over East Asia. Three case studies show how the methodology works to identify those differences to obtain a better AOT retrieval. The comparison between the MODIS and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) shows better results when the suggested methodology using the cluster based LUTs is applied (linear slope=0.94, R=0.92) than when operational MODIS aerosol products are used (linear slope=0.78, R=0.87). In conclusion, the suggested methodology is shown to work well with aerosol models acquired by statistical clustering the observation data in East Asia.

  20. Pneumonia in Calves Produced with Aerosols of Bovine Herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Jericho, K. W. F.; Langford, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    In each of 11 experiments, four calves were exposed first to an aerosol of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1, virus of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis) and second to an aerosol of Pasteurella haemolytica. The interval between aerosols was three to five days. In two other experiments, calves were exposed only to a bacterial aerosol. Climate was controlled for all experiments from the day of viral exposure and for eight of the experiments it was also controlled for four to six days before the first aerosol. The concentration of infectious doses of virus in the aerosols and the number of bacteria in the aerosols of each calf were determined. Macroscopically recognizable rhinitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, tracheitis and pneumonia of lobar distribution in 42 lobes from 11 calves were seen in five experiments in which bacterial aerosol followed the viral aerosol by at least four days. One calf died with marked respiratory disease in each of four experiments within four days of exposure to the bacterial aerosol. Production of pneumonia was dependent on an interval between aerosols of at least four days but not on the condition of controlled climate on the environmental chamber either before or after the viral aerosol nor on the period of habituation allowed calves of some experiments. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:210912

  1. Evidence for an early nitrogen isotopic evolution in the solar nebula from volatile analyses of a CAI from the CV3 chondrite NWA 8616

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Chaussidon, Marc; Marty, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by CO2 laser extraction static mass spectrometry analysis, as well as Al-Mg and O isotope data from secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses, are reported for a type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the CV3 chondrite NWA 8616. The high (26Al/27Al)i ratio of (5.06 ± 0.50) × 10-5 dates the last melting event of the CAI at 39-99+109ka after "time zero", limiting the period during which high-temperature exchanges between the CAI and the nebular gas could have occurred to a very short time interval. Partial isotopic exchange with a 16O-poor reservoir resulted in Δ17O > -5‰ for melilite and anorthite, whereas spinel and Al-Ti-pyroxene retain the inferred original 16O-rich signature of the solar nebula (Δ17O ⩽ -20‰). The low 20Ne/22Ne (⩽0.83) and 36Ar/38Ar (⩽0.75) ratios of the CAI rule out the presence of any trapped planetary or solar noble gases. Cosmogenic 21Ne and 38Ar abundances are consistent with a cosmic ray exposure (CRE) age of ∼14 to 20 Ma, assuming CR fluxes similar to modern ones, without any evidence for pre-irradiation of the CAI before incorporation into the meteorite parent body. Strikingly, the CAI contains 1.4-3.4 ppm N with a δ15N value of +8‰ to +30‰. Even after correcting the measured δ15N values for cosmogenic 15N produced in situ, the CAI is highly enriched in 15N compared to the protosolar nebula (δ15NPSN = -383 ± 8‰; Marty et al., 2011), implying that the CAI-forming region was contaminated by 15N-rich material within the first 0.15 Ma of Solar System history, or, alternatively, that the CAI was ejected into the outer Solar System where it interacted with a 15N-rich reservoir.

  2. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  3. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  4. Hydrothermal origin of hexagonal CaAl2Si2O8 (dmisteinbergite) in a compact type A CAI from the Northwest Africa 2086 CV3 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fintor, Krisztian; Park, Changkun; Nagy, Szabolcs; Pál-Molnár, Elemér; Krot, Alexander N.

    2014-05-01

    We report an occurrence of hexagonal CaAl2Si2O8 (dmisteinbergite) in a compact type A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the CV3 (Vigarano-like) carbonaceous chondrite Northwest Africa 2086. Dmisteinbergite occurs as approximately 10 μm long and few micrometer-thick lath-shaped crystal aggregates in altered parts of the CAI, and is associated with secondary nepheline, sodalite, Ti-poor Al-diopside, grossular, and Fe-rich spinel. Spinel is the only primary CAI mineral that retained its original O-isotope composition (Δ17O ~ -24‰); Δ17O values of melilite, perovskite, and Al,Ti-diopside range from -3 to -11‰, suggesting postcrystallization isotope exchange. Dmisteinbergite, anorthite, Ti-poor Al-diopside, and ferroan olivine have 16O-poor compositions (Δ17O ~ -3‰). We infer that dmisteinbergite, together with the other secondary minerals, formed by replacement of melilite as a result of fluid-assisted thermal metamorphism experienced by the CV chondrite parent asteroid. Based on the textural appearance of dmisteinbergite in NWA 2086 and petrographic observations of altered CAIs from the Allende meteorite, we suggest that dmisteinbergite is a common secondary mineral in CAIs from the oxidized Allende-like CV3 chondrites that has been previously misidentified as a secondary anorthite.

  5. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  6. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  7. Aerosol particle microphotography and glare-spot absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Holler, S; Li, J H; Serpengüzel, A; Auffermann, W F; Hill, S C

    1995-04-01

    The relative intensities of glare spots in the image of an electrodynamically trapped aerosol droplet are measured experimentally with an aerosol particle microscope and calculated theoretically. The theoretical calculations are in good agreement with these experiments and indicate that the intensities of these spots are extremely sensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index. Experimentally, we obtain the molecular absorption spectrum of an impurity within a droplet by recording the spectrum of an individual glare spot produced by broadband illumination.

  8. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  9. Relationship between column aerosol optical properties and surface aerosol gravimetric concentrations during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network - Northeast ASIA 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Seo, S.; Choi, M.; Kim, W. V.; Holben, B. N.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main objectives of Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) campaign in Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is to understand the relationship between the column optical properties of the atmosphere and the surface level air quality in terms of aerosols and gases. This study aims to identify the important parameters that affecting the relationship between those variables during the DRAGON - northeast Asia 2012 campaign. Column aerosol optical properties from ten Cimel sun photometers at DRAGON sites in Seoul, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) and particulate matter (PM10) sampling from 40 NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research of South Korea) measurement sites in Seoul during the period of 1st March - 31th May 2012 were employed in this study. The key parameters in relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM are reported to be aerosol vertical profile and hygroscopicity of the aerosols. The meteorological conditions including relative humidity, surface temperature, and wind speed that could affect those parameters were investigated.

  10. Extending 'Deep Blue' aerosol retrieval coverage to cases of absorbing aerosols above clouds: sensitivity analysis and first case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, C.; Bettenhausen, Corey; Lee, Jae N.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Shinozuka, Yohei

    2016-05-07

    Cases of absorbing aerosols above clouds (AAC), such as smoke or mineral dust, are omitted from most routinely-processed space-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) data products, including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This study presents a sensitivity analysis and preliminary algorithm to retrieve above-cloud AOD and liquid cloud optical depth (COD) for AAC cases from MODIS or similar

  11. Thermal maturity patterns (CAI and %R) in the Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Harper, John A.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance existing thermal maturity maps in Pennsylvania by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Group are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones (Ryder and others, 1998) and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  12. Thermal maturity patterns in the Ordovician and Devonian of Pennsylvania using conodont color alteration index (CAI) and vitrinite reflectance (%Ro)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, J.E.; Ryder, R.T.; Harper, J.A.; Trippi, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    This new series of maps enhances previous thermal maturity maps in Pennsylvania by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Group are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  13. Thermal maturity patterns (CAI and %R%) in the Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin in New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, David J.; Ryder, Robert T.; Nyahay, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance existing thermal maturity maps in New York State by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. The thermal maturity of the Ordovician and Devonian rocks is of major interest because they contain the source for most of the unconventional natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Group are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones (Jenden and others, 1993; Ryder and others, 1998). Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation, in particular, its basin-centered part (Ryder, 1998). Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulation in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  14. Thermal maturity patterns (CAI and %Ro) in the Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Avary, Katharine Lee; Trippi, Michael H.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance existing thermal maturity maps in West Virginia by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Limestone are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones (Ryder and others, 1998) and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  15. VUV state-selected photoionization of thermally-desorbed biomolecules by coupling an aerosol source to an imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectrometer: case of the amino acids tryptophan and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Gaie-Levrel, François; Garcia, Gustavo A; Schwell, Martin; Nahon, Laurent

    2011-04-21

    Gas phase studies of biological molecules provide structural and dynamical information on isolated systems. The lack of inter- or intra-molecular interactions facilitates the interpretation of the experimental results through theoretical calculations, and constitutes an informative complement to the condensed phase. However advances in the field are partially hindered by the difficulty of vaporising these systems, most of which are thermally unstable. In this work we present a newly developed aerosol mass thermodesorption setup, which has been coupled to a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) analyzer operated in coincidence with a Wiley-McLaren Time of Flight spectrometer, using synchrotron radiation as a single photon ionization source. Although it has been previously demonstrated that thermolabile molecules such as amino acids can be produced intact by the aerosol vaporisation technique, we show how its non-trivial coupling to a VMI analyzer plus the use of electron/ion coincidences greatly improves the concept in terms of the amount of spectroscopic and dynamic information that can be extracted. In this manner, we report on the valence shell ionization of two amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, for which threshold photoelectron spectra have been recorded within the first 3 eV above the first ionization energy using synchrotron radiation emitted from the DESIRS beamline located at SOLEIL in France. Their adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) have been measured at 7.40 ± 0.05 and 8.65 ± 0.02 eV, respectively, and their spectra analyzed using existing theoretical data from the literature. The IE values agree well with previously published ones, but are given here with a considerably reduced uncertainty by up to a factor of 5. The photostability of both amino acids is also described in detail, through the measurement of the state-selected fragmentation pathways via the use of threshold electron/ion coincidences (TPEPICO), with appearance energies for the different

  16. Automated aerosol Raman spectrometer for semi-continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, David C.; Hill, Steven C.

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is useful in characterizing atmospheric aerosol. It is not commonly used in studying ambient particles partly because automated instrumentation for aerosol RS has not been available. Battelle (Columbus, Ohio, USA) has developed the Resource Effective Bioidentification System (REBS) for automated detection of airborne bioagents based on RS. We use a version of the REBS that measures Raman spectra of one set of particles while the next set of particles is collected from air, then moves the newly collected particles to the analysis region and repeats. Here we investigate the use of the REBS as the core of a general-purpose automated Aerosol Raman Spectrometer (ARS) for atmospheric applications. This REBS-based ARS can be operated as a line-scanning Raman imaging spectrometer. Spectra measured by this ARS for single particles made of polystyrene, black carbon, and several other materials are clearly distinguishable. Raman spectra from a 15 min ambient sample (approximately 35-50 particles, 158 spectra) were analyzed using a hierarchical clustering method to find that the cluster spectra are consistent with soot, inorganic aerosol, and other organic compounds. The ARS ran unattended, collecting atmospheric aerosol and measuring spectra for a 7 hr period at 15-min intervals. A total of 32,718 spectra were measured; 5892 exceeded a threshold and were clustered during this time. The number of particles exhibiting the D-G bands of amorphous carbon plotted vs time (at 15-min intervals) increases during the morning commute, then decreases. This data illustrates the potential of the ARS to measure thousands of time resolved aerosol Raman spectra in the ambient atmosphere over the course of several hours. The capability of this ARS for automated measurements of Raman spectra should lead to more extensive RS-based studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  17. Cyclosporin a aerosol improves the anticancer effect of Paclitaxel aerosol in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Vernon; Koshkina, N. V.; Golunski, E.; Roberts, L. E.; Gilbert, B. E.

    2004-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a lipophilic agent with broad anticancer activity. In the present study we examined the antitumor effect and toxicity of co-administration of cyclosporine A (CsA) and PTX in liposomal aerosol using the Renca lung metastases mouse model. The untreated and PTX-only groups exhibited cancer growth while CsA aerosol plus PTX had more favorable effects on tumor growth. Weight loss was seen in mice treated with CsA/PTX+CsA by day 9 to 22. Histopathological examination showed no toxicity following treatment. The findings offer evidence that a combination of CsA and PTX may be suitable for aerosol treatment of lung cancer if it is possible to control toxicity of the therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:17060982

  18. Climatology of aerosol optical properties near the New England coast: preparation for the Two Column Aerosol Program (TCAP) field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, C. M.; Chand, D.; Berg, L.; Kassianov, E.; Chapman, E.

    2011-12-01

    A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to provide observations with which to evaluate the uncertainty in model simulations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their relation to estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and hence, to climate. To meet this objective, detailed ground-based aerosol measurements will be made via deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) at Cape Cod, Massachusetts for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012. These measurements will be supported by two scheduled aircraft campaigns using the ARM Aerial Facility's (AAF) G-1 aircraft and the NASA B-200 aircraft in July 2012 and again in February 2013. Each campaign will include sampling within two atmospheric columns using the aircrafts; one column will be located directly over, or very close to, Cape Cod, while the second will be over a relatively remote maritime location. This preliminary study presented here is designed to select the optimum location of the second, remote maritime atmospheric column using the mean and standard deviation of previously observed AODs from surface and space. An area with the large variability in AOD will be considered as a potential location for evaluation of the outputs from atmospheric models. In this study, we present regional climatological values of (1) AOD from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua satellite platforms; (2) single scattering albedo from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) satellite; (3) the vertical distribution of aerosol layers from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite; and (4) the long term aerosol optical properties from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) surface sunphotometer at Martha's Vineyard, MA. Seasonal and geographical variations in these quantities will be analyzed and possible explanations will be presented based on

  19. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  20. Observational Evidence of Aerosol Enhancement of Lightning Activity and Convective Invigoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Tianle; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Yu, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Lightning activity over the West Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines is usually much less frequent than over the nearby maritime continents. However, in 2005 the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) aboard the TRMM satellite observed anomalously high lightning activity in that area. In the same year the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measured anomalously high aerosol loading. The high aerosol loading was traced to volcanic activity, and not to any factor linked to meteorology, disentangling the usual convolution between aerosols and meteorology. We show that in general lightning activity is tightly correlated with aerosol loadings at both inter-annual and biweekly time scales. We estimate that a approximately 60% increase in aerosol loading leads to more than 150% increase in lightning flashes. Aerosols increase lightning activity through modification of cloud microphysics. Cloud ice particle sizes are reduced and cloud glaciation is delayed to colder temperature when aerosol loading is increased. TRMM precipitation radar measurements indicate that anomalously high aerosol loading is associated with enhanced cloud mixed phase activity and invigorated convection over the maritime ocean. These observed associations between aerosols, cloud microphysics, morphology and lightning activity are not related to meteorological variables or ENSO events. The results have important implications for understanding the variability of lightning and resulting aerosol-chemistry interactions.

  1. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  3. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols shift lake ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, Harry J.

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols over the Chinese Loess Plateau have diminished monsoon precipitation and concomitant soil erosion that plagues the region. Now, a reconstruction documents the differences between historical warming events and the present, highlighting the paradoxical implications of decreasing atmospheric aerosols.

  4. Generation of aerosolized drugs.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R K; Niven, R W

    1994-01-01

    The expanding use of inhalation therapy has placed demands on current aerosol generation systems that are difficult to meet with current inhalers. The desire to deliver novel drug entities such as proteins and peptides, as well as complex formulations including liposomes and microspheres, requires delivery systems of improved efficiency that will target the lung in a reproducible manner. These efforts have also been spurred by the phase out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and this has included a directed search for alternative propellants. Consequently, a variety of new aerosol devices and methods of generating aerosols are being studied. This includes the use of freon replacement propellants, dry powder generation systems, aqueous unit spray systems and microprocessor controlled technologies. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages depending upon each principle of action and set of design variables. In addition, specific drugs may be better suited for one type of inhaler device vs. another. The extent to which aerosol generation systems achieve their goals is discussed together with a summary of selected papers presented at the recent International Congress of Aerosols in Medicine.

  5. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  6. Evaluation of the Experimental CAI Network (1973-1975) of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of Medicine. Final Report. No. ED-75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Martin L.; And Others

    An evaluation was made of the biomedical Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) Network Experiment, established by the National Library of Medicine in 1973 to test the feasibility of sharing CAI learning materials through a national computer network. The evaluation was designed to assist decision makers in planning a future mechanism for distributing…

  7. Merging the SAGE II and OSIRIS Stratospheric Aerosol Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug

    2016-04-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite, launched in 2001 and currently operational, measures limb-scattered sunlight from which profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750nm are retrieved. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE) II instrument was operational from 1985 to 2005, and provided aerosol extinction at several visible and near infrared wavelengths. This work compares the SAGE II and OSIRIS aerosol extinction measurements during the four years of instrument overlap by interpolating the SAGE II data to 750nm using the 525 and 1020nm channels. Agreement is generally favourable in the tropics and mid-latitudes with differences less than 10% for the majority of the aerosol layer. However, near the UTLS and outside of the tropics agreement is poorer and reasons for this are investigated. Comparisons between the OSIRIS and SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements at 750nm are used to develop a merged aerosol climatology as a function of time, latitude and altitude at the native SAGE II wavelength of 525nm. Error due to assumptions in the OSIRIS retrieval and wavelength conversion are explored through simulation studies over a range of particle size distributions and is found to be approximately 20% for the majority of low-to-moderate volcanic loading conditions and OSIRIS geometries. Other sources of error such as cloud contamination in the UTLS are also explored.

  8. Resolving mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from satellite: Is fine resolution worth the hassle? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2013-12-01

    In early 2000 we began receiving global aerosol products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at nominal 10 km and 17.5 km resolution, respectively. Aerosol products derived from other satellite sensors such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with spatial resolution nominally at 13 x 12 km later joined these data. Suddenly the global aerosol system popped into focus. For global-scale science, a 10 km product appeared to be adequate. Questions concerning the adequacy of this moderate resolution data set began to arise as the community's interest in satellite-derived aerosol products branched towards more local questions. As of Collection 6, the MODIS aerosol product will now include a fine resolution product at nominal 3 km resolution. What can we learn about mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from this new product? Was the effort worth it? We take advantage of the AERONET DRAGON networks in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., in Korea and in California to compare the accuracy of the MODIS 3 km product with the MODIS 10 km product, and just for fun, with the 6 km Visible Infrared Imager Suite (VIIRS) aerosol product. Do the finer resolution aerosol products show us aerosol features unobtainable by the coarser resolution products? Are the finer resolution products worth the hassle?

  9. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  10. Satellite remote sensing of Asian aerosols: a case study of clean, polluted, and Asian dust storm days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. H.; Kim, Y. J.

    2010-12-01

    In East Asia, satellite observation is important because aerosols from natural and anthropogenic sources have been recognized as a major source of regional and global air pollution. However, retrieving aerosols properties from satellite observations over land can be difficult because of the surface reflection, complex aerosol composition, and aerosol absorption. In this study, a new aerosol retrieval method called as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite aerosol retrieval (MSTAR) was developed and applied to three different aerosol event cases over East Asia. MSTAR uses a separation technique that can distinguish aerosol reflectance from top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was determined by comparing this aerosol reflectance with pre-calculated values. Three case studies show how the methodology identifies discrepancies between measured and calculated values to retrieve more accurate AOT. The comparison between MODIS and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) showed improvement using the suggested methodology with the cluster-based look-up-tables (LUTs) (linear slope = 0.94, R = 0.92) than using operational MODIS collection 5 aerosol products (linear slope = 0.78, R = 0.87). In conclusion, the suggested methodology is shown to work well with aerosol models acquired by statistical clustering of the observation data in East Asia.

  11. Chemical aerosol Raman detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Di Cecca, S.; Amin, M.; Perkins, B. G.; Clark, M. L.; Jeys, T. H.; Sickenberger, D. W.; D'Amico, F. M.; Emmons, E. D.; Christesen, S. D.; Kreis, R. J.; Kilper, G. K.

    2017-03-01

    A sensitive chemical aerosol Raman detector (CARD) has been developed for the trace detection and identification of chemical particles in the ambient atmosphere. CARD includes an improved aerosol concentrator with a concentration factor of about 40 and a CCD camera for improved detection sensitivity. Aerosolized isovanillin, which is relatively safe, has been used to characterize the performance of the CARD. The limit of detection (SNR = 10) for isovanillin in 15 s has been determined to be 1.6 pg/cm3, which corresponds to 6.3 × 109 molecules/cm3 or 0.26 ppb. While less sensitive, CARD can also detect gases. This paper provides a more detailed description of the CARD hardware and detection algorithm than has previously been published.

  12. Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The skies over Northern India are filled with a thick soup of aerosol particles all along the southern edge of the Himalayan Mountains, and streaming southward over Bangladesh and the Bay of Bengal. Notice that the air over the Tibetan Plateau to the north of the Himalayas is very clear, whereas the view of the land surface south of the mountains is obstructed by the brownish haze. Most of this air pollution comes from human activities. The aerosol over this region is notoriously rich in sulfates, nitrates, organic and black carbon, and fly ash. These particles not only represent a health hazard to those people living in the region, but scientists have also recently found that they can have a significant impact on the region's hydrological cycle and climate (click to read the relevant NASA press release). This true-color image was acquired on December 4, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. It is interesting to compare the image above with this earlier MODIS image over the region, acquired on October 23, 2001. Notice the difference in the clarity of the air over the region in the earlier image. Under the thick plume of aerosol, the Brahmaputra (upper right) and Ganges Rivers are still visible. The many mouths of the Ganges have turned the northern waters of the Bay of Bengal a murky brown as they empty their sediment-laden waters into the bay. Toward the upper lefthand corner of the image, there appears to be a fresh swath of snow on the ground just south of the Himalayas.

  13. Microphysical properties of transported biomass burning aerosols in coastal regions, and application to improving retrievals of aerosol optical depth from SeaWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the limited measurement capabilities of heritage and current spaceborne passive imaging radiometers, algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related quantities must make assumptions relating to aerosol microphysical properties and surface reflectance. Over the ocean, surface reflectance can be relatively well-modelled, but knowledge of aerosol properties can remain elusive. Several field campaigns and many studies have examined the microphysical properties of biomass burning (smoke) aerosol. However, these largely focus on properties over land and near to the source regions. In coastal and open-ocean regions the properties of transported smoke may differ, due to factors such as aerosol aging, wet/dry deposition, and mixture with other aerosol sources (e.g. influence of maritime, pollution, or mineral dust aerosols). Hence, models based on near-source aerosol observations may be less representative of such transported smoke aerosols, introducing additional uncertainty into satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This study examines case studies of transported smoke from select globally-distributed coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. These are used to inform improved models for over-ocean transported smoke aerosol for AOD retrievals from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). These models are used in an updated version of the SeaWiFS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval (SOAR) algorithm, which has been combined with the Deep Blue algorithm over land to create a 13-year (1997-2010) high-quality record of AOD over land and ocean. Applying these algorithms to other sensors will enable the creation of a long-term global climate data record of spectral AOD.

  14. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  15. Highly stable aerosol generator

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, Henry S.; Clark, Mark L.

    1981-01-01

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

  16. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  17. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  18. MISR Aerosol Product Attributes and Statistical Comparisons with MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David L.; Garay, Michael J.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Paradise, Susan R.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol product attributes are described, including geometry and algorithm performance flags. Actual retrieval coverage is mapped and explained in detail using representative global monthly data. Statistical comparisons are made with coincident aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (ANG) retrieval results from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. The relationship between these results and the ones previously obtained for MISR and MODIS individually, based on comparisons with coincident ground-truth observations, is established. For the data examined, MISR and MODIS each obtain successful aerosol retrievals about 15% of the time, and coincident MISR-MODIS aerosol retrievals are obtained for about 6%-7% of the total overlap region. Cloud avoidance, glint and oblique-Sun exclusions, and other algorithm physical limitations account for these results. For both MISR and MODIS, successful retrievals are obtained for over 75% of locations where attempts are made. Where coincident AOD retrievals are obtained over ocean, the MISR-MODIS correlation coefficient is about 0.9; over land, the correlation coefficient is about 0.7. Differences are traced to specific known algorithm issues or conditions. Over-ocean ANG comparisons yield a correlation of 0.67, showing consistency in distinguishing aerosol air masses dominated by coarse-mode versus fine-mode particles. Sampling considerations imply that care must be taken when assessing monthly global aerosol direct radiative forcing and AOD trends with these products, but they can be used directly for many other applications, such as regional AOD gradient and aerosol air mass type mapping and aerosol transport model validation. Users are urged to take seriously the published product data-quality statements.

  19. Simulation of South Asian aerosols for regional climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Solmon, Fabien; Giorgi, Filippo; Mariotti, Laura; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-02-01

    Extensive intercomparison of columnar and near-surface aerosols, simulated over the South Asian domain using the aerosol module included in the regional climate model (RegCM4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) have been carried out using ground-based network of Sun/sky Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) radiometers, satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and ground-based black carbon (BC) measurements made at Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India (ARFI) network stations. In general, RegCM4 simulations reproduced the spatial and seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical depth over South Asia reasonably well, particularly over west Asia, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading. In contrast, RegCM4 simulations drastically underestimated the BC mass concentrations over most of the stations, by a factor of 2 to 5, with a large spatial variability. Seasonally, the discrepancy between the measured and simulated BC tended to be higher during winter and periods when the atmospheric boundary layer is convectively stable (such as nighttime and early mornings), while during summer season and during periods when the boundary layer is convectively unstable (daytime) the discrepancies were much lower, with the noontime values agreeing very closely with the observations. A detailed analysis revealed that the model does not reproduce the nocturnal high in BC, observed at most of the Indian sites especially during winter, because of the excessive vertical transport of aerosols under stable boundary layer conditions. As far as the vertical distribution was concerned, the simulated vertical profiles of BC agreed well with airborne measurements during daytime. This comprehensive validation exercise reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the model in simulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of the aerosol fields over

  20. The contribution of the androgen receptor (AR) in human spatial learning and memory: A study in women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).

    PubMed

    Mueller, S C; Verwilst, T; Van Branteghem, A; T'Sjoen, G; Cools, M

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of androgen insensitivity on human spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we tested 11 women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), a rare genetic disorder characterized by complete absence of AR activity, and compared their performance against 20 comparison males and 19 comparison females on a virtual analog of the Morris Water Maze task. The results replicated a main sex effect showing that men relative to women were faster in finding the hidden platform and had reduced heading error. Furthermore, findings indicated that mean performance of women with CAIS was between control women and control men, though the differences were not statistically significant. Effect size estimates (and corresponding confidence intervals) of spatial learning trials showed little difference between women with CAIS and control women but CAIS women differed from men, but not women, on two variables, latency to find the platform and first-move latency. No differences between groups were present during visible platform trials or the probe trial, a measure of spatial memory. Moreover, groups also did not differ on estimates of IQ and variability of performance. The findings are discussed in relation to androgen insensitivity in human spatial learning and memory.

  1. An Evaluation of the Cognitive and Affective Performance of an Integrated Set of CAI Materials in the Principles of Macroeconomics. Studies in Economic Education, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daellenbach, Lawrence A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on the cognitive and affective development of college students enrolled in a principles of macroeconomics course. The hypotheses of the experiment were stated as follows: In relation to the traditional principles course, the experimental treatment will…

  2. The relation between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth and PM2.5 over the United States: a geographical comparison by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Hoff, Raymond M; Engel-Cox, Jill A

    2009-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) acquired from satellite measurements demonstrates good correlation with particulate matter with diameters less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) in some regions of the United States and has been used for monitoring and nowcasting air quality over the United States. This work investigates the relation between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD and PM2.5 over the 10 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-defined geographic regions in the United States on the basis of a 2-yr (2005-2006) match-up dataset of MODIS AOD and hourly PM2.5 measurements. The AOD retrievals demonstrate a geographical and seasonal variation in their relation with PM2.5. Good correlations are mostly observed over the eastern United States in summer and fall. The southeastern United States has the highest correlation coefficients at more than 0.6. The southwestern United States has the lowest correlation coefficient of approximately 0.2. The seasonal regression relations derived for each region are used to estimate the PM2.5 from AOD retrievals, and it is shown that the estimation using this method is more accurate than that using a fixed ratio between PM2.5 and AOD. Two versions of AOD from Terra (v4.0.1 and v5.2.6) are also compared in terms of the inversion methods and screening algorithms. The v5.2.6 AOD retrievals demonstrate better correlation with PM2.5 than v4.0.1 retrievals, but they have much less coverage because of the differences in the cloud-screening algorithm.

  3. Satellite Estimates of the Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass Burning Aerosols Over South America and Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Kliche, Donna V.; Berendes, Todd; Welch, Ronald M.; Yang, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic are important to the earth's radiative balance. Therefore it is important to provide adequate validation information on the spatial, temporal and radiative properties of aerosols. This will enable us to predict realistic global estimates of aerosol radiative effects more confidently. The current study utilizes 66 AVHRR LAC (Local Area Coverage) and coincident Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) images to characterize the fires, smoke and radiative forcings of biomass burning aerosols over four major ecosystems of South America.

  4. Chronological study of oxygen isotope composition for the solar protoplanetary disk recorded in a fluffy Type A CAI from Vigarano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Noriyuki; Itoh, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Fluffy Type A Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) containing reversely zoned melilite crystals are suggested to be aggregates of direct condensates from solar nebular gas. We conducted an investigation of 26Al-26Mg systematics of a fluffy Type A CAI from Vigarano, named V2-01, with known oxygen isotopic distributions of reversely zoned melilite crystals; we also conducted oxygen isotope measurements of coexisting minerals. Two of six reversely zoned melilite crystals show continuous variations in magnesium isotopic composition, with δ25Mg decreasing along the inferred direction of crystal growth, which supports the idea that they originated through condensation. Petrography suggests that the constituent minerals of V2-01 formed in the following order: first spinel and fassaite enclosed by melilite, then reversely zoned melilite crystals, and spinel and diopside in the Wark-Lovering rim. The spinel enclosed by melilite has 16O-rich compositions (Δ17O ∼ -24‰) and on an Al-Mg evolutionary diagram plots along model isochron with an initial value of (26Al/27Al)0 = (5.6 ± 0.2) × 10-5. The fassaite enclosed by melilite crystals shows variable oxygen isotopic compositions (Δ17O ∼ -12‰ and -17‰) and plots on an isochron with (26Al/27Al)0 = (5.6 ± 0.2) × 10-5. The oxygen isotopic compositions of reversely zoned melilite showed continuous variations in Δ17O along the inferred direction of crystal growth, suggesting that surrounding nebular gas, during the formation of the reversely zoned melilite, changed from 16O-poor (Δ17O values larger than -10‰) to 16O-rich (Δ17O ∼ -25‰). The six reversely zoned melilite crystals show indistinguishable initial 26Al/27Al values with an average (26Al/27Al)0 of (4.7 ± 0.3) × 10-5, which is clearly distinguishable from the value of enclosed spinel and fassaite, indicating a younger formation age than the enclosed spinel and fassaite. The spinel and diopside from the Wark-Lovering rim show 16O-rich compositions (Δ17O

  5. Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and CAIs from Short-lived and Long-lived Radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kita, N. T.; Huss, G. R.; Tachibana, S.; Amelin, Y.; Zinner, E.; Nyquist, L. E.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the timing of events in the early solar system, we rely on the radio-nuclide-based chronometers applied to materials in primitive meteorites. Because the time scale of early-solar system evolution was on the order of a few million years (Myr), we focus on so-called "short-lived radionuclides" with mean lives of less than 10 Myr (Table 1), as well as on the long-lived U-Pb system where high precision 207Pb-206Pb ages are applied. Note that the validity of some systems as chronometers (e.g., Be-B, Fe-Ni) has yet to be established. We summarize literature data for chondrules and CAIs and discuss how these chronometers constrain formation time scales in the early solar system.

  6. Aerosol contributions to speleothem geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harrison, R.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J.

    2011-12-01

    The term "aerosols" encompasses the suspension of both fine solid or liquid particles within a gaseous medium. Aerosols become suspended into the earth's atmosphere through a multitude of processes both natural and anthropogenic. Atmospheric aerosols enter cave networks as a result of cave ventilation processes and are either deposited, or cycled and removed from the system. Speleothem offer a multiproxy palaeoclimate resource; many of the available proxies have been extensively investigated and utilised for palaeoclimatic reconstructions in a range of studies. The potential contribution of aerosols to speleothem chemistry and their applicability for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions remains untested and the extent of their value as an addition to palaeoclimate sciences unknown. Aerosols through incorporation into speleothem may provide a novel palaeoenvironmental resource. The aerosol component of interest is that which is transported into the cave atmosphere and deposited and are available for incorporation into precipitated calcite. Aerosol deposition and therefore distribution in the cave has shown to be a complex function of ventilation and changing environmental factors. Through detailed monitoring aerosols have been detected, identified, characterised and quantified to determine their prominence in the cave system. Investigations are on a case study basis, searching for suitable aerosol proxies of environmentally significant emission processes. Case studies include: Palaeofires at Yarrangobilly Caves, Australia; anthropogenic emissions at St Michaels Cave, Gibraltar and Cheddar gorge, UK; and drip water aerosol production and geochemical addition in Obir cave, Austria. Monitoring has allowed for the temporal and spatial determination of aerosols in karst networks. Speleothem samples will be analysed in combination with in-situ monitoring to determine incorporation factors and record preservation. By understanding how aerosols are transmitted within the

  7. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo Derived from MODIS Reflectances over a Bright Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Martins, J.; Remer, L. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Stephens, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate TOA reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol is similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from MODIS Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two AERONET stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the SBDART model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from GERB, ARM, and CERES data. Spectral SSA values retrieved at Banizoumbou result in TOA forcing estimates that agree with CERES measurements

  8. Isotopic Measurements in CAIs with the Nanosims: Implications to the understanding of the Formation process of Ca, Al-Rich Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, M.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Ca, Al-rich Inclusions (CAIs) preserve evidence of thermal events that they experienced during their formation in the early solar system. Most CAIs from CV and CO chondrites are characterized by large variations in O-isotopic compositions of primary minerals, with spinel, hibonite, and pyroxene being more O-16-rich than melilite and anorthite, with delta 17, O-18 = approx. -40%o (DELTA O-17 = delta O-17 - 0.52 x delta O-18 = approx. - 20%o ). These anomalous compositions cannot be accounted for by standard mass dependent fractionation and diffusive process of those minerals. It requires the presence of an anomalous oxygen reservoir of nucleosynthetic origin or mass independent fractionations before the formation of CAIs in the early solar system. The CAMECA NanoSIMS is a new generation ion microprobe that offers high sensitivity isotopic measurements with sub 100 nm spatial resolution. The NanoSIMS has significantly improved abilities in the study of presolar grains in various kind of meteorites and the decay products of extinct nuclides in ancient solar system matter. This instrument promises significant improvements over other conventional ion probes in the precision isotopic characterization of sub-micron scales. We report the results of our first O isotopic measurements of various CAI minerals from EK1-6-3 and 7R19-1(a) utilizing the JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe. We evaluate the measurement conditions, the instrumental mass fractionation factor (IMF) for O isotopic measurement and the accuracy of the isotopic ratio through the analysis of a San Carlos olivine standard and CAI sample of 7R19-1(a).

  9. Monitoring Aerosols from Space: What We can Say, and What We Can't

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols are understood to play a significant role is the global energy balance, and especially on atmospheric as well as surface energy balances regionally. A combination of direct radiative cooling of the surface, atmospheric warming through diabatic heating, and indirect effects of aerosol on clouds are all thought to contribute to the net aerosol effect, though the magnitudes of each are both highly variable in space and time, and highly uncertain. Passive space-based remote sensing is a key tool for constraining these effects, due to the frequent, global coverage satellites can provide. However, information from such observations about total-column aerosol amount (i.e., aerosol optical depth or AOD), and especially about aerosol type, is limited. The current generation of passive aerosol remote-sensing instruments, including the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) offer vast improvements over previous instruments, including AOD over water and much of the land surface, fine vs. coarse particle type over ocean from MODIS, and discrimination of about a dozen aerosol types from MISR under good retrieval conditions, based on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) constraints. This presentation will summarize the capabilities and expected improvements in the currently available aerosol products, in light of required energy budget constraints. Ways of addressing the need for detailed information about particle microphysical properties, especially SSA, unobtainable from MISR or MODIS, will be discussed.

  10. Internally Consistent MODIS Estimate of Aerosol Clear-Sky Radiative Effect Over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2004-01-01

    Modern satellite remote sensing, and in particular the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), offers a measurement-based pathway to estimate global aerosol radiative effects and aerosol radiative forcing. Over the Oceans, MODIS retrieves the total aerosol optical thickness, but also reports which combination of the 9 different aerosol models was used to obtain the retrieval. Each of the 9 models is characterized by a size distribution and complex refractive index, which through Mie calculations correspond to a unique set of single scattering albedo, assymetry parameter and spectral extinction for each model. The combination of these sets of optical parameters weighted by the optical thickness attributed to each model in the retrieval produces the best fit to the observed radiances at the top of the atmosphere. Thus the MODIS Ocean aerosol retrieval provides us with (1) An observed distribution of global aerosol loading, and (2) An internally-consistent, observed, distribution of aerosol optical models that when used in combination will best represent the radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We use these two observed global distributions to initialize the column climate model by Chou and Suarez to calculate the aerosol radiative effect at top of the atmosphere and the radiative efficiency of the aerosols over the global oceans. We apply the analysis to 3 years of MODIS retrievals from the Terra satellite and produce global and regional, seasonally varying, estimates of aerosol radiative effect over the clear-sky oceans.

  11. Characterization of absorbing aerosol types using ground and satellites based observations over an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Samina; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Humera

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, for the first time, an effort has been made to seasonally characterize the absorbing aerosols into different types using ground and satellite based observations. For this purpose, optical properties of aerosol retrieved from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were utilized over Karachi for the period 2012 to 2014. Firstly, OMI AODabs was validated with AERONET AODabs and found to have a high degree of correlation. Then, based on this validation, characterization was conducted by analyzing aerosol Fine Mode Fraction (FMF), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Aerosol Index (AI) and their mutual correlation, to identify the absorbing aerosol types and also to examine the variability in seasonal distribution. The absorbing aerosols were characterized into Mostly Black Carbon (BC), Mostly Dust and Mixed BC & Dust. The results revealed that Mostly BC aerosols contributed dominantly during winter and postmonsoon whereas, Mostly Dust were dominant during summer and premonsoon. These types of absorbing aerosol were also confirmed with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) observations.

  12. Satellite remote sensing of aerosols generated by the Island of Nauru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bradley G.; Chylek, Petr; Porch, William M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2006-11-01

    We use imagery from the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) to search for aerosols generated by the Island of Nauru, an island located in the tropical western Pacific Ocean. Nauru frequently displays linear cloud trails for many kilometers downwind of the island, and this study was intended to investigate the presence of aerosols as an aid to understanding those features. The study had three components: (1) a search for specific aerosol plumes, (2) a comparison of downwind and upwind aerosol loading to look for asymmetries, and (3) application of matched filters to increase the visibility of aerosol plumes. The plume search resulted in the finding of three aerosol plumes, two of which are presented as imagery and also radiance profiles. The comparison of downwind and upwind reflectance spectra demonstrated that the radiance is slightly higher downwind of the island, and the residual spectra (downwind minus upwind) have a spectrum consistent with sea salt aerosol. Application of clutter-matched filters to MTI imagery accentuated the upper (near source) sections of an aerosol plume when utilizing a single-scatter albedo signature for coarse-grained sea salt aerosol. We combine our observations with models from the literature to describe a simple mechanism by which Nauru aerosols are created by wave breaking and wind tearing of sea spray and then entrained by island-influenced wind motions.

  13. MISR Aerosol Air Mass Type Mapping over Mega-City: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Most aerosol air-quality monitoring in mega-city environments is done from scattered ground stations having detailed chemical and optical sampling capabilities. Satellite instruments such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) can retrieve total-column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), along with some information about particle microphysical properties. Although the particle property information from MISR is much less detailed than that obtained from the ground sampling stations, the coverage is extensive, making it possible to put individual surface observations into the context of regional aerosol air mass types. This paper presents an analysis of MISR aerosol observations made coincident with aircraft and ground-based instruments during the INTEX-B field campaign. These detailed comparisons of satellite aerosol property retrievals against dedicated field measurements provide the opportunity to validate the retrievals quantitatively at a regional level, and help to improve aerosol representation in retrieval algorithms. Validation of MISR retrieved AOD and other aerosol properties over the INTEX-B study region in and around Mexico City will be presented. MISR’s ability to distinguish among aerosol air mass types will be discussed. The goal of this effort is to use the MISR aerosol property retrievals for mapping both aerosol air mass type and AOD gradients in mega-city environments over the decade-plus that MISR has made global observations.

  14. Aerosol optical depth distribution in extratropical cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-10-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database, the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the postcold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  15. Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution in Extratropical Cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database,the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the post-cold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  16. Retrieving the Height of Smoke and Dust Aerosols by Synergistic Use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol Single scattering albedo and Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm was first introduced in Jeong and Hsu (2008) to provide aerosol layer height as well as single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass burning smoke aerosols. One of the advantages of this algorithm was that the aerosol layer height can be retrieved over broad areas, which had not been available from lidar observations only. The algorithm utilized aerosol properties from three different satellite sensors, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), UV aerosol index (UVAI) from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and aerosol layer height from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Here, we extend the application of the algorithm to Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) data. We also now include dust layers as well as smoke. Other updates include improvements in retrieving the AOD of nonspherical dust from VIIRS, better determination of the aerosol layer height from CALIOP, and more realistic input aerosol profiles in the forward model for better accuracy.

  17. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  18. Evaluation of AERONET Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2001-12-01

    The aerosol robotic network (AERONET) program provides aerosol retrievals at ground-based sunphotometer sites throughout the world. The aerosol size distributions and refractive index retrievals at two locations have been converted to phase functions and single-scattering albedo using Mie theory. These optical properties are incorporated into a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model and calculations are compared to independent measurements obtained at the surface. The independent measurements include principle plane radiances from sunphotometer data and narrowband irradiances from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) data. The two locations represent radically different environments. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Central Facility (CF) represents a rural continental environment, while the CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) site represents a coastal marine environment. Both sites exhibit good agreement between the model calculations and the principle plane radiances for the year 2000 (generally better than 15 percent at optical depths greater than 0.1). A comparison with RSS measurements in July 2000 at the ARM Central Facility shows an irradiance error of 12 percent or better at tested wavelenghs longer than 500 nm. Comparisons with MFRSR data fared less well, however, indicating a discrepancy between the instruments. Inspection of 28 whole-sky imager (WSI) files coincidental with all AERONET quality-controlled retrievals during 7 days reveals that no clouds were obstructing the almucantar field of view and that indeed the whole sky was clear during this period, indicating a degree of robustness in the AERONET cloud screening. Additionally, the size distributions were evaluated at COVE with hourly-averaged wind speed and direction. Linear regression indicates that the coarse mode column-integrated surface area increases from

  19. Thermal Maturity Patterns (CAI and %Ro) in Upper Ordovician and Devonian Rocks of the Appalachian Basin: A Major Revision of USGS Map I-917-E Using New Subsurface Collections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Weary, David J.; Harris, Anita G.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    The conodont color alteration index (CAI) introduced by Epstein and others (1977) and Harris and others (1978) is an important criterion for estimating the thermal maturity of Ordovician to Mississippian rocks in the Appalachian basin. Consequently, the CAI isograd maps of Harris and others (1978) are commonly used by geologists to characterize the thermal and burial history of the Appalachian basin and to better understand the origin and distribution of oil and gas resources in the basin. The main objectives of our report are to present new CAI isograd maps for Ordovician and Devonian rocks in the Appalachian basin and to interpret the geologic and petroleum resource implications of these maps. The CAI isograd maps presented herein complement, and in some areas replace, the CAI-based isograd maps of Harris and others (1978) for the Appalachian basin. The CAI data presented in this report were derived almost entirely from subsurface samples, whereas the CAI data used by Harris and others (1978) were derived almost entirely from outcrop samples. Because of the different sampling methods, there is little geographic overlap of the two data sets. The new data set is mostly from the Allegheny Plateau structural province and most of the data set of Harris and others (1978) is from the Valley and Ridge structural province, east of the Allegheny structural front.

  20. Determination of aerosol ammonium using an aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia, A. E.; Toohey, D. W.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    The chemical composition of fine aerosols is a significant issue both because it influences the chemical and radiative properties of the aerosols, which in turn impact the regional and global climate and human health, and because it is difficult to measure accurately. The Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) developed by Aerodyne Research measures both chemical composition and aerodynamic size of submicron aerosols quantitatively. However, the measurement of aerosol ammonium is more difficult than that of the other major inorganic species, nitrate and sulfate, because of interferences in the mass spectrum from air and water. This presentation will describe the successful procedure developed for dealing with these interferences and accurately determining the ammonium mass. In addition, the application of this procedure to aerosols from a range of ambient conditions will be demonstrated using data from several field studies.

  1. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  2. How Well Will MODIS Measure Top of Atmosphere Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Levin, Zev; Ghan, Stephen; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The new generation of satellite sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) will be able to detect and characterize global aerosols with an unprecedented accuracy. The question remains whether this accuracy will be sufficient to narrow the uncertainties in our estimates of aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. Satellite remote sensing detects aerosol optical thickness with the least amount of relative error when aerosol loading is high. Satellites are less effective when aerosol loading is low. We use the monthly mean results of two global aerosol transport models to simulate the spatial distribution of smoke aerosol in the Southern Hemisphere during the tropical biomass burning season. This spatial distribution allows us to determine that 87-94% of the smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere occurs in grid squares with sufficient signal to noise ratio to be detectable from space. The uncertainty of quantifying the smoke aerosol forcing in the Southern Hemisphere depends on the uncertainty introduced by errors in estimating the background aerosol, errors resulting from uncertainties in surface properties and errors resulting from uncertainties in assumptions of aerosol properties. These three errors combine to give overall uncertainties of 1.5 to 2.2 Wm-2 (21-56%) in determining the Southern Hemisphere smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The range of values depend on which estimate of MODIS retrieval uncertainty is used, either the theoretical calculation (upper bound) or the empirical estimate (lower bound). Strategies that use the satellite data to derive flux directly or use the data in conjunction with ground-based remote sensing and aerosol transport models can reduce these uncertainties.

  3. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  4. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  5. A multi-satellite analysis of the direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Christopher, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above liquid water clouds in the southeast Atlantic as a function of fire sources are investigated using A-Train data coupled with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP). Both the VIIRS Active Fire product and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Thermal Anomalies product (MYD14) are used to identify the biomass burning fire origin in southern Africa. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) are used to assess the aerosol type, aerosol altitude, and cloud altitude. We use back trajectory information, wind data, and the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) product to infer the transportation of aerosols from the fire source to the CALIOP swath in the southeast Atlantic during austral winter.

  6. Global all-sky shortwave direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols from combined satellite observations and GOCART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wenying; Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Chin, Mian; Rose, Fred G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) from satellite measurements is challenging because current satellite sensors do not have the capability of discriminating between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. We combine 3-hourly cloud properties from satellite retrievals with two aerosol data sets to calculate the all-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), which is the mean radiative perturbation due to the presence of both natural and anthropogenic aerosols. The first aerosol data set is based upon Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) assimilation model and is largely constrained by MODIS aerosol optical depth, but it does not distinguish between anthropogenic and natural aerosols. The other aerosol data set is based upon the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, which does not assimilate aerosol observations but predicts the anthropogenic and natural components of aerosols. Thus, we can calculate the aerosol DRF using GOCART classifications of anthropogenic and natural aerosols and the ratio of DRF to DRE. We then apply this ratio to DRE calculated using MODIS/MATCH aerosols to partition it into DRF (MODIS/MATCH DRF) by assuming that the anthropogenic fractions from GOCART are representative. The global (60°N~60°S) mean all-sky MODIS/MATCH DRF is -0.51 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), 2.51 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -3.02 Wm-2 at the surface. The GOCART all-sky DRF is -0.17 Wm-2 at the TOA, 2.02 Wm-2 within the atmosphere, and -2.19 Wm-2 at the surface. The differences between MODIS/MATCH DRF and GOCART DRF are solely due to the differences in aerosol properties, since both computations use the same cloud properties and surface albedo and the same proportion of anthropogenic contributions to aerosol DRE. Aerosol optical depths simulated by the GOCART model are smaller than those in MODIS/MATCH, and aerosols in the GOCART model are

  7. Charicteristics of Aerosol indices distribution followed by Aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, S.; Song, C.

    2010-12-01

    Transboundary transport of aerosol has been a hot issue in East Asia and with various aerosol types from different source region. To detect signals from aerosols, OMI provides aerosol indices. Aerosol Indices (AI) represent the change of spectral contrast between two wavelengths and these indices are derived in UV and Visible regions. These indices also can get not only in ocean but also in land region so that AI is good to observe the source region and transport of aerosols. In UV region, AI (UV-AI) can classify the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998) so that this value is frequently used for dust detection. Additionally, visible AI (VIS-AI) uses to differentiate the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types. If we combine two types of indices at the coordinate system of two types of AI, distribution of indices contains different signals if aerosol types change theoretically. In this study, we want to find out classification results based by the observation data to see the theoretical distribution in two AI values. For the observation data, aerosol types are obtained from the results of MODIS-OMI algorithm and 4-channel algorithm classify four types of aerosols, i.e. dust, carbonaceous, sea-salt and Non-Absorbing (NA). These algorithms classify aerosol by using the characteristics of aerosol optical properties in visible and near IR regions. MODIS-OMI algorithm uses the MODIS AOD and UV-AI in OMI values. For UV-AI case, dust and carbonaceous types have larger UV-AI values than non-absorbing aerosols because of absorbing characteristics. However, dust and carbonaceous types cannot classify if UV-AI values use only. For VIS-AI case, dust has larger proportion, but carbonaceous aerosol has smaller proportion in high AI value. However, VIS-AI cannot clearly classify between dust and carbonaceous types except for the case of extremely high AI cases. In NA type, VIS-AI has almost positive values, but the distribution has smaller than the absorbing

  8. CHARGE Image Generator: Theory of Operation and Author Language Support. Technical Report 75-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunwaldsen, Roger L.

    The image generator function and author language software support for the CHARGE (Color Halftone Area Graphics Environment) Interactive Graphics System are described. Designed initially for use in computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems, the CHARGE Interactive Graphics System can provide graphic displays for various applications including…

  9. Aerosol Dynamics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Mondy, L.A.

    1990-04-01

    In past five years, Department 1510 has developed a state-of-the-art Aerosol Dynamics Laboratory (ADL). This report documents the current instrumentation and capabilities that exist in this laboratory. The ADL was developed from a variety of sources, with a primary contribution from Department 1510's Independent Research and Development program in aerosol dynamics. Current capabilities of the ADL include: (1) generation of calibration-quality monodisperse particles with diameters between 0.005 to 100 {mu}m, (2) real-time measurement of particle size distributions for particle diameters between 0.01 and 100 {mu}m, (3) in situ, real-time measurement of particle size distributions for particle diameters between 0.3 and 100 {mu}m, and (4) real-time measurement of particle charge distributions for particle diameters between 0.01 and 1.0 {mu}m. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  11. A New Type of Foreign Clast in A Polymict Ureilite: A CAI or AL-Rich Chondrule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Ross, D. K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Polymict ureilites are breccias interpreted to represent regolith formed on a ureilitic asteroid [1-3]. They consist of approximately 90-95% clasts of various ureilite types (olivine-pyroxene rocks with Fo 75-95), a few % indigenous feldspathic clasts, and a few % foreign clasts [4-20]. The foreign clasts are diverse, including fragments of H, L, LL and R chondrites, angrites, other achondrites, and dark clasts similar to CC [6,7,9-19]. We report a new type of foreign clast in polymict ureilite DaG 999. Methods: Clast 8 in Dar al Gani (DaG) 999/1 (Museum fur Naturkunde) was discovered during a survey of feldspathic clasts in polymict ureilites [19,20]. It was studied by BEI, EMPA, and X-ray mapping on the JEOL 8530F electron microprobe at ARES, JSC. Petrography and Mineral Compositions: Clast 8 is sub-rounded to irregular in shape, approximately 85 micrometers in diameter, and consists of approximately 68% pyroxene and 32% mesostasis (by area). Part of the pyroxene (top half of clast in Fig. 1a and 2) shows a coarse dendritic morphology; the rest appears massive. Mesostasis may be glassy and contains fine needles/grains of pyroxene. The pyroxene has very high CaO (23.5 wt.%) and Al2O3 (19.7 wt.%), with the formula: (Ca(0.91)Mg(0.63)Fe(0.01)Al(sup VI) (0.38)Cr(0.01)Ti(0.05)1.99 Si2O6. The bulk mesostasis also has very high Al2O3 (approximately 26 wt.%). A bulk composition for the clast was obtained by combining modal abundances with phase compositions (Table 1, Fig. 3). Discussion: The pyroxene in clast 8 has a Ca-Al-(Ti)- rich (fassaitic) composition that is clearly distinct from compositions of pyroxenes in main group ureilites [22] or indigenous feldspathic clasts in polymict ureilites [4-8]. It also has significantly higher Al than fassaite in angrites (up to approximately 12 wt.% [23]), which occur as xenoliths in polymict ureilites. Ca-Al-Ti rich pyroxenes are most commonly found in CAIs, Al-rich chondrules and other types of refractory

  12. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  13. Improvement of Aerosol Prediction Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    by dust storms in the past.) The operational aerosol products will be used for initialization or specification of aerosols in COAMPS when new cloud...Figure 2. SeaWiFS visible imagery for May 18, 2001, showing a dust storm originating at dry lakes along the Iran-Afghanistan border and then...versions of the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) for analysis of airborne dust loads (Westphal/NRL). B: Modify existing radiative

  14. Unified Aerosol Microphysics for NWP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Specifically, the goal is to develop a COAMPS that is capable of simulating the full range of interactions between aerosol particles, clouds , and radiative...aerosol species that are responsible for degradation of Electro- Optical (EO) propagation or that modify cloud behavior and lifetime. Report...enabling new development of more complex cloud -aerosol interactions. The work on this project has been divided into two phases, an investigation phase

  15. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  16. Volcanic aerosols and lunar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Keen, R A

    1983-12-02

    The moon is visible during total lunar eclipses due to sunlight refracted into the earth's shadow by the atmosphere. Stratospheric aerosols can profoundly affect the brightness of the eclipsed moon. Observed brightnesses of 21 lunar eclipses during 1960-1982 are compared with theoretical calculations based on refraction by an aerosol-free atmosphere to yield globally averaged aerosol optical depths. Results indicate the global aerosol loading from the 1982 eruption of El Chichón is similar in magnitude to that from the 1963 Agung eruption.

  17. Aerosol infection of mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; Izumiya, K; Sato, H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1980-01-01

    Aerosol inhalation of Bordetella pertussis Tohama phase I resulted in a reproducible and uniform infection of mice (strain DDY or ICR). Mice in groups of 10 exposed for 30 min to aerosols generated from bacterial suspensions of 10(9) and 10(10) organisms per ml resulted in mean bacterial counts of 2.3 (+/- 0.3) X 10(4) and 1.0 (+/- 0.3) X 10(5) colony-forming units, respectively, in the lung of each animal. Subsequent studies using a 30-min aerosol inoculation of ICR mice with 2 X 10(9) bacterial cells per ml showed: (i) B. pertussis cells reached a maximum of about 10(7) colony-forming units per lung 14 days after inhalation. (ii) Deaths (10 to 100%, depending on mouse age) occurred 10 to 14 days after exposure. (iii) The lung weight and the leukocyte count increased from basal values of 100 mg and 10(4) leukocytes per mm3 to a plateau of 950 mg and 1.95 X 10(5) leukocytes per mm3, respectively, 14 days after challenge. (iv) There was a significantly reduced rate of body weight gain by infected mice compared to noninfected mice. (v) With mortality as the criterion for disease, susceptibility varied with the age of mice as follows: 10 days old greater than 18 greater than 28 greater than 49. (vi) Bacteria were associated with ciliated respiratory epithelial cells by scanning electron microscopy. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6249758

  18. Developments of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) and the retrieval accuracy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Ahn, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). By taking the advantage, the OMI UV aerosol algorithm has provided information on the absorbing aerosol (Torres et al., 2007; Ahn et al., 2008). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To obtain the retrieval accuracy, the error of the look-up table method occurred by the interpolation of pre-calculated radiances is estimated by using the reference dataset, and the uncertainties about aerosol type and height are evaluated. Also, the GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with measured normalized radiance from OMI, a provisional data set for GEMS measurement, and the results are compared with the values from AERONET measurements over Asia. Additionally, the method for simultaneous retrieve of the AOD and aerosol height is discussed.

  19. Evaluations of cirrus contamination and screening in ground aerosol observations using collocated lidar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Liu, Gin-Rong; Campbell, James R.; Liew, Soo Chin; Barnes, John E.

    2012-08-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly subvisual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to screen in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to systematically examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) vertical feature mask (VFM) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted; although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons; (2) challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed; and (3) estimates of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  20. Background aerosol over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: observed characteristics of aerosol mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cong, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Xin, Jinyuan; Wan, Xin; Pan, Yuepeng; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Zhongyan; Wang, Yongjie; Kang, Shichang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric aerosols of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), an observation network was established within the region's various ecosystems, including at the Ngari, Qomolangma (QOMS), Nam Co, and Southeastern Tibetan (SET) stations. In this paper we illustrate aerosol mass loadings by integrating in situ measurements with satellite and ground-based remote sensing datasets for the 2011-2013 period, on both local and large scales. Mass concentrations of these surface atmospheric aerosols were relatively low and varied with land cover, showing a general tendency of Ngari and QOMS (barren sites) > Nam Co (grassland site) > SET (forest site). Daily averages of online PM2.5 (particulates with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5 µm) at these sites were sequentially 18.2 ± 8.9, 14.5 ± 7.4, 11.9 ± 4.9 and 11.7 ± 4.7 µg m-3. Correspondingly, the ratios of PM2.5 to total suspended particles (TSP) were 27.4 ± 6.65, 22.3 ± 10.9, 37.3 ± 11.1 and 54.4 ± 6.72 %. Bimodal mass distributions of size-segregated particles were found at all sites, with a relatively small peak in accumulation mode and a more notable peak in coarse mode. Diurnal variations in fine-aerosol masses generally displayed a bi-peak pattern at the QOMS, Nam Co and SET stations and a single-peak pattern at the Ngari station, controlled by the effects of local geomorphology, mountain-valley breeze circulation and aerosol emissions. Dust aerosol content in PM2.1 samples gave fractions of 26 % at the Ngari station and 29 % at the QOMS station, or ˜ 2-3 times that of reported results at human-influenced sites. Furthermore, observed evidence confirmed the existence of the aerodynamic conditions necessary for the uplift of fine particles from a barren land surface. Combining surface aerosol data and atmospheric-column aerosol optical properties, the TSP mass and aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) generally decreased as land cover changed from

  1. Distinct impact of different types of aerosols on surface solar radiation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhou, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of surface direct solar radiation (DSR) and visibility, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), together with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) taken from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, were investigated to gain insight into the impact of aerosol pollution on surface solar radiation in China. The surface DSR decreased during 2004-2014 compared with 1993~2003 over eastern China, but no clear reduction was observed in remote regions with cleaner air. Significant correlations of visibility, PM2.5, and regionally averaged AOT with the surface DSR over eastern China indicate that aerosol pollution greatly affects the energy available at the surface. The net loss of surface solar radiation also reduces the surface ground temperature over eastern China. However, the slope of the linear variation of the radiation with respect to atmospheric visibility is distinctly different at different stations, implying that the main aerosol type varies regionally. The largest slope value occurs at Zhengzhou and indicates that the aerosol absorption in central China is the highest, and lower slope values suggest relatively weakly absorbing types of aerosols at other locations. The spatial distribution of the linear slopes agrees well with the geographical distribution of the absorbing aerosols derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations and Ozone Monitoring Instrument over China. The regional correlation between a larger slope value and higher absorbance properties of aerosols indicates that the net effects of aerosols on the surface solar energy and corresponding climatic effects are dependent on both aerosol amount and optical properties.

  2. Evolution of aerosol loading in Santiago de Chile between 1997 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Kristina; Gallardo, Laura

    2015-04-01

    While aerosols produced by major cities are a significant component of anthropogenic climate forcing as well as an important factor in public health, many South American cities have not been a major focus of aerosol studies due in part to relatively few long-term observations in the region. Here we present a synthesis of the available data for the emerging megacity of Santiago, Chile. We report new results from a recent NASA AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) site in the Santiago basin, combining these with previous AERONET observations in Santiago as well as with a new assessment of the 11-station air quality monitoring network currently administered by the Chilean Environment Ministry (MMA, Ministerio del Medio Ambiente) to assess changes in aerosol composition since 1997. While the average surface concentration of pollution components (specifically PM2.5 and PM10) has decreased, no significant change in total aerosol optical depth was observed. However, changes in aerosol size and composition are suggested by the proxy measurements. Previous studies have revealed limitations in purely satellite-based studies over Santiago due to biases from high surface reflection in the region, particularly in summer months (e.g. Escribano et al 2014). To overcome this difficulty and certain limitations in the air quality data, we next incorporate analysis of aerosol products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument along with those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, both on NASA's Terra satellite, to better quantify the high bias of MODIS. Thus incorporating these complementary datasets, we characterize the aerosol over Santiago over the period 1997 to 2014, including the evolution of aerosol properties over time and seasonal dependencies in the observed trends. References: Escribano et al (2014), "Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth over a Subtropical Urban Area: The Role of Stratification and Surface

  3. Trend analysis of the aerosol optical depth from fusion of MISR and MODIS retrievals over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Gu, Xingfa; Yu, Tao; Cheng, Tianhai; Chen, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in the climate change though direct and indirect processes. In order to evaluate the effects of aerosols on climate, it is necessary to have a research on their spatial and temporal distributions. Satellite aerosol remote sensing is a developing technology that may provide good temporal sampling and superior spatial coverage to study aerosols. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) have provided aerosol observations since 2000, with large coverage and high accuracy. However, due to the complex surface, cloud contamination, and aerosol models used in the retrieving process, the uncertainties still exist in current satellite aerosol products. There are several observed differences in comparing the MISR and MODIS AOD data with the AERONET AOD. Combing multiple sensors could reduce uncertainties and improve observational accuracy. The validation results reveal that a better agreement between fusion AOD and AERONET AOD. The results confirm that the fusion AOD values are more accurate than single sensor. We have researched the trend analysis of the aerosol properties over China based on nine-year (2002-2010) fusion data. Compared with trend analysis in Jingjintang and Yangtze River Delta, the accuracy has increased by 5% and 3%, respectively. It is obvious that the increasing trend of the AOD occurred in Yangtze River Delta, where human activities may be the main source of the increasing AOD.

  4. 3D Radiative Transfer Effects in Multi-Angle/Multi-Spectral Radio-Polarimetric Signals from a Mixture of Clouds and Aerosols Viewed by a Non-Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Garay, Michael J.; Xu, Feng; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    When observing a spatially complex mix of aerosols and clouds in a single relatively large field-of-view, nature entangles their signals non-linearly through polarized radiation transport processes that unfold in the 3D position and direction spaces. In contrast, any practical forward model in a retrieval algorithm will use only 1D vector radiative transfer (vRT) in a linear mixing technique. We assess the difference between the observed and predicted signals using synthetic data from a high-fidelity 3D vRT model with clouds generated using a Large Eddy Simulation model and an aerosol climatology. We find that this difference is signal--not noise--for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an instrument developed by NASA. Moreover, the worst case scenario is also the most interesting case, namely, when the aerosol burden is large, hence hase the most impact on the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Based on our findings, we formulate a mitigation strategy for these unresolved cloud adjacency effects assuming that some spatial information is available about the structure of the clouds at higher resolution from "context" cameras, as was planned for NASA's ill-fated Glory mission that was to carry the APS but failed to reach orbit. Application to POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data from the period when PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) was in the A-train is briefly discussed.

  5. Retrieval of Aerosol information from UV measurement by using optimal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W. V.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. D.; Moon, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    An algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and aerosol loading height is developed for GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) measurement. The GEMS is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018, and employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol information such as AOD and SSA [Torres et al., 2007; Torres et al., 2013; Ahn et al., 2014]. However, the large contribution of atmospheric scattering results in the increase of the sensitivity of the backward radiance to aerosol loading height. Thus, the assumption of aerosol loading height becomes important issue to obtain accurate result. Accordingly, this study focused on the simultaneous retrieval of aerosol loading height with AOD and SSA by utilizing the optimal estimation method. For the RTM simulation, the aerosol optical properties were analyzed from AERONET inversion data (level 2.0) at 46 AERONET sites over ASIA. Also, 2-channel inversion method is applied to estimate a priori value of the aerosol information to solve the Lavenberg Marquardt equation. The GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with OMI level-1B dataset, a provisional data for GEMS measurement, and the result is compared with OMI standard aerosol product and AERONET values. The retrieved AOD and SSA show reasonable distribution compared with OMI products, and are well correlated with the value measured from AERONET. However, retrieval uncertainty in aerosol loading height is relatively larger than other results.

  6. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-09

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30 degrees S-20 degrees S), smoke (20 degrees S-5 degrees N), mineral dust (5 degrees N-25 degrees N), and pollution aerosols (30 degrees N- 60 degrees N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 +/- 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect.

  7. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-01-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30°S–20°S), smoke (20°S–5°N), mineral dust (5°N–25°N), and pollution aerosols (30°N– 60°N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2–0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is –11 ± 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect. PMID:16076949

  8. Aerosol synthesis and application of folded graphene-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yantao; Wang, Zhongying; Qiu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide colloid has been widely used in the synthesis of various graphene-based materials. Graphene oxide sheets, with a low bending rigidity, can be folded when assembled in aqueous phase. A simple but industrial scalable way, aerosol processing, can be used to fabricate folded graphene-based materials. These folded materials can carry various cargo materials and be used in different applications such as time-controlled drug release, medical imaging enhancement, catalyst support and energy related areas. The aerosol synthesis of folded graphene-based materials can also be easily extended to fabricate hybrid nanomaterials without any complicated chemistries.

  9. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  10. INDOOR AEROSOLS AND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of both indoor aerosol concentration measurements, and the considerations for assessment of exposure to aerosols in non-occupational settings. The fixed-location measurements of concentration at an outdoor location, while commuting inside an a...

  11. Aerosol Variability Observed with Rpas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Lampert, A.; Scholtz, A.; Bange, J.; Platis, A.; Hermann, M.; Wehner, B.

    2013-08-01

    To observe the origin, vertical and horizontal distribution and variability of aerosol particles, and especially ultrafine particles recently formed, we plan to employ the remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) Carolo-P360 "ALADINA" of TU Braunschweig. The goal of the presented project is to investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution, transport and small-scale variability of aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer using RPAS. Two additional RPAS of type MASC of Tübingen University equipped with turbulence instrumentation add the opportunity to study the interaction of the aerosol concentration with turbulent transport and exchange processes of the surface and the atmosphere. The combination of different flight patterns of the three RPAS allows new insights in atmospheric boundary layer processes. Currently, the different aerosol sensors are miniaturized at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig and together with the TU Braunschweig adapted to fit into the RPAS. Moreover, an additional meteorological payload for measuring temperature, humidity and turbulence properties is constructed by Tübingen University. Two condensation particle counters determine the total aerosol number with a different lower detection threshold in order to investigate the horizontal and vertical aerosol variability and new particle formation (aerosol particles of some nm diameter). Further the aerosol size distribution in the range from about 0.300 to ~5 μm is given by an optical particle counter.

  12. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  13. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  15. Sampling stratospheric aerosols with impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.

    1989-01-01

    Derivation of statistically significant size distributions from impactor samples of rarefield stratospheric aerosols imposes difficult sampling constraints on collector design. It is shown that it is necessary to design impactors of different size for each range of aerosol size collected so as to obtain acceptable levels of uncertainty with a reasonable amount of data reduction.

  16. New Petrology, Mineral Chemistry and Stable MG Isotope Compositions of an Allende CAI: EK-459-7-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the key to understanding physical and chemical conditions in the nascent solar nebula. These inclusions have the oldest radiometric ages of solar system materials and are composed of phases that are predicted to condense early from a gas of solar composition. Thus, their chemistry and textures record conditions and processes in the earliest stages of development of the solar nebula. Type B inclusions are typically larger and more coarse grained than other types with substantial evidence that many of them were at least partially molten. Type B inclusions are further subdivided into Type B1 (possess thick melilite mantle) and Type B2 (lack melilite mantle). Despite being extensively studied, the origin of the melilite mantles of Type B1 inclusions remains uncertain. We present petrologic and chemical data for a Type B inclusion, EK-459-7-2, that bears features found in both Type B1 and B2 inclusions and likely represents an intermediate between the two types. Detailed studies of more of these intermediate objects may help to constrain models for Type B1 rim formation.

  17. Aerosol Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline (Editor); Remer, Lorraine (Editor); Tanre, Didier (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    This book gives a much needed explanation of the basic physical principles of radia5tive transfer and remote sensing, and presents all the instruments and retrieval algorithms in a homogenous manner. For the first time, an easy path from theory to practical algorithms is available in one easily accessible volume, making the connection between theoretical radiative transfer and individual practical solutions to retrieve aerosol information from remote sensing. In addition, the specifics and intercomparison of all current and historical methods are explained and clarified.

  18. A novel ultrasonic aerosol generator.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Hudson, N; Pirie, L

    1995-07-01

    An ultrasonic aerosol generator constructed from a domestic humidifier is described which has been used to produce liquid aerosols for physiological investigations. The instrument was constructed from a Pifco domestic humidifier modified to include an energy guide to direct the oscillations of the transducer through the coupling water, which would normally be aerosolized, onto a small membrane based sample chamber containing the liquid to be aerosolized. The size distribution of the aerosol produced was found to be between 2 and 6 mm, optimum for diffuse intrapulmonary deposition. Up to 4 ml/min of aqueous liquid was used; however the sample chamber could be made small enough to contain economic amounts of expensive material to administer by inhalation. The instrument has proved to be reliable over a period of three years.

  19. The Aerosol Coarse Mode Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Adhikari, N.; Air, D.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the world show an aerosol volume distribution with a significant coarse mode and sometimes a dominant coarse mode. The large coarse mode is usually due to dust, but sea salt aerosol can also play an important role. However, in many field campaigns, the coarse mode tends to be ignored, because it is difficult to measure. This lack of measurements leads directly to a concomitant "lack of analysis" of this mode. Because, coarse mode aerosols can have significant effects on radiative forcing, both in the shortwave and longwave spectrum, the coarse mode -- and these forcings -- should be accounted for in atmospheric models. Forcings based only on fine mode aerosols have the potential to be misleading. In this paper we describe examples of large coarse modes that occur in areas of large aerosol loading (Mexico City, Barnard et al., 2010) as well as small loadings (Sacramento, CA; Kassianov et al., 2012; and Reno, NV). We then demonstrate that: (1) the coarse mode can contribute significantly to radiative forcing, relative to the fine mode, and (2) neglecting the coarse mode may result in poor comparisons between measurements and models. Next we describe -- in general terms -- the limitations of instrumentation to measure the coarse mode. Finally, we suggest a new initiative aimed at examining coarse mode aerosol generation mechanisms; transport and deposition; chemical composition; visible and thermal IR refractive indices; morphology; microphysical behavior when deposited on snow and ice; and specific instrumentation needs. Barnard, J. C., J. D. Fast, G. Paredes-Miranda, W. P. Arnott, and A. Laskin, 2010: Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 7325-7340. Kassianov, E. I., M. S. Pekour, and J. C. Barnard, 2012: Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

  20. Estimate of the aerosol properties over the ocean with POLDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuzé, J. L.; Goloub, P.; Herman, M.; Marchand, A.; Perry, G.; Susana, S.; Tanré, D.

    2000-06-01

    The wide field of view imaging spectroradiometer Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) developed by Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and operated aboard the Japanese heliosynchronous platform Advanced Earth Observation Satellite (ADEOS) from October 30, 1996, to June 30, 1997, provided the first global systematic measurements of the spectral, directional, and polarized characteristics of the solar radiation reflected by the Earth/atmosphere system. These original observational capabilities offer an opportunity to enhance the characterization of several components of the global environment, especially the oceanic and terrestrial vegetal primary production, the aerosol physical and optical properties, and the tridimensional structure and microphysics of clouds. Here we examine the remote sensing of aerosols over the oceans. In a first step the aerosol optical thickness and Ångström exponent are derived from the radiance measurements. In a second step the polarization measurements are used for the retrieval of the aerosol refractive index. The inversion algorithm assumes spherical, nonabsorbing particles with monomodal lognormal size distribution. The adequacy of this modeling is discussed for a representative set of aerosol observations. Successful retrieval is generally achieved in the presence of small aerosols with Ångström exponent larger than ˜1.0. For such particles, polarization may provide information on the particle refractive index. As the Ångstrom exponent of the particle decreases, the data fitting residual errors increase, especially in polarized light, which prevents the retrieval of the aerosol refractive index. The trends of the discrepancies point out two shortcomings of the aerosol modeling. The theoretical results systematically underestimate the contribution of small polarizing particles in the polarization measurements for side-scattering angles ranging from 80° to 120°. This indicates very probably that

  1. Significant efficiency findings while controlling for the frequent confounders of CAI research in the PlanAlyzer project's computer-based, self-paced, case-based programs in anemia and chest pain diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lyon, H C; Healy, J C; Bell, J R; O'Donnell, J F; Shultz, E K; Wigton, R S; Hirai, F; Beck, J R

    1991-04-01

    Richard E. Clark in his widely published comprehensive studies and meta-analyses of the literature on computer assisted instruction (CAI) has decried the lack of carefully controlled research, challenging almost every study which shows the computer-based intervention to result in significant post-test proficiency gains over a non-computer-based intervention. We report on a randomized study in a medical school setting where the usual confounders found by Clark to plague most research, were carefully controlled. PlanAlyzer is a microcomputer-based, self-paced, case-based, event-driven system for medical education which was developed and used in carefully controlled trials in a second year medical school curriculum to test the hypothesis that students with access to the interactive programs could integrate their didactic knowledge more effectively and/or efficiently than with access only to traditional textual "nonintelligent" materials. PlanAlyzer presents cases, elicits and critiques a student's approach to the diagnosis of two common medical disorders: anemias and chest pain. PlanAlyzer uses text, hypertext, images and critiquing theory. Students were randomized, one half becoming the experimental group who received the interactive PlanAlyzer cases in anemia, the other half becoming the controls who received the exact same content material in a text format. Later in each year there was a crossover, the controls becoming the experimentals for a similar intervention with the cardiology PlanAlyzer cases. Preliminary results at the end of the first two full trials shows that the programs have achieved most of the proposed instructional objectives, plus some significant efficiency and economy gains. 96 faculty hours of classroom time were saved by using PlanAlyzer in their place, while maintaining high student achievement. In terms of student proficiency and efficiency, the 328 students in the trials over two years were able to accomplish the project's instructional

  2. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures

  3. Evidence for a Glaciation Aerosol Indirect Effect from Ship Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, M.; Suzuki, K.; Stephens, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Ship tracks are a prominent manifestation of the aerosol indirect effect that provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol interactions in both warm and mixed-phase clouds. While ample evidence supports that an increase in aerosol concentration generally suppresses warm phase precipitation leading to longer cloud lifetime and more reflected sunlight (Albrecht, 1989) there is less understood about these effects in mixed-phase clouds. Lohmann, (2002) propose that an increase in IN (Ice Nuclei) may cause a glaciation indirect effect which results in more frequent glaciation of super-cooled droplets via the Bergeron process thereby increasing the amount of precipitation, which could decrease cloud cover, cloud longevity, and reflected sunlight. In this study, over 200 ship tracks are identified in mixed phase clouds using MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) imagery. Retrievals of the ice phase are obtained using CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). These measurements provide evidence that glaciation is more frequent in polluted clouds compared to the unpolluted clouds that lie adjacent to ship tracks. Larger ice fractions may result from the increased IN emitted from the ship or by other processes (e.g., immersion/contact freezing) that lead to faster ice multiplication in polluted clouds with smaller and more numerous supercooled droplets. Observations from the profiling radar on CloudSat show that aerosol suppresses warm phase precipitation but enhances the cold phase precipitation. For mixed-phase clouds, these differences roughly cancel resulting in small changes in precipitation between polluted and unpolluted clouds. When cloud tops are warm, aerosol decreases precipitation rates and cloud water paths due to the entrainment effect but the differences in cloud water amount are considerably smaller than those found in cold phase clouds. These results provide the first glance of ship tracks in mixed

  4. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  5. How Important Is Organic Aerosol Hygroscopicity to Aerosol Indirect Forcing?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jian

    2010-12-07

    Organics are among the most abundant aerosol components in the atmosphere. However, there are still large uncertainties with emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (precursor gases of secondary organic aerosol, SOA), formation and yield of SOA, and chemical and physical properties (e.g., hygroscopicity) of POA and SOA. All these may have significant impacts on aerosol direct and indirect forcing estimated from global models. In this study a modal aerosol module (MAM) in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) is used to examine sensitivities of aerosol indirect forcing to hygroscopicity (“κ” value) of POA and SOA. Our model simulation indicates that in the present-day condition changing “κ” value of POA from 0 to 0.1 increases the number concentration of cloud condensational nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation S=0.1% by 40-60% over the POA source regions, while changing “κ” value of SOA by ±50% (from 0.14 to 0.07 and 0.21) changes the CCN within 30%. Changes in the in-cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) are within 20% in most locations on the globe with the above changes in “κ” value of POA and SOA. Global annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) between present-day (PD) and pre-industrial (PI) conditions change by 0.4 W m-2 with the control run of -1.3 W m-2. AIF reduces with the increase hygroscopicity of organic aerosol, indicating the important role of natural organic aerosol in buffering the relative change of CDNC from PI to PD.

  6. Multiwavelength multistatic optical scattering for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.

    The main focus of this research is the development of a technique to remotely characterize aerosol properties, such as particle size distribution, concentration, and refractive index as a function of wavelength, through the analysis of optical scattering measurements. The proposed technique is an extension of the multistatic polarization ratio technique that has been developed by prior students at the Penn State Lidar Lab to include multiple wavelengths. This approach uses the ratio of polarized components of the scattering phase functions at multiple wavelengths across the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum to extract the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols. The scattering intensities at each wavelength are vertically separated across the face of the imager using a transmission diffraction grating, so that scattering intensities for multiple wavelengths at many angles are available for analysis in a single image. The ratio of the scattering phase function intensities collected using parallel and perpendicular polarized light are formed for each wavelength and analysis of the ratio is used to determine the microphysical properties of the aerosols. One contribution of the present work is the development of an inversion technique based on a genetic algorithm that retrieves lognormal size distributions from scattering measurements by minimizing the squared error between measured polarization ratios and polarization ratios calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. The opportunities and limitations of using the polarization ratio are explored, and a genetic algorithm is developed to retrieve single mode and trimodal lognormal size distributions from multiwavelength, angular scattering data. The algorithm is designed to evaluate particles in the diameter size range of 2 nm to 60 im, and uses 1,000 linear spaced diameters within this range to compute the modeled polarization ratio. The algorithm returns geometric mean radii and

  7. Retrieving the height of smoke and dust aerosols by synergistic use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    This study extends the application of the previously developed Aerosol Single-scattering albedo and layer Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm, which was originally applied to smoke aerosols only, to both smoke and dust aerosols by including nonspherical dust properties in the retrieval process. The main purpose of the algorithm is to derive aerosol height information over wide areas using aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors simultaneously: aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), UV aerosol index from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), and total backscatter coefficient profile from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The case studies suggest that the ASHE algorithm performs well for both smoke and dust aerosols, showing root-mean-square error of the retrieved aerosol height as compared to CALIOP observations from 0.58 to 1.31 km and mean bias from -0.70 to 1.13 km. In addition, the algorithm shows the ability to retrieve single-scattering albedo to within 0.03 of Aerosol Robotic Network inversion data for moderate to thick aerosol loadings (AOD of ~1.0). For typical single-layered aerosol cases, the estimated uncertainty in the retrieved height ranges from 1.20 to 1.80 km over land and from 1.15 to 1.58 km over ocean when favorable conditions are met. Larger errors are observed for multilayered aerosol events, due to the limited sensitivities of the passive sensors to such cases.

  8. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  9. What we can Learn About Aerosols from EOS-MISR Multi-Angle Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    Multiangle, multispectral remote sensing observations, such as those anticipated from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), promise to significantly improve our ability to constrain aerosol properties from space. Recent advances in modeling the Earth's climate have brought us to a point where the contributions made by aerosols to the global radiation budget noticeably affect the results. Knowledge of both aerosol optical depth and the microphysical properties of particles is needed to adequately model aerosol effects. This talk explores the ability of multiangle, multi-spectral remote sensing observations anticipated from the EOS MISR instrument, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and information about mixes of particle types, globally, at 17.6 km spatial resolution. The instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM, sun-synchronous polar orbit in 1999.

  10. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  11. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  12. Evaluation of a size-resolved aerosol model based on satellite and ground observations and its implication on aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2016-04-01

    The latest AeroCom phase II experiments have showed a large diversity in the simulations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution, vertical profile, and optical properties among 16 detailed global aerosol microphysics models, which contribute to the large uncertainty in the predicted aerosol radiative forcing and possibly induce the distinct climate change in the future. In the last few years, we have developed and improved a global size-resolved aerosol model (Yu and Luo, 2009; Ma et al., 2012; Yu et al., 2012), GEOS-Chem-APM, which is a prognostic multi-type, multi-component, size-resolved aerosol microphysics model, including state-of-the-art nucleation schemes and condensation of low volatile secondary organic compounds from successive oxidation aging. The model is one of 16 global models for AeroCom phase II and participated in a couple of model inter-comparison experiments. In this study, we employed multi-year aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 2004 to 2012 taken from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals to evaluate the performance of the GEOS-Chem-APM in predicting aerosol optical depth, including spatial distribution, reginal variation and seasonal variabilities. Compared to the observations, the modelled AOD is overall good over land, but quite low over ocean possibly due to low sea salt emission in the model and/or higher AOD in satellite retrievals, specifically MODIS and MISR. We chose 72 AERONET sites having at least 36 months data available and representative of high spatial domain to compare with the model and satellite data. Comparisons in various representative regions show that the model overall agrees well in the major anthropogenic emission regions, such as Europe, East Asia and North America. Relative to the observations, the modelled AOD is

  13. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E.; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future. PMID:22408531

  14. VIIRS Aerosol Products During the SEAC4RS Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Martins, J. V.; Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field experiment that took place during August and September 2013 offered an in depth portrait of the aerosol system over much of the continental United States. Heavily instrumented aircraft, including the NASA DC-8 sampled a wide variety of aerosol types including transported Saharan dust, both fresh and aged smoke from western wildfires, urban pollution plumes and also biogenic aerosol produced by the "green volcano" in the vegetated Ozarks. Complementing these aircraft measurements was an enhanced array of AERONET stations sprinkled across the country and also concentrated in a mesoscale array near the home base of Houston Texas. This rich collection of suborbital aerosol information permits a more comprehensive evaluation of the VIIRS aerosol product that includes validation of the products across the mesoscale and choices of case studies in which we can delve deeper into the VIIRS retrieval to test algorithm assumptions. We will compare VIIRS retrievals during SEAC4RS with MODIS retrievals, with AERONET observations and retrievals, and with measurements and retrievals from the Polar Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) that flew aboard the NASA DC-8.

  15. The role of anisotropic expansion for pulmonary acinar aerosol deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Lung deformations at the local pulmonary acinar scale are intrinsically anisotropic. Despite progress in imaging modalities, the true heterogeneous nature of acinar expansion during breathing remains controversial, where our understanding of inhaled aerosol deposition still widely emanates from studies under self-similar, isotropic wall motions. Building on recent 3D models of multi-generation acinar networks, we explore in numerical simulations how different hypothesized scenarios of anisotropic expansion influence deposition outcomes of inhaled aerosols in the acinar depths. While the broader range of particles acknowledged to reach the acinar region (dp = 0.005–5.0 μm) are largely unaffected by the details of anisotropic expansion under tidal breathing, our results suggest nevertheless that anisotropy modulates the deposition sites and fractions for a narrow band of sub-micron particles (dp ~ 0.5–0.75 μm), where the fate of aerosols is greatly intertwined with local convective flows. Our findings underscore how intrinsic aerosol motion (i.e. diffusion, sedimentation) undermines the role of anisotropic wall expansion that is often attributed in determining aerosol mixing and acinar deposition. PMID:27614613

  16. Efremovka 101.1: A Primitive CAI with Superrefractory REE Patterns and Enormous Enrichments of Sc, Zr, and Y in Fassaite and Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, A.; Zinner, E. K.; Matsunami, S.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Lin, Y.; Nazarov, M.

    1993-07-01

    A fragment (30 mg) consisting of two inclusions (101.1 and 101.2) was separated from the Efremovka (CV3) meteorite. 101.1 is an unusual Type A CAI, whereas 101.2 consists of Cr-spinel and fassaite. INAA of the whole fragment revealed 16% MgO reflecting significant contributions from 101.2. Refractory lithophile elements in the bulk fragment have CI-enrichment factors of ~14 with two times enrichment factors for Ca, Eu, and Yb. CAI 101.1 (1.6 mm) contains more than 90% gehlenitic melilite (Ak(sub)1- Ak(sub)32) in its core. It is surrounded by a 5 layer rim sequence (~40 micrometers thick) consisting of spinel -->Al- diopside + fassaite (<= 0.7% Sc2O3) -->forsterite (Fo(sub)97- Fo(sub)100) --> diopside --> forsterite. Two small complete CAIs with a two layer sequence (diopside + anorthite) are contained within the core. Numerous layered sinuous inclusions presumably rim sequence fragments also consisting of diopside + anorthite, are locally crowded in the core. The melilite core is sprinkled with fassaite, perovskite, FeNi, and OsRu-rich metal blebs. Fassaite grains (<= 30 micrometers) contain enormous concentrations in Sc (up to 12.9% Sc2O3) and Zr (up to 5.4% ZrO2). Fassaite rims around FeNi blebs are rich in V (up to 5.4% V2O3) and are zoned with decreasing Sc-, Zr-, and V-concents from the metal cores to the outer fassaite rims. Sc2O3 and ZrO2 concentrations in fassaite display a positive correlation with a correlation coeffient of 0.88. This coherent behavior is a result of a complex cation substitution involving Mg, Ti, Sc, Zr, and V. A coupled substitution is demonstrated by the excellent linear correlation between Mg^2++Ti^4+(y) and Sc^3++Zr^4++Ti^3++V^3+(x) satisfying the equation y = 0.70-0.66x and having a linear regression coefficient of 0.84. Ti^3+/Ti^tot varies between 0.27 and 1. In contrast to fassaites, perovskites are generally depleted in Sc and Zr and enriched in Y (<=1.4% Y2O3). The assemblage andradite+wollastonite+ Fe^degree/or FeNi metal was

  17. Digestibility and nitrogen retention of diets containing different levels of fibre in local (Mong Cai), F1 (Mong Cai x Yorkshire) and exotic (Landrace x Yorkshire) growing pigs in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Len, N T; Lindberg, J E; Ogle, B

    2007-08-01

    Total tract digestibility and nitrogen retention of three diets containing different levels of fibre [200, 260 and 320 g/kg neutral detergent fibre (NDF) in dry matter] were determined in three breeds of growing pig at an initial age of approximately 3.5 months. The breeds were local (Mong Cai, MC), F1 crossbred (MC x Yorkshire) and exotic (Landrace x Yorkshire, LY), allocated at random within breed (block) to double 3 x 3 Latin squares. The main fibrous ingredients of the experimental diets were rice bran, cassava residue meal and non-dehulled groundnut cake meal. Digestibility of organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), NDF, crude fibre, gross energy (GE) and ether extract (EE) decreased as the level of dietary NDF increased (p < 0.001). The r(2) values for the relationship between NDF level and digestibility of OM, CP, GE and EE were 83%, 83%, 80% and 82% respectively. On average, an increase in NDF content of 1% unit resulted in a decrease in OM, CP, GE and EE digestibility of 0.67%, 0.75%, 0.50% and 0.42% units respectively. Digestibility of energy and nutrients was the highest for MC and the lowest for LY (p < 0.01), with intermediate values for F1. There was a negative effect of NDF level on nitrogen (N) retained as a proportion of intake (p < 0.05). Nitrogen retention and utilization were significantly higher (p < 0.001) for LY than for MC and F1 pigs.

  18. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Daniel

    (RH) at a certain RH divided by sp at a dry value, was used to evaluate the aerosol hygroscopicity. Different empirical fits were evaluated using the f(RH) data. The widely used gamma model was found inappropriate, as it overestimates f(RH) for RH<75%. Abetter empirical fit with two power-law curve-fitting parameters c and k was found to replicate f(RH) accurately from the three sites. The relationship between the organic carbon mass (OMC) and the species that are affected by RH and f(RH) was also studied and categorized between the sites. A second experiment is reported where the first two elements of the scattering matrix of laboratory generated particles were studied under different humidity conditions. The non-spherical particles generated were ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium nitrate. The optical measurements were performed with a polarized imaging nephelometer (PI-Neph) installed in series with the humidifier dryer apparatus. The inorganic salts experienced low (80%) RH levels so that the observations could contrast the differences when the salts were crystallized (low RH) and when the particles turned to aqueous solutions after deliquesence (high RH). The measurements with the PI-Neph produce the aerosol phase function and the polarized phase function in a range of angles that go from 3 to 177. The results showed significant changes in the phase function and polarized phase function due to the hygroscopic growth. Although the inorganic salts used inthe experiments were non-spherical, the dry measurements were successfully reproduced with the Mie theory using literature values for the dry index of refraction. Moreover, the changes in the particle size distribution and index of refraction were evaluated through classic thermodynamic equilibrium theory producing comparable results with the simulations performed with Mie formalism. The final experiment consisted in the measurements of phase function and degree of linear polarization of ambient aerosols

  19. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks established by NASA and LOA-PHOTONS (CNRS) and is greatly expanded by collaborators from national agencies, institutes, universities, individual scientists, and partners. The program provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical, mircrophysical and radiative properties for aerosol research and characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with other databases. The network imposes standardization of instruments, calibration, processing and distribution. AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  20. Beyond MODIS: Developing an aerosol climate data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Patadia, F.; Laszlo, I.; Holz, R.

    2013-12-01

    As defined by the National Research Council, a climate data record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity to determine climate variability and change. As one of our most pressing research questions concerns changes in global direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), creating an aerosol CDR is of high importance. To reduce our uncertainties in DARF, we need uncertainty in global aerosol optical depth (AOD) reduced to ×0.02 or better, or about 10% of global mean AOD (~0.15-0.20). To quantify aerosol trends with significance, we also need a stable time series at least 20-30 years. By this Fall-2013 AGU meeting, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) has been flying on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites for 14 years and 11.5 years, respectively. During this time, we have fine-tuned the aerosol retrieval algorithms and data processing protocols, resulting in a well characterized product of aerosol optical depth (AOD). MODIS AOD has been extensively compared to ground-based sunphotometer data, showing per-retrieval expected error (EE) of ×(0.03 + 5%) over ocean, and has been generally adopted as a robust and stable environmental data record (EDR). With the 2011 launch of the Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP, we have begun a new aerosol time series. The VIIRS AOD product has stabilized to the point where, compared to ground-based AERONET sunphotometer, the VIIRS AOD is within similar EE envelope as MODIS. Thus, if VIIRS continues to perform as expected, it too can provide a robust and stable aerosol EDR. What will it take to stitch MODIS and VIIRS into a robust aerosol CDR? Based on the recent experience of MODIS 'Collection 6' development, there are many details of aerosol retrieval that each lead to ×0.01 uncertainties in global AOD. These include 'radiative transfer' assumptions such as calculations for gas absorption and sea-level Rayleigh optical depth, 'decision

  1. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, A. R.; Gupta, P.; Zavodsky, B.; McGrath, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  2. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  3. Towards Improved MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over the US East Coast Region: Re-examining the Aerosol Model and Surface Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Holben, B. N.

    2002-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and recently the Aqua platform, produces a set of aerosol products over both ocean and land regions. Previous validation efforts have shown that from a global perspective, aerosol optical depth (AOD) is successfully retrieved from MODIS. Even over coastal regions, the over- land and over-ocean retrievals are consistent with each other, and well matched with ground-based sunphotometer measurements (such as AERONET). However, the East Coast of the United States is one region where there is consistently a discrepancy between land and ocean retrievals. Over the ocean, MODIS AODs are consistent with coastal sunphotometer measurements, but over land, AODs are consistently over- estimated. In this study we use field data from the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites experiment (CLAMS), (held during summer 2001) to determine the aerosol properties at a number of sites. Using the 6-S radiative transfer package, we compute simulated satellite radiances and compare them with observed MODIS radiances. We believe that the AOD over-estimation is not likely due to an incorrect choice of the urban/industrial aerosol models. Using 6-S to do an atmospheric correction for a very low AOD case, we show rather, that the discrepancies are likely a result of incorrect assumptions about the surface reflectance properties. Understanding and improving MODIS retrievals over the East Coast will not only improve the global quality of MODIS, but also would enable the use of MODIS as a tool for monitoring regional aerosol events.

  4. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  5. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere.

  6. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  7. Remote Sensing of Aerosol and Non-Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B. N.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol from the new satellite instruments (e.g. MODIS from Terra) and ground based radiometers (e.g. the AERONET) provides the opportunity to measure the absorption characteristics of the ambient undisturbed aerosol in the entire atmospheric column. For example Landsat and AERONET data are used to measure spectral absorption of sunlight by dust from West Africa. Both Application of the Landsat and AERONET data demonstrate that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is several times smaller than the current international standards. This is due to difficulties of measuring dust absorption in situ, and due to the often contamination of dust properties by the presence of air pollution or smoke. We use the remotely sensed aerosol absorption properties described by the spectral sin le scattering albedo, together with statistics of the monthly optical thickness for the fine and coarse aerosol derived from the MODIS data. The result is an estimate of the flux of solar radiation absorbed by the aerosol layer in different regions around the globe where aerosol is prevalent. If this aerosol forcing through absorption is not included in global circulation models, it may be interpreted as anomalous absorption in these regions. In a preliminary exercise we also use the absorption measurements by AERONET, to derive the non-aerosol absorption of the atmosphere in cloud free conditions. The results are obtained for the atmospheric windows: 0.44 microns, 0.66 microns, 0.86 microns and 1.05 microns. In all the locations over the land and ocean that were tested no anomalous absorption in these wavelengths, was found within absorption optical thickness of +/- 0.005.

  8. Aerosol Climate Time Series Evaluation In ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Pinnock, S.

    2015-12-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. By the end of 2015 full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which are also validated. The paper will summarize and discuss the results of major reprocessing and validation conducted in 2015. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension with successor instruments of the Sentinel family will be described and the complementarity of the different satellite aerosol products

  9. Biomass Burning Aerosol Absorption Measurements with MODIS Using the Critical Reflectance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Li; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    This research uses the critical reflectance technique, a space-based remote sensing method, to measure the spatial distribution of aerosol absorption properties over land. Choosing two regions dominated by biomass burning aerosols, a series of sensitivity studies were undertaken to analyze the potential limitations of this method for the type of aerosol to be encountered in the selected study areas, and to show that the retrieved results are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the assumptions used in the retrieval of smoke aerosol. The critical reflectance technique is then applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to retrieve the spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) in South African and South American 35 biomass burning events. The retrieved results were validated with collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. One standard deviation of mean MODIS retrievals match AERONET products to within 0.03, the magnitude of the AERONET uncertainty. The overlap of the two retrievals increases to 88%, allowing for measurement variance in the MODIS retrievals as well. The ensemble average of MODIS-derived SSA for the Amazon forest station is 0.92 at 670 nm, and 0.84-0.89 for the southern African savanna stations. The critical reflectance technique allows evaluation of the spatial variability of SSA, and shows that SSA in South America exhibits higher spatial variation than in South Africa. The accuracy of the retrieved aerosol SSA from MODIS data indicates that this product can help to better understand 44 how aerosols affect the regional and global climate.

  10. Observationally-constrained estimates of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over East Asia via data assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Not only aerosol's direct effect on climate by scattering and absorbing the incident solar radiation, but also they indirectly perturbs the radiation budget by influencing microphysics and dynamics of clouds. Aerosols also have a significant adverse impact on human health. With an importance of aerosols in climate, considerable research efforts have been made to quantify the amount of aerosols in the form of the aerosol optical depth (AOD). AOD is provided with ground-based aerosol networks such as the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), and is derived from satellite measurements. However, these observational datasets have a limited areal and temporal coverage. To compensate for the data gaps, there have been several studies to provide AOD without data gaps by assimilating observational data and model outputs. In this study, AODs over East Asia simulated with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) observation are interpolated via different data assimilation (DA) techniques such as Cressman's method, Optimal Interpolation (OI), and Kriging for the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March - May 2012). Here, the interpolated results using the three DA techniques are validated intensively by comparing with AERONET AODs to examine the optimal DA method providing the most reliable AODs over East Asia.

  11. Aerosol patterns and aerosol-cloud-interactions off the West African Coast based on the A-train formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Bendix, Jörg; Cermak, Jan

    2013-04-01

    In this study, spatial and temporal aerosol patterns off the Western African coast are characterized and related to cloud properties, based on satellite data Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in atmospheric processes and influence our environmental system in a complex way. Their identification, characterization, transport patterns as well as their interactions with clouds pose major challenges. Especially the last aspect reveals major uncertainties in terms of the Earth's radiation budget as reported in the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC, 2007). Western and Southern Africa are dominated by two well-known source types of atmospheric aerosols. First, the Saharan Desert is the world's largest aeolian dust emitting source region. Second, biomass burning aerosol is commonly transported off-shore further south (Kaufman et al., 2005). Both aerosol types influence Earth's climate in different manners and can be detected by the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor onboard the EOS platforms as they propagate to the Central and Southern Atlantic. The motivation of this study was to reveal the seasonal pattern of the Saharan dust transport based on an observation period of 11 years and trying to explain the meteorological mechanisms. North African dust plumes are transported along a latitude of 19°N in July and 6°N in January. The seasonally fluctuating intensities adapt to the annual cycle of wind and precipitation regimes. A strong relationship is found between the spatial shift of the Azores High and the Saharan dust load over the middle Atlantic Ocean. Monthly Aerosol Optical Thickness products of Terra MODIS and NCEP-DOE (National Centers for Environmental Predictions) Reanalysis II data are used for this purpose. The relationship between aerosol and cloud droplet parameters is blurred by high sensitivities to aerosol size and composition (Feingold, 2003; McFiggans et al., 2006) as well as meteorological context (Ackerman et al., 2004

  12. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013–2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occur