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Sample records for aerosol iron solubility

  1. On determining the fractional solubility of aerosol iron in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Islas, A. M.; Mehalek, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of iron to the surface ocean. The fraction of aerosol iron that partitions into the dissolved phase after deposition is considered available to biota, and as such it is an important parameter for the marine biogeochemical cycle of iron and the global carbon cycle. Yet, the fractional solubility of aerosol iron remains poorly constrained (<0.1% to 90%), and the relative importance of the different factors controlling the extent of dissolution has not been determined. Here we present results from onboard dissolution experiments conducted during the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic section cruises. Our results suggest that time-dependent dissolution processes are important, and that aerosol provenance rather than the leaching protocol employed is a key parameter in determining the fractional solubility of aerosol iron. The physicochemical speciation of aerosol iron after dissolution will also be discussed.

  2. Dry season aerosol iron solubility in tropical northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, V. Holly L.; Edwards, Ross; Bowie, Andrew R.; Keywood, Melita; Williams, Alistair G.; Chambers, Scott D.; Selleck, Paul W.; Desservettaz, Maximilien; Mallet, Marc D.; Paton-Walsh, Clare

    2016-10-01

    Marine nitrogen fixation is co-limited by the supply of iron (Fe) and phosphorus in large regions of the global ocean. The deposition of soluble aerosol Fe can initiate nitrogen fixation and trigger toxic algal blooms in nitrate-poor tropical waters. We present dry season soluble Fe data from the Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season (SAFIRED) campaign in northern Australia that reflects coincident dust and biomass burning sources of soluble aerosol Fe. The mean soluble and total aerosol Fe concentrations were 40 and 500 ng m-3 respectively. Our results show that while biomass burning species may not be a direct source of soluble Fe, biomass burning may substantially enhance the solubility of mineral dust. We observed fractional Fe solubility up to 12 % in mixed aerosols. Thus, Fe in dust may be more soluble in the tropics compared to higher latitudes due to higher concentrations of biomass-burning-derived reactive organic species in the atmosphere. In addition, biomass-burning-derived particles can act as a surface for aerosol Fe to bind during atmospheric transport and subsequently be released to the ocean upon deposition. As the aerosol loading is dominated by biomass burning emissions over the tropical waters in the dry season, additions of biomass-burning-derived soluble Fe could have harmful consequences for initiating nitrogen-fixing toxic algal blooms. Future research is required to quantify biomass-burning-derived particle sources of soluble Fe over tropical waters.

  3. Fractional solubility of aerosol iron: Synthesis of a global-scale data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholkovitz, Edward R.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Church, Thomas M.; Baker, Alexander R.; Powell, Claire F.

    2012-07-01

    Aerosol deposition provides a major input of the essential micronutrient iron to the open ocean. A critical parameter with respect to biological availability is the proportion of aerosol iron that enters the oceanic dissolved iron pool - the so-called fractional solubility of aerosol iron (%FeS). Here we present a global-scale compilation of total aerosol iron loading (FeT) and estimated %FeS values for ∼1100 samples collected over the open ocean, the coastal ocean, and some continental sites, including a new data set from the Atlantic Ocean. Despite the wide variety of methods that have been used to define 'soluble' aerosol iron, our global-scale compilation reveals a remarkably consistent trend in the fractional solubility of aerosol iron as a function of total aerosol iron loading, with the great bulk of the data defining an hyperbolic trend. The hyperbolic trends that we observe for both global- and regional-scale data are adequately described by a simple two-component mixing model, whereby the fractional solubility of iron in the bulk aerosol reflects the conservative mixing of 'lithogenic' mineral dust (high FeT and low %FeS) and non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols (low FeT and high %FeS). An increasing body of empirical and model-based evidence points to anthropogenic fuel combustion as the major source of these non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols, implying that human emissions are a major determinant of the fractional solubility of iron in marine aerosols. The robust global-scale relationship between %FeS and FeT provides a simple heuristic method for estimating aerosol iron solubility at the regional to global scale.

  4. Speciation and water soluble fraction of iron in aerosols from various sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kurisu, M.; Uematsu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient and has been identified as a limiting factor for phytoplankton growth in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean. In the North Pacific, three sources of iron (Fe) transported via. atmosphere can be suggested: (i) mineral dust from East Asia, (ii) anthropogenic Fe, and (iii) aerosols from volcanic origin. Considering these different sources, Fe can be found and transported in a variety of chemical forms, both water-soluble and -insoluble. It is generally believed that only the soluble fraction of Fe can be considered as bioavailable for phytoplankton. To assess the biogeochemical impact of the atmospheric input, attempt was made to determine Fe species by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and its water solubility, in particular to compare the three sources. Iron species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentration in aerosol collected at Tsukuba (Japan) through a year were investigated to compare the contributions of mineral dust and anthropogenic components. It was found that the concentration of soluble Fe in aerosol is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate which originate from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. XAS analysis showed that main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba were illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, soluble Fe fraction is closely correlated with that of Fe(III) sulfate. In spite of supply of high concentrations of Fe in mineral dust from East Asia, it was found that anthropogenic fraction is important due to its high water solubility by the presence of Fe(III) sulfate. Marine aerosol samples originated from volcanic ash were collected in the western North Pacific during KH-08-2 cruise (August, 2008). XAS analysis suggested that Fe species of volcanic ashes changed during the long-range transport, while dissolution experiment showed that Fe solubility of the marine aerosol is larger than

  5. The Effect of Particle Size on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, A. R.; Majestic, B. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    The long range transport of mineral dust aerosols, which contain approximately 3% iron by mass, results in an estimated 14-16 Tg of iron deposited into the oceans annually; however, only a small percentage of the deposited iron is soluble. In high-nutrient, low chlorophyll ocean regions iron solubility may limit phytoplankton primary productivity. Although the atmospheric transport processes of mineral dust aerosols have been well studied, the role of particle size has been given little attention. In this work, the effect of particle size on iron solubility in atmospheric aerosols is examined. Iron-containing minerals (illite, kaolinite, magnetite, goethite, red hematite, black hematite, and quartz) were separated into five size fractions (10-2.5, 2.5-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and <0.25μm) and extracted into buffer solutions simulating environments in the transport of aerosol particles for 150 minutes. Particle size was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Soluble iron content of the extracted mineral solutions was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Extracted mineral solutions were also analyzed for Fe(II) and Fe(III) content using a ferrozine/UV-VIS method. Preliminary results show that differences in solution composition are more important than differences in size. When extracted into acetate and cloudwater buffers (pH 4.25-4.3), < 0.3% of the Fe in iron oxides (hematite, magnetite, and goethite) is transferred to solution as compared to ~0.1-35% for clays (kaolinite and illite). When extracted into a marine aerosol solution (pH 1.7), the percentage of Fe of the iron oxides and clays transferred to solution increases to approximately 0.5-3% and 5-70%, respectively. However, there is a trend of increased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the largest and smallest size fractions (~0.01-0.3% and ~0.5-35% for iron oxides and clays, respectively), and decreased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the mid

  6. Estimation of iron solubility from observations and a global aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N. M.; Meskhidze, N.; Chen, Y.; Siefert, R. L.; Baker, A. R.; Johansen, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    Mineral aerosol deposition is the dominant source of iron to the open ocean. Soil iron is typically insoluble and understanding the atmospheric processes that convert insoluble iron to the more soluble forms observed over the oceans is crucial. In this paper, we model several proposed processes for the conversion of Fe(III) to Fe(II), and compare with cruise observations. The comparisons show that the model results in similar averaged magnitudes of iron solubility as measured during 8 cruises in 2001-2003. Comparisons show that results of cases including cloud, SO2 and hematite processing are better than the other approaches used using the reaction rates we assume in this paper; unfortunately the reaction rates are not well known, and this hampers our ability to conclusive show one process is more likely than another. The total soluble iron deposited to the global ocean is estimated by the model to range from 0.36 to 1.6 Tg y-1, with 0.88 Tg y-1 being the mean estimate; however there are large uncertainties in these estimates. Comparison shows that the regions with largest differences between the model simulations and observations of iron solubility are in the Southern Atlantic near South America coast and North Atlantic near Spain coast. More observations in these areas or in the South Pacific will help us identify the most important processes. Additionally, laboratory experiments that constrain the reaction rates of different compounds that will result in a net solubilization of iron in aerosols are required to better constrain iron processing in the atmosphere. Additionally, knowing what forms of iron are most bioavailable will assist atmospheric scientists in providing better budgets of iron deposited to the ocean surfaces.

  7. Influence of measurement uncertainties on fractional solubility of iron in mineral aerosols over the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Johnson, Matthew S.; Hurley, David; Dawson, Kyle

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric supply of mineral dust iron (Fe) plays a crucial role in the Earth's biogeochemical cycle and is of specific importance as a micronutrient in the marine environment. Observations show several orders of magnitude variability in the fractional solubility of Fe in mineral dust aerosols, making it hard to assess the role of mineral dust in the global ocean biogeochemical Fe cycle. In this study we compare the operational solubility of mineral dust aerosol Fe associated with the flow-through leaching protocol to the results of the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. According to the protocol, aerosol Fe is defined as soluble by first deionized water leaching of mineral dust through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane followed by acidification and storage of the leachate over a long period of time prior to analysis. To estimate the uncertainty in soluble Fe results introduced by the flow-through leaching protocol, we prescribe an average 50% (range of 30-70%) fractional solubility to sub-0.45 μm sized mineral dust particles that may inadvertently pass the filter and end up in the acidified (at pH ∼ 1.7) leachate for a couple of month period. In the model, the fractional solubility of Fe is either explicitly calculated using a complex mineral aerosol Fe dissolution equations, or prescribed to be 1% and 4% often used by global ocean biogeochemical Fe cycle models to reproduce the broad characteristics of the presently observed ocean dissolved iron distribution. Calculations show that the fractional solubility of Fe derived through the flow-through leaching is higher compared to the model results. The largest differences (∼40%) are predicted to occur farther away from the dust source regions, over the areas where sub-0.45 μm sized mineral dust particles contribute a larger fraction of the total mineral dust mass. This study suggests that different methods used in soluble Fe measurements and inconsistences in the operational definition of

  8. Influence of measurement uncertainties on soluble aerosol iron over the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, N.; Johnson, M. S.; Hurley, D.; Dawson, K.

    2015-09-01

    The atmospheric supply of dust iron (Fe) plays a crucial role in the Earth's biogeochemical cycle and is of specific importance as a micronutrient in the marine environment. Observations show several orders of magnitude variability in the fractional solubility of Fe in dust aerosols, making it hard to assess the role of mineral dust for global ocean biogeochemical Fe cycle. In this study we compare the operational solubility of dust aerosol Fe associated with one of the flow-through leaching protocols to the results of the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. In the protocol aerosol Fe is defined soluble by first deionized water leaching of mineral dust through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane followed by acidification and storage of the leachate over a long period of time prior to the analysis. To assess the concentrations of soluble Fe inferred by this flow-through leaching protocol we are using in situ measurements of dust size distribution with the prescribed of 50 % fractional solubility of Fe in less than 0.45 μm sized dust particles collected in the leachate. In the model, the fractional solubility of Fe is either explicitly calculated using complex dust Fe dissolution module, or prescribed to be 1 and 4 %. Calculations show that the fractional solubility of Fe derived through the flow-through leaching is typically higher compared to the model results. The largest differences (>30 %) are predicted to occur farther away from the dust source regions, over the areas where sub-0.45 μm sized mineral dust particles contribute a larger fraction of the total dust mass. This study suggests that inconsistences in the operational definition of soluble Fe could contribute to the wide range of the fractional solubility of dust aerosol Fe reported in the literature.

  9. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Conway, T.M.; Wolff, E.W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial–interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1–42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01–0.84 mg m−2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply. PMID:26204562

  10. The impact of particle size, relative humidity, and sulfur dioxide on iron solubility in simulated atmospheric marine aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cartledge, Benton T; Marcotte, Aurelie R; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Majestic, Brian J

    2015-06-16

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in about half of the world's oceans, and its most significant source is atmospheric deposition. To understand the pathways of iron solubilization during atmospheric transport, we exposed size segregated simulated marine aerosols to 5 ppm sulfur dioxide at arid (23 ± 1% relative humidity, RH) and marine (98 ± 1% RH) conditions. Relative iron solubility increased as the particle size decreased for goethite and hematite, while for magnetite, the relative solubility was similar for all of the fine size fractions (2.5-0.25 μm) investigated but higher than the coarse size fraction (10-2.5 μm). Goethite and hematite showed increased solubility at arid RH, but no difference (p > 0.05) was observed between the two humidity levels for magnetite. There was no correlation between iron solubility and exposure to SO2 in any mineral for any size fraction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements showed no change in iron speciation [Fe(II) and Fe(III)] in any minerals following SO2 exposure. SEM-EDS measurements of SO2-exposed goethite revealed small amounts of sulfur uptake on the samples; however, the incorporated sulfur did not affect iron solubility. Our results show that although sulfur is incorporated into particles via gas-phase processes, changes in iron solubility also depend on other species in the aerosol.

  11. Aerosol iron and aluminum solubility in the northwest Pacific Ocean: Results from the 2002 IOC cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Clifton S.; Landing, William M.; Resing, Joseph A.; Lebon, Geoffrey T.

    2006-04-01

    Dust aerosol samples were collected across the western North Pacific Ocean during May-June 2002. Samples were analyzed for soluble aerosol Fe(II), Fe(II) + Fe(III), and Al as well as major cations and anions. The aerosol samples were leached using a 10 second exposure to either filtered surface seawater or ultrapure deionized water yielding a measure of the "instantaneous" soluble fraction. A variety of analytical methods were employed, including 57Fe isotope dilution high-resolution ICP-MS, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, graphite furnace AAS, ion chromatography, and the FeLume chemiluminescent technique. Fe was found to be more soluble in ultrapure deionized water leaches, especially during periods of higher dust concentrations. Fe solubility averaged 9 ± 8% in ultrapure water leaches and 6 ± 5% in seawater leaches. Significant correlations were found between both soluble aerosol FeT and soluble Fe(II) concentrations and aerosol acidity; however, the percentages of soluble aerosol FeT and Fe(II) did not correlate with aerosol acidity We also did not observe significant correlations between total and soluble aerosol Fe concentrations and the concentrations of either particulate Fe or dissolved Fe in surface waters.

  12. Trends in the solubility of iron in dust-dominated aerosols in the equatorial Atlantic trade winds: Importance of iron speciation and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, John Michael; Millero, Frank J.; Prospero, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the solubility of Fe(II) and Fe(III) extracted from bulk and size-fractionated African dust collected in summer trade winds at Barbados, West Indies. Iron solubilities typically ranged from 1% to 3%. Fe(III) dominates the iron solubility over the entire range of particle sizes. At mineral dust concentrations below about 5 ug/m3 Fe(II), believed to be largely derived from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources, becomes increasingly important. Samples containing large soluble iron fractions and high Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios are associated with South Atlantic back trajectories; the gray coloration of the filters suggests that the source may be biomass burning in southern Africa. In general, much of the variability in Fe solubility is linked to Fe(II) concentration changes. Vanadium is often used as a tracer of anthropogenic impacts. Although many of our samples yielded V/Ti ratios much greater than average crustal abundances, we could find no relationship between the enrichment of V and Fe solubility. Our Fe solubility results are quite similar to those obtained by others despite the fact that the measurements were made in diverse ocean regions and the protocols used were quite different in all cases. This uniformity implies that the factors controlling aerosol iron solubility are largely inherent in the properties of the aerosols themselves and not the procedures used to extract the iron. Our results suggest that dust transport models that focus on the role of iron in ocean biogeochemistry must take into account aerosol origin in order to better model the solubility of iron.

  13. Characterization of soluble iron in urban aerosols using near-real time data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Michelle; Rastogi, Neeraj; Majestic, Brian J.; Shafer, Martin; Schauer, James J.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the first near-real time (12 min) measurements of fine particle (PM2.5) water soluble ferrous iron (WS_Fe(II)) measured in two urban settings: Dearborn Michigan, and Atlanta, Georgia. A new approach was used to measure WS_Fe(II) involving a Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) coupled to a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and UV/VIS spectrometer. We found no clear diurnal trends in WS_Fe(II) at any urban site studied. High temporal variability, however, was observed at all urban sites, where concentrations often changed from the method limit of detection (4.6 ng m-3) to approximately 300 to 400 ng m-3, lasting only a few hours. These transient events predominately occurred during times of low wind speeds and appeared to be from local sources or processes. In Atlanta, several WS_Fe(II) events were associated with sulfate plumes, and highest WS_Fe(II) concentrations were found in plumes of highest apparent aerosol acidity. At all locations studied, WS_Fe(II) was poorly correlated (R2 < 0.34) with light-absorbing aerosol, indicating no direct linkage between mobile source emissions and enhanced WS_Fe(II) concentrations. WS_Fe(II) measured within a prescribed forest-burn was strongly correlated with water soluble potassium (R2 = 0.88; WS_Fe(II)/WS_K = 15 mg/g), pointing to biomass burning as a source of WS_Fe(II); however, peak concentrations within the fire were low compared to transient events observed at the urban sites. Overall, WS_Fe(II) temporal trends for these urban sites consisted of low background concentrations with periodic short duration transient events that appear to be linked to unique industrial emissions or atmospheric processing of industrial emissions that form WS_Fe(II).

  14. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M.; Shelley, Rachel U.; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D.

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.

  15. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    DOE PAGES

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation statemore » became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.« less

  16. The Solubility of Aerosol Iron and Aluminum in the Pacific Ocean: Results From the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. S.; Landing, W. M.; Resing, J.; Lebon, G. T.

    2006-12-01

    Daily (24-hour integrated) aerosol samples were collected as part of the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean during the 2004 P02 cruise (Japan to Sand Diego), the 2005 P16S (Tahiti to New Zealand), and the 2006 P16N (Tahiti to Alaska). The goal of this research was to measure the solubility of Fe, Al, and other trace elements in aerosols collected over the open ocean. Dust was collected on polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) and polypropylene filters in both bulk and size fractionated samples using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor (MOUDI). The filters were quickly leached with 100 mL of either freshly collected 0.2 μm filtered surface seawater at natural pH or 100 mL of unacidified ultrapure water (pH 5.6) providing measurements of the amount of Fe that is instantly soluble upon aerosol dry deposition to the surface ocean and scavenging by rain drops. Previous work has shown good agreement of dissolved Fe concentrations between aerosol samples leached with seawater and ultrapure water. Seawater filtrates were analyzed for soluble Fe(II) using the FeLume chemiluminescent method. The ultrapure water filtrate samples were frozen until analysis at FSU for major anions using ion chromatography and a suite of 46 elements by ICP-MS. The PCTE filters were analyzed for total Fe (and other elements) using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence at the NOAA/PMEL laboratory. Results from P02 show a range of Fe concentrations over three orders of magnitude, 1 - 900 pmol/m3, with an average Fe solubility of 11%. Fe concentrations in the South Pacific were lower, ranging from below the detection limit to 17 pmol/m3 with an average solubility of 8%. Samples collected over the North Pacific showed higher Fe concentrations, ranging from 2 - 350 pmol/m3.

  17. Soluble ferrous iron (Fe (II)) enrichment in airborne dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, Abinash; Reche, Isabel; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The input of soluble iron in dust delivered to the ocean and lakes is critical to their biogeochemistry and phytoplankton productivity. Most iron in soils and sediment deposits is insoluble, while only a tiny fraction is soluble and therefore suitable to meet the phytoplankton's requirements for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. Aerosol deposition constitutes a major source of soluble iron to oceans and lakes, and in some regions the low phytoplankton productivity has been related to limitations in the supply of soluble iron from terrestrial sources. It is suggested that during atmospheric transport part of the insoluble iron is converted into soluble form. While the understanding of increased bioavailability of iron during atmospheric transport is improving, there are only a limited number of studies that actually quantify the increase in iron bioavailability in dust. In this study we compare the soluble ferrous iron, Fe (II) content in dust collected at deposition sites in the high-altitude mountains of the Sierra Nevada, Spain, to the source of dust in North Africa. We found that the dust is greatly enriched (on average 15 times) in Fe (II) relative to the fine fraction (<45 µm) of the parent soil collected from North African dust sources.

  18. Iron solubility driven by speciation in dust sources to the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, A.W.; Crusius, J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Bostick, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Although abundant in the Earths crust, iron is present at trace concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in approximately 40% of the ocean. Current literature suggests that aerosols are the primary external source of iron to offshore waters, yet controls on iron aerosol solubility remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that iron speciation (oxidation state and bonding environment) drives iron solubility in arid region soils, glacial weathering products (flour) and oil combustion products (oil fly ash). Iron speciation varies by aerosol source, with soils in arid regions dominated by ferric (oxy)hydroxides, glacial flour by primary and secondary ferrous silicates and oil fly ash by ferric sulphate salts. Variation in iron speciation produces systematic differences in iron solubility: less than 1% of the iron in arid soils was soluble, compared with 2-3% in glacial products and 77-81% in oil combustion products, which is directly linked to fractions of more soluble phases. We conclude that spatial and temporal variations in aerosol iron speciation, driven by the distribution of deserts, glaciers and fossil-fuel combustion, could have a pronounced effect on aerosol iron solubility and therefore on biological productivity and the carbon cycle in the ocean. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  19. Impact of Air Pollution on Mineral Aerosol Deposition, Soluble Fe Flux and Ocean Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, H.

    2006-12-01

    We find that a two-step mechanism (sulfate and nitrate coating followed by hematite dissolution) is necessary to reproduce observations of mineral aerosol iron solubility that range from less than 1% over desert source regions to frequently more than 10% in the remote Pacific and Atlantic. This mechanism was implemented in a global atmospheric model of dust entrainment, transport, dissolution, and deposition that simulates a realistic distribution of mineral aerosol. Model simulations with pre-industrial and present levels of pollution are presented. Analysis shows that, while atmospheric pollution results in a slight decrease in mineral aerosol lifetime and lower dust concentrations over the remote oceans, it also appreciably increases the rate of hematite dissolution in the dust that remains airborne and results in a significant increase in the percent solubility of deposited iron. The net result of anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx is increased oceanic deposition of soluble iron, particularly to the Northern Hemisphere oceans. These new soluble iron deposition fields are then used as input to an ocean biogeochemistry model. We first compare results from two complex ocean biogeochemistry model simulations using: 1. Fe fluxes based on previous global model approaches of constant solubility; 2. Fe fluxes of variable iron solubility from this study. We then examine the implications of the pollution driven increases in iron deposition to ocean ecosystems and to iron cycling in the surface ocean, particularly in the Subarctic and Equatorial Pacific where primary productivity is known to be stressed by low iron availability.

  20. Sources, solubility, and acid processing of aerosol iron and phosphorous over the South China Sea: East Asian dust and pollution outflows vs. Southeast Asian biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.-C.; Gong, G.-C.; Shiah, F.-K.; Hung, C.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Zhang, R.; Chen, W.-N.; Chen, C.-C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Lin, F.-J.; Lin, S.-H.

    2014-08-01

    Iron and phosphorous are essential to marine microorganisms in vast regions in oceans worldwide. Atmospheric inputs are important allochthonous sources of Fe and P. The variability in airborne Fe deposition is hypothesized to serve an important function in previous glacial-interglacial cycles, contributing to the variability in atmospheric CO2 and ultimately the climate. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the mobilization of airborne Fe and P from insoluble to soluble forms is critical to evaluate the biogeochemical effects of these elements. In this study, we present a robust power-law correlation between fractional Fe solubility and non-sea-salt-sulfate / Total-Fe (nss-sulfate / FeT) molar ratio independent of distinct sources of airborne Fe of natural and/or anthropogenic origins over the South China Sea. This area receives Asian dust and pollution outflows and Southeast Asian biomass burning. This correlation is also valid for nitrate and total acids, demonstrating the significance of acid processing in enhancing Fe mobilization. Such correlations are also found for P, yet source dependent. These relationships serve as straightforward parameters that can be directly incorporated into available atmosphere-ocean coupling models that facilitate the assessment of Fe and P fertilization effects. Although biomass burning activity may supply Fe to the bioavailable Fe pool, pyrogenic soils are possibly the main contributors, not the burned plants. This finding warrants a multidisciplinary investigation that integrates atmospheric observations with the resulting biogeochemistry in the South China Sea, which is influenced by atmospheric forcings and nutrient dynamics with monsoons.

  1. Photoreduction of iron(III) in marine mineral aerosol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaorong; Prospero, Joseph M.; Savoie, Dennis L.; Millero, Frank J.; Zika, Rod G.; Saltzman, Eric S.

    1993-05-01

    Although there have been a number of studies of the solubility of Fe in marine mineral aerosols, there have been few studies of the oxidation states of the soluble iron fraction and of the factors that affect the solubility of iron in aerosol solutions. In this paper we present measurements of the concentrations of total Fe (including particulate), total soluble Fe and total soluble Fe(II) in marine aerosol particles. Only 1% of the total Fe and 7.5% of the soluble Fe was in the Fe(II) form. Photolysis experiments were performed with solutions extracted from aerosol filter samples and with solutions of Fe(III) in acidic sodium chloride. In both systems, Fe(II) concentrations increased rapidly when the solutions were exposed to sunlight and they attained steady state within an hour. However, in all cases Fe(II) is only a minor component even when conditions are favorable for photolysis. Fe(II) formation is hindered at the low pH that is believed to be characteristic of marine aerosol solutions. Solutions with added oxalate yielded greatly increased concentrations of Fe(II); this is probably related to the fact that Fe(III) oxalate complexes have strong ligand to metal charge transfer bands in the tropospheric solar UV-visible region. However, the presence of oxalate also leads to the formation of H2O2; when the radiation level decreased, the Fe(II) was partially or totally oxidized back to Fe(III) due to reactions with H2O2. The photoreduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) did not appear to significantly increase the dissolution of Fe(III) from the dust mineral matrix.

  2. Aerosol Iron/Phytoplankton Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-16

    effect on the photocycling of able and particulate iron in the euphotic zone at iron. The TRFe levels in carboys to which catalase O0N, 140’W that...experiments without catalase (Figs. 4 filter averaged 0.05 nM in the upper 100 m and and 5). The effects of adding catalase to a carboy particulate iron... Effects on dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulphoniopropionate production. Nightingale, P. D., Turner, S. M. Malin, G. and L1ss, P. S. Iron

  3. Influence of Slightly Soluble Organics on Aerosol Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Ghan, Steven J.

    2005-03-22

    This paper examines the effects of slightly soluble organics on aerosol activation in a parcel of air rising adiabatically. Slightly soluble organics can affect aerosol activation by three mechanisms: lowering surface tension, altering the bulk hygroscopicity, and delaying the growth of particles due to their lower solubilities. Here, we address the third mechanism by simulating the activation process of aerosol particles modeled using a single lognormal size distribution and consisting of an internal uniform chemical mixture of adipic acid (representing slightly soluble organics having extremely low solubility) and ammonium sulfate. The simulations were carried out using measured solubility of adipic acid spanning a wide range of physical and dynamical parameters. The same conditions were re-simulated but assuming fully soluble aerosols. Results of the simulations show that although that the low solubility of the adipic acid alters Köhler curves and increases critical supersaturation of the smaller particles (Köhler curves of the larger particles are not effected since these particles are completely dissolved at the initial supersaturation of zero), it has minimal to no effect on the parcel’s supersaturation except for particles consisting of more than 95% adipic acid. Accordingly, since aerosols in realistic atmospheric conditions do not contain more than 90% organics, we conclude that it is not necessary to retune the parameterization of aerosol activation previously developed and modified to address the other two mechanisms. The slightly soluble organics can thus be assumed to be fully soluble for the purpose of predicting the fraction of activation and the maximum supersaturation with negligible error.

  4. CCN activation of fumed silica aerosols mixed with soluble pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalirian, M.; Keskinen, H.; Ahlm, L.; Ylisirniö, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Virtanen, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2015-04-01

    Particle-water interactions of completely soluble or insoluble particles are fairly well understood but less is known of aerosols consisting of mixtures of soluble and insoluble components. In this study, laboratory measurements were performed to investigate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of silica particles mixed with ammonium sulfate (a salt), sucrose (a sugar) and bovine serum albumin known as BSA (a protein). The agglomerated structure of the silica particles was investigated using measurements with a differential mobility analyser (DMA) and an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM). Based on these data, the particles were assumed to be compact agglomerates when studying their CCN activation capabilities. Furthermore, the critical supersaturations of particles consisting of pure and mixed soluble and insoluble compounds were explored using existing theoretical frameworks. These results showed that the CCN activation of single-component particles was in good agreement with Köhler- and adsorption theory based models when the agglomerated structure was accounted for. For mixed particles the CCN activation was governed by the soluble components, and the soluble fraction varied considerably with particle size for our wet-generated aerosols. Our results confirm the hypothesis that knowing the soluble fraction is the key parameter needed for describing the CCN activation of mixed aerosols, and highlight the importance of controlled coating techniques for acquiring a detailed understanding of the CCN activation of atmospheric insoluble particles mixed with soluble pollutants.

  5. Improving the Representation of Soluble Iron in Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos

    2016-03-13

    Mineral dust produced in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world is the dominant source of iron (Fe) in atmospheric aerosol inputs to the open ocean. The bioavailable Fe fraction of atmospheric dust is thought to regulate and occasionally limit the primary productivity in large oceanic regions, which influences the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere affecting the Earth’s climate. Because Fe bioavailability cannot be directly measured, it is assumed that the dissolved Fe or highly reactive Fe in the dust is bioavailable. The fraction of soluble Fe in dust is mainly controlled by: (1) the mineral composition of the soils and the emitted dust from the source areas; (2) the atmospheric processing that converts the Fe in Fe-bearing minerals into highly soluble forms of Fe. The project has mainly focused on constraining the mineral composition of dust aerosols (1), a previously neglected, yet a key issue to constrain the deposition of soluble iron. Deriving aerosol mineral composition requires global knowledge of the soil mineral content, which is available from poorly constrained global atlases. In addition, the mineral content of the emitted aerosol differs from that of the parent soil. Measurements of soil mineral fractions are based upon wet sedimentation (or ’wet sieving’) techniques that disturb the soil sample, breaking aggregates that are found in the original, undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. Wet sieving alters the soil size distribution, replacing aggregates that are potentially mobilized as aerosols with a collection of smaller particles. A major challenge is to derive the size-distributed mineral fractions of the emitted dust based upon their fractions measured from wet-sieved soils. Finally, representations of dust mineral composition need to account for mixtures of minerals. Examination of individual particles shows that iron, an element that is central to many climate processes, is often found as trace impurities of iron oxide

  6. Solubility of iron and other trace elements over the Southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A.; Losno, R.; Triquet, S.

    2013-03-01

    The fraction of soluble aerosols that is deposited on the open ocean is vital for phytoplankton growth. It is believed that a large proportion of this dissolved fraction is bioavailable for marine biota and thus plays an important role in primary production, especially in HNLC oceanic areas where this production is limited by micronutrient supply. There is still much uncertainty surrounding the solubility of atmospheric particles in global biogeochemical cycles and it is not well understood. In this study, we present the solubilities of seven elements (Al, Ce, Fe, La, Mn, Nd, Ti) in rainwater on Kerguelen Islands, in the middle of the Southern Indian Ocean. The solubilities exhibit high values, generally greater than 70%, and Ti remains the least soluble element. Because the Southern Indian Ocean is remote from its dust sources, only the fraction of smaller aerosols reaches Kerguelen Islands after undergoing several cloud and chemical processes during their transport resulting in a drastic increase in solubility. Finally, we deduced an average soluble iron deposition flux of 23 μg m-2 d-1 (0.4 μmol m-2 d-1) for the studied oceanic area, taking into account a~median iron solubility of 82% ± 18%.

  7. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  8. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Rastak, N.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of multicomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures using solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in the VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture as a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a given range. We conducted Köhler theory calculations for 144 different mixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption about the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility distribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation nucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive calculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about organic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of activation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and density into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter κ; and (3) assuming a fixed water-soluble fraction ϵeff. The complete dissolution was able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy only when the majority (70-80%) of the material was dissolved at the point of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex mixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools for representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the activation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations. Depending mostly on the condensed-phase interactions between the organic molecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1 could be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over atmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations. Our results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility distribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for capturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility range will probably not add

  9. Water soluble organic constituents in Arctic aerosols and snow pack

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaomeng ); Winchester, J.W. )

    1993-01-08

    Eight water-soluble organic anions were measured in 70 aerosol samples and 10 snow samples at Barrow, Alaska in March-April, 1989. The ranking of the ions in aerosols according to total (coarse + fine aerosol) median concentrations was acetate (44 ng m[sup [minus]3]), oxalate (27), benzoate (23), formate (22), propionate (6), methanesulfonate (5), lactate (4), and pyruvate (4). When added up, the median organic anion mass was 156 ng m[sup [minus]3]. The organic anions/nssSO[sub 4][sup =] mass ratio had a median of 0.18 and 0.07 in the coarse (>1 [mu]m) and fine (<1 [mu]m) size fractions, respectively, but can be very high on occasions. On average, the organic anions made up more than 10% of the water-soluble aerosol mass. A similar ranking in concentration was also found for the organic ions in the snow pack samples. The organic anion/nssSO[sub 4][sup =] mass ratio in these samples was >0.5, substantially higher than in aerosols. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Cloud condensation nuclei activation of limited solubility organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff Hartz, Kara E.; Tischuk, Joshua E.; Chan, Man Nin; Chan, Chak K.; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of 19 organic species with water solubilities ( Csat) ranging from 10 -4 to 10 2 g solute 100 g -1 H 2O was measured. The organic particles were generated by nebulization of an aqueous or an alcohol solution. Use of alcohols as solvents enables the measurement of low solubility, non-volatile organic CCN activity and reduces the likelihood of residual water in the aerosol. The activation diameter of organic species with very low solubility in water ( Csat<0.3 g 100 g -1 H 2O) is in agreement with Köhler theory using the bulk solubility (limited solubility case) of the organic in water. Many species, including 2-acetylbenzoic acid, aspartic acid, azelaic acid, glutamic acid, homophthalic acid, phthalic acid, cis-pinonic acid, and salicylic acid are highly CCN active in spite of their low solubility (0.3 g 100 g -1 H 2O< Csat<1 g 100 g -1 H 2O), and activate almost as if completely water soluble. The CCN activity of most species is reduced, if the particles are produced using non-aqueous solvents. The existence of the particles in a metastable state at low RH can explain the observed enhancement in CCN activity beyond the levels suggested by their solubility.

  11. Improving the representation of soluble iron in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Natalie

    2016-11-29

    Funding from this grant supported Rachel Sanza, Yan Zhang and partially Samuel Albani. Substantial progress has been made on inclusion of mineralogy, showing the quality of the simulations, and the impact on radiation in the CAM4 and CAM5 (Scanza et al., 2015). In addition, the elemental distribution has been evaluated (and partially supported by this grant) (Zhang et al., 2015), showing that using spatial distributions of mineralogy, improved resperentation of Fe, Ca and Al are possible, compared to the limited available data. A new intermediate complexity soluble iron scheme was implemented in the Bulk Aerosol Model (BAM), which was completed as part of Rachel Scanza’s PhD thesis. Currently Rachel is writing up at least two first author papers describing the general methods and comparison to observations (Scanza et al., in prep.), as well as papers describing the sensitivity to preindustrial conditions and interannual variability. This work lead to the lead PI being asked to write a commentary in Nature (Mahowald, 2013) and two review papers (Mahowald et al., 2014, Mahowald et al., submitted) and contributed to related papers (Albani et al., 2016, Albani et al., 2014, Albani et al., 2015).

  12. Delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust and combustion aerosols to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Shi, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. Here, we, for the first time, interactively combined laboratory kinetic experiments with global aerosol modeling to more accurately quantify anthropogenic soluble Fe due to air pollution. We firstly examined Fe dissolution kinetics of African dust samples at acidic pH values with and without ionic species commonly found in aerosol water (i.e., sulfate and oxalate). We then constructed a new empirical scheme for Fe release from mineral dust due to inorganic and organic anions in aerosol water, by using acidity as a master variable. We implemented this new scheme and applied an updated mineralogical emission database in a global atmospheric chemistry transport model to estimate the atmospheric concentration and deposition flux of soluble Fe under preindustrial and modern conditions. Our improved model successfully captured the inverse relationship of Fe solubility and total Fe loading measured over the North Atlantic Ocean (i.e., 1-2 orders of magnitude lower Fe solubility in North African- than combustion-influenced aerosols). The model results show a positive relationship between Fe solubility and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC)/Fe molar ratio, which is consistent with previous field measurements. We estimated that deposition of soluble Fe to the ocean increased from 0.05-0.07 Tg Fe yr-1 in preindustrial era to 0.11-0.12 Tg Fe yr-1 in present days, due to air pollution. Over the High Nitrate Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean, the modeled Fe solubility remains low for

  13. Delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust and combustion aerosols to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Shi, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. In this study, for the first time, we interactively combined laboratory kinetic experiments with global aerosol modeling to more accurately quantify anthropogenic soluble Fe due to air pollution. Firstly, we determined Fe dissolution kinetics of African dust samples at acidic pH values with and without ionic species commonly found in aerosol water (i.e., sulfate and oxalate). Then, by using acidity as a master variable, we constructed a new empirical scheme for Fe release from mineral dust due to inorganic and organic anions in aerosol water. We implemented this new scheme and applied an updated mineralogical emission database in a global atmospheric chemistry transport model to estimate the atmospheric concentration and deposition flux of soluble Fe under preindustrial and modern conditions. Our improved model successfully captured the inverse relationship of Fe solubility and total Fe loading measured over the North Atlantic Ocean (i.e., 1-2 orders of magnitude lower Fe solubility in northern-African- than combustion-influenced aerosols). The model results show a positive relationship between Fe solubility and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC)/Fe molar ratio, which is consistent with previous field measurements. We estimated that deposition of soluble Fe to the ocean increased from 0.05-0.07 Tg Fe yr-1 in the preindustrial era to 0.11-0.12 Tg Fe yr-1 in the present day, due to air pollution. Over the high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean, the modeled Fe

  14. Factors controlling the solubility of trace metals in atmospheric aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaou, Panagiota; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric input of aerosols is recognized, as an important source of nutrients, for the oceans. The chemical interactions between aerosols and varying composition of air masses lead to different coating of their surfaces with sulfate, nitrate and organic compounds, increasing their solubility and their role as a carrier of nutrients and pollutants in ecosystems. Recent works have highlighted that atmospheric inputs of nutrients and trace metals can considerably influence the marine ecosystem functioning at semi-enclosed or enclosed water bodies such as the eastern Mediterranean. The current work aims to determine the sources and the factors controlling the variability of nutrients in the eastern Mediterranean. Special focus has been given on trace elements solubility, considered either as key nutrients for phytoplankton growth such as iron (Fe), phosphorus (P) or inhibitors such as copper (Cu). This has been accomplished by analyzing size segregated aerosol samples collected at the background site of Finokalia in Crete for an entire year. Phosphorus concentrations indicate important increases in air masses influenced both by anthropogenic activities in the northeast European countries and by dust outbreaks. The last is confirmed by the correlation observed between total P and dust concentrations and by the air mass backward trajectories computed by running the NOAA Hysplit Model (Hybrid Single - Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready/hysplit4.html). Overall 73% of total P has been found to be associated with anthropogenic sources. The solubility of P and Fe has been found to be closely related to the acidity (pH) and dust amount in aerosols. The aerosol pH was predicted using thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II), meteorological observations (RH, T), and gas/particle observations. More specifically P and Fe solubility appears to be inversely related to the crustal elements levels, while it increases in acidic environment. The

  15. Water soluble dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daou, T J; Pourroy, G; Greneche, J M; Bertin, A; Felder-Flesch, D; Begin-Colin, S

    2009-06-21

    The grafting of pegylated dendrons on 9(2) nm and 39(5) nm iron oxide nanoparticles in water, through a phosphonate group as coupling agent has been successfully achieved and its mechanism investigated, with a view to produce biocompatible magnetic nano-objects for biomedical applications. Grafting has been demonstrated to occur by interaction of negatively charged phosphonate groups with positively charged groups and hydroxyl at the iron oxide surface. The isoelectric point of the suspension of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH as the amount of dendron increases. It reaches 4.7 for the higher grafting rate and for both particle size. Thus, the grafting of molecules using a phosphonate group allows stabilizing electrostatically the suspensions at physiological pH, a prerequisite for biomedical applications. Moreover the grafting step has been shown to preserve the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles due to super-super exchange interactions through the phosphonate group.

  16. Solubility of iron and other trace elements in rainwater collected on the Kerguelen Islands (South Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A.; Losno, R.; Triquet, S.

    2013-10-01

    The soluble fraction of aerosols that is deposited on the open ocean is vital for phytoplankton growth. It is believed that a large proportion of this dissolved fraction is bioavailable for marine biota and thus plays an important role in primary production, especially in HNLC oceanic areas where this production is limited by micronutrient supply. There is still much uncertainty surrounding the solubility of atmospheric particles in global biogeochemical cycles and it is not well understood. In this study, we present the solubilities of seven elements (Al, Ce, Fe, La, Mn, Nd, Ti) in rainwater on the Kerguelen Islands, in the middle of the Southern Indian Ocean. The solubilities of elements exhibit high values, generally greater than 70%, and Ti remains the least soluble element. Because the Southern Indian Ocean is remote from its dust sources, only a fraction of smaller aerosols reaches the Kerguelen Islands after undergoing several cloud and chemical processes during their transport, resulting in a drastic increase in solubility. Finally, we deduced an average soluble iron deposition flux of 27 ± 6 μg m-2 d-1 (~0.5 μmol m-2 d-1) for the studied oceanic area, taking into account a median iron solubility of 82% ± 18%.

  17. Atmospheric processing outside clouds increases soluble iron in mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G

    2015-02-03

    Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient regulating primary productivity in many parts of the global ocean. Dust deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean, but most of this Fe is biologically unavailable. Atmospheric processing and reworking of Fe in dust aerosol can increase the bioavailable Fe inputs to the ocean, yet the processes are not well understood. Here, we experimentally simulate and model the cycling of Fe-bearing dust between wet aerosol and cloud droplets. Our results show that insoluble Fe in dust particles readily dissolves under acidic conditions relevant to wet aerosols. By contrast, under the higher pH conditions generally relevant to clouds, Fe dissolution tends to stop, and dissolved Fe precipitates as poorly crystalline nanoparticles. If the dust-bearing cloud droplets evaporated again (returning to the wet aerosol stage with low pH), those neo-formed Fe nanoparticles quickly redissolve, while the refractory Fe-bearing phases continue to dissolve gradually. Overall, the duration of the acidic, wet aerosol stage ultimately increases the amount of potentially bioavailable Fe delivered to oceans, while conditions in clouds favor the formation of Fe-rich nanoparticles in the atmosphere.

  18. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF SOME HYDROCARBON SOLUBLE CERIUM AND IRON COMPOUNDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    REACTIONS, COMPLEX COMPOUNDS, HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, IRON COMPOUNDS, LUMINESCENCE, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, NITRATES, OXIDATION REDUCTION REACTIONS, SODIUM, SOLUBILITY, STABILIZATION, SYNTHESIS , TOLUENES.

  19. Solubility of silicon in hcp-iron at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core is believed to be composed of liquid iron alloy with one or more light elements (e.g., Birch 1952; Poirier 1994). Although a number of elements lighter than iron, including hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and sulfur, have been considered by various researchers as potential light elements in the Earth's core, silicon is one of the most attractive candidates for the light element in the core (e.g., Takafuji et al. 2005; Sakai et al. 2006; Ozawa et al. 2008, 2009, Wood et al., 2008). The Earth's inner core is considered to consist mainly of a solid iron-nickel alloy. However, multiple experimental studies revealed that the inner core is also less dense than pure iron, indicating the presence of light components in the inner core (e.g., Jephcoat and Olson 1987; Mao et al. 1998; Lin et al. 2005; Badro et al. 2007). If silicon is indeed a major light element in the liquid outer core, the maximum amount of silicon that can be incorporated in the solid inner core during inner-core solidification is limited by the solubility of silicon in solid iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary. Therefore the phase relations of iron-silicon alloys, especially the solubility of silicon in solid iron at high pressure and temperature, are the key to understanding the composition, structure, and crystallization of the inner core. The phase relations of iron-silicon alloys at high pressure have been extensively studied using a multi-anvil apparatus (Zhang and Guyot 1999; Dobson et al. 2002; Kuwayama and Hirose 2004) and a diamond-anvil cell with in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements (Lin et al. 2002; Lin et al. 2003; Dubrovinsky et al. 2003; Hirao et al. 2004; Asanuma et al. 2008, Lin et al 2009, Kuwayama et al. 2009). Below 200 GPa, the solubility of silicon in solid hcp-iron has been well studied. Solid hcp-iron can contain at least ~10 wt% Si at low temperature, but it decomposed to iron-rich hcp phase and silicon-rich bcc phase at high temperature

  20. Very low isotope ratio of iron in fine aerosols related to its contribution to the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, Minako; Takahashi, Yoshio; Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2016-09-01

    Seven size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected from Hiroshima, Japan, and were analyzed in terms of chemical composition, soluble fraction of iron (Fe), Fe species, and Fe isotope ratios. The results suggested that Fe in fine particles contained a larger fraction of anthropogenic aerosols than coarse particles did. Iron in the fine particles was more soluble in simulated seawater (up to 25%) than that in the coarse particles and was in the form of Fe (hydr)oxide species, such as ferrihydrite or hematite. The Fe isotope ratios (δ56Fe) of the coarse particles (+0.04‰ to +0.30‰) were close to the crustal mean value (0.0‰). By contrast, the δ56Fe values of fine particles were much lower and ranged from -2.01‰ to -0.56‰. δ56Fe values of the soluble Fe fraction in the fine particles were remarkably low (-3.91 to -1.87‰), suggesting that anthropogenic aerosols yield soluble Fe with low δ56Fe values. Such low values could be explained by kinetic isotope fractionation during evaporation of Fe at high temperatures, coupled with the refractory characteristics of Fe. Marine aerosols from the Northwest Pacific were also analyzed. The δ56Fe values in the fine particles were also lower than those in the coarse particles. These results may be important to quantitatively estimate the contribution of anthropogenic Fe deposited on the surface ocean on the basis of the Fe isotopes.

  1. Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the Asian Continental Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Rodel, Tobias; Henn, Tobias R.; Sprau, Peter; Laskin, Alexander; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Gilles, Marry K.

    2012-04-04

    Bioavailable iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on Okinawa Island during an atmospheric pollution transport event from China were analyzed using complementary single particle techniques to determine the iron source and speciation. Comparing the spatial distribution of iron within ambient particles and standard Asian mineral dust, it was determined that field-collected atmospheric Fe-containing particles have numerous sources, including anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion. Fe-containing particles were found to be internally mixed with secondary species such as sulfate, soot, and organic carbon. The mass weighted average Fe(II) fraction (defined as Fe(II)/[Fe(II)+Fe(III)]) was determined to be 0.33 {+-} 0.08. Within the experimental uncertainty, this value lies close to the range of 0.26-0.30 determined for representative Asian mineral dust. Previous studies have indicated that the solubility of iron from combustion is much higher than that from mineral dust. Therefore, chemical and/or physical differences other than oxidation state may help explain the higher solubility of iron in atmospheric particles.

  2. Soluble iron nutrients in Saharan dust over the central Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzolo, Joana A.; Barbosa, Cybelli G. G.; Borillo, Guilherme C.; Godoi, Ana F. L.; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Andreoli, Rita V.; Manzi, Antônio O.; Sá, Marta O.; Alves, Eliane G.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Angelis, Isabella H.; Ditas, Florian; Saturno, Jorge; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Rosário, Nilton E.; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Santos, Rosa M. N.; Yamamoto, Carlos I.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Artaxo, Paulo; Taylor, Philip E.; Godoi, Ricardo H. M.

    2017-02-01

    The intercontinental transport of aerosols from the Sahara desert plays a significant role in nutrient cycles in the Amazon rainforest, since it carries many types of minerals to these otherwise low-fertility lands. Iron is one of the micronutrients essential for plant growth, and its long-range transport might be an important source for the iron-limited Amazon rainforest. This study assesses the bioavailability of iron Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the particulate matter over the Amazon forest, which was transported from the Sahara desert (for the sake of our discussion, this term also includes the Sahel region). The sampling campaign was carried out above and below the forest canopy at the ATTO site (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), a near-pristine area in the central Amazon Basin, from March to April 2015. Measurements reached peak concentrations for soluble Fe(III) (48 ng m-3), Fe(II) (16 ng m-3), Na (470 ng m-3), Ca (194 ng m-3), K (65 ng m-3), and Mg (89 ng m-3) during a time period of dust transport from the Sahara, as confirmed by ground-based and satellite remote sensing data and air mass backward trajectories. Dust sampled above the Amazon canopy included primary biological aerosols and other coarse particles up to 12 µm in diameter. Atmospheric transport of weathered Saharan dust, followed by surface deposition, resulted in substantial iron bioavailability across the rainforest canopy. The seasonal deposition of dust, rich in soluble iron, and other minerals is likely to assist both bacteria and fungi within the topsoil and on canopy surfaces, and especially benefit highly bioabsorbent species. In this scenario, Saharan dust can provide essential macronutrients and micronutrients to plant roots, and also directly to plant leaves. The influence of this input on the ecology of the forest canopy and topsoil is discussed, and we argue that this influence would likely be different from that of nutrients from the weathered Amazon bedrock, which otherwise provides the

  3. On the fractional solubility of copper in marine aerosols: Toxicity of aeolian copper revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholkovitz, Edward R.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Church, Thomas M.

    2010-10-01

    Paytan et al. (2009) argue that the atmospheric deposition of aerosols lead to copper concentrations that are potentially toxic to marine phytoplankton in a large area of tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. A key assumption in their model is that all marine aerosols (mineral dust and anthropogenic particles) have a high (40%) fractional solubility of copper. Our data show that the fractional solubility of copper for Saharan dust over the Sargasso Sea and Bermuda is significantly lower (1-7%). In contrast, anthropogenic aerosols with non-Saharan sources have significantly higher values (10-100%). Hence, the potential Cu toxicity in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic should be re-estimated, given the low fractional solubility of Cu in the Saharan dust that dominates aerosol deposition to this region.

  4. Influences from soluble and insoluble aerosols on precipitation and lightning in deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Vaughan; Formenton, Marco; Lienert, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Observations reported in past studies in the literature have revealed correlations between measures of aerosol loading and lightning occurrence. Recent advances in simulating cloud-microphysical processes have highlighted their control by aerosol conditions. New hypotheses about aerosol-precipitation-lightning interactions have emerged. Most deep convective clouds globally have warm bases with precipitation controlled by coalescence and by loadings of soluble aerosols, which form droplets. However, those over mountainous continental regions often have cooler bases and can generate much hail that reaches the ground. Cold-base convective clouds were observed to produce lightning over the High Plains of the USA during the Severe Thunderstorms Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) in the summer of 2000. Cold-base thunderstorms can be without an active coalescence process, due to the low adiabatic liquid water content limiting droplet sizes. There is then the potential for a greater influence from ice-nucleating insoluble aerosols on ice-precipitation production, charge separation and lightning, relative to soluble aerosols. In the presentation, an aerosol-cloud model (hybrid bin/2-moment bulk microphysics, prognostic aerosol component with 6 aerosol species) with a new electrification component is described. The model treats non-inductive charge separation and has a lightning discharge scheme. A simulation of a STEPS case of a cold-base thunderstorm is validated against aircraft, radar and electrical observations. Sensitivity tests are presented to show the roles of ice multiplication and ice-nucleating aerosols, such as dust and soot from biomass-burning plumes, in controlling ice-precipitation production and lightning frequencies for the cold-base thunderstorm. Their influence is compared with that from soluble aerosol loadings. The roles of cloud-base temperature and wet growth of hail and graupel are discussed.

  5. Light-absorbing soluble organic aerosol in Los Angeles and Atlanta: A contrast in secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Surratt, Jason D.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, Andre S. H.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Light absorption spectra and carbon mass of fine particle water-soluble components were measured during the summer of 2010 in the Los Angeles (LA) basin, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. Fresh LA secondary organic carbon had a consistent brown color and a bulk absorption per soluble carbon mass at 365 nm that was 4 to 6 times higher than freshly-formed Atlanta soluble organic carbon. Radiocarbon measurements of filter samples show that LA secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was mainly from fossil carbon and chemical analysis of aqueous filter extracts identified nitro-aromatics as one component of LA brown SOA. Interpreting soluble brown carbon as a property of freshly-formed anthropogenic SOA, the difference in absorption per carbon mass between these two cities suggests most fresh secondary water-soluble organic carbon formed within Atlanta is not from an anthropogenic process similar to LA. Contrasting emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds may account for these differences.

  6. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in this study to identify the Fe species in aerosols. The fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) determined the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high

  7. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in order to identify the Fe species in aerosols. Fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) showed the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high mineral

  8. New technique for online measurement of water-soluble Fe(II) in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neeraj; Oakes, Michelle M; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Majestic, Brian J; Weber, Rodney J

    2009-04-01

    A prototype instrument has been developed for online analysis of water-soluble Fe(II) (WS_Fe(II)) in atmospheric aerosols using a particle-into-liquid-sampler (PILS), which concentrates particles into a small flow of purified water, coupled with a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and absorbance spectrophotometryto detect iron-ferrozine colored complexes. The analytical method is highly precise (<3% RSD), and the overall measurement uncertainty and limit of detection for the complete PILS-LWCC system are estimated at 12% and 4.6 ng m(-3), respectively. The online measurements compared well with those of 24 h integrated filter samples collected at two different sampling sites (n=27, R2 = 0.82, slope 0.90 +/- 0.08, and intercept 3.08 +/- 1.99 ng m(-3)). In urban Atlanta, fine particle WS_Fe(II) concentrations measured every 12 min exhibited large variability, ranging from below the detection limit (4.6) to 370 ng m(-3) during a 24 day period in June 2008. This instrument provides new capabilities for investigating the sources and atmospheric processing of fine particle WS_Fe(II) and may prove useful in studies ranging from effects of particle WS_Fe(II) on human health to effects of particle WS_Fe(II) on atmospheric chemistry and ocean biogeochemistry.

  9. Detection of Remarkably Low Isotopic Ratio of Iron in Anthropogenic Aerosols and Evaluation of its Contribution to the Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, M.; Iizuka, T.; Sakata, K.; Uematsu, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that phytoplankton growth in the High Nutrient-Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions is limited by dissolved iron (DFe) concentration (e.g., Martin and Fitzwater, 1988). Aerosol is known as one of the dominant sources of DFe to the ocean and classified into two origins such as anthropogenic and natural. A series of recent studies showed that Fe in anthropogenic aerosols is more soluble than that in natural aerosols (Takahashi et al., 2013) and has lower isotopic ratio (Mead et al., 2013). However, the difference between Fe isotopic ratio (δ56Fe: [(56Fe/54Fe)sample/(56Fe/54Fe)IRMM-14]-1) of two origins reported in Mead et al. (2013) is not so large compared with the standard deviation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine Fe species and δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosols more accurately and to evaluate its contribution to the ocean surface. Iron species were determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis, while δ56Fe in size-fractionated aerosols were measured by MC-ICP-MS (NEPTUNE Plus) after chemical separation using anion exchange resin. Dominant Fe species in the samples were, ferrihydrite, hematite, and biotite. It was also revealed that coarse particles contained a larger amount of biotite and that fine particles contained a larger amount of hematite, which suggested that anthropogenic aerosols were emitted during combustion processes. In addition, results of Fe isotopic ratio analysis suggested that δ56Fe of coarse particles were around +0.25‰, whereas that of fine particles were -0.5 ˜ -2‰, which was lower than the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol by Mead et al. (2013). The size-fractionated sampling made it possible to determine the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol. Soluble component in fine particles extracted by simulated rain water also showed much lower δ56Fe (δ56Fe = -3.9±0.12‰), suggesting that anthropogenic Fe has much lower isotopic ratio. The remarkably low δ56Fe may be caused by the

  10. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols IV: in vitro solubility analysis.

    PubMed

    Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2009-03-01

    As part of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, the solubility of selected aerosol samples was measured using an accepted in vitro dissolution test system. This static system was employed along with a SUF (synthetic ultrafiltrate) solvent, which is designed to mimic the physiological chemistry of extracellular fluid. Using sequentially obtained solvent samples, the dissolution behavior over a 46-d test period was evaluated by fitting the measurement data to two- or three-component negative exponential functions. These functions were then compared with Type M and S absorption taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model. The results indicated that there was a substantial variability in solubility of the aerosols, which in part depended on the type of armor being impacted by the DU penetrator and the particle size fraction being tested. Although some trends were suggested, the variability noted leads to uncertainties in predicting the solubility of other DU-based aerosols. Nevertheless, these data provide a useful experimental basis for modeling the intake-dose relationships for inhaled DU aerosols arising from penetrator impact on armored vehicles.

  11. Magnesium solubility in metallic iron during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial core formation occurred by gravitational segregation of immiscible metal and silicate melts in an extensively molten proto-Earth. This stripped the bulk silicate Earth of most of its siderophile elements, which were concentrated in the core. The process occurs by virtue of partitioning through a redox reaction (e.g. [1]) whereby iron in the metal exchanges for a bonded siderophile element in the mantle. By performing metal-silicate equilibration experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we find that the major lithophile component of the silicate Earth, namely MgO, can also become soluble in the metal. At close to 5000 K, our experiments show that up to 1.2 % MgO can be incorporated in the metal. We show that Mg incorporation in the metal isn't a redox reaction as with siderophile element partitioning, but rather a direct solubility of the MgO component as temperatures approach the metal-silicate solvus; in that respect, our results are fully consistent with the recently calculated Fe-MgO solvus [2]. This confirms that significant amounts of magnesium could have been added to the early core, provided that a giant impact had generated the necessary temperature increase. The subsequent exsolution of MgO driven by core cooling would have provided a significant buoyancy source, likely sufficient to drive core convection and producing an ancient magnetic field [3]. [1] J. Wade and B. J. Wood, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 236, 78-95 (2005) [2] S. M. Wahl and B. Militzer, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 410, 25-33 (2015) [3] D. J. Stevenson, DI11C-03, Fall AGU 2012.

  12. Soluble Iron in Alveolar Macrophages Modulates Iron Oxide Particle-Induced Inflammatory Response via Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM)-associated metals have been shown to play an important role in cardiopulmonary health outcomes. To study the modulation of inflammation by PM-associated soluble metal, we investigated intracellular solubility of radiolabelled iron oxide (59

  13. Elemental composition of PM 2.5 aerosols in Queens, New York: Solubility and temporal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Sumizah; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Khan, Adil R.; Swami, Kamal; Yang, Karl X.; Husain, Liaquat; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    As a part of the PM 2.5 Technology Assessment and Characterization Study-New York (PMTACS-NY), concentrations of sulfate and 15 trace elements were determined in daily PM 2.5 samples collected from July 2001 to September 2002 at a site in urban Queens, NY. The elements were Mg, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, and Pb. Over the first 12 months these elemental concentrations were measured in both a water extract and in a total acid digestate so that the solubility of the aerosols bearing the above trace elements could be evaluated. This is important as elements with high solubility can be more readily bio-activated in the lungs and thus may be potentially more harmful to humans. An overview of the elemental composition of PM 2.5 aerosols at the Queens, NY site over the 15-month period is presented. This includes a comparison of seasonal changes in aerosol composition and solubility at the sites along with an evaluation of the impacts on aerosol composition of the collapse of the World Trade Center Towers in Manhattan on 9/11/2001 and the smoke from Quebec wildfires in early July 2002.

  14. Solubility of HOBr in Acidic Solution and Implications for Liberation of Halogens Via Aerosol Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Rammer, T. A.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Halogen species are known to catalytically destroy ozone in several regions of the atmosphere. In addition to direct catalytic losses, bromine compounds can indirectly enhance ozone loss through coupling to other radical families. Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species in the linkage of BrOx to ClOx and HOx. The aqueous- phase coupling reaction HOBr + HCI (right arrow) BrCl + H2O may provide a pathway for chlorine activation on sulfate aerosols at temperatures warmer than those required for polar stratospheric cloud formation. We have measured t h e solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol dm(exp -3) atm(exp -1). The expected inverse dependence of H* on temperature was observed, but only a weak dependence on acidity was found. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that equilibrium concentrations of HOBr could equal or exceed those of HBr in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols. Despite the high solubility of HOBr, aerosol volumes are not large enough to sequester a significant fraction of inorganic bromine from the gas phase. Our measurements of HOBr uptake in aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases show the evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  15. Development of a wet-chemical method for the speciation of iron in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Majestic, Brian J; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Turner, Jay R; Fine, Philip M; Singh, Manisha; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2006-04-01

    The ability to quantify the chemical and physical forms of transition metals in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is essential in determining potential human health and ecological effects. A method for the speciation of iron in atmospheric PM has been adapted which involves extraction in a well-defined solution followed by oxidation state specific detection. The method was applied to a suite of environmental aerosols. Ambient atmospheric aerosols in an urban area of St. Louis (the St. Louis-Midwest Supersite) were collected on Teflon substrates and were leached in one of four different solutions: (1) >18.0 Momega water; (2) 140 microM NaCl solution; (3) pH = 7.4 NaHCO3 solution; and (4) pH = 4.3 acetate buffering system. Fe(ll) was determined directly using the Ferrozine method as adapted to liquid waveguide spectrophotometry using a 1 m path-length cell. Fe(lll) was determined similarly after reduction to Fe(ll). It was found that, at low ionic strength, pH exerted a major influence on Fe(ll) solubility with the greatest Fe(ll) concentration consistently found in the pH = 4.3 acetate buffer. Soluble Fe(lll) (as defined by a 0.2 microm filter) varied little with extractant, which implies that most of the Fe(lll) detected was colloidal. To characterize well-defined materials for future reference, NIST standard reference materials were also analyzed for soluble Fe(ll) and Fe(lll). For all SRMs tested, a maximum of 2.4% of the total iron (Urban Dust 1649a) was soluble in pH = 4.3 acetate buffer. For calibration curves covering the ranges of 0.5-20 microg/L Fe(ll), excellent linearity was observed in all leaching solutions with R2 values of > 0.999. Co-located filters were used to test the effect of storage time on iron oxidation state in the ambient particles as a function of time. On two samples, an average Fe(ll) decay rate of 0.89 and 0.57 ng Fe(ll) g(-1) PM day(-1) was determined from the slope of the regression, however this decrease was determined not to be

  16. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  17. Surface tension depression by low-solubility organic material in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, Allison; Mitroo, Dhruv; McNeill, V. Faye

    2012-07-01

    Surface-active material, including long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), comprises a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass. Surface-active species are thought to form a film at the gas-aerosol interface, with implications for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation. However, LCFA phase behavior and surface-bulk partitioning has not been characterized under most conditions typical of tropospheric aerosol water (i.e. acidic, high ionic content), making it challenging to predict surface film formation in aerosols. In this study, we present measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions containing the slightly soluble LCFAs oleic and stearic acid. The effect of varying pH, organic concentration, and inorganic salt content was tested for each system. We observe surface tension depression compared to water of up to ˜30 and 45% for aqueous solutions containing stearic or oleic acid at pH 0-8 and high inorganic salt concentrations (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4). This suggests that surface film formation is favorable for these species in atmospheric aerosols.

  18. Solubility of aerosol trace elements: Sources and deposition fluxes in the Canary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Patricia; Gelado-Caballero, María Dolores; Collado-Sánchez, Cayetano; Hernández-Brito, José Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    African dust inputs have important effects on the climate and marine biogeochemistry of the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of dust inputs on oceanic carbon uptake and climate is dependent on total dust deposition fluxes as well as the bioavailability of nutrients and metals in the dust. In this work, the solubility of trace metals (Fe, Al, Mn, Co and Cu) and ions (Ca, sulphate, nitrate and phosphate) has been estimated from the analysis of a long-time series of 109 samples collected over a 3-year period in the Canary Islands. Solubility is primarily a function of aerosol origin, with higher solubility values corresponding to aerosols with more anthropogenic influence. Using soluble fractions of trace elements measured in this work, atmospheric deposition fluxes of soluble metals and nutrients have been calculated. Inputs of dissolved nutrients (P, N and Fe) have been estimated for the mixed layer. Considering that P is the limiting factor when ratios of these elements are compared with phytoplankton requirements, an increase of 0.58 nM of P in the mixed layer (∼150 m depth) and in a year can be estimated, which can support an increase of 0.02 μg Chla L-1 y-1. These atmospheric inputs of trace metals and nutrients appear to be significant relative to the concentrations reported in this region, especially during the summer months when the water column is more stratified and deep-water nutrient inputs are reduced.

  19. Formation mechanisms of water-soluble organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaofeng

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are abundant in atmospheric aerosols, typically accounting for 20˜80% of particulate organic matter mass. Due to their affinity for water, WSOCs play an active role in aerosol-water interaction, and thus influence hygroscopic properties of aerosols, which in turn affect cloud formation processes and earth's radiation balance. Despite their abundance and significance, the sources of WSOCs are not well understood. Some primary sources (e.g., biomass burning) are known to emit WSOCs. It is also known from smog chamber experiments that photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds lead to less volatile oxygenated compounds that reside in the aerosol phase and are water-soluble because of the presence of polar functional groups. More recent work points to in-cloud/fog processes as a potentially important source for WSOCs. Work in this thesis aims to improve our understanding of the sources and formation mechanisms of WSOCs in atmospheric aerosols. Multiple approaches have been taken, including field measurements and controlled laboratory experiments. The thesis consists of the following four parts: (1) The formation mechanism of the most abundant WSOC species, oxalate, was investigated by synthesizing field measurement data obtained by our group and those available in the literature. Our measurements of aerosol sulfate and oxalate across a wide geographical span in the East Asia region, up to Beijing in the north and down to Hong Kong in the south, indicated that the two species were highly correlated. This good correlation was also found in measurements made elsewhere in the world by other researchers. Through a detailed analysis of factors influencing ambient oxalate, it can be argued that a common dominant formation pathway, likely in-cloud processing, explains the close tracking of the two chemically distinct species. This result also highlights the potential importance of in-cloud processing as a pathway leading to

  20. Bioavailability an in vitro solubility of iron in green leafy vegetables

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.

    1986-03-05

    Bioavailability, measured by hemoglobin repletion in anemic rats, of iron in turnip greens, spinach, and broccoli was compared with its solubility in water, in 0.1 and 1.0 N HCl, and in 0.1 M acetic, citric and tartaric acids. Both in vivo and in vitro tests were conducted with raw plant materials and with vegetables that had been heat processed. Turnip greens were canned and spinach and broccoli were cooked in boiling water. Bioavailability of iron in turnip greens was significantly increased by heat processing and the RBV of canned greens was 70-90% of the standard FeSO/sub 4/. The RBV of spinach was about 50% and that of broccoli was about 80%, and the bioavailability of iron in neither of these vegetables was altered significantly by cooking. In vitro solubility of iron of raw turnip greens in water, the organic acids, and 0.1 N HCl was poor and was increased by heat treatment. Iron of raw spinach was somewhat more soluble in these media than that of raw turnip greens, but cooking had the effect of decreasing the proportion of iron on spinach that could be solubilized by the aqueous solutions. Thus, the in vitro solubility of iron in the green leafy vegetables was predictive of biological availability of this iron the anemic rats.

  1. Inorganic, organic and macromolecular components of fine aerosol in different areas of Europe in relation to their water solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappoli, S.; Andracchio, A.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Gelencsér, A.; Kiss, G.; Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.; Mészáros, E.; Hansson, H.-C.; Rosman, K.; Zebühr, Y.

    A chemical mass balance of fine aerosol (<1.5 μm AED) collected at three European sites was performed with reference to the water solubility of the different aerosol classes of components. The sampling sites are characterised by different pollution conditions and aerosol loading in the air. Aspvreten is a background site in central Sweden, K-puszta is a rural site in the Great Hungarian Plain and San Pietro Capofiume is located in the polluted Po Valley, northern Italy. The average fine aerosol mass concentration was 5.9 μg m -3 at the background site Aspvreten, 24 μg m -3 at the rural K-puszta and 38 μg m -3 at the polluted site San Pietro Capofiume. However, a similarly high soluble fraction of the aerosol (65-75%) was measured at the three sites, while the percentage of water soluble organic species with respect to the total soluble mass was much higher at the background site (ca. 50%) than at the other two sites (ca. 25%). A very high fraction (over 70%) of organic compounds in the aerosol consisted of polar species. The presence of water soluble macromolecular compounds was revealed in the samples from K-puszta and San Pietro Capofiume. At both sites these species accounted for between ca. 20-50% of the water soluble organic fraction. The origin of the compounds was tentatively attributed to biomass combustion.

  2. Effect of atmospheric organic complexation on iron-bearing dust solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, R.; Desboeufs, K. V.

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies reported that the effect of organic complexation may be a potentially important process to be considered by models estimating atmospheric iron flux to the ocean. In this study, we investigated this process effect by a series of dissolution experiments on iron-bearing dust in the presence or the absence of various organic compounds (acetate, formate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, glycolate, lactate, tartrate and humic acid as an analogue of humic like substances, HULIS) typically found in atmospheric waters. Only 4 of tested organic ligands (oxalate, malonate, tartrate and humic acid) caused an enhancement of iron solubility which was associated with an increase of dissolved Fe(II) concentrations. For all of these organic ligands, a positive linear dependence of iron solubility to organic concentrations was observed and showed that the extent of organic complexation on iron solubility decreased in the following order: oxalate >malonate = tartrate > humic acid. This was attributed to the ability of electron donors of organic ligands and implies a reductive ligand-promoted dissolution. This study confirms that among the known atmospheric organic binding ligands of Fe, oxalate is the most effective ligand promoting dust iron solubility and showed, for the first time, the potential effect of HULIS on iron dissolution under atmospheric conditions.

  3. Effect of atmospheric organic complexation on iron-bearing dust solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, R.; Desboeufs, K. V.

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies reported that the effect of organic complexation may be a potentially important process to be considered in models to estimate atmospheric iron flux to the ocean. In this study, we investigated this effect by a series of dissolution experiments on iron-bearing dust in presence or absence of various organic compounds typically found in the atmospheric waters (acetate, formate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, glycolate, lactate, tartrate and humic acid as an analogue of humic like substances (HULIS)). Only 4 of tested organic ligands (oxalate, malonate, tartrate and humic acid) caused an enhancement of iron solubility which was associated with an increase of dissolved Fe(II) concentrations. For all of these organic ligands, a positive linear dependence of iron solubility to organic concentrations was observed and showed that the extent of organic complexation on iron solubility decreased in order oxalate > malonate = tartrate > humic acid. This was attributed to the ability of electron donors of organic ligands and implied a reductive ligand-promoted dissolution. This study confirmed that oxalate is the most effective ligand playing on dust iron solubility and showed, for the first time, the potential effect of HULIS on iron dissolution in atmospheric conditions.

  4. Understanding soluble arsenate removal kinetics by zerovalent iron media.

    PubMed

    Melitas, Nikos; Wang, Jianping; Conklin, Martha; O'Day, Peggy; Farrell, James

    2002-05-01

    Zerovalent iron filings have been proposed as a filter medium for removing arsenic compounds from potable water supplies. This research investigated the kinetics of arsenate removal from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron media. Batch experiments were performed to determine the effect of the iron corrosion rate on the rate of As(V) removal. Tafel analyses were used to determine the effect of the As(V) concentration on the rate of iron corrosion in anaerobic solutions. As(V) removal in column reactors packed with iron filings was measured over a 1-year period of continuous operation. Comparison of As(V) removal by freely corroding and cathodically protected iron showed that rates of arsenate removal were dependent on the continuous generation of iron oxide adsorption sites. In addition to adsorption site availability, rates of arsenate removal were also limited by mass transfer associated with As(V) diffusion through iron corrosion products. Steady-state removal rates in the column reactor were up to 10 times faster between the inlet-end and the first sampling port than between the first sampling port and the effluent-end of the column. Faster removal near the influent-end of the column was due to a faster rate of iron oxidation in that region. The presence of 100 microg/L As(V) decreased the iron corrosion rate by up to a factor of 5 compared to a blank electrolyte solution. However, increasing the As(V) concentration from 100 to 20,000 microg/L resulted in no further decrease in the iron corrosion rate. The kinetics of arsenate removal ranged between zeroth- and first-order with respect to the aqueous As(V) concentration. The apparent reaction order was dependent on the availability of adsorption sites and on the aqueous As(V) concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses showed the presence of iron metal, magnetite (Fe3O4), an Fe(III) oxide phase, and possibly an Fe(II,III) hydroxide phase in the reacted iron filings. These mixed valent oxide phases are

  5. Transdermal Delivery of Iron Using Soluble Microneedles: Dermal Kinetics and Safety.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H Nanjappa; McCrudden, Maeliosa T C; Donnelly, Ryan F; Banga, Ajay; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the iron compounds are administered via oral and parenteral routes in patients of all ages, to treat iron deficiency. Despite continued efforts to supplement iron via these conventional routes, iron deficiency still remains the most prevalent nutritional disorder all over the world. Transdermal replenishment of iron is a novel, potential approach of iron replenishment. Ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) was found to be a suitable source of iron for transdermal replenishment. The safety of FPP was assessed in this project by challenging the dermal fibroblast cells with high concentration of FPP. The cell viability assay and reactive oxygen species assay were performed. The soluble microneedle array was developed, incorporated with FPP and the kinetics of free iron in the skin; extracellular fluid following dermal administration of microneedle array was investigated in hairless rats. From the cell based assays, FPP was selected as one of the potential iron sources for transdermal delivery. The microneedles were found to dissolve in the skin fluid within 3 hours of administration. The FPP concentration in the dermal extracellular fluid declined after complete dissolution of the microneedle array. Overall, the studies demonstrated the safety of FPP for dermal delivery and the feasibility of soluble microneedle approach for transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

  6. Water soluble ions in aerosols (TSP) : Characteristics, sources and seasonal variation over the central Himalayas, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathee, Lekhendra; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Rupakheti, Dipesh

    2016-04-01

    Atmspheric pollutants transported from South Asia could have adverse impact on the Himalayan ecosystems. Investigation of aerosol chemistry in the Himalayan region in Nepal has been limited on a temporal and spatial scale to date. Therefore, the water-soluble ionic composition of aerosol using TSP sampler was investigated for a year period from April 2013 to March 2014 at four sites Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom characterized as an urban, rural, semi-urban and remote sites in Nepal. During the study period, the highest concentration of major cation was Ca2+ with an average concentration of 8.91, 2.17, 7.85 and 6.42 μg m-3 and the highest concentration of major anion was SO42- with an average of 10.96, 4.06, 6.85 and 3.30 μg m-3 at Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom respectively. The soluble ions showed the decrease in concentrations from urban to the rural site. Correlations and PCA analysis suggested that that SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ were derived from the anthropogenic sources where as the Ca2+ and Mg2+ were from crustal sources. Our results also suggest that the largest acid neutralizing agent at our sampling sites in the central Himalayas are Ca2+ followed by NH4+. Seasonal variations of soluble ions in aerosols showed higher concentrations during pre-monsoon and winter (dry-periods) due to limited precipitation amount and lower concentrations during the monsoon which can be explained by the dilution effect, higher the precipitation lower the concentration. K+ which is regarded as the tracer of biomss burning had a significant peaks during pre-monsoon season when the forest fires are active around the regions. In general, the results of this study suggests that the atmospheric chemistry is influenced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Thus, soluble ionic concentrations in aerosols from central Himalayas, Nepal can provide a useful database to assess atmospheric environment and its impacts on human health and ecosystem in the southern side of central

  7. Soluble iron dust export in the high altitude Saharan Air Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-Pérez, L. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Galindo, L.; García, M. I.; Alastuey, A.; López-Solano, J.

    2016-05-01

    Every summer huge amounts of desert dust particles are exported from the hyperarid subtropical Sahara to the North Atlantic the so-called Saharan Air Layer (SAL), a dry, warm and dust-laden corridor that expands from the North African coast (1-5 km.a.s.l.) to the Americas above the marine boundary layer. Because of the potential impact of the dust deposited on the ocean on marine biogeochemistry and climate, we studied the Fe solubility (in seawater) of atmospheric aerosols samples directly collected in the SAL off the North African coast, i.e. the fresh aerosols recently exported from the Sahara in the SAL. The aerosol sampling was performed at ˜2400 m.a.s.l. in Izaña observatory in Tenerife island. In the total aerosols, we found low Fe concentrations and high fractional Fe solubility (FFS ˜2%) in the North Atlantic free troposphere airflows and high Fe concentrations and low FFS (˜0.7%) within the SAL; the resulting FFS versus total dust (or total Fe) plot shows a hyperbolic trend attributed to the conservative mixing of 'fine combustion aerosols' and 'lithogenic mineral dust'. We then focused on the soluble Fe in the SAL. Our results indicate that ˜70% of soluble Fe is associated with the dissolution of submicron dust particles, probably involving Fe-bearing clays. We found a FFS of submicron dust (˜6%) higher than that typically observed in submicron particles of soil dust samples (<1%). The correlation between FFS and the ammonium-sulphate/dust ratio and the low variability in the Fe/Al ratio in the dust samples, suggests that the increase in the FFS of submicron dust aerosols (with respect to soil dust particles) may be related to the presence of acid pollutants mixed with dust. Previous studies had focused on dust processing and changes of Fe solubility during the trans-Atlantic transport of dust in the SAL. We found that submicron dust exported off the coast of North Africa may have already experienced acid processing over the Sahara, i.e. before

  8. Chemical compositions of past soluble aerosols reconstructed from NEEM (Greenland) and Dome C (Antarctica) ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu; Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Mulvaney, Robert; Hansson, Margareta

    2015-04-01

    Polar ice core preserve past atmospheric aerosols, which is a useful proxy for understanding the interaction between climate changes and atmospheric aerosols. One useful technique for reconstructing past soluble aerosols from ice core is the determination of dissolved ion species. However, since salts and acids melt into ions, chemical compositions of soluble aerosols in the ice cores have not been cleared. To clarify the temporal variations in the chemical compositions of past soluble aerosols, this study investigated chemical compositions of soluble particles preserved in the NEEM (Greenland) and Dome C (Antarctica) ice cores using new method 'ice-sublimation method'. The ice-sublimation method can extract soluble salts particles as a solid state without melting. The ice core samples are selected from the sections from the last termination (the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to Holocene) of Dome C (inland Antarctica) and NEEM ice cores. Using ice-sublimation method, soluble salts particles were extracted. Chemical components of extracted particles were analysed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The major components of soluble salts particles in the Dome C ice core are CaSO4, Na2SO4 and NaCl. The CaSO4 and NaCl fractions were high in the first half of the last termination, whereas the Na2SO4 fraction is high in the latter half of the last termination. The major components of soluble salts particles in the NEEM ice core are CaCO3, CaSO4, NaCl and Na2SO4. The fractions of CaCO3, CaSO4 and NaCl were high in LGM, whereas those of NaCl and Na2SO4 were high in Holocene. The changes in the salts compositions in Dome C ice core are mainly controlled by concentration of terrestrial material (Ca2+). In the first half of the last termination, most of the terrestrial material (CaCO3) reacted with H2SO4 but some of sea-salt (NaCl) was not reacted with H2SO4 due to high Ca2+ concentration. As a result, the CaSO4 and Na

  9. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions.

  10. Fluorescent water-soluble organic aerosols in the High Arctic atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Qin, Mingyue; Ren, Lujie; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Barrie, Leonard A.; Tachibana, Eri; Ding, Aijun; Yamashita, Youhei

    2015-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. They have been extensively studied in urban, rural and marine environments. However, little is known about the fluorescence properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or their transport to and distribution in the polar regions. Here, we present evidence that fluorescent WSOC is a substantial component of High Arctic aerosols. The ratios of fluorescence intensity of protein-like peak to humic-like peak generally increased from dark winter to early summer, indicating an enhanced contribution of protein-like organics from the ocean to Arctic aerosols after the polar sunrise. Such a seasonal pattern is in agreement with an increase of stable carbon isotope ratios of total carbon (δ13CTC) from −26.8‰ to −22.5‰. Our results suggest that Arctic aerosols are derived from a combination of the long-range transport of terrestrial organics and local sea-to-air emission of marine organics, with an estimated contribution from the latter of 8.7–77% (mean 45%). PMID:25920042

  11. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, R.W.; Vijgen, A.S.; Harriss, R.C. Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA )

    1992-10-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions. 61 refs.

  12. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  13. Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in Aerosol Particles in Jingjinji-Mega Typical Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol has important effects on climate, environment and human health and water-soluble ions are important chemical composition in aerosol. It is important to study concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water-soluble ions in aerosol. In recent years, with the increasing of energy consumption and the amount of automobile, regional pollution has become more serious in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. Especially since the haze happened frequently in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, it is an imminent study about water-soluble ions in aerosol.To investigate the concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI), size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using Andersen cascade sampler from Aug2010to Aug2011in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding. The WSI were analyzed by ion chromatography(IC).The results indicated that the order of total WSI (TWSI) concentration of TSP in the region was Tianjin-Baoding-Beijing-Tangshan. The order of TWSI of the fine particles in the region was Baoding-Tianjin-Beijing-Tangshan. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the coarse mode were 41.36±15.76,48.04±15.79,39.40±11.03,40.49±13.32μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the fine mode were 66.54±47.95,69.12±34.85, 61.80±44.63,71.73±45.12μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. All the annual mean concentrations of TWSIin the fine mode in the four sites had exceeded averaged concentration of PM2.5in the environmental quality standards (35μg m-3), which indicated that the pollution of TWSI was serious. Secondary water-soluble ions (SWSI)(SO42-, NO3-and NH4+) and Cl-were the main components, and were mainly found in the fine particles in the four sites of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In the coarse particles, NO3-Ca2+ and SO42-were the dominant contributions to WSI. Almost all water-soluble ions in fine particles are similar

  14. On the iron chloride aerosol in the clouds of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron chloride in the Venus clouds is under discussion for three decades, and the saturated vapor pressure of this species is of crucial importance for its modeling. There is a great scatter in the published data, and the preferable results are by Rustad and Gregory (1983, J. Chem. Eng. Data 28, 151-155) and those based on thermodynamic parameters by Chase (1998, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data Monograph 9). Using these data, loss by coagulation with sulfuric acid, transport by eddy diffusion, and the Stokes precipitation, the model confirms conclusions of our early study (Krasnopolsky 1985, Planet. Space Sci. 33, 109-117) that FeCl3 in the Venus clouds (1) agrees with the near UV and blue reflectivity of Venus (Zasova et al. 1981, Adv. Space Res. 1, #9, 13-16), (2) was observed by the direct X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, (3) explains the altitude profiles of the mode 1 aerosol in the middle and lower cloud layers and (4) the decrease in the NUV absorption below 60 km. Here we add to these conclusions that (5) the delivery of FeCl3 into the upper cloud layer and the production of sulfuric acid are just in proportion of 1: 100 by mass that is required to fit the observed NUV albedo. Furthermore, (6) the mode 1 and 2 particle sizes fit this proportion as well. Finally, (7) the required Fe2Cl6 mixing ratio is 17 ppbv in the atmosphere and the FeCl3 mole fraction is 19 ppbv in the Venus surface rocks.

  15. Basin scale survey of marine humic fluorescence in the Atlantic: Relationship to iron solubility and H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, M. I.; Gaiero, D. M.; Croot, P. L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton productivity in many different oceanic regions. A critical aspect underlying iron limitation is its low solubility in seawater as this controls the distribution and transport of iron through the ocean. Processes which enhance the solubility of iron in seawater, either through redox reactions or organic complexation, are central to understanding the biogeochemical cycling of iron. In this work we combined iron solubility measurements with parallel factor (PARAFAC) data analysis of Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) fluorescence along a meridional transect through the Atlantic (PS ANT XXVI-4) to examine the hypothesis that marine humic fluorescence is a potential proxy for iron solubility in the surface ocean. PARAFAC analysis revealed 4 components (C1-4), two humic like substances (C2&4) and two protein-like (C1&3). Overall none of the 4 components were significantly correlated with iron solubility, though humic-like components were weakly correlated with iron solubility in iron replete waters. Our analysis suggests that the ligands responsible for maintaining iron in solution in the euphotic zone are sourced from both remineralisation processes and specific ligands produced in response to iron stress and are not easily related to bulk CDOM properties. The humic fluorescence signal was sharply attenuated in surface waters presumably most likely due to photo bleaching, though there was only a weak correlation with the transient photo product H2O2, suggesting longer lifetimes in the photic zone for the fluorescent components identified here.

  16. Both soluble and colloidal iron phases control dissolved iron variability in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The size partitioning of dissolved iron (dFe, <0.4 μm) into soluble (sFe, <0.02 μm) and colloidal (0.02 μm < cFe < 0.4 μm) phases was investigated at seven stations in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the results are compared to the dFe size fractionation study of Bergquist et al. (2007) in the same region. Downwind of the North African dust plumes, cFe comprised 80 ± 7% of the surface dFe pool at six stations, supporting the hypothesis that atmospherically-derived Fe is maintained in the colloidal size fraction. At the deep chlorophyll maximum, colloidal Fe had minimum concentrations or was completely absent, suggesting that cFe was either preferentially taken up by microbes and/or scavenged/aggregated at these depths. At remineralization depths, sFe was the dominant fraction both in the subtropical gyre-like stations (76% sFe; [sFe] = 0.42 ± 0.03 nmol/kg) and in the oxygen minimum zone (56% sFe; [sFe] = 0.65 ± 0.03 nmol/kg). Only at remineralization depths of stations with intermediate oxygen concentrations (100-110 μmol/kg) did colloidal Fe dominate (contributing 58% of dFe) , indicating that cFe may be serving as a conduit of dFe loss during mixing of high-Fe OMZ and low-Fe gyre waters. North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) had a typical sFe concentration of 0.34 ± 0.05 nmol/kg. In the deepest samples composed of a NADW/Antarctic Bottom Water mixture where the bottom water may have attained a ∼0.1 nmol/kg hydrothermal Fe input during transit past the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, sFe did not increase coincidentally with dFe, indicating that any potential hydrothermal Fe contribution was colloidal. In general, the results of this study counter the previous hypothesis of Bergquist et al. (2007) that the colloidal Fe fraction predominately controls dFe variability, instead suggesting that both soluble and colloidal Fe are variable, and both contribute to the observed dFe variability throughout the North Atlantic. The nearly 50-50% dFe partitioning into soluble

  17. Water soluble organic aerosols in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA: composition, sources and optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingjie; Mladenov, Natalie; Williams, Mark W.; Neff, Jason C.; Wasswa, Joseph; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been shown to be an important input of organic carbon and nutrients to alpine watersheds and influence biogeochemical processes in these remote settings. For many remote, high elevation watersheds, direct evidence of the sources of water soluble organic aerosols and their chemical and optical characteristics is lacking. Here, we show that the concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) load at a high elevation site in the Colorado Rocky Mountains was strongly correlated with UV absorbance at 254 nm (Abs254, r = 0.88 p < 0.01) and organic carbon (OC, r = 0.95 p < 0.01), accounting for >90% of OC on average. According to source apportionment analysis, biomass burning had the highest contribution (50.3%) to average WSOC concentration; SOA formation and motor vehicle emissions dominated the contribution to WSOC in the summer. The source apportionment and backward trajectory analysis results supported the notion that both wildfire and Colorado Front Range pollution sources contribute to the summertime OC peaks observed in wet deposition at high elevation sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. These findings have important implications for water quality in remote, high-elevation, mountain catchments considered to be our pristine reference sites. PMID:27991554

  18. Water soluble organic aerosols in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA: composition, sources and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingjie; Mladenov, Natalie; Williams, Mark W.; Neff, Jason C.; Wasswa, Joseph; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been shown to be an important input of organic carbon and nutrients to alpine watersheds and influence biogeochemical processes in these remote settings. For many remote, high elevation watersheds, direct evidence of the sources of water soluble organic aerosols and their chemical and optical characteristics is lacking. Here, we show that the concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) load at a high elevation site in the Colorado Rocky Mountains was strongly correlated with UV absorbance at 254 nm (Abs254, r = 0.88 p < 0.01) and organic carbon (OC, r = 0.95 p < 0.01), accounting for >90% of OC on average. According to source apportionment analysis, biomass burning had the highest contribution (50.3%) to average WSOC concentration; SOA formation and motor vehicle emissions dominated the contribution to WSOC in the summer. The source apportionment and backward trajectory analysis results supported the notion that both wildfire and Colorado Front Range pollution sources contribute to the summertime OC peaks observed in wet deposition at high elevation sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. These findings have important implications for water quality in remote, high-elevation, mountain catchments considered to be our pristine reference sites.

  19. Uncertainties in the measurements of water-soluble organic nitrogen in the aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yamato, Koki

    2016-11-01

    In order to evaluate the positive and negative artifacts in the measurements of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) in the aerosols by filter sampling, comparative experiments between the filter sampling and denuder-filter sampling were conducted during both the warm and cold seasons. The results suggest that the traditional filter sampling underestimates the concentrations of the particulate WSON due to its volatilization loss, but this effect on the ratio of the WSON to the water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) was small probably because inorganic nitrogen species were also lost during the filter sampling. Approximately 32.5% of the WSON in the PM2.5 was estimated to be lost during the filter sampling. The denuder-filter sampling also demonstrated the existence of the WSON in the gas phase with approximately quarter concentrations of the WSON in the PM2.5. On the other hand, the filter sampling would overestimate the gaseous WSON concentration due to the loss of the WSON from the aerosol collection filter.

  20. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-07

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction.

  1. COMPARISON OF MINERAL AND SOLUBLE IRON FENTON'S CATALYSTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE. (R826163)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Contaminant degradation, stoichiometry, and role of hydroxyl radicals (OH·) in four Fenton's systems were investigated using trichloroethylene (TCE) as a model contaminant. A standard Fenton's system, a modified soluble iron system with a...

  2. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  3. Continuous flow analysis method for determination of soluble iron and aluminium in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Spolaor, A; Vallelonga, P; Gabrieli, J; Roman, M; Barbante, C

    2013-01-01

    Iron and aluminium are the two most abundant metals on the Earth's crust, but they display quite different biogeochemical properties. While iron is essential to many biological processes, aluminium has not been found to have any biological function at all. In environmental studies, iron has been studied in detail for its limiting role in the bioproductivity of high nutrient, low carbon oceanic zones, while aluminium is routinely used as a reference of crustal contributions to atmospheric deposition archives including peat bogs, lacustrine and marine sediments and ice sheets and glaciers. We report here the development of a flow injection analysis technique, which has been optimised for the simultaneous determination of soluble iron and aluminium in polar ice cores. Iron was determined by its catalytic role in the reduction of N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamene (DPD) to a semiquinonic form (DPDQ) and subsequent absorption spectroscopy at 514 nm. Aluminium was determined by spectroscopic analysis of an aluminium-lumogallion complex that exhibits fluorescence at 560 nm. These techniques have been applied to a section of Greenland ice dated to 1729-1733 AD and indicate that volcanism is a source of highly soluble aluminium and iron.

  4. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-09-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  5. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  6. Solubility and speciation of atmospheric iron in buffer systems simulating cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Majestic, Brian J.; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-04-01

    The solubility of iron (Fe) in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is important to understand its chemistry and potential bioavailability to ocean phytoplankton. However, current studies on Fe solubility and its speciation are highly uncertain partly due to inconsistencies in analytical protocols. In this study, cloud-processing of atmospheric PM was simulated in acetate, formate, and oxalate buffers (pH = 4.30 ± 0.05) at 0.5, 1, 5, and 20 mM. Colorimetric analysis of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex showed that Fe solubility increased by an order of magnitude when acetate and formate concentrations increased from 0.5 mM to 5 mM, with a higher fraction of soluble Fe in acetate than in formate at lower buffer concentration (0.5 mM). Measured pH of sample extracts revealed that weak buffers are unable to maintain pH, presumably due to acidic or alkaline components of PM, requiring an optimum concentration (5 mM in this study) of acetate and formate for Fe solubility measurements. Similar extraction procedures revealed that oxalate buffer inhibits the formation of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex, especially with Fe(III)-containing solutions, rendering it unsuitable for Fe solubility measurements by Ferrozine method. Application of the optimized analytical method to PM samples from different environments showed quite variable Fe solubility, with the lowest (<1%) in dust-impacted samples and the highest (5%) in urban samples. The highest solubility (6.8%) was observed in ambient PM2.5 samples influenced by anthropogenic sources (car emissions) with more than 90% of soluble Fe in the form of Fe(II). Results from this study highlight the importance of the type and strength of buffer at a given pH for Fe solubility and provide further evidence of a higher Fe solubility in urban PM samples compared to desert dust.

  7. Hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter in marine aerosols over the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Fu, Pingqing; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Boreddy, S K R; Yang, Fan; Wei, Lianfang; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Ge, Maofa

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated hygroscopic properties of water-soluble matter (WSM) in marine aerosols over the East China Sea, which were collected during a Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) sharing cruise in 2014. Hygroscopic growth factors (g) of WSM were measured by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) with an initial dry particle mobility diameter of 100nm. The observed g at 90% relative humidity (RH), g(90%)WSM, defined as the ratio of the particle diameter at 90% RH to that at RH<5% (initial dry diameter), ranged from 1.67 to 2.41 (mean±std: 1.99±0.23). The g values were lower than that of seawater (2.1) but comparable with those reported for marine aerosols (1.79-2.08). The H-TDMA retrieved hygroscopicity parameter of WSM, κWSM, ranged from 0.46 to 1.56 (0.88±0.35). The observed g(90%)WSM during the daytime ranged from 1.67 to 2.40 (1.95±0.21) versus 1.71 to 2.41 (2.03±0.26) during the nighttime. κWSM was 0.81±0.32 in the daytime and 0.95±0.40 in the nighttime. The day/night differences of g(90%)WSM and κWSM indicated that nighttime marine aerosols were more hygroscopic than those in daytime, which was likely related to enhanced heterogeneous reaction of ammonium nitrate in nighttime and the higher Cl(-)/Na(+) molar ratios obtained (0.80) in nighttime than those (0.47) in daytime. Inorganic ions accounted for 72-99% of WSM with SO4(2-) being the dominant species, contributing to 47% of the total inorganic ion mass. The declined g(90%) comparing with sea water was likely due to the transport of anthropogenic aerosols, chemical aging of dust particles, the contribution of biomass burning products, and the aerosol hygroscopic growth inhibition of organics.

  8. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    PubMed

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-06

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation.

  9. Sources and light absorption of water-soluble organic carbon aerosols in the outflow from northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2014-02-01

    High loadings of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols in Chinese air influence the air quality for over one billion people and impact the regional climate. A large fraction (17-80%) of this aerosol carbon is water-soluble, promoting cloud formation and thus climate cooling. Recent findings, however, suggest that water-soluble carbonaceous aerosols also absorb sunlight, bringing additional direct and indirect climate warming effects, yet the extent and nature of light absorption by this water-soluble "brown carbon" and its relation to sources is poorly understood. Here, we combine source estimates constrained by dual carbon isotopes with light-absorption measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for a March 2011 campaign at the Korea Climate Observatory at Gosan (KCOG), a receptor station in SE Yellow Sea for the outflow from northern China. The mass absorption cross section at 365 nm (MAC365) of WSOC for air masses from N. China were in general higher (0.8-1.1 m2 g-1), than from other source regions (0.3-0.8 m2 g-1). However, this effect corresponds to only 2-10% of the radiative forcing caused by light absorption by elemental carbon. Radiocarbon constraints show that the WSOC in Chinese outflow had significantly higher fraction fossil sources (30-50%) compared to previous findings in S. Asia, N. America and Europe. Stable carbon (δ13C) measurements were consistent with aging during long-range air mass transport for this large fraction of carbonaceous aerosols.

  10. Luxury uptake of aerosol iron by Trichodesmium in the western tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Tovar-Sanchez, Antonio; Siefert, Ronald L.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2011-09-01

    Dust transported from North Africa carries micronutrient iron (Fe) to the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA) which may significantly influence the metabolism of the N2-fixing cyanobacteria, Trichodesmium. For the first time, we conducted shipboard incubation experiments using freshly collected aerosol, seawater, and Trichodesmium colonies. Trichodesmium assimilated significant amount of aerosol Fe up to 14 times higher than the control. The uptake amount increased proportionally to the P: Fe ratio that Trichodesmium initially contained and to the aerosol Fe added and leached to the incubation solution. Trichodesmium assimilated more aerosol Fe than needed for its maximum growth (0.14 d-1) demonstrating a high capacity of luxury uptake of Fe from the dust.

  11. Elemental and iron isotopic composition of aerosols collected in a parking structure.

    PubMed

    Majestic, Brian J; Anbar, Ariel D; Herckes, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The trace metal contents and iron isotope composition of size-resolved aerosols were determined in a parking structure in Tempe, AZ, USA. Particulate matter (PM)<2.5 microm in diameter (the fine fraction) and PM>2.5 microm were collected. Several air toxics (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, and antimony) were enriched above the crustal average, implicating automobiles as an important source. Extremely high levels of fine copper (up to 1000 ng m(-3)) were also observed in the parking garage, likely from brake wear. The iron isotope composition of the aerosols were found to be +0.15+/-0.03 per thousand and +0.18+/-0.03 per thousand for the PM<2.5 microm and PM>2.5 microm fractions, respectively. The similarity of isotope composition indicates a common source for each size fraction. To better understand the source of iron in the parking garage, the elemental composition in four brake pads (two semi-metallic and two ceramic), two tire tread samples, and two waste oil samples were determined. Striking differences in the metallic and ceramic brake pads were observed. The ceramic brake pads contained 10-20% copper by mass, while the metallic brake pads contained about 70% iron, with very little copper. Both waste oil samples contained significant amounts of calcium, phosphorous, and zinc, consistent with the composition of some engine oil additives. Differences in iron isotope composition were observed between the source materials; most notably between the tire tread (average=+0.02 per thousand) and the ceramic brake linings (average=+0.65 per thousand). Differences in isotopic composition were also observed between the metallic (average=+0.18 per thousand) and ceramic brake pads, implying that iron isotope composition may be used to resolve these sources. The iron isotope composition of the metallic brake pads was found to be identical to the aerosols, implying that brake dust is the dominant source of iron in a parking garage.

  12. Characterization of water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols in coastal city, Xiamen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Ya; Chen, Jinsheng

    2011-03-01

    The samples of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIs), including anions (F-, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-) and cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) in 8 size-segregated particle matter (PM), were collected using a sampler (with 8 nominal cut-sizes ranged from 0.43 to 9.0 μm) from October 2008 to September 2009 at five sites in both polluted and background regions of a coastal city, Xiamen. The results showed that particulate matters in the fine mode (PM2.1, Dp < 2.1 μm) comprised large part of mass concentrations of aerosols, which accounted for 45.56-51.27%, 40.04-60.81%, 42.02-60.81%, and 40.46-57.07% of the total particulate mass in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The water-soluble ionic species in the fine mode at five sampling sites varied from 15.33 to 33.82 (spring), 14.03 to 28.06 (summer), 33.47 to 72.52 (autumn), and 48.39 to 69.75 μg m- 3 (winter), respectively, which accounted for 57.30 ± 6.51% of the PM2.1 mass concentrations. Secondary pollutants of NH4+, SO42- and NO3- were the dominant contributors of WSIs, which suggested that pollutants from anthropogenic activities, such as SO2, NOx were formed in aerosols by photochemical reactions. The size distributions of Na+, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- were bimodal, peaking at 0.43-0.65 μm and 3.3-5.8 μm. Although some ions, such as NH4+ presented bimodal distributions, the coarse mode was insignificant compared to the fine mode. Ca2+ and Mg2+ exhibited unimodal distributions at all sampling sites, peaking at 2.1-3.3 μm, while K+ having a bimodal distributions with a major peak at 0.43-0.65 μm and a minor one at 3.3-4.7 μm, were used in most of samples. Seasonal and spatial variations in the size-distribution profiles suggested that meteorological conditions (seasonal patterns) and sampling locations (geographical patterns) were the main factors determining the formation of secondary aerosols and characteristics of size distributions for WSIs.

  13. Fine Iron Aerosols Are Internally Mixed with Nitrate in the Urban European Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, D C S; Harrison, Roy M; Onat, Burcu

    2016-04-19

    Atmospheric iron aerosol is a bioavailable essential nutrient playing a role in oceanic productivity. Using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), the particle size (0.3-1.5 μm), chemical composition and mixing state of Fe-containing particles collected at two European urban sites (London and Barcelona) were characterized. Out of the six particle types accounting for the entire Fe-aerosol population, that arising from long-range transport (LRT) of fine Fe-containing particles (Fe-LRT, 54-82% across the two sites) was predominant. This particle type was found to be internally mixed with nitrate and not with sulfate, and likely mostly associated with urban traffic activities. This is in profound contrast with previous studies carried out in Asia, where the majority of iron-containing particles are mixed with sulfate and are of coal combustion origin. Other minor fine iron aerosol sources included mineral dust (8-11%), traffic brake wear material (1-17%), shipping/oil (1-6%), biomass combustion (4-13%) and vegetative debris (1-3%). Overall, relative to anthropogenic Asian Fe-sulfate dust, anthropogenic European dust internally mixed with additional key nutrients such as nitrate is likely to play a different role in ocean global biogeochemical cycles.

  14. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H{sub 2}O, MgO, and SiO{sub 2} dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures.

  15. Air pollution-aerosol interactions produce more bioavailable iron for ocean ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijun; Xu, Liang; Liu, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Jianchao; Lin, Yangting; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Huiwang; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Wenxing; Harrison, Roy M; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shao, Longyi; Fu, Pingqing; Nenes, Athanasios; Shi, Zongbo

    2017-03-01

    It has long been hypothesized that acids formed from anthropogenic pollutants and natural emissions dissolve iron (Fe) in airborne particles, enhancing the supply of bioavailable Fe to the oceans. However, field observations have yet to provide indisputable evidence to confirm this hypothesis. Single-particle chemical analysis for hundreds of individual atmospheric particles collected over the East China Sea shows that Fe-rich particles from coal combustion and steel industries were coated with thick layers of sulfate after 1 to 2 days of atmospheric residence. The Fe in aged particles was present as a "hotspot" of (insoluble) iron oxides and throughout the acidic sulfate coating in the form of (soluble) Fe sulfate, which increases with degree of aging (thickness of coating). This provides the "smoking gun" for acid iron dissolution, because iron sulfate was not detected in the freshly emitted particles and there is no other source or mechanism of iron sulfate formation in the atmosphere.

  16. Air pollution–aerosol interactions produce more bioavailable iron for ocean ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weijun; Xu, Liang; Liu, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Jianchao; Lin, Yangting; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Huiwang; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Wenxing; Harrison, Roy M.; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shao, Longyi; Fu, Pingqing; Nenes, Athanasios; Shi, Zongbo

    2017-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that acids formed from anthropogenic pollutants and natural emissions dissolve iron (Fe) in airborne particles, enhancing the supply of bioavailable Fe to the oceans. However, field observations have yet to provide indisputable evidence to confirm this hypothesis. Single-particle chemical analysis for hundreds of individual atmospheric particles collected over the East China Sea shows that Fe-rich particles from coal combustion and steel industries were coated with thick layers of sulfate after 1 to 2 days of atmospheric residence. The Fe in aged particles was present as a “hotspot” of (insoluble) iron oxides and throughout the acidic sulfate coating in the form of (soluble) Fe sulfate, which increases with degree of aging (thickness of coating). This provides the “smoking gun” for acid iron dissolution, because iron sulfate was not detected in the freshly emitted particles and there is no other source or mechanism of iron sulfate formation in the atmosphere. PMID:28275731

  17. Acid and organic aerosol coatings on magnetic nanoparticles increase iron concentrations in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Jang, Myoseon

    2009-07-01

    Numerous industrial applications for man-made nanoparticles have been proposed. Interactions of nanoparticles with agents in the atmosphere may impact human health. We tested the postulate that in vitro exposures of respiratory epithelial cells to airborne magnetic nanoparticles (MNP; Fe(3)O(4)) with and without a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and an inorganic acid could affect iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and interleukin (IL)-8 release. Cell iron concentrations were increased after exposures to MNP and values were further elevated with co-exposures to either SOA or inorganic acid. Increased expression of ferritin and elevated levels of RNA for DMT1, proteins for iron storage and transport respectively, followed MNP exposures, but values were significant for only those with co-exposures to inorganic acid and organic aerosols. Cell iron concentration corresponded to a measure of oxidative stress in the airway epithelial cells; MNP with co-exposures to SOA and inorganic acid increased both available metal and indices of oxidant generation. Finally, the release of a proinflammatory cytokine (i.e. IL-8) by the exposed cells similarly increased with cell iron concentration. We conclude that MNP can interact with a SOA and an inorganic acid to present metal in a catalytically reactive state to cultured respiratory cells. This produces an oxidative stress to affect a release of IL-8.

  18. Electron paramagnetic studies of the copper and iron containing soluble ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2010-08-01

    Soluble ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) from Nitrosomonas europaea was purified to homogeneity and metals in the active sites of the enzyme (Cu, Fe) were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were obtained for a type 2 Cu(II) site with g(parallel) = 2.24, A(parallel) = 18.4 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.057 as well as for heme and non heme iron present in purified soluble AMO from N. europaea. A second type 2 Cu(II) EPR signal with g(parallel) = 2.29, A(parallel) = 16.1 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.03 appeared in the spectrum of the ferricyanide oxidized enzyme and was attributed to oxidation of cuprous sites. Comparison of EPR-detectable Cu(2+) with total copper determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) suggests that there are six paramagnetic Cu(2+) and three diamagnetic Cu(1+) per heterotrimeric soluble AMO (two paramagnetic and one diamagnetic Cu per alphabetagamma-protomer). A trigonal EPR signal at g = 6.01, caused by a high-spin iron, indicative for cytochrome bound iron, and a rhombic signal at g = 4.31, characteristic of specifically bound Fe(3+) was detectable. The binding of nitric oxide in the presence of reductant resulted in a ferrous S = 3/2 signal, characteristic of a ferrous nitrosyl complex. Inactivation of soluble AMO with acetylene did neither diminish the ferrous signal nor the intensity of the Cu(2+)-EPR signal.

  19. THE LATTICE PARAMETERS AND SOLUBILITY LIMITS OF ALPHA IRON AS AFFECTED BY SOME BINARY TRANSITION-ELEMENT ADDITIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The lattice parameters of alpha iron with binary additions of all the transition metals, except technetium, have been accurately determined on solid...samples. No direct correlation with solute size is observed, but an effect of electron configuration is noted. The solubility limits of alpha iron with

  20. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  1. Mixing and water-soluble characteristics of particulate organic compounds in individual urban aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic compounds (POCs) in the atmosphere can alter the morphology and hygroscopicity of inorganic particles by coagulation and mixing. Direct observations can illustrate the mixing of organic and inorganic particles. Compositions, mixing states, and morphologies of 360 aerosol particles from urban Beijing collected on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with Si-O substrate were obtained using TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X ray spectrometry (TEM/EDX). The Si-O substrate used in this study allows TEM/EDX to detect carbonaceous particles internally mixed with inorganic particles. POCs were present in approximately 90% of the nitrate-coated mineral particles on both hazy and clear days. Approximately 73% of K- and S-rich particles contained organic coatings and organic inclusions/aggregations on hazy days, while 53% of S-rich particles on clear days during the Beijing Olympics contained only organic coatings. Water dialysis of individual particles indicated that the organic inclusions/aggregations in the K- and S-rich particles were insoluble in water but that POCs from the coatings of individual particles were soluble. The organic coatings on individual inorganic particles may influence their surface hygroscopicity and optical properties.

  2. Hygroscopic growth of water soluble organic carbon isolated from atmospheric aerosol collected at US national parks and Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathan F.; Collins, Don R.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Samburova, Vera; Zielinska, Barbara; Kumar, Naresh; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-02-01

    Due to the atmospheric abundance and chemical complexity of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), its contribution to the hydration behavior of atmospheric aerosol is both significant and difficult to assess. For the present study, the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of isolated atmospheric WSOC particulate matter was measured without the compounding effects of common, soluble inorganic aerosol constituents. WSOC was extracted with high purity water from daily high-volume PM2.5 filter samples and separated from water soluble inorganic constituents using solid-phase extraction. The WSOC filter extracts were concentrated and combined to provide sufficient mass for continuous generation of the WSOC-only aerosol over the combined measurement time of the tandem differential mobility analyzer and coupled scanning mobility particle sizer-CCN counter used for the analysis. Aerosol samples were taken at Great Smoky Mountains National Park during the summer of 2006 and fall-winter of 2007-2008; Mount Rainier National Park during the summer of 2009; Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, during the summer of 2010; and Acadia National Park during the summer of 2011. Across all sampling locations and seasons, the hygroscopic growth of WSOC samples at 90 % RH, expressed in terms of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ranged from 0.05 to 0.15. Comparisons between the hygroscopicity of WSOC and that of samples containing all soluble materials extracted from the filters implied a significant modification of the hydration behavior of inorganic components, including decreased hysteresis separating efflorescence and deliquescence and enhanced water uptake between 30 and 70 % RH.

  3. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  4. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation over Coastal Ocean: Inferences from Atmospheric Water-Soluble Low Molecular Weight Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Sarin, Manmohan

    2017-04-07

    A lack of consensus on the distributions and formation pathways of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) over oceanic regions downwind of pollution sources limits our ability to assess their climate impact globally. As a case study, we report here on water-soluble SOA components such as dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls in the continental outflows from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and Southeast Asia (SEA) to the Bay of Bengal. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant species followed by succinic (C4) and glyoxylic acids (ωC2) in the outflow. Nonsea-salt SO4(2-) also dominates (∼70%) total water-soluble inorganic constituents and correlates well with aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and C2, indicating their production through aqueous phase photochemical reactions. Furthermore, mass ratios of dicarboxylic acids (C2/C4, C2/ωC2), and their relative abundances in water-soluble organic carbon and total organic carbon are quite similar between the two continental (IGP and SEA) outflows, indicating the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photochemical reactions in LWC-enriched aerosols, largely controlled by anthropogenic SO4(2-).

  5. Phase Partitioning of Soluble Trace Gases with Size-Resolved Aerosols during the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A.; Keene, W. C.; Pszenny, A.; Sander, R.; Maben, J. R.; Warrick-Wriston, C.; Bearekman, R.

    2011-12-01

    During February and March 2011, size-resolved and bulk aerosol were sampled at 22 m above the surface over nominal 12-hour (daytime and nighttime) intervals from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (40.05 N, 105.01 W, 1584-m elevation). Samples were analyzed for major organic and inorganic ionic constituents by high performance ion chromatography (IC). Soluble trace gases (HCl, HNO3, NH3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) were sampled in parallel over 2-hour intervals with tandem mist chambers and analyzed on site by IC. NH4+, NO3-, and SO42- were the major ionic components of aerosols (median values of 57.7, 34.5, and 7.3 nmol m-3 at STP, respectively, N = 45) with 86%, 82%, and 82%, respectively, associated with sub-μm size fractions. Cl- and Na+ were present at significant concentrations (median values of 6.8 and 6.6 nmol m-3, respectively) but were associated primarily with super-μm size fractions (75% and 78%, respectively). Median values (and ranges) for HCl, HNO3, and NH3 were 21 (<20-1257), 120 (<45-1638), and 5259 (<1432-48,583) pptv, respectively. Liquid water contents of size-resolved aerosols and activity coefficients for major ionic constituents were calculated with the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model II and IV (E-AIM) based on the measured aerosol composition, RH, temperature, and pressure. Size-resolved aerosol pHs were inferred from the measured phase partitioning of HCl, HNO3, and NH3. Major controls of phase partitioning and associated chemical dynamics will be presented.

  6. Water-Soluble Organic Species in Biomass Burning Aerosols in Southern Africa: Their Chemical Identification and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Magi, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the SAFARI-2000 field campaign, 14 aerosol samples were collected from an aircraft in plumes from biomass fires (under both flaming and smoldering conditions), at various distances from the fire source. Also collected were 36 aerosol samples in haze layers ranging from the surface to 16,000 feet, some of which could be associated with specific fires. The samples were collected on teflon membrane filters (lower size limit of about 30nm in diameter) which were analyzed for total aerosol mass loading and chemical composition using several analytical techniques. Particular effort was made to speciate the water-soluble portion of the aerosol organics. Seven organic acids and seven carbohydrate species (and their possible stereoisomers) were identified and quantified, along with three inorganic anions and five inorganic cations. The identified organic species accounted for up to 32% of the total aerosol mass; compared with concurrent total carbon and organic carbon measurements, the identified organics constituted at least 5% to 30% of the mass of the total aerosol organics. A number of conspicuous spatial distribution patterns were observed for these species. For instance, using K+ to correct for dilution, it was found that gluconate, oxalate, succinate, and glutarate, along with sulfate and nitrate, all increased significantly in mass concentration from the fire source going downwind. This suggests secondary formation of these species during aerosol aging. On the other hand, formate and acetate showed decreasing trends downwind, probably due to the loss of these volatile species to the gas phase. Another striking pattern is that anhydrosugars (e.g. levoglucosan) had the highest aerosol mass fraction near smoldering fires but a very low fraction in the haze layers, whereas, dicarboxylic acids showed an almost opposite trend. This implies possible chemical reaction processes converting intermediate organic products, such as levoglucosan, to smaller products like

  7. Characterization of Chromophoric Water-Soluble Organic Matter in Urban, Forest, and Marine Aerosols by HR-ToF-AMS Analysis and Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingcai; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Iwamoto, Yoko; Kagami, Sara; Deng, Yange; Ogawa, Shuhei; Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Kato, Shungo; Ida, Akira; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-10-04

    Chromophoric water-soluble organic matter in atmospheric aerosols potentially plays an important role in aqueous reactions and light absorption by organics. The fluorescence and chemical-structural characteristics of the chromophoric water-soluble organic matter in submicron aerosols collected in urban, forest, and marine environments (Nagoya, Kii Peninsula, and the tropical Eastern Pacific) were investigated using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer. A total of three types of water-soluble chromophores, two with fluorescence characteristics similar to those of humiclike substances (HULIS-1 and HULIS-2) and one with fluorescence characteristics similar to those of protein compounds (PLOM), were identified in atmospheric aerosols by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) for EEMs. We found that the chromophore components of HULIS-1 and -2 were associated with highly and less-oxygenated structures, respectively, which may provide a clue to understanding the chemical formation or loss of organic chromophores in atmospheric aerosols. Whereas HULIS-1 was ubiquitous in water-soluble chromophores over different environments, HULIS-2 was abundant only in terrestrial aerosols, and PLOM was abundant in marine aerosols. These findings are useful for further studies regarding the classification and source identification of chromophores in atmospheric aerosols.

  8. Zero-valent iron for the removal of soluble uranium in simulated DOE site groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Jarabek, R.J.; Fiedor, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    Groundwater at the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area, located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, is contaminated with regulated metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to former site activities and disposal practices. The contaminant of principle concern, from the perspective of protecting human health, is soluble uranium, which is present in some waters at concentrations up to a few parts-per-million. We present product speciation and relative reaction kinetics; for removal of soluble uranium under oxic and anoxic conditions with use of zero-valent iron. Under oxic conditions, U(VI) is rapidly and strongly sorbed to hydrous ferric oxide particulate ({open_quotes}rust{close_quotes}), whereas uranium is slowly and incompletely reduced to U(IV) under anoxic conditions.

  9. Water-soluble organic carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and α-dicarbonyls in the tropical Indian aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.

    2010-06-01

    Tropical aerosol (PM10) samples (n = 49) collected from southeast coast of India were studied for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), together with analyses of total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Their distributions were characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid followed by terephthalic (t-Ph), malonic, and succinic acids. Total concentrations of diacids (227-1030 ng m-3), ketoacids (16-105 ng m-3), and dicarbonyls (4-23 ng m-3) are comparative to those from other Asian megacities such as Tokyo and Hong Kong. t-Ph acid was found as the second most abundant diacid in the Chennai aerosols. This feature has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols. t-Ph acid is most likely derived from the field burning of plastics. Water-soluble diacids were found to contribute 0.4%-3% of TC and 4%-11% of WSOC. Based on molecular distributions and backward air mass trajectories, we found that diacids and related compounds in coastal South Indian aerosols are influenced by South Asian and Indian Ocean monsoons. Organic aerosols are also suggested to be significantly transported long distances from North India and the Middle East in early winter and from Southeast Asia in late winter, but some originate from photochemical reactions over the Bay of Bengal. In contrast, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, and South Indian continent are suggested as major source regions in summer. We also found daytime maxima of most diacids, except for C9 and t-Ph acids, which showed nighttime maxima in summer. Emissions from marine and terrestrial plants, combined with land/sea breezes and in situ photochemical oxidation, are suggested especially in summer as an important factor that controls the composition of water-soluble organic aerosols over the southeast coast of India. Regional emissions from anthropogenic sources are also important in megacity Chennai, but their influence is

  10. Solubility relationships of aluminum and iron minerals associated with acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Yelton, Jennifer L.; Reddy, K. J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability to properly manage the oxidation of pyritic minerals and associated acid mine drainage is dependent upon understanding the chemistry of the disposal environment. One accepted disposal method is placing pyritic-containing materials in the groundwater environment. The objective of this study was to examine solubility relationships of Al and Fe minerals associated with pyritic waste disposed in a low leaching aerobic saturated environment. Two eastern oil shales were used in this oxidizing equilibration study, a New Albany Shale (unweathered, 4.6 percent pyrite), and a Chattanooga Shale (weathered, 1.5 percent pyrite). Oil shale samples were equilibrated with distilled-deionized water from 1 to 180 d with a 1∶1 solid-to-solution ratio. The suspensions were filtered and the clear filtrates were analyzed for total cations and anions. Ion activities were calculated from total concentrations. Below pH 6.0, depending upon SO{4/2-} activity, Al3+ solubility was controlled by AlOHSO4 (solid phase) for both shales. Initially, Al3+ solubility for the New Albany Shale showed equilibrium with amorphous Al(OH)3. The pH decreased with time, and Al3+ solubility approached equilibrium with AlOHSO4(s). Below pH 6.0, Fe3+ solubility appeared to be regulated by a basic iron sulfate solid phase with the stoichiometric composition of FeOHSO4(s). The results of this study indicate that below pH 6.0, Al3+ solubilities, are limited by basic Al and Fe sulfate solid phases (AlOHSO4(s) and FeHSO4(s)). The results from this study further indicate that the acidity in oil shale waters is produced from the hydrolysis of Al3+ and Fe3+ activities in solution. These results indicate a fundamental change in the stoichiometric equations used to predict acidity from iron sulfide oxidation. The results of this study also indicate that water quality predictions associated with acid mine drainage can be based on fundamental thermodynamic relationships. As a result, waste management decisions

  11. Enhanced Yields of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria by In Situ Electrochemical Reduction of Soluble Iron in the Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Robert C.; Howard, Gary T.; McGinness, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus for culturing chemolithotrophic bacteria that respire aerobically on ferrous ions is described. Enhanced yields of the bacteria were achieved by the in situ electrochemical reduction of soluble iron in the growth medium. When subjected to a direct current of 30 A for 60 days, a 45-liter culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans grew from 6 × 107 to 9.5 × 109 cells per ml. Growth of the bacterium within the electrolytic bioreactor was linear with time. A final cell density corresponding to 4.7 g of wet cell paste per liter was achieved, and a total of 320 g of wet cell paste was harvested from one culture. The apparatus was designed to deliver protons concomitantly with electrons; therefore, the pH of the culture remained stable at 1.6 ± 0.1 for the duration of growth. This laboratory-scale apparatus may be readily adapted to pilot or production scale. It is thus anticipated that abundant numbers of iron-oxidizing bacteria may be obtained for both fundamental and applied studies. PMID:16349344

  12. Climate engineering by mimicking natural dust climate control: the iron salt aerosol method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeste, Franz Dietrich; de Richter, Renaud; Ming, Tingzhen; Caillol, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Power stations, ships and air traffic are among the most potent greenhouse gas emitters and are primarily responsible for global warming. Iron salt aerosols (ISAs), composed partly of iron and chloride, exert a cooling effect on climate in several ways. This article aims firstly to examine all direct and indirect natural climate cooling mechanisms driven by ISA tropospheric aerosol particles, showing their cooperation and interaction within the different environmental compartments. Secondly, it looks at a proposal to enhance the cooling effects of ISA in order to reach the optimistic target of the Paris climate agreement to limit the global temperature increase between 1.5 and 2 °C. Mineral dust played an important role during the glacial periods; by using mineral dust as a natural analogue tool and by mimicking the same method used in nature, the proposed ISA method might be able to reduce and stop climate warming. The first estimations made in this article show that by doubling the current natural iron emissions by ISA into the troposphere, i.e., by about 0.3 Tg Fe yr-1, artificial ISA would enable the prevention or even reversal of global warming. The ISA method proposed integrates technical and economically feasible tools.

  13. Dense nanocrystalline yttrium iron garnet films formed at room temperature by aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Scooter D. Glaser, Evan R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Hite, Jennifer

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We deposit yttrium iron garnet films at room temperature using aerosol deposition. • Films are 96% of theoretical density for yttrium iron garnet. • We report magnetic and structural properties post-deposition and post-annealing. • Low-temperature annealing decreases the FMR linewidth. • We discuss features of the FMR spectra at each anneal temperature. - Abstract: We have employed aerosol deposition to form polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on sapphire at room temperature that are 90–96% dense. We characterize the structural and dynamic magnetic properties of the dense films using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. We find that the as-deposited films are pure single-phase YIG formed of compact polycrystallites ∼20 nm in size. The ferromagnetic resonance mode occurs at 2829 G with a linewidth of 308 G. We perform a series of successive anneals up to 1000 °C on a film to explore heat treatment on the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth. We find the narrowest linewidth of 98 G occurs after a 750 °C anneal.

  14. Modelling of Soluble Iron Formation, Transport and Deposition to the North Pacific Ocean, Role of Anthropogenic Pollutants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmon, F.; Chuang, P.; Meskhidze, N.

    2006-12-01

    Soluble iron deposited via atmospheric processes represents an important nutrient for open ocean ecosystems, which might influence phytoplancton productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake. Atmospheric deposition of mineral dust is known to be the essential supply of iron to the ocean. However, most of the iron contained in mineral particles is unsoluble, whereas only the soluble fraction of the iron is thought to be effectively bio-available. There is still a great deal of uncertainties in the estimation of this fraction and the representation of iron solubilisation processes in the atmosphere. In this scope, we present a modeling study aiming at better representing such processes. In particular, we focus on the different roles of anthropogenic chemical compounds in the atmospheric iron cycle and deposition. These roles are of two orders : (i) the acidification of mineral particles by anthropogenic compounds influencing the solubilisation of the iron transported and (ii) the direct emission, transport and deposition of iron emitted by anthropogenic activities. For this study, we implement a set of specific mechanisms in the global chemistry transport model GEOS- CHEM. Our study focuses on the East Asia - North pacific outflow, a region where interactions between dust and pollution are particularly likely to occur and where the ocean ecosystem is known to be iron limited.

  15. Natural abundance 13C and 14C analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Elena N; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-10-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constitutes a large fraction of climate-forcing organic aerosols in the atmosphere, yet the sources of WSOC are poorly constrained. A method was developed to measure the stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) and radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) composition of WSOC for apportionment between fossil fuel and different biogenic sources. Synthetic WSOC test substances and ambient aerosols were employed to investigate the effect of both modern and fossil carbon contamination and any method-induced isotope fractionation. The method includes extraction of aerosols collected on quartz filters followed by purification and preparation for off-line δ(13)C and Δ(14)C determination. The preparative freeze-drying step for isotope analysis yielded recoveries of only ∼70% for ambient aerosols and WSOC probes. However, the δ(13)C of the WSOC isolates were in agreement with the δ(13)C of the unprocessed starting material, even for the volatile oxalic acid probe (6.59 ± 0.37‰ vs 6.33 ± 0.31‰; 2 sd). A (14)C-fossil phthalic acid WSOC probe returned a fraction modern biomass of <0.008 whereas a (14)C-modern sucrose standard yielded a fraction modern of >0.999, indicating the Δ(14)C-WSOC method to be free of both fossil and contemporary carbon contamination. Application of the δ(13)C/Δ(14)C-WSOC method to source apportion climate-affecting aerosols was illustrated be constraining that WSOC in ambient Stockholm aerosols were 88% of contemporary biogenic C3 plant origin.

  16. A case of anaemia in a neonatal warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) and evaluation of serum-soluble iron in warthogs.

    PubMed

    Kenny, D E; Braselton, W E; Taylor, R A; Morgan, T; Hesky, R B

    2002-09-01

    A 38-day-old male warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) with marked anaemia (haematocrit = 14 %) presented to the Denver Zoological Gardens hospital with ataxia, tachypnoea, suspected stunted growth and cardiomegaly. The piglet demonstrated some features consistent with both iron deficiency anaemia and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Serum-soluble iron was below the level of detection (< 8.96 micromol/l). Iron deficiency anaemia is a well recognised entity in domestic swine reared on concrete and denied access to soil. Fifteen captive warthogs were subsequently evaluated for serum soluble iron content (mean = 21.62 +/- 4.36 micromol/l as well as 5 neonatal warthog piglets that required hand-rearing. Only 1 of 5 neonatal warthog piglets had measurable serum soluble iron (9.50 micromol/l). These data suggest that warthogs are similar to domestic swine and are born with low iron stores. Some form of iron supplementation should be considered for captive neonatal warthog piglets, especially if they are reared on concrete.

  17. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  18. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  19. Reticulocyte haemoglobin content vs. soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index in iron deficiency anaemia accompanied with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marković, M; Majkić-Singh, N; Ignjatović, S; Singh, S

    2007-10-01

    Ferritin concentration, as a parameter of iron status that is commonly used in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), often has limited values if the iron deficiency is accompanied by inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the value of reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr) and soluble transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/F) in the diagnosis of IDA and differential diagnosis of IDA and anaemia of chronic disease. The study included 66 nonanaemic individuals as controls, 86 patients with IDA divided into noninflammatory and inflammatory subgroups, and 32 patients with anaemia of chronic disease. Blood count, iron, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, ferritin, C-reactive protein, sTfR and CHr were determined. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed very high discriminating power for CHr, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/F in the diagnosis of IDA. In patients with anaemia of chronic disease these parameters showed no significant difference from the control. CHr and sTfR enabled recognition of iron deficiency and were not affected by acute phase reaction. They are sensitive markers of body iron status with additional value to conventional tests for the detection of iron deficiency.

  20. Sources and light absorption of water-soluble brown carbon aerosols in the outflow from northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2013-07-01

    High loadings of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols in Chinese air influence the air quality for over 1 billion people and impact the regional climate. A large fraction (17-80%) of this aerosol carbon is water soluble, promoting cloud formation and thus climate cooling. Recent findings, however, suggest that water-soluble carbonaceous aerosols also absorb sunlight, bringing additional direct and indirect climate warming effects, yet the extent and nature of light absorption by this water-soluble brown carbon (WS-BrC) and its relation to sources is poorly understood. Here, we combine source estimates constrained by dual-carbon-isotope with light absorption measurements of WS-BrC for a March 2011 campaign at the Korea Climate Observatory at Gosan (KCOG), a receptor station in SE Yellow Sea for the outflow from N. China. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of WS-BrC for air masses from N. China were in general higher (0.8-1.1 m2 g-1), than from other source regions (0.3-0.8 m2 g-1). We estimate that this effect corresponds to 13-49% of the radiative forcing caused by light absorption by black carbon. Radiocarbon constraints show that the WS-BrC in Chinese outflow had significantly higher amounts of fossil sources (30-50%) compared to previous findings in S. Asia, N. America and Europe. Stable carbon (δ13C) measurements indicated influence of aging during air mass transport. These results indicate the importance of incorporating WS-BrC in climate models and the need to constrain climate effects by emission source sector.

  1. Dissolution behaviour of ferric pyrophosphate and its mixtures with soluble pyrophosphates: Potential strategy for increasing iron bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Blanco, Elena; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Velev, Orlin D; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2016-10-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) is a widely used iron source in food fortification and in nutritional supplements, due to its white colour, that is very uncommon for insoluble Fe salts. Although its dissolution is an important determinant of Fe adsorption in human body, the solubility characteristics of FePP are complex and not well understood. This report is a study on the solubility of FePP as a function of pH and excess of pyrophosphate ions. FePP powder is sparingly soluble in the pH range of 3-6 but slightly soluble at pH<2 and pH>8. In the presence of pyrophosphate ions the solubility of FePP strongly increases at pH 5-8.5 due to formation a soluble complex between Fe(III) and pyrophosphate ions, which leads to an 8-10-fold increase in the total ionic iron concentration. This finding is beneficial for enhancing iron bioavailability, which important for the design of fortified food, beverages, and nutraceutical products.

  2. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-07-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements which can provide further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows for the characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP supersite, Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-) were the dominating species (63 %) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt was the main component (73 %) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17 %) providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely that organic acids contributed to the charge balance. This study demonstrates the UK

  3. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-02-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements, which can lead to further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP "Supersite", Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-), were the dominating species (63%) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt, was the main component (73%) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17%) as providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where as smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other Western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely, that organic acids contributed to the charge

  4. Dicarboxylic acids and water-soluble organic carbon in aerosols in New Delhi, India, in winter: Characteristics and formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2009-10-01

    Day- and nighttime aerosol samples were collected at an urban site in New Delhi, India, in winter 2006-2007. They were studied for low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and related compounds, as well as total water-soluble organic carbon (TWSOC). High concentrations of diacids (up to 6.03 μg m-3), TWSOC, and OC were obtained, which are substantially higher than those previously observed at other urban sites in Asia. Daytime TWSOC/OC ratio (37%) was on average higher than that in nighttime (25%). In particular, more water-soluble OC (M-WSOC) to TWSOC ratio in daytime (50%) was twice higher than in nighttime (27%), suggesting that aerosols in New Delhi are photochemically more processed in daytime to result in more water-soluble organic compounds. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid, followed by succinic (C4) and malonic (C3) acids. Contributions of C2 to M-WSOC were greater (av. 8%) in nighttime than daytime (av. 3%). Positive correlations of C2 with malic acid (hC4), glyoxylic acid (ωC2), and relative humidity suggest that secondary production of C2 probably in aqueous phase is important in nighttime via the oxidation of both longer-chain diacids and ωC2. C2 also showed a positive correlation with potassium (K+) in nighttime, suggesting that the enhanced C2 concentrations are associated with biomass/biofuel burning. More tight, positive correlation between less water-soluble OC (L-WSOC) and K+ was found in both day- and nighttime, suggesting that L-WSOC, characterized by longer chain and/or higher molecular weight compounds, is significantly influenced by primary emissions from biomass/biofuel burning.

  5. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm.

  6. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  7. Water Soluble Ions in Bulk Aerosol During the WINTER 2015 Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Brown, S. S.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Fibiger, D. L.; Guo, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; McDuffie, E. E.; Schroder, J. C.; Sullivan, A.; Thornton, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on filters from the NCAR C-130 during the WINTER campaign using an inlet believed to transmit particles up to 4 micron in diameter. Filter integration times were nominally 7 minutes. Aqueous extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for 5 anions and 5 cations, we focus primarily on chloride and nitrate due to their roles coupling chlorine and nitrogen oxide chemistry. Comparison to measurements of submicron aerosol (by PILS and AMS) indicates that there was significant coarse chloride in the boundary layer on all WINTER flights, including the 7 flights over the continent. Significant super micron chloride at altitudes above 2 km was seen in just 3 of the filter samples from the entire mission, all of these were well inland. During the 6 flights over the Atlantic ocean we observed displacement of chloride from the dominant seasalt aerosol at times, but evidence for coarse mode nitrate or sulfate aerosol to explain this is less clear. While coarse aerosol chloride mixing ratios were sufficient to support observed production of nitryl chloride, no correlations between these compounds were observed on any flights. However, nitrate was positively correlated with nitryl chloride, as expected, on all flights when the latter exceeded several 100's of pptv for extended periods. Aerosol nitrate was also positively correlated with dinitrogen pentoxide when mixing ratios of the latter exceeded ~500 pptv for significant portions of a flight. On the WINTER flights in February aerosol nitrate was often more abundant than nitric acid, this was less often the case for the flights in March. This change in partitioning of nitrate between gas and particle phases reflects an increasing trend of nitric acid and a small decrease in abundance of aerosol nitrate through the campaign.

  8. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  9. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  10. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  11. Saharan dust aerosol over the central Mediterranean Sea: optical columnar measurements vs. aerosol load, chemical composition and marker solubility at ground level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Sferlazzo, D. M.; Becagli, S.; Bommarito, C.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; di Sarra, A.; Ghedini, C.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Lucarelli, F.; Meloni, D.; Monteleone, F.; Nava, S.; Pace, G.; Piacentino, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study aims at the determination of the mineral contribution to PM10 in the central Mediterranean Sea on the basis of 7 yr of PM10 chemical composition daily measurements made on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E). Aerosol optical depth measurements are carried out in parallel while sampling with a multi-stage impactor, and observations with an optical particle counter were performed in selected periods. Based on daily samples, the total content and soluble fraction of selected metals are used to identify and characterize the dust events. The total contribution is determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) while the composition of the soluble fraction by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) after extraction with HNO3 at pH 1.5. The average PM10 concentration at Lampedusa calculated over the period June 2004-December 2010 is 31.5 μg m-3, with low interannual variability. The annual means are below the EU annual standard for PM10, but 9.9% of the total number of daily data exceed the daily threshold value established by the European Commission for PM (50 μg m-3, European Community, EC/30/1999). The Saharan dust contribution to PM10 was derived by calculating the contribution of Al, Si, Fe, Ti, non-sea-salt (nss) Ca, nssNa, and nssK oxides in samples in which PIXE data were available. Cases with crustal content exceeding the 75th percentile of the crustal oxide content distribution were identified as dust events. Using this threshold we identify 175 events; 31.6% of them (55 events) present PM10 higher than 50 μg m-3, with dust contributing by 33% on average. The annual average crustal contribution to PM10 is 5.42 μg m-3, reaching a value as high as 67.9 μg m-3, 49% of PM10, during an intense Saharan dust event. The crustal aerosol amount and contribution to PM10 shows a very small seasonal dependence; conversely, the dust columnar burden displays an evident annual cycle, with a strong summer maximum (monthly

  12. A new approach for the fractionation of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andracchio, Antonella; Cavicchi, Catia; Tonelli, Domenica; Zappoli, Sergio

    A novel approach is described for the fractionation of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops. The method is based on the preliminary adsorption of the sample, acidified at pH 2, on a polymeric styrene-divinylbenzene resin (XAD-2) and subsequent elution with a series of solvents, which leads to the fractionation of the sample into three classes of compounds. The method was set up using synthetic mixtures of organic compounds and then applied to selected samples of atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops. All samples and collected fractions were analysed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This method proved particularly useful both in providing information on the organic content of the samples and for the characterisation of the macromolecular compounds (MMCs) in the samples. Synthetic samples were prepared using humic, fulvic and tannic acid to simulate naturally occurring MMCs. In the first fraction, eluted with HCl, only the most soluble organic compounds (oxalic acid, formic acid and acetic acid) were collected. In the second fraction, eluted with methanol, the major part of the organic material was collected together with the more hydrophilic constituents of the humic substances. In the third fraction, it was possible to separately recover the more hydrophobic component of the humic substances. A large number of atmospheric samples (fog, aerosol, cloud) were then analysed using SEC. Most of these samples evidenced a noteworthy chromatogram at 254 nm. Moreover, the chromatographic area evidenced a clear linear correlation with the total organic carbon (TOC) values. The fractionation method on XAD-2 was finally applied to selected atmospheric samples, yielding three classes of organic compounds. In each sample, a non-negligible amount of compounds with dimensional and chemical properties similar to humic substances were collected in the third fraction. The carbon content in this latter fraction was estimated both by TOC

  13. Evidence of formation of submicrometer water-soluble organic aerosols at a deciduous forest site in northern Japan in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Jung, Jinsang; Fu, Pingqing; Mizoguchi, Yasuko; Yamanoi, Katsumi; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2012-10-01

    Semicontinuous measurements of submicrometer water-soluble organic aerosols and particle size distributions were conducted at a deciduous forest site in northern Japan in August 2010. Increases in particle number concentration were frequently observed in daytime, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). We found that daily averaged WSOC concentrations positively correlated with gross primary production of CO2 by the forest ecosystem (r2 = 0.63) and ambient temperature during daytime. These relations suggest that the formation of WSOC is closely linked to photosynthetic activity by the forest ecosystem, which depends on both temperature and solar radiation. Off-line chemical analysis of samples of particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1 μm collected during a 2 day event of elevated WSOC levels suggests that photochemical aging of both α- andβ-pinene and isoprene oxidation products contributes to the particle growth and the WSOC mass. Organic tracers of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) showed distinct diurnal variations with a maximum around noontime, also indicating that higher temperature and light intensity induce emissions of PBAPs. However, their contribution to the submicrometer WSOC mass was likely insignificant. During the day, the concentrations of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) showed a strong dependence on temperature, and the ratios of WSOC to particle volume concentration increased with an increase in the concentration ratios of 3-MBTCA to pinonic acid (PA). This result supports a previous proposal that the 3-MBTCA/PA ratios in submicrometer particles can be a useful tracer for chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol from forest vegetation.

  14. A fine fraction of soil used as an aerosol analogue during the DUNE experiment: sequential solubility in water, decreasing pH step-by-step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghnatios, C.; Losno, R.; Dulac, F.

    2014-09-01

    A soil sample collected in a desert aerosol source area near Douz (southern Tunisia) was dry-sieved at 20 μm in order to extract the fraction similar to a wind-generated aerosol, and was used to seed mesocosms during the DUNE experiment (a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient, low chlorophyll Ecosystem). In this work, said "aerosol-like" fine dust was sequentially leached by short contacts with water at initial pHs, decreasing from seven to one, representing various wet environmental conditions. For each step, the solubility of a given element is calculated as the amount of its dissolved fraction, relative to its total amount. The evolution of this fractional solubility from the highest to lowest pHs provides information on the chemical strength needed to solubilise a given element and its lability. The behaviour of the elemental solubility was sorted into two groups: (1) Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, and P, with a solubility between 23% and 70%, and a maximum sequential solubility at pH 3; (2) Al and Fe, with a solubility of less than 2% and the highest release at pH 1. Similar solubility patterns in group 1 for Ca, P, and Mn suggest a possible association of the elements in the same minerals, most probably carbonates.

  15. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated <1% were at risk for deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  16. Partitioning of dissolved iron and iron isotopes into soluble and colloidal phases along the GA03 GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Carrasco, Gonzalo G.; Wu, Jingfeng; Roshan, Saeed; Hatta, Mariko; Measures, Christopher I.; Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.; Boyle, Edward A.

    2015-06-01

    The size partitioning of dissolved Fe (dFe<0.2 μm) into soluble (sFe<0.02 μm) and colloidal (0.02 μmaerosol-derived surface dFe was maintained in the colloidal size fraction, while cFe disappeared completely at the deep chlorophyll maximum, presumably a result of preferential cFe biological uptake and/or scavenging. In the intermediate and deep ocean, however, dFe was evenly partitioned ~50:50% into sFe and cFe phases, which we hypothesize results from a "steady state" of dFe exchange reactions during and following remineralization including ligand exchange, sorption/desorption, and aggregation/disaggregation. There were only two exceptions to this constant partitioning in the intermediate/deep ocean. First, cFe dominated (82-96%) at and downstream of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal system. Also, along Line W between Woods Hole and Bermuda the dFe partitioning favored ~60-80% cFe, with the excess cFe likely resulting from inorganic cFe inputs from the margin. Thus, in the North Atlantic Ocean we propose a new model of dFe size partitioning where a "steady state" of dFe exchange reactions during and following remineralization re-partitions intermediate and deep ocean dFe into constantly fractionated sFe and cFe pools, while in the upper ocean, downstream of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and along Line W, sFe and cFe appear to cycle more independently, since either not enough time has passed to reach a new dFe exchange steady state or one of the dFe phases is non-labile to dFe exchange. This surface-subsurface decoupling model of North Atlantic dFe size partitioning is supported by Fe isotope ratio analyses of the sFe and dFe size fractions, which recorded isotopically heavy sFe (δ56Fe of +1.3‰ to +1.5‰) relative to dFe (δ56Fe~+0.5‰) in the surface ocean where sFe and cFe cycle

  17. Can land use intensification in the Mallee, Australia increase the supply of soluble iron to the Southern Ocean?

    PubMed Central

    Bhattachan, Abinash; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. In comparison to the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere exhibits low levels of dust activity. However, given their proximity to the Southern Ocean, dust emissions from continental sources in the Southern Hemisphere could have disproportionate impact on ocean productivity. Australia is the largest source of dust in the Southern Hemisphere and aeolian transport of dust has major ecological, economic and health implications. In the Mallee, agriculture is a major driver of dust emissions and dust storms that affect Southeastern Australia. In this study, we assess the dust generating potential of the sediment from the Mallee, analyze the sediment for soluble iron content and determine the likely depositional region of the emitted dust. Our results suggest that the Mallee sediments have comparable dust generating potential to other currently active dust sources in the Southern Hemisphere and the dust-sized fraction is rich in soluble iron. Forward trajectory analyses show that this dust will impact the Tasman Sea and the Australian section of the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts. PMID:25109703

  18. Can land use intensification in the Mallee, Australia increase the supply of soluble iron to the Southern Ocean?

    PubMed

    Bhattachan, Abinash; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-08-11

    The supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. In comparison to the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere exhibits low levels of dust activity. However, given their proximity to the Southern Ocean, dust emissions from continental sources in the Southern Hemisphere could have disproportionate impact on ocean productivity. Australia is the largest source of dust in the Southern Hemisphere and aeolian transport of dust has major ecological, economic and health implications. In the Mallee, agriculture is a major driver of dust emissions and dust storms that affect Southeastern Australia. In this study, we assess the dust generating potential of the sediment from the Mallee, analyze the sediment for soluble iron content and determine the likely depositional region of the emitted dust. Our results suggest that the Mallee sediments have comparable dust generating potential to other currently active dust sources in the Southern Hemisphere and the dust-sized fraction is rich in soluble iron. Forward trajectory analyses show that this dust will impact the Tasman Sea and the Australian section of the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts.

  19. Can land use intensification in the Mallee, Australia increase the supply of soluble iron to the Southern Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, Abinash; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. In comparison to the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere exhibits low levels of dust activity. However, given their proximity to the Southern Ocean, dust emissions from continental sources in the Southern Hemisphere could have disproportionate impact on ocean productivity. Australia is the largest source of dust in the Southern Hemisphere and aeolian transport of dust has major ecological, economic and health implications. In the Mallee, agriculture is a major driver of dust emissions and dust storms that affect Southeastern Australia. In this study, we assess the dust generating potential of the sediment from the Mallee, analyze the sediment for soluble iron content and determine the likely depositional region of the emitted dust. Our results suggest that the Mallee sediments have comparable dust generating potential to other currently active dust sources in the Southern Hemisphere and the dust-sized fraction is rich in soluble iron. Forward trajectory analyses show that this dust will impact the Tasman Sea and the Australian section of the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts.

  20. A~fine fraction of soil used as an aerosol analogue during the DUNE experiment: sequential solubility in water with step-by-step decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghnatios, C.; Losno, R.; Dulac, F.

    2014-02-01

    A soil sample collected in a desert aerosol source area near Douz (South Tunisia) was sieved at 20 μm in order to extract the fraction similar to an aerosol generated by wind and used to seed mesocosms during the DUNE experiment. In the present work, this "aerosol-like" fine dust was sequentially leached by short contacts with water at pHs decreasing from 7 to 1. These pHs are representative of various environmental wet conditions, the lowest of which could be reached during cloud conditions. The evolution of the solubility from the highest to the lowest pHs provides information on the necessary strength for the solubilisation of a given element and its lability. The behaviour of the elemental fractional solubility is sorted into two groups: (i) Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, P constitute group 1, with a solubility between 23% and 70% and with a maximum solubility at pH 3; (ii) whereas in group 2 (Al, Fe), the solubility is less than 2% with the highest release at pH 1. Similar solubility patterns in group 1 for Ca, P and Mn suggest a~possible association of the elements in the same minerals, most probably carbonates, which gives phosphorus an unexpected high lability.

  1. Formation of Thick Dense Yttrium Iron Garnet Films Using Aerosol Deposition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scooter D; Glaser, Evan R; Kub, Fritz J; Eddy, Charles R

    2015-05-15

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a thick-film deposition process that can produce layers up to several hundred micrometers thick with densities greater than 95% of the bulk. The primary advantage of AD is that the deposition takes place entirely at ambient temperature; thereby enabling film growth in material systems with disparate melting temperatures. This report describes in detail the processing steps for preparing the powder and for performing AD using the custom-built system. Representative characterization results are presented from scanning electron microscopy, profilometry, and ferromagnetic resonance for films grown in this system. As a representative overview of the capabilities of the system, focus is given to a sample produced following the described protocol and system setup. Results indicate that this system can successfully deposit 11 µm thick yttrium iron garnet films that are  > 90% of the bulk density during a single 5 min deposition run. A discussion of methods to afford better control of the aerosol and particle selection for improved thickness and roughness variations in the film is provided.

  2. Iron mobilization in North African dust.

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, A.; Feng, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton. Although iron-containing dust mobilized from arid regions supplies the majority of the iron to the oceans, the key flux in terms of the biogeochemical response to atmospheric deposition is the amount of soluble or bioavailable iron. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. sulfuric acid) may transform insoluble iron into soluble forms. Previous studies have suggested higher iron solubility in smaller particles, as they are subject to more thorough atmospheric processing due to a longer residence time than coarse particles. On the other hand, the specific mineralogy of iron in dust may also influence the particulate iron solubility in size. Compared to mineral dust aerosols, iron from combustion sources could be more soluble, and found more frequently in smaller particles. Internal mixing of alkaline dust with iron-containing minerals could significantly reduce iron dissolution in large dust aerosols due to the buffering effect, which may, in contrast, yield higher solubility in smaller particles externally mixed with alkaline dust (Ito and Feng, 2010). Here, we extend the modeling study of Ito and Feng (2010) to investigate atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols from African dust. In contrast to Asian dust, we used a slower dissolution rate for African dust in the fine mode. We compare simulated fractional iron solubility with observations. The inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during long-range transport to the Atlantic Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2%) dissolves from illite in coarsemode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. In contrast, a significant fraction (1-1.5%) dissolves in fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model generally reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles

  3. Distinguishing molecular characteristics of aerosol water soluble organic matter from the 2011 trans-North Atlantic US GEOTRACES cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Willoughby, A. S.; Gurganus, S. C.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-08-01

    The molecular characteristics of aerosol organic matter (OM) determines to a large extent its impacts on the atmospheric radiative budget and ecosystem function in terrestrial and aquatic environments, yet the OM molecular details of aerosols from different sources are not well established. Aerosol particulate samples with North American-influenced, North African-influenced, and marine (minimal recent continental influence) air mass back trajectories were collected as part of the 2011 trans-North Atlantic US GEOTRACES cruise and analyzed for their water soluble OM (WSOM) molecular characteristics using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples into five groups defined by distinct molecular formula characteristics. An abundance of nitrogen containing compounds with molecular formulas consistent with amino acid derivatives defined the two samples comprising the primary marine group (henceforth referred to as Primary Marine), which suggest a primary marine biological source to their WSOM in spite of their North American-influenced air mass trajectories. A second group of samples (aged marine, henceforth referred to as Aged Marine) with marine air mass trajectories was characterized by an abundance of low O / C (0.15-0.45) sulfur containing compounds consistent with organosulfate compounds formed via secondary aging reactions in the atmosphere. Several samples having North American-influenced air mass trajectories formed another group again characterized by organosulfate and nitrooxyorganosulfate type compounds with higher O / C ratios (0.5-1.0) than the Aged Marine samples reflecting the combustion influence from the North American continent. All the samples with North African-influenced air mass trajectories were grouped together in the PCA and were characterized by a lack of heteroatom (N, S, P) containing molecular formulas covering a wide O / C range (0

  4. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere: Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-10-01

    We report here the distribution of selected acidic gases and aerosol species in the North American Arctic and sub-Arctic summer troposphere. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases and acidic sulfate aerosols dominating the particulate phase. Our data show that the acidic gas and aerosol composition is uniform on a large spatial scale. There appears to be a surface source of NH4+ over the Arctic Ocean pack ice which may reflect release of NH3 from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface near ice leads, release from rotting sea ice, or an upward flux from surface ocean waters in open ice leads. This NH3 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity in the boundary layer. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southwestern Alaska inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the nearby Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO42-. While there were only minor effects on aerosol chemistry over the tundra from sea salt, the rainwater chemistry showed influence from marine aerosols which were apparently incorporated into air masses during frontal passages moving inland from the Bering Sea. The rainwater acidity over the tundra (pH 4.69) is typical of remote regions. The principal acidity components are H2SO4 and carboxylic acids, especially HCOOH. The carboxylic acids appear to have a strong continental biogenic source, but hydrocarbons of marine origin and emissions from forest fires may also be important. The wet deposition fluxes of NO3--N and SO42--S over sub-Arctic tundra during July-August 1988 were 2.1 and 2.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Wet deposition of NO3- was nearly 3 times higher than the average NOy deposition flux, which is believed to represent primarily dry deposition of HNO3 (Bakwin et al., this issue). Our measurements indicate that the mid-troposphere in the Arctic is generally contaminated with low levels of anthropogenic pollutants even in summer when direct atmospheric coupling

  5. Development and application of a quantification method for water soluble organosulfates in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Zhao, Xiaopei; Hu, Di; Zhu, Rongshu; Ouyang, Feng

    2017-03-16

    In recent years, organosulfates have been found as a significant component of secondary organic aerosols from both smog chamber experiments and field measurements. In this study, an indirect method was developed to estimate organosulfates in aerosol particles as a whole based on their sulfate functional group. A series of experiments were conducted to optimize and validate the method, and it was then applied to quantify organosulfates in the aerosol samples collected at three sampling characteristic sites in Shenzhen, with one close to a power plant (PP), one at a heavy traffic intersection (HTI), and one on the campus of Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen graduate school (HITSZ). On average, the mass concentrations of organic sulfur (Sorg) were 1.98, 1.11, 0.25 μgS m(-3) in PP, HTI and HITSZ respectively. The lower bounds of mass concentrations of organosuflates (OMs-related) were 6.86, 3.85 and 0.86 μg m(-3) and the upper bounds of mass concentrations of organosulfates were 23.05, 12.93 and 2.90 μg m(-3) in PP, HTI and HITSZ respectively. This indicates that primary emissions from coal burning and automobile exhaust can promote the secondary formation of organosulfates in the atmosphere. Overall, the mass concentrations observed in this work were higher than those reported by previous studies.

  6. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and its temperature-resolved carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei; Ci, Zhijia

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) can improve our understanding of the chemical properties, formation processes and sources of WSOC in aerosols. We developed a method that can examine different temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC and used this method to characterize aerosol samples (n = 102) collected from an urban site in Beijing in 2010-2011. The aerosol composition data including inorganic ions, elements and temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC were used as input of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model to investigate the sources of WSOC. The results showed that the mean concentrations of WSOC were 10.2 μg m- 3 with increased values in winter and decreased values in summer, while WSOC/OC ratios (mean: 51.7%) were higher in spring and summer than in fall and winter. The sampling artifacts of WSOC (18.2%) were higher than those of OC (13.4%). Though WSOC was significantly influenced by biomass burning in spring and winter, the strong correlations between WSOC and other secondary components suggested that WSOC was secondary in nature. Results of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of OC and WSOC showed that WSOC/OC ratios for different carbon fractions had the highest value of 0.92 and lowest value of 0.30. PMF analysis identified four factors, three of which were associated with three organic polar compounds groups (low, medium, and high molecular weight compounds) based on their thermal evolution features, and one of which was attributed to inorganic secondary formation processes. Annually, the contributions of four factors were 20.5%, 46.2%, 12.4% and 20.9%, respectively.

  7. [Characteristics and sources of soluble ions in aerosols from Glacier No. 1 at the headwater of Urumqi River, Tianshan Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao-Ying; Li, Zhong-Qin; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Zhou, Ping; Fan, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Major soluble ions were measured in 26 aerosol samples collected at Glacier NO. 1 at the headwater of Urumqi River in Tianshan Mountains in April, August and October 2007. The concentration, seasonal change and source of aerosol were analyzed. The results showed that the mean concentration of total soluble major ions of aerosol was 2.76 microg.m-3, Ca2+, NO-(3) and SO2-(4) were the major soluble inorganic ion components. In spring, summer and autumn, the seasonal change of the mean concentration of total soluble inorganic ions was consistent with Ca2+ , SO2-(4) , NH+(4), Na+ , Mg2+ and Cl- , the highest concentration was in summer, followed by autumn and spring. While the maximum concentration of K and NO-(3) was observed in autumn, the minimum was in spring. Soluble inorganic ion source characteristics were that: Ca2+ , Na+, Mg2+ , K+ and Cl- were mostly the land source; NO-(3) and NH: were mainly from the anthropogenic source. SO2-(4) was mainly originated from both crustal surface and anthropogenic sources.

  8. The Effects of Particle Size, Relative Humidity, and Sulfur Dioxide on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, B. T.; Marcotte, A.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.; Majestic, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study focuses on studying how iron (Fe) solubility is affected by particle size, relative humidity, and exposure to sulfur dioxide (SO2). Fe, the most abundant transition metal in atmospheric particulate matter, plays a critical role in the atmospheric sulfur cycle and is a micronutrient for phytoplankton in remote regions of the ocean. To mimic oceanic particles, iron-containing minerals (hematite, magnetite, goethite, and illite) were resuspended with sodium chloride and size-segregated on Teflon filters into five different size fractions: 10-2.5 μm, 2.5-1.0 μm, 1.0-0.5 μm, 0.5-0.25 μm, and <0.25 μm. Mineral phases were then exposed to 5 ppm SO2 in air at marine environment humidity (>80%) and arid environment humidity (24%). Trials with no SO2 ­were also performed as comparisons. Total Fe was determined by using microwave-assisted acid digestion and soluble Fe was determined by extracting the samples in a simulated cloud water buffer (pH 4.25, 0.5 mM acetate, 0.5 mM formate, and 0.2 mM ammonium nitrate). Both total and soluble Fe concentrations were determined via inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We found that, as particle size decreased, Fe percent solubility increased for hematite, magnetite, and goethite. The percent solubility of Fe in these mineral phases steadily increased from 0.5-10% as particle size decreased. In contrast, the Fe percent solubility in illite was relatively constant for the largest four size fractions but increased dramatically in the smallest size fraction. The percent solubility of Fe in illite ranged from 5-20% as the particle size decreased. Additionally, increased Fe solubility was linked to increased relative humidity with higher percent solubility generally observed in all mineral phases for the samples exposed at the higher humidity. No correlation was observed for the effects of the SO2 on Fe percent solubility. The likely lack of Fe-SO2 interactions were also supported by synchrotron

  9. Effect of magnetism on the solubility of 3 d elements in BCC iron: Results of first-principle investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Okatov, S. V.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Korzhavyi, P. A.; Ruban, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The methods of quantum-mechanical simulation have been used to study alloys of bcc iron with 3 d transition metals in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states. It has been shown that the main factor that determines the solubility of the 3 d elements is their electronic structure. The energy of the solution, mixing, and effective interatomic interactions vary regularly depending on the position of the element in the Periodic Table and on the magnetic state of the matrix. In some cases, depending on the magnetic state, changes in these quantities lead to the violation of the Hume-Rothery rules that determine the solubility of substitutional elements in alloys. The results obtained help us to understand the microscopic mechanisms that determine the solubility of alloying elements and their effect on the phase stability and structural state of steels.

  10. Physico-chemical qualification of a universal portable sampler for aerosols and water-soluble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Jean-Maxime; Sarda-Estève, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Developing a universal portable air sampler based on electrostatic precipitation. The challenge is to collect micro and nanoparticles, microorganisms as well as toxic molecules with a portable device. Electrostatic precipitation is an efficient and gentle method to collect airborne microorganisms and preserve their cultivability. But the collection of toxic gases required is not possible in such a device. The collection of such gases requires a liquid into which they have to be solubilized. Two concepts are being evaluated. The first one is based on electrospray. The goal is to investigate the collection efficiency of water-soluble gases. The second concept is based on the semi-humid electrostatic precipitator. Their high collection efficiencies for particles were already demonstrated. In the present study they are both tested with water-soluble gases. Concentrations are measured in the liquid solution by Ion Chromatography and in the gas phase by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry.

  11. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    PubMed Central

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; da Costa, G. Gamboa; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5 % of particle mass for particles with δp > 0.96 μm and 10 % of particle mass for particles with δp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H–C), unsaturated aliphatic (H–C–C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H–C–O), acetalic (O–CH–O) and aromatic (Ar–H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m−3 for particles with 1.5 < δp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m−3 for particles with δp < 0.49 μm. The molar H/C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R–H was the most abundant group, representing about 45 % of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H–C–O (27 %) and H–C–C= (26 %). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from −26.81 ± 0.18 ‰ for the smallest particles to

  12. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 months, and group 2 comprised 20 adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Results In group 1, patients' serum sTfR levels correlated negatively with mean corpuscular volume; hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, and serum iron levels; and transferrin saturation and positively with total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and red cell distribution width. In group 2, patients' serum sTfR levels did not correlate with ferritin levels and TIBC, but had a significant relationship with other iron indices. Hb and serum sTfR levels had a significant inverse relationship in both groups; however, in group 1, there was no correlation between Hb and serum ferritin levels. In 30 patients of group 1, serum sTfR levels were significantly decreased with an increase in Hb levels after iron supplementation for 1 month. Conclusion Serum sTfR levels significantly correlated with other diagnostic iron parameters of IDA and inversely correlated with an increase in Hb levels following iron supplementation. Therefore, serum sTfR levels can be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of IDA in children. PMID:25729394

  13. Soluble ferric iron as an effective protective agent against UV radiation: Implications for early life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Felipe; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Some recent MER Rover Opportunity results on ancient sedimentary rocks from Mars describe sandstones originated from the chemical weathering of olivine basalts by acidic waters [Squyres, S.W., Knoll, A.H., 2005. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 240, 1-10]. The absence of protective components in early Mars atmosphere forced any possible primordial life forms to deal with high doses of UV radiation. A similar situation occurred on the primitive Earth during the development of early life in the Archean [Berkner, L.V., Marshall, L.C., 1965. J. Atmos. Sci. 22 (3), 225-261; Kasting, J.F., 1993. Science 259, 920-926]. It is known that some cellular and/or external components can shield organisms from damaging UV radiation or quench its toxic effects [Olson, J.M., Pierson, B.K., 1986. Photosynth. Res. 9, 251-259; García-Pichel, F., 1998. Origins Life Evol. B 28, 321-347; Cockell, C., Rettberg, P., Horneck, G., Scherer, K., Stokes, M.D., 2003. Polar Biol. 26, 62-69]. The effectiveness of iron minerals for UV protection has also been reported [Phoenix, V.R., Konhauser, K.O., Adams, D.G., Bottrell, S.H., 2001. Geology 29 (9), 823-826], but nothing is known about the effect of iron in solution. Here we demonstrate the protective effect of soluble ferric iron against UV radiation on acidophilic photosynthetic microorganisms. These results offer an interesting alternative means of protection for life on the surface of early Mars and Earth, especially in light of the geochemical conditions in which the sedimentary minerals, jarosite and goethite, recently reported by the MER missions, were formed [Squyres, S.W., Arvidson, R.E., Bell III, J.F., Brückner, J., Cabrol, N.A., Calvin, W., Carr, M.H., Christensen, P.R., Clark, B.C., Crumpler, L., Des Marais, D.J., d'Uston, C., Economou, T., Farmer, J., Farrand, W., Folkner, W., Golombek, M., Gorevan, S., Grant, J.A., Greeley, R., Grotzinger, J., Haskin, L., Herkenhoff, K.E., Hviid, S., Johnson, J., Klingelhöfer, G., Knoll, A.H., Landis, G

  14. Heterogeneous reaction probabilities, solubilities, and the physical state of cold volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O.; Browell, E.; Gary, B.; Lait, L.; Livingston, J.; Newman, P.; Pueschel, R.; Russell, P.; Schoeberl, M.; Toon, G.

    1993-01-01

    On 19 January 1992, heterogeneous loss of HNO3, ClNO3, and HCl was observed in part of the Mount Pinatubo volcanic cloud that had cooled as a result of forced ascent. Portions of the volcanic cloud froze near 191 kelvin. The reaction probability of ClNO3 and the solubility of HNO3 were close to laboratory measurements on liquid sulfuric acid. The magnitude of the observed loss of HCl suggests that it underwent a heterogeneous reaction. Such reactions could lead to substantial loss of HCl on background sulfuric acid particles and so be important for polar ozone loss.

  15. Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol from Residential Wood Burning in Fresno, CA: Results from 2013 NASA DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol were investigated at Fresno, CA from 13 January to 11 February, 2013 as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The light absorption spectra of water soluble organic aerosol in PM2.5 was measured using a UV/vis diode array detector (DAD) coupled with a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) that sampled downstream of a PM2.5 cyclone (URG). The PILS was also coupled with two ion chromatographs (IC) to measure inorganic and organic ionic species in PM2.5. In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the same site to measure size-resolved chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) in real time during this study. Light absorption at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy of water-soluble brown carbon (BrC), showed strong enhancement during night time and appeared to correlate well (r = 0.71) with biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from residential wood burning for heating in the Fresno area. The tight correlations between Abs365 and biomass burning relevant tracers such as acetonitrile (r = 0.69), AMS-signature ions for phenolic compounds (r = 0.52-0.71), PAH (r = 0.74), and potassium (r = 0.67) further confirm that biomass burning contributed significantly to water soluble brown carbon during this study. The absorption angstrom exponent (Åa) values fitted between 300 and 700 nm wavelength were 3.3 ± 1.1, 2.0 ± 0.9 and 4.0 ± 0.8, respectively, in the morning, afternoon and nighttime, indicating that BrC is prevalent at night in Fresno during wintertime. However, there are also indications that small amount of BrC existed during the daytime as well, likely due to daytime wood burning and other sources such as the formation of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Finally, light absorption at 300 nm, 330 nm, and 390 nm were found to correlate tightly with BBOA, which indicate that biomass burning also emits

  16. Use of levoglucosan, potassium, and water-soluble organic carbon to characterize the origins of biomass-burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Roberta Cerasi; Lima-Souza, Michele; Caetano-Silva, Letícia; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C.; Nogueira, Raquel F. P.; Allen, Andrew G.; Cardoso, Arnaldo A.; Held, Gerhard; Campos, Maria Lucia A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Three chemical species related to biomass burning, levoglucosan, potassium and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), were measured in aerosol samples collected in a rural area on the outskirts of the municipality of Ourinhos (São Paulo State, Brazil). This region is representative of the rural interior of the State, where the economy is based on agro-industrial production, and the most important crop is sugar cane. The manual harvesting process requires that the cane be first burned to remove excess foliage, leading to large emissions of particulate materials to the atmosphere. Most of the levoglucosan (68-89%) was present in small particles (<1.5 μm), and its concentration in total aerosol ranged from 25 to 1186 ng m-3. The highest values were found at night, when most of the biomass burning occurs. In contrast, WSOC showed no diurnal pattern, with an average concentration of 5.38 ± 2.97 μg m-3 (n = 27). A significant linear correlation between levoglucosan and WSOC (r = 0.54; n = 26; p < 0.0001) confirmed that biomass burning was in fact an important source of WSOC in the study region. A moderate (but significant) linear correlation between levoglucosan and potassium concentrations (r = 0.62; n = 40; p < 0.0001) was indicative of the influence of other sources of potassium in the study region, such as soil resuspension and fertilizers. When only the fine particles (<1.5 μm; typical of biomass burning) were considered, the linear coefficient increased to 0.91 (n = 9). In this case, the average levoglucosan/K+ ratio was 0.24, which may be typical of biomass burning in the study region. This ratio is about 5 times lower than that previously found for Amazon aerosol collected during the day, when flaming combustion prevails. This suggests that the levoglucosan/K+ ratio may be especially helpful for characterization of the type of vegetation burned (such as crops or forest), when biomass-burning is the dominant source of potassium. The relatively high

  17. Yttrium Iron Garnet Thick Films Formed by the Aerosol Deposition Method for Microwave Inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Scooter; Newman, Harvey; Glaser, E. R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Tadjer, Marko; Kub, Fritz; Eddy, Charles, Jr.

    2014-03-01

    We have employed the aerosol deposition method (ADM) to direct-write 40 μm-thick polycrystalline films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG, Y3Fe5O12) at room temperature onto patterned gold inductors on sapphire substrates at a deposition rate of 1-3 μm/min as a first step toward integration into microwave magnetic circuits. A challenge to integrating magnetic films into current semiconductor technology is the high-temperature regime (900-1400°C) at which conventional ferrite preparation takes place. The ability of the ADM to form dense, thick films at room temperature makes this a promising approach for integrated magnetics where low-temperature deposition and thick films are required. The ADM YIG film has an rms roughness of 3-4 μm, is comprised of nano-crystalline grains with a density 50% of the theoretical value. XRD patterns of the as-deposited film and starting powder indicate a polycrystalline single-phase film. In-plane VSM and FMR measurements reveal a saturation of 22 emu/g, coercivity of 27 Oe, and linewidth of 360 Oe. Early measurements of air-filled and YIG-filled gold inductors between 0.01-10 GHz indicate an improved inductance of nearly a factor of 2 at low frequency. At higher frequency, resonance effects diminish this improvement. This work is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under program number N0001413WX20845 (Dr. Daniel Green, Program Manager).

  18. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  19. Soluble iron modulates iron oxide particle-induced inflammatory responses via prostaglandin E2 synthesis: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Ambient particulate matter (PM)-associated metals have been shown to play an important role in cardiopulmonary health outcomes. To study the modulation of PM-induced inflammation by leached off metals, we investigated intracellular solubility of radio-labeled iron oxide (59Fe2O3) particles of 0.5 and 1.5 μm geometric mean diameter. Fe2O3 particles were examined for the induction of the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) as pro-inflammatory and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as anti-inflammatory markers in cultured alveolar macrophages (AM) from Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, we exposed male WKY rats to monodispersed Fe2O3 particles by intratracheal instillation (1.3 or 4.0 mg/kg body weight) to examine in vivo inflammation. Results Particles of both sizes are insoluble extracellularly in the media but moderately soluble in AM with an intracellular dissolution rate of 0.0037 ± 0.0014 d-1 for 0.5 μm and 0.0016 ± 0.0012 d-1 for 1.5 μm 59Fe2O3 particles. AM exposed in vitro to 1.5 μm particles (10 μg/mL) for 24 h increased IL-6 release (1.8-fold; p < 0.05) and also PGE2 synthesis (1.9-fold; p < 0.01). By contrast, 0.5 μm particles did not enhance IL-6 release but strongly increased PGE2 synthesis (2.5-fold, p < 0.005). Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by indomethacin caused a pro-inflammatory phenotype as noted by increased IL-6 release from AM exposed to 0.5 μm particles (up to 3-fold; p < 0.005). In the rat lungs, 1.5 but not 0.5 μm particles (4.0 mg/kg) induced neutrophil influx and increased vascular permeability. Conclusions Fe2O3 particle-induced neutrophilic inflammatory response in vivo and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in vitro might be modulated by intracellular soluble iron via PGE2 synthesis. The suppressive effect of intracellular released soluble iron on particle-induced inflammation has implications on how ambient PM-associated but soluble metals influence pulmonary toxicity of ambient PM. PMID:20028532

  20. CV-Dust: Atmospheric aerosol in the Cape Verde region: carbon and soluble fractions of PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, C.; Nunes, T.; Cardoso, J.; Caseiro, A.; Custódio, D.; Cerqueira, M.; Patoilo, D.; Almeida, S. M.; Freitas, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    than 100 PM10 samples, addressing mainly their mass concentrations and the chemical composition of water soluble ions and carbon species (carbonates and organic and elemental carbon). Different PM10 samplers worked simultaneously in order to collect enough mass to make the aerosol characterization through the different methodologies and to collect aerosols in different filter matrixes, which have to be appropriated to the chemical and mineralogical analysis. The sampling site was located at Santiago Island, in the surroundings of Praia City (14° 55' N e 23° 29' W, 98 m at sea level). High concentrations, up to more than 400 μg m-3, are connected to north-east and north-northeast winds, and it was identified several dust events characteristic of "bruma seca", whose duration is on average of two to four days. Backward trajectories analysis confirms that the high concentrations in Cape Verde are associated with air masses passing over the Sahara. During dust events the percentage of inorganic water soluble ions for the total PM10 mass concentration decreased significantly to values lower than 10% in comparison with remainder data that range around 45±10%. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the Portuguese Science Foundation (FCT) through the project PTDD/AAC-CLI/100331/2008 and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-008646 (CV-Dust). J. Cardoso acknowledges the PhD grant SFRH-BD-6105-2009 from FCT.

  1. [Characteristics of mass distributions of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in summer over a suburb farmland in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Tong; Liang, Bao-sheng; Hu, Min; Kang, Ling; Gong, Ji-cheng

    2006-02-01

    Agricultural activity is one of the important sources of aerosol particle. To understand the mass distribution and sources of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the suburb farmland of Beijing, particle samples were collected with a MOUDI cascade impactor in the summer of 2004 in a suburb vegetable field. The mass distributions of the particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the diameter range of 0.18 to approximately 18 microm were measured. The dominant ions in the fine particle were SO4(2-), NOS3(-) and NH4+. The association of day to day variation of the concentration of these ions with temperature, humidity and solar radiation suggests that they are formed by the reaction of NH3 released from the vegetable field with the acid species produced from photochemical reactions. K+ in the fine particle is likely from the vegetation emission and biomass burning. Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in the coarse particle are suggested to come from the mechanical process by which the soil particle entered the atmosphere, and from the reactions of the acid species at the surface of the soil particle. The results show that fertilizer and soil are possibly important factors determining the aerosol particle over the agricultural fields, and the vegetable fields in suburb Beijing could contribute significantly to the aerosol particle.

  2. Phase partitioning and solubility of iron in natural seawater controlled by dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Wang, Wen-Xiong; Guo, Laodong

    2004-12-01

    The phase partitioning and solubility of Fe as well as its relationship with marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) in different natural seawater and phytoplankton cultures were examined using radiotracer and ultrafiltration techniques to better understand Fe biogeochemical cycling and its biological availability in the ocean. Fe solubility in seawaters was related to the filter's cutoff, with the Fe solubility in the <3 × 103 amu fraction being about one third of that in the <10 × 103 amu filtrate. The Fe solubility decreased from estuarine to coastal to oceanic seawater and then to DOM-free seawater. There was a significant linear relationship between Fe solubility or [FeL] concentration and the dissolved organic carbon concentration for the seawater of different origins tested, suggesting that Fe solubility was largely controlled by the amount of dissolved organic matter. In addition, Fe solubility was significantly enhanced by the presence of fresh phytoplankton exudates, indicating that the nature of organic ligands also plays an important role in controlling the Fe solubility in seawater. Most of the Fe-bound organic ligands were in the size fraction <10 × 103 amu and decreased from the estuarine to the coastal and then to the oceanic seawater. Among the standard macromolecular organic compounds examined, siderophores (deferoxamine mesylate and ferrichrome) showed the highest binding capacity for Fe, and carrageenan (a high molecular weight-sulfated acid polysaccharide) also slightly increased Fe solubility. Complexation of organic ligands with Fe appeared to be Fe-specific or Fe preferential. Our results highlight quantitatively the importance of DOM in controlling Fe solubility in seawater. Further studies are needed to elucidate the interrelationship between the biogeochemical cycles of Fe and the chemistry of DOM in the ocean.

  3. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Meixner, F. X.; Slanina, J.; Otjes, R.; Jongejan, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2004-06-01

    We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2 and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), chloride (Cl- and sulfate (SO42-), and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil). This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity), through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions). Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder (WAD) in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition) were ≤0.015ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong relative

  4. Secondary formation of water-soluble organic acids and α-dicarbonyls and their contributions to total carbon and water-soluble organic carbon: Photochemical aging of organic aerosols in the Arctic spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kasukabe, Hideki; Barrie, Leonard A.

    2010-11-01

    Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketocarboxylic acids (C2-C6, C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) were determined in the Arctic aerosols collected in winter to early summer, as well as aerosol total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Concentrations of TC and WSOC gradually decreased from late February to early June with a peak in spring, indicating a photochemical formation of water-soluble organic aerosols at a polar sunrise. We found that total (C2-C11) diacids (7-84 ng m-3) increased at polar sunrise by a factor of 4 and then decreased toward summer. Their contributions to TC (average 4.0%) peaked in early April and mid-May. The contribution of total diacids to WSOC was on average 7.1%. It gradually increased from February (5%) to a maximum in April (12.7%) with a second peak in mid-May (10.4%). Although oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant diacid until April, its predominance was replaced by succinic acid (C4) after polar sunrise. This may indicate that photochemical production of C2 was overwhelmed by its degradation when solar radiation was intensified and the atmospheric transport of its precursors from midlatitudes to the Arctic was ended in May. Interestingly, the contributions of azelaic (C9) and ω-oxobutanoic acids to WSOC increased in early summer possibly due to an enhanced emission of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids from the ocean followed by photochemical oxidation in the atmosphere. An enhanced contribution of diacids to TC and WSOC at polar sunrise may significantly alter the hygroscopic properties of organic aerosols in the Arctic.

  5. The Exochelins of Pathogenic Mycobacteria: Unique, Highly Potent, Lipid- and Water-Soluble Hexadentate Iron Chelators with Multiple Potential Therapeutic Uses

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Exochelins are lipid- and water-soluble siderophores of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with unique properties that endow them with exceptional pharmacologic utility. Exochelins can be utilized as probes to decipher the role of iron in normal and pathological states, and, since they rapidly cross cell membranes and chelate intracellular iron with little or no toxicity, exochelins are potentially useful for the treatment of a number of iron-dependent pathological phenomena. Recent Advances: In animal models, exochelins have been demonstrated to have promise for the treatment of transfusion-related iron overload, restenosis after coronary artery angioplasty, cancer, and oxidative injury associated with acute myocardial infarction and transplantation. Critical Issues: To be clinically effective, iron chelators should be able to rapidly enter cells and chelate iron at key intracellular sites. Desferri-exochelins, and other lipid-soluble chelators, can readily cross cell membranes and remove intracellular free iron; whereas deferoxamine, which is lipid insoluble, cannot do so. Clinical utility also requires that the chelators be nontoxic, which, we hypothesize, includes the capability to prevent iron from catalyzing free radical reactions which produce •OH or other reactive oxygen species. Lipid-soluble iron chelators currently available for clinical application are bidentate (deferiprone) or tridentate (desferasirox) molecules that do not block all six sites on the iron molecule capable of catalyzing free radical reactions. In contrast, desferri-exochelins are hexadentate molecules, and by forming a one-to-one binding relationship with iron, they prevent free radical reactions. Future Directions: Clinical studies are needed to assess the utility of desferri-exochelins in the treatment of iron-dependent pathological disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2246–2261. PMID:24684595

  6. Seasonal variations and size distributions of water-soluble ions in atmospheric aerosols in Beijing, 2012.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongjie; Zhou, Rui; Wu, Jianjun; Yu, Yue; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Lejian; Di, Yi'an

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics of water-soluble ions in airborne particulate matter in Beijing were investigated using ion chromatography. The results showed that the total concentrations of ions were 83.7 ± 48.9 μg/m(3) in spring, 54.0 ± 17.0 μg/m(3) in summer, 54.1 ± 42.9 μg/m(3) in autumn, and 88.8 ± 47.7 μg/m(3) in winter, respectively. Furthermore, out of all the ions, NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4(+) accounted for 81.2% in spring, 78.5% in summer, 74.6% in autumn, and 76.3% in winter. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were mainly associated with coarse particles, with a peak that ranged from 5.8 to 9.0 μm. Na(+), NH4(+) and Cl(-) had a multi-mode distribution with peaks that ranged from 0.43 to 1.1 μm and 4.7 to 9.0 μm. K(+), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) were mainly associated with fine particles, with a peak that ranged from 0.65 to 2.1 μm. The concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NH4(+), Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) were 2.69, 2.32, 1.01, 4.84, 16.9, 11.8, 42.0, and 44.1 μg/m(3) in particulate matter (PM) on foggy days, respectively, which were 1.4 to 7.3 times higher than those on clear days. The concentrations of these ions were 2.40, 1.66, 0.92, 4.95, 17.5, 7.00, 32.6, and 34.7 μg/m(3) in PM on hazy days, respectively, which were 1.2-5.7 times higher than those on clear days.

  7. Seasonal variation and secondary formation of size-segregated aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions during pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wen, Tianxue; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a serious issue that has aroused great public attention in Beijing. To examine the seasonal characteristics of aerosols in typical pollution episodes, water-soluble inorganic ions (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, Na+, Ca2 + and Mg2 +) in size-segregated PM collected by an Anderson sampler (equipped with 50% effective cut-off diameters of 9.0, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.65, 0.43 μm and an after filter) were investigated in four intensive campaigns from June 2013 to May 2014 in the Beijing urban area. Pronounced seasonal variation of TWSIs in fine particles (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.1 μm) was observed, with the highest concentration in summer (71.5 ± 36.3 μg/m3) and the lowest in spring (28.1 ± 15.2 μg/m3). Different ion species presented different seasonal characteristics of mass concentration and size distribution, reflecting their different dominant sources. As the dominant component, SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) in fine particles appeared to play an important role in the formation of high PM pollution since its contribution to the TWSIs and PM2.1 mass increased significantly during pollution episodes. Due to the hygroscopic growth and enhanced secondary formation in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm) from clean days to polluted days, the size distribution peak of SNA in the fine mode tended to shift from 0.43-0.65 μm to 0.65-2.1 μm. Relative humidity (RH) and temperature contributed to influence the secondary formation and regulate the size distributions of sulfates and nitrates. Partial correlation analysis found that high RH would promote the sulfur and nitrogen oxidation rates in the fine mode, while high temperature favored the sulfur oxidation rate in the condensation mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and reduced the nitrogen oxidation rate in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm). The NO3-/SO42 - mass ratio in PM2.1 (73% of the samples) exceeded 1.0, suggesting that vehicle exhaust currently makes a greater contribution to aerosol

  8. Seasonal variations in the light-absorbing properties of water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Jin, Hyoun Cher; Lee, Ji Yi; Lee, Se Pyo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral properties of light-absorbing organic aerosol extractions were investigated using 24-h average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from October 2012 to September 2013 in Seoul, Korea. The light-absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts exhibited strong evidence of brown carbon with Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE; fitted between 300 and 700 nm) ranges of 5.84-9.17 and 4.08-5.75, with averages of 7.23 ± 1.58 and 5.05 ± 0.67, respectively. The light absorption of both extracts at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy for brown carbon (BrC), displayed strong seasonal variations and was well correlated with both water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC; r = 0.81) and organic carbon (OC; r = 0.85), indicating that both primary and secondary organics were sources of BrC in this region. Normalizing the Abs365 of water and methanol extracts to the mass of WSOC and OC yielded average solution mass absorption efficiency (MAE365) of 0.28-1.18 and 0.44-1.45 m2 g-1 C, respectively. MAE365 in Korea were in the same range or slightly lower than those in China, however, despite the same ranges, the seasonal variations were different, suggesting that the sources of light absorbers could be different. Combining the AAE, Abs365, and MAE365 of both extracts and a detailed chemical speciation of filter extracts identified the compounds responsible for the temporal variations of BrC in Korea. During summer, secondary organic aerosol (SOA), photochemically generated from anthropogenic emissions, was the major source; however, during winter, long range transported organics or transported BrC seem to be a source of BrC in Korea, a downwind site of China, where severe smog and BrC were observed during this season. Biomass burning was also an important source; however, unlike in previous studies, where it was identified as a major source during winter, here, it contributed during the whole year. Although many of its properties, sources, and potential

  9. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    PubMed

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-03-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p < 0.05) compared with non-vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.01) lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p < 0.05) but sTfR concentrations significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared with omnivorous children. In the multivariate regression model, we observed associations between hepcidin level and ferritin concentration (β = 0.241, p = 0.05) in the whole group of children as well as between hepcidin concentration and CRP level (β = 0.419, p = 0.047) in vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  10. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Meixner, F. X.; Slanina, J.; Otjes, R.; Jongejan, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2004-02-01

    We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), chloride (Cl-) and sulfate (SO42-), and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil). This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate). Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity), through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions). Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition) were ≤0.015 ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118 ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong relative humidity and temperature variations between day and night as well as to

  11. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and ω-oxocarboxylic acids in size-segregated aerosols over northern Japan during spring: sources and formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Dhananjay Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kobayashi, Minoru; Gowda, Divyavani

    2016-04-01

    Seven sets (AF01-AF07) of size-segregated aerosol (12-sizes) samples were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Sapporo, Japan during the spring of 2001 to understand the sources and atmospheric processes of water-soluble organic aerosols in the outflow region of Asian dusts. The samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and ω-oxocarboxylic acids as well as inorganic ions. The molecular distribution of diacids showed the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic and succinic acids whereas ω-oxoacids showed the predominance of glyoxylic acid (ωC2) in size-segregated aerosols. SO42- and NH4+ are enriched in submicron mode whereas NO3- and Ca2+ are in supermicron mode. Most of diacids and ω-oxoacids are enriched in supermicron mode in the samples (AF01-AF03) influenced by the long-range transport of mineral dusts whereas enhanced presence in submicron mode was observed in other sample sets. The strong correlations of C2 with Ca2+ (r = 0.95-0.99) and NO3- (r = 0.96-0.98) in supermicron mode in the samples AF01-AF03 suggest the adsorption or production of C2 diacid via heterogeneous reaction on the surface of mineral dust during long-range atmospheric transport. The preferential enrichment of diacids and ω-oxoacids in mineral dust has important implications for the solubility and cloud nucleation properties of the dominant fraction of water-soluble organic aerosols. This study demonstrates that biofuel and biomass burning and mineral dust originated in East Asia are two major factors to control the size distribution of diacids and related compounds over northern Japan.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Water-Soluble Anions and Organic Carbons in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Ryukyu Islands, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Ijyu, M.; Nakaema, F.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols pose health risks to humans and change global climate. Ryukyu Islands in Japan are mainly covered with maritime air mass in summer and continental air mass for the rest of the seasons. Thus, it is possible to estimate the origins of chemical components, in particular transboundary air pollutants from East Asia. Ryukyu Islands are one of the best locations for monitoring the changes in Asia's atmosphere. This study tried to elucidate the spatial and temporal distribution of water-soluble anions and organic carbons, and chemical changes during the transportation processes. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Sep. 2005 - Dec. 2010), Kume Island (KM, ca. 100 km from Naha), and Minami-Daitou Island (MD, ca. 350 km from Naha) from June 2008 to June 2010 on quartz filters by using identical high-volume air samplers. The sample filters were exchanged every week. The concentrations of water-soluble anions (Cl-,Br-,NO3-,NO2-,SO42-) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were determined by using ion chromatography and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. And, concentrations of non-sea-salt SO(nss-SO42-) were calculated based on the concentrations of Na+. For the samples collected at CHAAMS, seawater component accounted for on average 56±5% of total aerosol mass. Monthly mean concentrations of nss-SO42- showed distinctive difference among the sampling sites (KM>CHAAMS>MD) during Jan. to May, suggesting that distance from Asian continent affected on its behavior. Yearly average concentrations of NO3- and nss-SO42- showed +42% and +16% increase, respectively between 2005 and 2011. Annual rate of NO3- increase was much faster than that of nss-SO42-, probably reflecting changes in lifestyles in Asian continent.

  13. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of <1500Da. Interestingly, only these fractions containing ferric reductase activity also stimulated the uptake of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  14. Analysis of water soluble organic aerosols over the mid-Atlantic region of the United States: A method for chemical characterization using IC/MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Reiner, J.; Sander, L.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stehr, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Because of its links to respiratory morbidity and mortality, particulate matter (PM) is a federally designated criteria pollutant. Composition of airborne particulate matter is not homogeneous and varies widely with respect to source, climate and local meteorology. The complexities of aerosol composition represent a significant challenge to analysts and studies are commonly limited to determination of aerosol bulk properties. Routine, in situ, monitoring stations typically measure organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic salts. This study provides the first reported application of IC/MS/MS to the characterization of organic acids in atmospheric PM. Using NIST SRM 1649b, Urban Dust, as a test material for method development, organic acids were resolved chromatographically into classes of aliphatic monoacids, aliphatic diacids, aromatic acids and polyacids. The selective ion monitoring capability of a triple quadropole mass analyzer frequently overcame instances of incomplete chromatographic separation. This combination of ion chromatography and mass spectrometry significantly increases the number of ions for which a single IC procedure can be optimized due to the increased selectivity of the approach. The method was applied to water soluble quartz fiber extract of samples collected on a Cessna 402B aircraft during the NASA July 2011 DISCOVER AQ air campaign resulting in the qualitative identification of 21 organic acids 15 of which were also evaluated quantitatively and the quantitative evaluation of 4 inorganic species. The molecular speciation of aerosol composition is important for understanding mechanistic pathways and ultimately for apportioning aerosol sources. Improved methods for determining the molecular composition will provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere. Lastly, greater structural elucidation of

  15. Quantitative LC-MS for water-soluble heterocyclic amines in fine aerosols (PM2.5) at Duke Forest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, Shar; Hays, Michael D.

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique was developed to measure the concentrations of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds in ambient fine aerosols (PM2.5). Quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) MS technology was used to provide both accurate-mass and MS/MS data for confirmation of chemical formula and nitrogen compound structure. The fine aerosol was collected over the winter and summer seasons at an experimental monitoring station at Duke Forest in North Carolina U.S.A. 3-Hydroxypyridine and two β-carbolines, harmane, and norharmane, were observed in both campaigns at concentrations lower in summer (sum = 332 pg m-3; N = 27) than winter (554 pg m-3; N = 31). Aminopyridines, dimethylpyrazoles, and hydroxymethyl-pyridines were observed in the winter aerosols with a total estimated average concentration of 779 pg m-3. These results demonstrate the possibility of enhanced speciation and provide a first glance at heterocyclic amines in the water-soluble organic nitrogen (ON) fraction of fine aerosols collected from a forest atmosphere.

  16. Thermodynamic assessment of solubility and activity of iron, chromium, and nickel in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossé, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) is a heavy liquid alloy used as a coolant for the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors and spallation target for Accelerator Driven Systems. LBE is also considered in sodium fast reactor designs as coolant in secondary circuit to avoid any occurrence of the reaction between sodium and water in steam generators. Even if this coolant presents many advantages due to its thermophysical properties, corrosion towards structural materials remains one of the major issues of LBE. Because corrosion in LBE is partly driven by dissolution processes, the solubility and chemical activity of the main elements of the alloy are the key parameters to model the related corrosion processes. Using the Calphad method and the Thermo-Calc software, a thermodynamic database was developed to assess the interaction between Cr-Ni-Fe alloys and LBE. The current thermodynamic data on the Cr-Fe-Ni + Bi-Pb quinary system was reviewed and the Bi-Cr and Cr-Pb binary phase diagrams were assessed. Fe, Cr and Ni solubilities (in at. fraction, T in K) at LBE composition were calculated: Fe solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SFe)=0.5719-4398.6T (399-1173 K) Cr solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SCr)=-0.2757-3056.1T (399-1173 K) Ni solubility at LBE composition: log10 (SNi)=2.8717-2932.9T (528-742 K) log10 (SNi)=0.2871-1006.3T (742-1173 K) Then, the thermodynamic assessment performed in this study was used to predict more accurately the Fe, Cr and Ni activities and solubilities in the case of four austenitic model alloys also studied in the framework of corrosion tests [1]. The calculated activities and solubilities provide thermodynamic data to better understand dissolution or precipitation phenomena observed during LBE corrosion processes.

  17. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  18. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  19. Coal Ash Aerosol in East Asian Outflow as a Source for Oceanic Deposition of Iron and Other Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.; Hua, X.

    2008-12-01

    While ocean deposition of East Asian dust is given significant emphasis as a source of biologically-active trace elements, iron in particular, dust events are episodic and highly seasonal. There is, however, a constant source of aerosol that is chemically similar to dust (albeit amorphous in structure rather than crystalline) in the ash particles emitted from many hundreds of coal-fired power plants that are sited along the entire coastal region of China and Korea. The emission controls on these facilities vary widely and, in even cases of state-of-the-art emission controls, the secondary release of ash can be significant. There are of course even more small industrial and household sources of coal combustion emissions, in most cases with little or no emissions controls. Ash from a modern coal-fired power facility in Korea has been examined chemically and morphologically with electron microscopic techniques. As is characteristic of all such facilities, two principal types of ash are present: (1) flyash, silicate glass spheres that are emitted with the smoke and removed by electrostatic precipitators; and (2) bottom ash, "clinkers" and noncombustible material sticking to the furnace walls that are mixed with water and ground after cooling, then removed as a slurry to a dumping area. In addition, iron sulfide (pyrite) is a common constituent of coal and provides both a source of sulfur dioxide gas and also molten iron spherical particles in the ash. The iron spheres then are rapidly oxidized upon cooling. Bottom ash is a more complex material than flyash in that it contains more iron and other trace metals, plus it contains varying amounts of uncombusted carbon. The post-combustion handling of bottom ash can lead to significant emissions despite the fact that little or none goes out the stack. The iron oxide spheres can also be emitted by this secondary method. The concentrations of ash can be very high in close proximity to power plants (PM10 of several hundred

  20. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) < 2.5 μm) are assessed. ROS-generating (or oxidative) potential of the particulate matter (PM) was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Particles were collected on quartz filters (N = 8) at an urban site near central Atlanta during January-February 2012 using a PM(2.5) high-volume sampler. Filter punches were extracted separately in both water and methanol. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  1. Contribution of dissolved organic matter to submicron water-soluble organic aerosols in the marine boundary layer over the eastern equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Coburn, Sean; Ono, Kaori; Ho, David T.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and organic molecular markers were measured to investigate the relative contributions of the sea surface sources to the water-soluble fraction of submicron organic aerosols collected over the eastern equatorial Pacific during the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated VOCs (TORERO)/KA-12-01 cruise. On average, the water-soluble organic fraction of the total carbon (TC) mass in submicron aerosols was ˜ 30-35 % in the oceans with the low chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations, whereas it was ˜ 60 % in the high-Chl a regions. The average stable carbon isotope ratio of WSOC (δ13CWSOC) was -19.8 ± 2.0 ‰, which was systematically higher than that of TC (δ13CTC) (-21.8 ± 1.4 ‰). We found that in the oceans with both high and low Chl a concentrations the δ13CWSOC was close to the typical values of δ13C for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ranging from -22 to -20 ‰ in surface seawater of the tropical Pacific Ocean. This suggests an enrichment of marine biological products in WSOC aerosols in the study region regardless of the oceanic area. In particular, enhanced levels of WSOC and biogenic organic marker compounds together with high values of WSOC / TC ( ˜ 60 %) and δ13CWSOC were observed over upwelling areas and phytoplankton blooms, which was attributed to planktonic tissues being more enriched in δ13C. The δ13C analysis estimated that, on average, marine sources contribute ˜ 90 ± 25 % of the aerosol carbon, indicating the predominance of marine-derived carbon in the submicron WSOC. This conclusion is supported by Lagrangian trajectory analysis, which suggests that the majority of the sampling points on the ship had been exposed to marine boundary layer (MBL) air for more than 80 % of the time during the previous 7 days. The combined analysis of the δ13C and monosaccharides, such as glucose and fructose, demonstrated that DOC concentration was

  2. Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles and their conjuntion with water soluble polymers for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Huong, Nguyen; Thi Kieu Giang, Lam; Thanh Binh, Nguyen; Minh, Le Quoc

    2009-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) coated with suitable bio-compatible substances have been used in biomedicine, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), tissue engineering, and hyperthermia and drug delivery. In this study, we describe the synthesis of SPION and its surface modification for in-vitro experiments. The particle diameter and structure were estimated by FESEM, TEM, XRD analyses. The saturation magnetization was characterized. SPION with a mean size of 12 nm have been prepared under N2 atmosphere, with support of natural polymeric starch, by controlling chemical coprecipitation of magnetite phase from aqueous solutions containing suitable salts ratios of Fe2+ and Fe3+. The surface of SPION-nanoparticles was treated with a coordinatable agent for higher dispersion ability in water and remaining the superparamagnetic behavior. The prepared iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with starch, dextran, PEG or MPEG to extend the application potential in the quite different engineering field of nano biomedicine.

  3. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  4. Annual cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products and other water-soluble organic compounds in coarse and fine aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-05-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse particulate matter were collected over a period of one year and analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds, including the pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and a variety of dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks and data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid (C6) and phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) indicate that the investigated aerosols samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. An Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence is largely due to enhanced emissions and OH radical concentrations at elevated temperatures, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. Enhanced ratios of pinic acid to 3-MBTCA indicate strong chemical aging of the investigated aerosols in summer and spring. Acknowledgment: The authors would like to thank M. Claeys for providing synthetic 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid standards for LC-MS analysis and J. Fröhlich for providing filter samples and related information.

  5. Hygroscopic growth of water-soluble matter extracted from remote marine aerosols over the western North Pacific: Influence of pollutants transported from East Asia.

    PubMed

    Boreddy, S K R; Kawamura, K

    2016-07-01

    We examined the hygroscopic properties of water-soluble matter (WSM) nebulized from water extracts of total suspended particles (TSP) collected at Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific during January to September 2003. The hygroscopic growth factor g(RH) of the aerosol particles was measured using a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) with an initial dry particle diameter of 100nm and relative humidity (RH) of 5-95%. The measured growth factor at 90% RH, g(90%), ranged from 1.51 to 2.14 (mean: 1.76±0.15), significantly lower than that of sea salts (2.1), probably owing to the heterogeneous reactions associated with chloride depletion in sea-salt particles and water-soluble organic matter (WSOM). The g(90%) maximized in summer and minimized in spring. The decrease in spring was most likely explained by the formation of less hygroscopic salts or particles via organometallic reactions during the long-range transport of Asian dust. Cl(-) and Na(+) dominate the mass fractions of WSM, followed by nss-SO4(2-) and WSOM. Based on regression analysis, we confirmed that g(90%) at Chichijima Island largely increased due to the dominant sea spray; however, atmospheric processes associated with chloride depletion in sea salts and WSOM often suppressed g(90%). Furthermore, we explored the deviation (average: 18%) between the measured and predicted g(90%) by comparing measured and model growth factors. The present study demonstrates that long-range atmospheric transport of anthropogenic pollutants (SO2, NOx, organics, etc.) and the interactions with sea-salt particles often suppress the hygroscopic growth of marine aerosols over the western North Pacific, affecting the remote background conditions. The present study also suggests that the HCl liberation leads to the formation of less hygroscopic aerosols over the western North Pacific during long-range transport.

  6. Water soluble organic carbon in aerosols (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) and various precipitation forms (rain, snow, mixed) over the southern Baltic Sea station.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita U

    2016-12-15

    In the urbanized coastal zone of the Southern Baltic, complex measurements of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were conducted between 2012 and 2015, involving atmospheric precipitation in its various forms (rain, snow, mixed) and PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols. WSOC constituted about 60% of the organic carbon mass in aerosols of various sizes. The average concentration of WSOC was equal to 2.6μg∙m(-3) in PM1, 3.6μg∙m(-3) in PM2.5 and 4.4μg∙m(-3) in PM10. The lowest concentration of WSOC was noted in summer as a result of effective removal of this compound with rainfall. The highest WSOC concentrations in PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols were measured in spring, which should be associated with developing vegetation on land and in the sea. On the other hand, the highest WSOC concentrations in PM1 occurred in winter at low air temperatures and greatest atmospheric stability, when there were increased carbon emissions from fuel combustion in the communal-utility sector and from transportation. WSOC concentrations in precipitation were determined by its form. Mixed precipitation turned out to be the richest in soluble organic carbon (5.1mg·dm(-3)), while snow contained the least WSOC (1.7mg·dm(-3)). Snow and rain cleaned carbon compounds from the atmosphere more effectively when precipitation lasted longer than 24h, while in the case of mixed precipitation WSOC was removed most effectively within the first 24h.

  7. Acceptability and solubility of iron and zinc contents of modified Moringa oleifera sauces consumed in the Far-north region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Mawouma, Saliou; Ponka, Roger; Mbofung, Carl Moses

    2017-03-01

    Consumption of Moringa oleifera leaves is a local and inexpensive solution to iron and zinc deficiencies in the Far-north region of Cameroon. However, traditional household's cooking techniques result in sauces with high pH levels and low leaves incorporation rates that compromise the bioavailability of iron and zinc. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of modifying a standard Moringa sauce on consumer acceptability and the solubility of iron and zinc, which is an indicator of their bioavailability. Lime juice or tamarind pulp was added to a standard recipe in order to reduce the pH by about one unit, and Moringa leaf powder was incorporated in each acidulated sauce at three levels (1, 2, and 4 g/100 g of sauce). All the formulations were evaluated for their acceptability by 30 housewives using a five-point hedonic scale. The pH was measured by a digital electronic pH-meter. Moisture and ash were determined by AOAC methods. Total iron and zinc contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and soluble iron and zinc by HCl-extractability. The lime juice-acidulated sauce and the tamarind pulp-acidulated sauce enriched with 1 g of Moringa leaf powder were the most acceptable formulations with scores of 3.4 and 3.6, respectively. Their chemical analysis showed a reduced pH (6.4 and 6.1, respectively), compared to the Control (7.2). Lime juice-acidulated sauce improved iron and zinc solubility from 42.19 to 66.38% and 54.03 to 82.03%, respectively. Tamarind pulp-acidulated sauce enriched with 1 g of Moringa leaf powder showed a decrease in iron solubility from 42.19 to 38.26% and an increase in zinc solubility from 54.03 to 72.86%. These results confirm the beneficial effect of lime juice in improving iron and zinc bioavailability.

  8. Distributions of Beryllium 7 and Lead 210, and Soluble Aerosol-Associated Ionic Species Over the Western Pacific: PEM West B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didd, J. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Lefer, B. L.; Scheuer, E.; Gregory, G. L.; Browell, E. V.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol sampling for the determination of the concentrations of soluble ionic species and the natural radionuclides Be-7 and Pb-210 was conducted from the NASA DC-8 over the western Pacific as part of GTE/PEM-West B during February - March 1994. Concentrations of most soluble ionic species in the free troposphere were higher in samples collected on flights originating from Hong Kong and Japan than those collected further east over the open ocean. In both regions the measured concentrations were higher than those found during PEM-West A (fall 1991). Activities of Pb-210 tracer of air masses influenced by sources on the Asian continent, showed the same patterns. These data indicate the effect of stronger continental outflow from Asia over the western Pacific during the spring compared to fall season. For readily scavenged aerosol-associated species and soluble acidic gases the strongest indications of Asian outflow were restricted to altitudes below 6 km. The distribution of the continental tracer Pb-210 was also compared to those of a large number of gas phase species measured on the DC-8. Relatively strong correlations were found with O3 and peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN), but only during the flights over the remote Pacific. During PEM-West A, similar correlations were seen, but they were stronger near Asia. We believe that these correlations are a signature of continental air that has been processed by deep wet convection over land before being advected over the ocean. One flight over the Sea of Japan provided the opportunity to sample upper troposphere/lower stratosphere air in and around a tropopause fold. Concentrations of Be-7 reached 7 pCi/cu m STP, and peak O3, mixing ratios of 480 ppb were encountered at 10.7 km. The Be-7 data are used to estimate the fraction of stratospheric air mixed down into the troposphere by circulation in the fold.

  9. Distributions of Beryllium 7 and Lead 210, and Soluble Aerosol-Associated Ionic Species Over the Western Pacific: PEM West B, February - March 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Lefer, B. L.; Scheuer, E.; Gregory, G. L.; Browell, E. V.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol sampling for the determination of the concentrations of soluble ionic species and the natural radionuclides Be-7 and Pb-210 was conducted from the NASA DC-8 over the western Pacific as part of GTE/PEM-West B during February - March 1994. Concentrations of most soluble ionic species in the free troposphere were higher in samples collected on flights originating from Hong Kong and Japan than those collected further east over the open ocean. In both regions the measured concentrations were higher than those found during PEM-West A (fall 1991). Activities of Pb-210, a tracer of air masses influenced by sources on the Asian continent, showed the same patterns. These data indicate the effect of stronger continental outflow from Asia over the western Pacific during the spring compared to fall season. For readily scavenged aerosol-associated species and soluble acidic gases the strongest indications of Asian outflow were restricted to altitudes below 6 km. The distribution of the continental tracer Pb-210 was also compared to those of a large number of gas phase species measured on the DC-8. Relatively strong correlations were found with O3, and peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN), but only during the flights over the remote Pacific. During PEM-West A, similar correlations were seen, but they were stronger near Asia. We believe that correlations are a signature of continental air that has been processed by deep wet convection over land before being advected over the ocean. One flight over the Sea of Japan provided the opportunity to sample upper troposphere/lower stratosphere air in and around a tropopause fold. Concentrations of Be-7 reached 7 pCi/cu m STP, and peak O3, mixing ratios of 480 ppb were encountered at 10.7 km. The Be-7 data are used to estimate the fraction of stratospheric air mixed down into the troposphere by circulation in the fold.

  10. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  11. Toxicity evaluation of e-juice and its soluble aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes using recombinant bioluminescent bacteria responsive to specific cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shiv; Mitchell, Robert J; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2017-04-15

    Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are widely used as an alternative to traditional cigarettes but their safety is not well established. Herein, we demonstrate and validate an analytical method to discriminate the deleterious effects of e-cigarette refills (e-juice) and soluble e-juice aerosol (SEA) by employing stress-specific bioluminescent recombinant bacterial cells (RBCs) as whole-cell biosensors. These RBCs carry luxCDABE-operon tightly controlled by promoters that specifically induced to DNA damage (recA), superoxide radicals (sodA), heavy metals (copA) and membrane damage (oprF). The responses of the RBCs following exposure to various concentrations of e-juice/SEA was recorded in real-time that showed dose-dependent stress specific-responses against both the e-juice and vaporized e-juice aerosols produced by the e-cigarette. We also established that high doses of e-juice (4-folds diluted) lead to cell death by repressing the cellular machinery responsible for repairing DNA-damage, superoxide toxicity, ion homeostasis and membrane damage. SEA also caused the cellular damages but the cells showed enhanced bioluminescence expression without significant growth inhibition, indicating that the cells activated their global defense system to repair these damages. DNA fragmentation assay also revealed the disintegration of total cellular DNA at sub-toxic doses of e-juice. Despite their state of matter, the e-juice and its aerosols induce cytotoxicity and alter normal cellular functions, respectively that raises concerns on use of e-cigarettes as alternative to traditional cigarette. The ability of RBCs in detecting both harmful effects and toxicity mechanisms provided a fundamental understanding of biological response to e-juice and aerosols.

  12. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation.

  13. In situ Spectroscopy Reveals that Microorganisms in Different Phyla Use Different Electron Transfer Biomolecules to Respire Aerobically on Soluble Iron

    PubMed Central

    Blake II, Robert C.; Anthony, Micah D.; Bates, Jordan D.; Hudson, Theresa; Hunter, Kamilya M.; King, Brionna J.; Landry, Bria L.; Lewis, Megan L.; Painter, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Absorbance spectra were collected on 12 different live microorganisms, representing six phyla, as they respired aerobically on soluble iron at pH 1.5. A novel integrating cavity absorption meter was employed that permitted accurate absorbance measurements in turbid suspensions that scattered light. Illumination of each microorganism yielded a characteristic spectrum of electrochemically reduced colored prosthetic groups. A total of six different patterns of reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectra were observed. Three different spectra were obtained with members of the Gram-negative eubacteria. Acidithiobacillus, representing Proteobacteria, yielded a spectrum in which cytochromes a and c and a blue copper protein were all prominent. Acidihalobacter, also representing the Proteobacteria, yielded a spectrum in which both cytochrome b and a long-wavelength cytochrome a were clearly visible. Two species of Leptospirillum, representing the Nitrospirae, both yielded spectra that were dominated by a cytochrome with a reduced peak at 579 nm. Sulfobacillus and Alicyclobacillus, representing the Gram-positive Firmicutes, both yielded spectra dominated by a-type cytochromes. Acidimicrobium and Ferrimicrobium, representing the Gram-positive Actinobacteria, also yielded spectra dominated by a-type cytochromes. Acidiplasma and Ferroplasma, representing the Euryarchaeota, both yielded spectra dominated by a ba3-type of cytochrome. Metallosphaera and Sulfolobus, representing the Crenarchaeota, both yielded spectra dominated by the same novel cytochrome as that observed in the Nitrospirae and a new, heretofore unrecognized redox-active prosthetic group with a reduced peak at around 485 nm. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that individual acidophilic microorganisms that respire aerobically on iron utilize one of at least six different types of electron transfer pathways that are characterized by different redox-active prosthetic groups. In situ absorbance

  14. Comparison of the TSI Model 8520 and Grimm Series 1.108 portable aerosol instruments used to monitor particulate matter in an iron foundry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang

    2008-03-01

    This study uses two real-time dust monitors, the TSI Model 8520 DustTrak and Grimm Series 1.108 Aerosol Spectrometer, to determine PM(10) and PM(2.5) levels simultaneously in an iron foundry. The SA Model 241 Dichotomous Sampler was used as a reference gravimetric method for comparing the measurement results obtained by these direct-reading instruments. The response to PM levels from DustTrak is higher than that of the Aerosol Spectrometer. The DustTrak provides an overestimation PM levels, and PM levels measured by an Aerosol Spectrometer are lower than actual concentrations. Calibration factors of the DustTrak and Aerosol Spectrometer are 0.74 and 1.33, respectively, when used to measure particulate matter at an iron foundry. Based on measurement results, the DustTrak provides a lower overestimation of PM(10) levels than PM(2.5) levels; that is, the response of the DustTrak increases as particle size decreases. In addition, measurement results suggest that the Aerosol Spectrometer provides precise measurements of PM(10) and PM(2.5), and measurement accuracy compared with the reference gravimetric method can be improved through a calibration factor.

  15. In vitro solubility of calcium, iron and zinc in relation to phytic acid levels in rice-based consumer products in China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jianfen; Han, Bei-Zhong; Nout, M J Robert; Hamer, Robert J

    2010-02-01

    In vitro solubility of calcium, iron and zinc in relation to phytic acid (PA) levels in 30 commercial rice-based foods from China was studied. Solubility of minerals and molar ratios of PA to minerals varied with degrees of processing. In primary products, [PA]/[Ca] values were less than 5 and [PA]/[Fe] and [PA]/[Zn] similarly ranged between 5 and 74, with most values between 20 and 30. [PA]/[mineral] molar ratios in intensively processed products were lower. Solubility of calcium ranged from 0% to 87%, with the lowest in brown rice (12%) and the highest in infant foods (50%). Iron solubility in two-thirds of samples was lower than 30%, and that of zinc narrowly ranged from 6% to 30%. Solubility of minerals was not significantly affected by [PA]/[mineral]. At present, neither primary nor intensively processed rice-based products are good dietary sources of minerals. Improvements should be attempted by dephytinization, mineral fortification or, preferably, combination of both.

  16. Iron chelating active packaging: Influence of competing ions and pH value on effectiveness of soluble and immobilized hydroxamate chelators.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Yoshiko; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-04-01

    Many packaged foods utilize synthetic chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) to inhibit iron-promoted oxidation or microbial growth which would result in quality loss. To address consumer demands for all natural products, we have previously developed a non-migratory iron chelating active packaging material by covalent immobilization of polyhydroxamate and demonstrated its efficacy in delaying lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of this hydroxamate-functionalized iron chelating active packaging to retain iron chelating capacity; even in the presence of competing ions common in food. Both immobilized and soluble hydroxamate chelators retained iron chelating capacity in the presence of calcium, magnesium, and sodium competing ions, although at pH 5.0 the presence of calcium reduced immobilized hydroxamate iron chelation. A strong correlation was found between colorimetric and mass spectral analysis of iron chelation by the chelating packaging material. Such chelating active packaging may support reducing additive use in product formulations, while retaining quality and shelf life.

  17. In vitro solubility of calcium, iron, and zinc in rice bran treated with phytase, cellulase, and protease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqin; Cheng, Yongqiang; Ou, Keqin; Lin, Li; Liang, Jianfen

    2008-12-24

    Absorption of minerals is inhibited by phytic acid, fiber, and protein because of the chelates formed. Response surface method (RSM) was used in this study to evaluate the effect of application of commercial phytase, protease, and cellulase in rice bran on the in vitro solubility of calcium (IVCa), iron (IVFe), and zinc (IVZn). It is shown that IVCa and IVZn were significantly improved by the application of phytase and cellulase, and the models of two second-order polynomials are recommended for prediction, with coefficients at R(2) = 0.86 and R(2) = 0.88, respectively. Interaction between protease and cellulase also significantly affected IVCa and IVZn. Cellulase had more efficiency than phytase on IVCa. Differing in its effect on Ca and Zn, phytase had a significant linear correlation with IVFe, and none of the other processing parameters exerted a significant effect. The largest increment for IVFe, IVCa, and IVZn occurred in the treatment with applications of phytase at 2.5 U g(-1) and protease and cellulase at 0.2% and 1%, respectively, which were 3.3, 3.6, and 4.3 times, respectively, that of the untreated material.

  18. Surface-Sensitive and Bulk Studies on the Complexation and Photosensitized Degradation of Catechol by Iron(III) as a Model for Multicomponent Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-abadleh, H. A.; Tofan-Lazar, J.; Situm, A.; Ruffolo, J.; Slikboer, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  19. Radiocarbon-Based Source Apportionment of the Water-Soluble Organic Carbon (wsoc) of Atmospheric Aerosols in South and East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Sheesley, R. J.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, K.; Rao, P. S.; Kang, E.; Han, J.; Lee, M.

    2011-12-01

    The air quality and regional climate in South and East Asia are considerably affected by atmospheric aerosols produced by anthropogenic activities. Recent studies have investigated the sources of the black carbon aerosol component in these regions. This study seeks to make progress in apportioning the sources of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component, which makes up 20-65% of the carbonaceous aerosol mass in these areas. WSOC is important as it enhances the ability of particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and, therefore, has an impact on regional climate and radiative forcing. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fifteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCOH) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). WSOC is a large fraction of organic aerosols and its annual average contribution to TOC during 2008 is 26% at MCOH and 40% at SIN. There is a distinct seasonal variability in WSOC concentrations at both sites with high concentrations during the winter season (0.92±0.49μg m-3 at MCOH and 3.5±2.0μg m-3 at SIN) and very low concentrations during the summer monsoon season (0.08±0.04μg m-3 at MCOH and 0.27±0.20μg m-3 at SIN). The radiocarbon source apportionment of WSOC in winter dry season was similar at MCOH and SIN with 80-85% from biogenic/biomass combustion and the rest from fossil fuel precursors. For the rest of the year, the biogenic/biomass contribution to WSOC is higher at the Indian Ocean site (86-93%) compared to the Indian site (74-83%). In March 2011 the GoPoEx2011 intensive sampling campaign at the Gosan ABC Superstation, Jeju Island, South Korea was dedicated to study atmospheric

  20. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOEpatents

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Water-soluble inorganic ions in airborne particulates from the nano to coarse mode: a case study of aerosol episodes in southern region of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Peng; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Kai-Lun; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-06-01

    In 2004, airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected for several aerosol episodes occurring in the southern region of Taiwan. The particulate samples were taken using both a MOUDI (Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a nano-MOUDI sampler. These particulate samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ionic species with an emphasis to characterize the mass concentrations and distributions of these ions in the ambient ultrafine (PM0.1, diameter <0.1 microm) and nano mode (PMnano, diameter <0.056 microm) particles. Particles collected at the sampling site (the Da-Liao station) on the whole exhibited a typical tri-modal size distribution on mass concentration. The mass concentration ratios of PMnano/PM2.5, PM0.1/PM2.5, and PM1/PM2.5 on average were 1.8, 2.9, and 71.0%, respectively. The peak mass concentration appeared in the submicron particle mode (0.1 microm < diameter <1.0 microm). Mass fractions (percentages) of the three major water-soluble ions (nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium) as a group in PMnano, PM0.1, PM1, and PM2.5 were 18.4, 21.7, 50.0, and 50.7%, respectively. Overall, results from this study supported the notion that secondary aerosols played a significant role in the formation of ambient submicron particulates (PM0.1-1). Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were essentially basic, whereas those greater than 2.5 microm were neutral or slightly acidic. The neutralization ratio (NR) was close to unity for airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.18 to 1 microm. The NRs of these airborne particles were found strongly correlated with their sizes, at least for samples taken during the aerosol episodes under study. Insofar as this study is exploratory in nature, as only a small number of particulate samples were used, there appears to be a need for further research into the chemical composition, source contribution, and formation of the nano and ultrafine mode airborne particulates.

  2. Determination of water-soluble vitamins in infant milk and dietary supplement using a liquid chromatography on-line coupled to a corona-charged aerosol detector.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Sillero, Isabel; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-10-25

    A simple and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of seven water-soluble vitamins (thiamine, folic acid, nicotinic acid, ascorbic acid, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine and biotin) was developed by high performance liquid chromatographic separation and corona-charged aerosol detection. The water-soluble vitamins were separated on a Lichrosorb RP-C18 column under isocratic conditions with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M ammonium acetate:methanol 90:10 (v/v) at the flow rate 0.5 mL min(-1). The vitamins were extracted from the infant milk (liquid and powder format) using a precipitation step with 2.5 M acetic acid remaining the analyte in the supernatant. As far as dietary supplements are concerned, only a dilution with distilled water was required. The detection limits ranged from 0.17 to 0.62 mg L(-1) for dietary supplements and 1.7 to 6.5 mg L(-1) for milk samples. The precision of the method was evaluated in terms of relative standard deviation (%, RSD) under repeatability and reproducibility conditions, being the average values for each parameter 2.6 and 2.7 for dietary supplements and 4.3 and 4.6 for milk samples. The optimized method was applied to different infant milk samples and dietary supplements. The results of the analysis were in good agreement with the declared values.

  3. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K.; Kelly, T.; Hanft, E.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Walker, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the U.S. EPA's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The U.S. EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to examine ecosystem exposure to nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution and with greater accuracy than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC from September 8th-October 8th, 2010. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by comparing duplicate units and accuracy was evaluated by comparing duplicate MARGAs to duplicate reference denuder/filter packs. The MARGA utilizes a Wet Rotating Denuder (WRD) to collect gases, while aerosols are collected by a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC). Both the WRD and the SJAC produce aqueous sample streams, which are analyzed by online ion chromatography for anions and cations. The reference denuder/filter pack consisted of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and phosphorous acid (H3PO3) coated denuders followed by a Teflon filter, a nylon filter, and a citric acid coated cellulose filter. The assessment of the MARGA units focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3 and NH3 and aerosol SO4-, NO3- and NH4+. To evaluate accuracy, hourly MARGA concentrations were averaged over 12 hours to match with 12-hour integrated concentrations from the reference system. The concentrations were compared using linear regression with performance goals of slope between 0.8-1.2 and y-intercept between -10 ppb and 10 ppb. Accuracy was further quantified as the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between 12-hour MARGA and reference concentrations, with a performance goal of ≤ 40%. The precision of

  4. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-w.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor to determine the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for three clay minerals: illite, sodium-rich montmorillonite, and Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. EM is also used to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory and Frenkel, Halsey, and Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-Köhler is a suitable framework, less complex than FHH theory, to describe clay mineral nucleation activity despite apparent differences in κ with respect to size. For dry-generated particles the size dependence is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much lower critical supersaturation for droplet activation than expected. For wet-generated particles, deviation from κ-Köhler theory is likely a result of the dissolution and redistribution of soluble material. (2) Wet-generation is found to be unsuitable for simulating the lofting of fresh dry dust because it changes the size-dependent critical supersaturations by fractionating and re-partitioning soluble material.

  5. The influence of engineered Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles and soluble (FeCl(3)) iron on the developmental toxicity caused by CO(2)-induced seawater acidification.

    PubMed

    Kadar, E; Simmance, F; Martin, O; Voulvoulis, N; Widdicombe, S; Mitov, S; Lead, J R; Readman, J W

    2010-12-01

    An embryo development assay using a common test organism, the edible mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), exposed to both Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles and soluble FeCl(3) at 3 acidic pHs, has provided evidence for the following: (1) CO(2) enriched seawater adjusted to pH projections for carbon capture leakage scenarios (CCS) significantly impaired embryo development; (2) under natural pH conditions, no significant effect was detected following exposure of embryos to Fe, no matter if in nano- or soluble form; (3) at pH of natural seawater nano-Fe particles aggregate into large, polydisperse and porous particles, with no biological impact detected; (4) at pH 6 and 7, such aggregates may moderate the damage associated with CO(2) enrichment as indicated by an increased prevalence of normal D-shell larvae when nano-Fe was present in the seawater at pH 7, while soluble iron benefited embryo development at pH 6, and (5) the observed effects of iron on pH-induced development toxicity were concentration dependent.

  6. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  7. Spatial and seasonal variations of fine particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) over the Southeastern United States: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Hecobian, A.; Zheng, M.; Frank, N. H.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the Southeastern US is investigated by analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other PM2.5 components from 900 archived 24 h Teflon filters collected at 15 urban or rural EPA Federal Reference Method (FRM) network sites throughout 2007. Online measurements of WSOC at an urban/rural-paired site in Georgia in the summer of 2008 are contrasted to the filter data. Based on FRM filters, excluding biomass-burning events (levoglucosan < 50 ng m-3), WSOC and sulfate were highly correlated with PM2.5 mass and both comprised a large mass fraction of PM2.5 (13% and 35%, respectively). Sulfate and WSOC both tracked ambient temperature throughout the year, suggesting the temperature effects were mainly on the photochemical processes that lead to secondary formation. FRM WSOC, and to a lesser extent sulfate, were spatially homogeneous throughout the region, yet WSOC was moderately enhanced (27%) in locations of greater predicted isoprene emissions in summer. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis identified two major source types for the summer WSOC; 22% of the WSOC were associated with ammonium sulfate, and 56% of the WSOC was associated with brown carbon and oxalate. A small urban excess of FRM WSOC (10%) was observed in the summer of 2007, however, comparisons of online WSOC measurements at one urban/rural pair (Atlanta/Yorkville) in August 2008 showed substantially greater difference in WSOC (31%) relative to the FRM data, suggesting a low bias for urban filters. The measured Atlanta urban excess, combined with the estimated boundary layer heights, gave an estimated Atlanta daily WSOC production rate in August of 0.55 mg C m-2 h-1 between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. This study characterizes the regional nature of fine particles in the Southeastern US, confirming the importance of secondary organic aerosol and the roles of both biogenic and anthropogenic emissions.

  8. Water-soluble ions in atmospheric aerosols measured in five sites in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Size-fractionated, seasonal variations and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; Xu, Honghui; An, Junlin; Xue, Guoqiang; Cao, Jinfei

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate the regional variations of water-soluble ions (WSIs), size-resolved measurement of aerosol particles and WSIs was conducted by using Anderson Sampler and Ion Chromatography at five sites (Nanjing, Suzhou, Lin'an, Hangzhou and Ningbo) in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, China in the Autumn of 2012 and Winter, Spring and Summer of 2013. WSIs exhibited obvious seasonal variations due to the monsoon conversion, with the highest level in winter and lowest level in summer. The aerosol mass concentrations and WSIs in different size segments varied with four seasons. The dominant ions concentrations in PM2.1 ranked in the order of SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Cl- > K+ > Ca2+, and the dominant ions concentrations in PM2.1-10 ranked in the order of Ca2+ > NO3- > SO42- > Cl- > NH4+ > Na+. The size spectra of mass and WSIs concentration peaked mostly at 0.43-0.65 μm in four seasons. The concentration discrepancies of WSIs in different cities were caused by the geographic locations and emission source. It's belonged to ammonium-rich distribution in PM2.1 and ammonium-poor distribution in PM2.1-10 in the YRD region. The impact of temperature on mass concentrations of NO3- and NH4+ in PM2.1 were stronger than those in PM2.1-10. PCA analysis shows that the sources of WSIs dominant by anthropogenic sources, soil particles or falling dust, sea salt and burning process.

  9. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  10. An assessment of the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA): a semi-continuous method for soluble compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Cowen, K. A.; Walker, J. T.; Kelly, T. J.; Hanft, E. A.; Mishoe, K.; Rogers, C.; Proost, R.; Beachley, G. M.; Lear, G.; Frelink, T.; Otjes, R. P.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient air monitoring as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) currently uses filter packs to measure weekly integrated concentrations. The US EPA is interested in supplementing CASTNet with semi-continuous monitoring systems at select sites to characterize atmospheric chemistry and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds at higher time resolution than the filter pack. The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) measures water-soluble gases and aerosols at an hourly temporal resolution. The performance of the MARGA was assessed under the US EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The assessment was conducted in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, from 8 September to 8 October 2010 and focused on gaseous SO2, HNO3, and NH3 and aerosol SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+. Precision of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the median absolute relative percent difference (MARPD) between paired hourly results from duplicate MARGA units (MUs), with a performance goal of ≤ 25%. The accuracy of the MARGA was evaluated by calculating the MARPD for each MU relative to the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations, with a performance goal of ≤ 40%. Accuracy was also evaluated by using linear regression, where MU concentrations were plotted against the average of the duplicate denuder/filter pack concentrations. From this, a linear least squares line of best fit was applied. The goal was for the slope of the line of best fit to be between 0.8 and 1.2. The MARGA performed well in comparison to the denuder/filter pack for SO2, SO42-, and NH4+, with all three compounds passing the accuracy and precision goals by a significant margin. The performance of the MARGA in measuring NO3- could not be evaluated due to the different sampling efficiency of coarse NO3- by the MUs and the filter pack. Estimates of "fine" NO3- were calculated for the MUs and the filter pack

  11. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used in order to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. It is also used in order to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory (κ-KT) and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-KT is the suitable framework to describe clay mineral nucleation activity. Apparent differences in κ with respect to size arise from an artifact introduced by improper size-selection methodology. For dust particles with mobility sizes larger than ~300 nm, i.e., ones that are within an atmospherically relevant size range, both κ-KT and FHH theory yield similar critical supersaturations. However, the former requires a single hygroscopicity parameter instead of the two adjustable parameters required by the latter. For dry-generated particles, the size dependence of κ is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much

  12. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOEpatents

    Liu, David K.; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1989-01-01

    A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

  13. Milk peptides increase iron solubility in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our objectives were to investigate whether these fractions a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Peptid...

  14. Selected water-soluble organic compounds found in size-resolved aerosols collected from urban, mountain and marine atmospheres over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Cao, Junji; An, Zhisheng

    2011-07-01

    Primary (i.e. sugars and sugar-alcohols) and secondary (i.e. carboxylic acids) water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) in size-segregated aerosols from the urban and mountain atmosphere of China and from the marine atmosphere in the outflow region of East Asia were characterized on a molecular level. Levoglucosan is the most abundant compound among the quantified WSOCs in the urban and mountain atmosphere, whose concentration at the urban site was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that at the mountain and marine sites. In contrast, malic, succinic and phthalic acids were dominant among the measured WSOCs at the marine site. In the urban air, sugars except levoglucosan gave a bimodal size distribution with a large peak in fine range (<2.1 μm) and a small peak in coarse range (≥2.1 μm) during winter, being opposite to those in spring. In contrast, these WSOCs at the mountain and marine sites dominated in the coarse range but diminished and even disappeared in the fine range. Geometric mean diameters (GMDs) of the measured WSOCs in the fine mode at the urban site were larger in winter than in spring. Levoglucosan and carboxylic acids except for azelaic and benzoic acids showed a larger GMD in the coarse mode at the marine site probably due to an increased hygroscopic growth.

  15. Utility of Access Soluble Transferrin Receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log Ferritin Index in Diagnosing Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Min Jeong; Suh, In Bum; Shin, Kyu Sung

    2015-01-01

    The Access(®) soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is considered the world's first automated chemiluminescence immunoassay. In this study, the diagnostic utility of this and other tests for serum iron were evaluated by studying their interrelationships with inflammation. A total of 367 patients with anemia (iron deficiency anemia [IDA], 157; anemia of chronic disease [ACD], 210) and 80 normal controls were subjected to a battery of diagnostic tests, including complete blood cell count, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, sTfR, and hepcidin. The accuracy of test parameters was determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Patients falling within the ferritin grey zone (10-100 ng/ml) were evaluated separately, given that such individuals are typically difficult to detect and manage in actual clinical practice. CRP was used to assess the correlation between the aforementioned markers of iron and inflammation. The single most accurate diagnostic test used to differentiate IDA from ACD was serum ferritin (AUC 0.989). However, sTfR assay outperformed other tests in the ferritin grey zone (AUC 0.931), and the sTfR/log ferritin index was the most reliable parameter in both scenarios (AUC 0.994 and 0.962, respectively). Ferritin, TIBC, and hepcidin showed the highest correlation with CRP, whereas sTfR displayed the lowest. The Access sTfR and sTfR/log ferritin index enabled highly accurate diagnosis of IDA in the ferritin grey zone. This is an easy-to-use automated chemiluminescence immunoassay, amenable to routine use in hospitals.

  16. Activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by NO donors--S-nitrosothiols, and dinitrosyl-iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Severina, Irina S; Bussygina, Olga G; Pyatakova, Natalya V; Malenkova, Irina V; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2003-05-01

    We studied the capability of dimeric forms of dinitrosyl-iron complexes and S-nitrosothiols to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) from human platelet cytosol. The dinitrosyl-iron complexes had the ligands glutathione (DNIC-GS) or N-acetylcysteine (DNIC-NAC). The S-nitrosothiols were S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO) or S-nitrosoacetylcysteine (SNAC). For both glutathione and N-acetylcysteine, the DNIC and S-nitrosothiol forms are equally effective activators of sGC. The activation mechanism is strongly affected by the presence of intrinsic metal ions. Pretreatment with the potent iron chelator, disodium salt of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS), suppressed sGC activation by GS-NO: the concentration of GS-NO producing maximal sGC activation was increased by two orders of magnitude. In contrast, activation by DNIC-GS is strongly enhanced by BPDS. When BPDS was added 10 min after supplementation of DNIC-GS or GS-NO at 4 degrees C, it exerted a similar effect on sGC activation by either NO donor: BPDS only enhanced the sGC stimulation at low concentrations of the NO donors. Our experiments demonstrated that both Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) ions contribute to the decomposition of GS-NO in the presence of ascorbate. The decomposition of GS-NO induced by Fe(2+) ions was accompanied by formation of DNIC. BPDS protected GS-NO against the destructive action of Fe(2+) but not Cu(2+) ions. Additionally, BPDS is a sufficiently strong chelator to remove the iron from DNIC-GS complexes. Based on our data, we propose that S-nitrosothiols activate sGC via a two-step iron-mediated process: In the first step, intrinsic Fe(2+) ions catalyze the formation of DNICs from S-nitrosothiols. In the secondary step, these newly formed DNICs act as the real NO donors responsible for sGC activation.

  17. Simulation of iron/dust in the atmosphere by a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, S.; Perez, C.

    2008-12-01

    During sporadic desert dust storms mineral aerosol is raised from the ground, diffused to higher elevations and transported away from sources. Through sedimentation, dry deposition and wet scavenging, dust deposited to the ocean brings at the same time iron and phosphorus embedded in dust particles. Iron exposed to the atmospheric (photo-) chemical processing converts from almost non-soluble to relative high soluble state. Only as soluble, iron can be consumed as a nutrient by microorganisms in a primary marine bio-production phase. In ocean regions distant from coastlines where upwelling and river inputs are missing, iron (and phosphorus) is the major potential marine nutrient. Current knowledge on the atmospheric iron cycle is rather unsatisfactory. First, distribution of iron minerals in desert soils is not yet well known. Second, there are uncertainties on how the iron minerals are chemically processed in the atmosphere since there is no agreement on the roles of solar radiation, clouds and pollution and their relative importance. Finally, current iron models are of global domain and cannot sufficiently resolve the dust (and associated iron) life cycle which is highly variable in time and space. Therefore, more accurate information on deposition of iron to the ocean and its soluble state are generally missing today. This paper presents developments of an atmospheric iron model performed by adding the iron component to the regional dust model DREAM. To specify the iron sources in deserts, relatively high resolution data on soil types (4 km) and land cover (1 km) are used in combination with recent field mineralogy studies. Iron minerals are assumed to be embedded in dust and therefore driven by dust; a corresponding governing set of equations specific for the dynamics of embedded iron, as well as pseudo-first order chemical reaction converting from non-soluble to soluble is then developed. Finally, experiments were performed using the model horizontal resolution

  18. High abundances of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in the mountaintop aerosols over the North China Plain during wheat burning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Okuzawa, K.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosol (TSP) samples were collected at the summit of Mount Tai (elevation: 1534 m a.s.l., 36.25° N, 117.10° E) located in the North China Plain using a high-volume air sampler and pre-combusted quartz filters. Sampling was conducted on day/night or 3 h basis in the period from 29 May to 28 June 2006 during the field burning of wheat straw residue and the post-burning season. The filter samples were analyzed for low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and α-dicarbonyls using capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-MS employing water extraction and butyl ester derivatization. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11, 220-6070 ng m-3) were characterized by a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid (105-3920 ng m-3) followed by succinic (C4) or malonic (C3) acid. Unsaturated aliphatic diacids, including maleic (M), isomaleic (iM) and fumaric (F) acids, were also detected together with aromatic diacids (phthalic, isophthalic and terephthalic acids). ω-oxocarboxylic acids (C2-C9, 24-610 ng m-3) were detected as the second most abundant compound class with the predominance of glyoxylic acid (11-360 ng m-3), followed by α-ketoacid (pyruvic acid, 3-140 ng m-3) and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal, 1-230 ng m-3 and methylglyoxal, 2-120 ng m-3). We found that these levels (>6000 ng m-3 for diacids) are several times higher than those reported in Chinese megacities at ground levels. The concentrations of diacids increased from late May to early June, showing a maximum on 7 June, and then significantly decreased during the period 8-11 June, when the wind direction shifted from southerly to northerly. Similar temporal trends were found for ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls as well as total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The temporal variations of water-soluble organics were interpreted by the direct emission from the field burning of agricultural wastes (wheat straw) in the North China Plain and the subsequent photochemical oxidation of

  19. Photoformation Rate of OH radical in Water-Extract of Atmospheric Aerosol and Water-Soluble Gases Collected in Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomi, S. N.; Sakugawa, H. H.; Kondo, H.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (?OH) photoformation rate (ROH), chemical composition and primary generation sources of ?OH in the atmospheric water-extract of aerosol (WEA) and water-soluble gaseous (WSG) fractions were studied at Higashi-Hiroshima from June 2008 to June 2010. Among the major anions being present in the WSG samples, the SO42- concentration was highest (9.8±2.9 nmol m-3), followed by NO3- and Cl-, while for WEA fractions the mean concentration of SO42- was 81±33 nmol m-3. The concentration of H2O2 was 0.2±0.3 and 0.9±2.3 nmol m-3 in the WSG and WEA, respectively. Using a solar simulator, the extracted sample was irradiated and the ROH was determined and normalized based on the air-volume, which revealed values of 1.4 and 0.5 nmol h-1 m-3 for the WEA and WSG, respectively. Linear relationship between irradiation time and production of ?OH in both fractions suggested high capacity or similar efficiency of ?OH generation. The contribution of NO3-, NO2- and H2O2 to the formation of ?OH via photolysis were 4.5, 0.7 and 1.2%, respectively, for the WSG fraction, while in the WEA fraction, NO3-, NO2- and H2O2 contributed 8.9, 1.2 and 2.5%, respectively. The photo-Fenton reaction contributed 42% of the total ?OH formation in the WSG fraction, while unknown sources that might be humic-like substances (HULIS) accounted for the remaining 52%.

  20. Concentration characteristics of bromine and iodine in aerosols in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunchuan; Sun, Mingxing; Wu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongdi; Guo, Yaqi; Wu, Ji

    2010-11-01

    Aerosol samples (TSP and PM 10) during each season were collected at a national monitoring point in Shanghai in 2008. Halogens (Br, I) were determined in samples along with sodium (Na) by ICP-MS and ICP-OES after microwave digestion. In this report we focused on the concentration characteristics of halogen elements Br and I and their seasonal distributions. The mean annual concentrations of total Br and I were 24 ng m -3 and 12 ng m -3 for TSP, 21 ng m -3 and 9 ng m -3 for PM 10, respectively. Concentrations of Br and I in TSP and PM 10 were lowest in summer but an increase occurred in autumn and winter. Water-soluble Br and I accounted for about 32% of the total Br and I in aerosols, and about 68% of Br and I was non soluble which may be non-soluble organic species. These non-soluble organic species are present in aerosols in the possible binding forms as mineral dust, natural organic matter, and adsorption to black carbon or mineral material such as iron oxides. Soluble Br and I in PM 10 extracted by a dilute acid solution (HNO 3 + H 2SO 4) increased by 22% and 18%, respectively, compared with water-soluble Br and I. A positive correlation with Na and sea water enrichment factors for Br and I indicated that bromine and iodine in aerosols originated mostly from marine sources in Shanghai.

  1. KINETICS OF SOLUBLE CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM CONTAMINATED WATER BY ZEROVALENT IRON MEDIA: CORROSION INHIBITION AND PASSIVE OXIDE EFFECTS. (R825223)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers containing zerovalent iron are being increasingly
    employed for in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with redox active
    metals and chlorinated organic compounds. This research investigated the effect
    of chromate concentration on...

  2. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chien, Chia-Te; Post, Anton F.; Saito, Mak A.; Paytan, Adina

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined, and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 days period to (1) evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2) explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples), to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples). Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples). Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean. PMID:25653645

  3. Using Soluble Transferrin Receptor and Taking Inflammation into Account When Defining Serum Ferritin Cutoffs Improved the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in a Group of Canadian Preschool Inuit Children from Nunavik

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon O'Brien, Huguette; Blanchet, Rosanne; Gagné, Doris; Vézina, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was assessed in preschool Inuit children using soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and traditional indicators of iron status while disregarding or taking inflammation into account when defining SF cutoffs. Iron depletion was defined as follows: (1) SF < 15 μg/L regardless of the C-reactive protein (CRP) level and (2) SF < 15 or <50 μg/L with CRP ≤ 5 or >5 mg/L, respectively. IDE corresponded to iron depletion combined with total iron binding capacity > 72 μmol/L and/or transferrin saturation < 16%. Iron depletion and IDE affected almost half of the children when accounting for inflammation, compared to one-third when the SF cutoff was defined regardless of CRP level (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of IDE adjusted for inflammation (45.1%) was very similar to the prevalence observed when sTfR was used as a sole marker of IDE (47.4%). The prevalence of anemia was 15%. The prevalence of IDA (IDE + hemoglobin < 110 g/L) was higher when accounting for than when disregarding inflammation (8.0% versus 6.2%, P = 0.083). Using sTfR and different SF cutoffs for children with versus without inflammation improved the diagnosis of iron depletion and IDE. Our results confirm that Inuit children are at particularly high risk for iron deficiency. PMID:27382488

  4. Using Soluble Transferrin Receptor and Taking Inflammation into Account When Defining Serum Ferritin Cutoffs Improved the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in a Group of Canadian Preschool Inuit Children from Nunavik.

    PubMed

    Turgeon O'Brien, Huguette; Blanchet, Rosanne; Gagné, Doris; Lauzière, Julie; Vézina, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was assessed in preschool Inuit children using soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and traditional indicators of iron status while disregarding or taking inflammation into account when defining SF cutoffs. Iron depletion was defined as follows: (1) SF < 15 μg/L regardless of the C-reactive protein (CRP) level and (2) SF < 15 or <50 μg/L with CRP ≤ 5 or >5 mg/L, respectively. IDE corresponded to iron depletion combined with total iron binding capacity > 72 μmol/L and/or transferrin saturation < 16%. Iron depletion and IDE affected almost half of the children when accounting for inflammation, compared to one-third when the SF cutoff was defined regardless of CRP level (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of IDE adjusted for inflammation (45.1%) was very similar to the prevalence observed when sTfR was used as a sole marker of IDE (47.4%). The prevalence of anemia was 15%. The prevalence of IDA (IDE + hemoglobin < 110 g/L) was higher when accounting for than when disregarding inflammation (8.0% versus 6.2%, P = 0.083). Using sTfR and different SF cutoffs for children with versus without inflammation improved the diagnosis of iron depletion and IDE. Our results confirm that Inuit children are at particularly high risk for iron deficiency.

  5. Controls on iron distributions in the deep water column of the North Pacific Ocean: Iron(III) hydroxide solubility and marine humic-type dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Saori; Kuma, Kenshi; Manabe, Eri; Sugie, Koji; Takata, Hyoe; Isoda, Yutaka; Toya, Kenji; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Takagi, Shohgo; Kamei, Yoshihiko; Sakaoka, Keiichiro

    2009-08-01

    Dissolved Fe in the western and central North Pacific Ocean was characterized by surface depletion, middepth maxima and, below that, a slight decrease with depth similar to the vertical distributions of nutrients, apparent oxygen utilization, Fe(III) hydroxide solubility, and humic-type fluorescence (H-flu) intensity. Dissolved Fe concentrations ([D-Fe], <0.22-μm fraction) in the deep water column were one-half lower in the central region (0.3-0.6 nM) than the western region (0.5-1.2 nM) although the Fe(III) solubility ([Fe(III)sol], <0.025-μm fraction) levels and distributions in deep waters were almost the same between both regions with middepth maxima (˜0.6 nM) at 500-1500-m depth range and then a gradual decrease to ˜0.3 nM at 5000-m depth. Higher [D-Fe] than [Fe(III)sol] in the deep water column of the western region results from the higher production of dissolved Fe from the decomposition of sinking particulate organic matter in the western region than the central region because of the high atmospheric and/or lateral Fe inputs in the western region. Similarity between [D-Fe] level and [Fe(III)sol] value at each deep water depth in the central region may be attributed to [D-Fe] being nearly in the solubility equilibrium with Fe(III) hydroxide in seawater. Strong linear correlation between [D-Fe] and H-flu intensity in the central region and relatively similar linear relationships between [Fe(III)sol] and H-flu intensity in the western and central regions are the first confirmation that humic-type fluorescent dissolved organic matter may be responsible for [D-Fe] in the deep water column as natural organic ligands complexing with Fe(III).

  6. Spectrophotometric method for the determination of ascorbic acid with iron (III)-1,10-phenanthroline after preconcentration on an organic solvent-soluble membrane filter.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Chen, C; Thou, T

    1996-04-01

    A solvent-soluble membrane filter is proposed for the simple and rapid preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid based on the reduction of 1, 10-phenanthroline (phen)-iron (III), which is collected on a nitrocellulose membrane filter as an ion-associate of the cationic complex of tri,phen-iron (II) [ferroin, Fe(phen)(2+)(3)] with an anionic surfactant (of dodecyl sulfate). The ion-associate collected is dissolved in a small volume of 2-methoxyethanol together with the filter. The colour intensity is measured at 510 nm against the reagent blank and is proportional to the content of ascorbic acid in the range 2.5-50 microg ascorbic acid in 5 ml of solvent with excellent reproducibility (RSD 3.2% for 200 microg 1(-1) ascorbic acid), the enrichment factor achieves 100-fold and detection limits better than 2.0 microg 1(-1) can be obtained. Diverse components of organic and inorganic compounds normally present in fruits, vegetable, beverages and urine do not interfere. The recoveries of the ascorbic acid added to the samples are quantitative.

  7. Spatial and seasonal variations of fine particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) over the southeastern United States: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Hecobian, A.; Zheng, M.; Frank, N. H.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2012-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the southeastern US is investigated by analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other PM2.5 components from 900 archived 24-h Teflon filters collected at 15 urban or rural EPA Federal Reference Method (FRM) network sites throughout 2007. Online measurements of WSOC at an urban/rural-paired site in Georgia in the summer of 2008 are contrasted to the filter data. Based on FRM filters, excluding biomass-burning events (levoglucosan < 50 ng m-3), WSOC and sulfate were highly correlated with PM2.5 mass (r2~0.7). Both components comprised a large mass fraction of PM2.5 (13% and 31%, respectively, or ~25% and 50% for WSOM and ammonium sulfate). Sulfate and WSOC both tracked ambient temperature throughout the year, suggesting the temperature effects were mainly linked to faster photochemistry and/or synoptic meteorology and less due to enhanced biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. FRM WSOC, and to a lesser extent sulfate, were spatially homogeneous throughout the region, yet WSOC was moderately enhanced (27%) in locations of greater predicted isoprene emissions in summer. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis identified two major source types for the summer WSOC; 22% of the WSOC were associated with ammonium sulfate, and 56% of the WSOC were associated with brown carbon and oxalate. A small urban excess of FRM WSOC (10%) was observed in the summer of 2007, however, comparisons of online WSOC measurements at one urban/rural pair (Atlanta/Yorkville) in August 2008 showed substantially greater difference in WSOC (31%) relative to the FRM data, suggesting a low bias for urban filters. The measured Atlanta urban excess, combined with the estimated boundary layer heights, gave an estimated Atlanta daily WSOC production rate in August of 0.55 mgC m-2 h-1 between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. This study characterizes the regional nature of fine particles in the southeastern US, confirming the

  8. Influence of chemical weathering and aging of iron oxides on the potential iron solubility of Saharan dust during simulated atmospheric processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D.; Bonneville, Steeve; Baker, Alex R.; Bristow, Charlie; Drake, Nick; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; McQuaid, James B.; Jickells, Tim; Benning, Liane G.

    2011-06-01

    The flux of bioavailable Fe from mineral dust to the surface ocean is controlled not only by the processes in the atmosphere but also by the nature and source of the dust. In this study, we investigated how the nature of Fe minerals in the dust affects its potential Fe solubility (Fepsol) employing traditional and modern geochemical, mineralogical, and microscopic techniques. The chemical and mineralogical compositions, particularly Fe mineralogy, in soil samples as dust precursors collected from North African dust source regions were determined. The Fepsol was measured after 3 days of contact with sulfuric acid at pH 2 to simulate acid processes in the atmosphere. Fepsol of the soil dust samples were compared with calculated predictions of Fepsol based on the amount of individual Fe-bearing minerals present in the samples and Fe solubilities of corresponding standard minerals. The calculated Fepsol deviated significantly from the measured Fepsol of the soil dust samples. We attributed this to the variability in properties of Fe minerals (e.g., size of Fe oxides and heterogeneity of chemical compositions of clay minerals) in soil dusts in comparison to the standard minerals. There were, however, clear relationships between the degree of chemical weathering of North African soils and Fepsol. The Parker index and ratio of ascorbate plus dithionite Fe to total Fe ((FeA+FeD)/FeT) are positively and negatively correlated with Fepsol, respectively. In addition, the ratio of FeA/(FeA+FeD), which decreases with aging of the Fe oxides, was found to be positively correlated with Fepsol in the soil dusts. Overall, our results indicate that there is a significant regional variability in the chemical and Fe mineralogical compositions of dusts across North African sources, as a result of the differences in chemical weathering and aging of Fe oxides. Furthermore, the indices for these weathering processes can provide an estimate of the fraction of Fe which can be solubilized if

  9. Binding Studies of a New Water-Soluble Iron(III) Schiff Base Complex to DNA Using Multispectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Ghasemian, Zeinab; Hadidi, Saba

    2012-01-01

    A novel iron(III) complex [Fe(SF)](ClO4)3.2H2O; in which SF = N,N0-bis{5-[(triphenylphosphonium chloride)-methyl] salicylidene}-o-phenylenediamine) has been synthesized and characterized using different physicochemical methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, voltammetric studies, and viscosity measurements. The results showed that this complex can bind to DNA via external and groove binding modes. PMID:22899896

  10. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  11. Iron from nanocompounds containing iron and zinc is highly bioavailable in rats without tissue accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilty, Florentine M.; Arnold, Myrtha; Hilbe, Monika; Teleki, Alexandra; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Ehrensperger, Felix; Hurrell, Richard F.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2010-05-01

    Effective iron fortification of foods is difficult, because water-soluble compounds that are well absorbed, such as ferrous sulphate (FeSO4), often cause unacceptable changes in the colour or taste of foods. Poorly water-soluble compounds, on the other hand, cause fewer sensory changes, but are not well absorbed. Here, we show that poorly water-soluble nanosized Fe and Fe/Zn compounds (specific surface area ~190 m2 g-1) made by scalable flame aerosol technology have in vivo iron bioavailability in rats comparable to FeSO4 and cause less colour change in reactive food matrices than conventional iron fortificants. The addition of Zn to FePO4 and Mg to Fe/Zn oxide increases Fe absorption from the compounds, and doping with Mg also improves their colour. After feeding rats with nanostructured iron-containing compounds, no stainable Fe was detected in their gut wall, gut-associated lymphatics or other tissues, suggesting no adverse effects. Nanosizing of poorly water-soluble Fe compounds sharply increases their absorption and nutritional value.

  12. Enhanced removal of soluble Cr(VI) by using zero-valent iron composite supported by surfactant-modified zeolites.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyu; Zhang, Yongxiang; Du, Peiwen

    2014-01-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was immobilized onto surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZ) using calcium alginate. Scanning electron microscopy showed that ZVI powder was uniformly immobilized on the surface of the SMZ. The added ZVI powder resulted in enhanced dichromate removal efficiency and the heterogeneous surface of the composite. The adsorption of dichromate onto the ZVI-SMZ composites fitted well to a pseudo-second-order model and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The maximum dichromate adsorption capacity of the composite was 2.49 mg/g at the temperature of 293 K. Higher removal efficiency was obtained at pH lower than 7. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry revealed that the composites combined the strong reductive quality of ZVI and superior adsorption of SMZ.

  13. Thermodynamic data for modeling acid mine drainage problems: compilation and estimation of data for selected soluble iron-sulfate minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, Bruch S.; Seal, Robert R., II; Chou, I-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Enthalpy of formation, Gibbs energy of formation, and entropy values have been compiled from the literature for the hydrated ferrous sulfate minerals melanterite, rozenite, and szomolnokite, and a variety of other hydrated sulfate compounds. On the basis of this compilation, it appears that there is no evidence for an excess enthalpy of mixing for sulfate-H2O systems, except for the first H2O molecule of crystallization. The enthalpy and Gibbs energy of formation of each H2O molecule of crystallization, except the first, in the iron(II) sulfate - H2O system is -295.15 and -238.0 kJ?mol-1, respectively. The absence of an excess enthalpy of mixing is used as the basis for estimating thermodynamic values for a variety of ferrous, ferric, and mixed-valence sulfate salts of relevance to acid-mine drainage systems.

  14. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  15. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  16. Enhanced sandwich immunoassay using antibody-functionalized magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for extraction and detection of soluble transferrin receptor on a photonic crystal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross D; Chen, Weili; Cunningham, Brian T; Andrade, Juan E

    2015-12-15

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has detrimental effects on individuals and societies worldwide. A standard sandwich assay (SA) for the detection of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), a biomarker of IDA, on a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor was established, but it was susceptible to non-specific signals from complex matrixes. In this study, iron-oxide nanoparticles (fAb-IONs) were used as magnetic immuno-probes to bind sTfR and minimize non-specific signals, while enhancing detection on the PC biosensor. This inverse sandwich assay (IA) method completely bound sTfR with low variability (<4% RSD) in buffer and allowed for its accurate and precise detection in sera (Liquichek™ control sera) on the PC biosensor using two certified ELISAs as reference methods. A linear dose-response curve was elicited at the fAb-IONs concentration in which the theoretical binding ratio (sTfR:fAb-IONs) was calculated to be <1 on the IA. The LoDs for sTfR in the SA and IA were similar (P>0.05) at 14 and 21 μg/mL, respectively. The inherent imprecision of the IA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.45 µg/mL and the mean biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.18, 0.19 and -0.04 µg/mL, respectively. Whereas the inherent imprecision of the SA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.52 µg/mL and the biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.66, 0.14 and -0.67 µg/mL, respectively. Thus, unlike the SA, the IA method measures sTfR with the same bias as the reference ELISAs. Combined magnetic separation and detection of nutrition biomarkers on PC biosensors represents a facile method for their accurate and reliable quantification in complex matrixes.

  17. Atmospheric delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Shi, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. Here, we interactively combined laboratory kinetic experiments with global aerosol modeling to more accurately quantify anthropogenic soluble Fe due to air pollution. We firstly examined Fe dissolution kinetics of African dust samples at acidic pH values with and without ionic species commonly found in aerosol water (i.e., sulfate and oxalate). We then constructed a new empirical scheme for Fe release from mineral dust due to inorganic and organic anions in aerosol water, by using acidity as a master variable. We implemented this new scheme and applied an updated mineralogical emission database in a global atmospheric chemistry transport model to estimate the atmospheric concentration and deposition flux of soluble Fe under preindustrial and modern conditions. Our improved model successfully captured the inverse relationship of Fe solubility and total Fe loading measured over the North Atlantic Ocean. However, our modeled Fe solubility was significantly lower than that deduced from observations over the South Atlantic east downwind from the Patagonian dust source regions. Our modeled Fe solubility for dry deposition over the Atlantic is in good agreement the measurement, while that for wet deposition is significantly lower than the measurement. Our model results suggest that human activities contribute to about half of the soluble Fe supply to a significant portion of the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere, while their contribution to oceans in the high latitude remains highly uncertain

  18. Quantitative LC–MS for water-soluble heterocyclic amines in fine aerosols (PM2.5) at Duke Forest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique capable of measuring the concentrations of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds in ambient fine aerosols (PM2.5) has been developed. Quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) MS technology is used to provi...

  19. Determination of water-soluble and insoluble (dilute-HCl-extractable) fractions of Cd, Pb and Cu in Antarctic aerosol by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry: distribution and summer seasonal evolution at Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land).

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, A; Truzzi, C; Illuminati, S; Bassotti, E; Scarponi, G

    2007-02-01

    Eight PM10 aerosol samples were collected in the vicinity of the "Mario Zucchelli" Italian Antarctic Station (formerly Terra Nova Bay Station) during the 2000-2001 austral summer using a high-volume sampler and precleaned cellulose filters. The aerosol mass was determined by differential weighing of filters carried out in a clean chemistry laboratory under controlled temperature and humidity. A two-step sequential extraction procedure was used to separate the water-soluble and the insoluble (dilute-HCl-extractable) fractions. Cd, Pb and Cu were determined in the two fractions using an ultrasensitive square wave anodic stripping voltammetric (SWASV) procedure set up for and applied to aerosol samples for the first time. Total extractable metals showed maxima at midsummer for Cd and Pb and a less clear trend for Cu. In particular, particulate metal concentrations ranged as follows: Cd 0.84-9.2 microg g(-1) (average 4.7 microg g(-1)), Pb 13.2-81 microg g(-1) (average 33 microg g(-1)), Cu 126-628 microg g(-1) (average 378 microg g(-1)). In terms of atmospheric concentration, the values were: Cd 0.55-6.3 pg m(-3) (average 3.4 pg m(-3)), Pb 8.7-48 pg m(-3) (average 24 pg m(-3)), Cu 75-365 pg m(-3) (average 266 pg m(-3)). At the beginning of the season the three metals appear widely distributed in the insoluble (HCl-extractable) fraction (higher proportions for Cd and Pb, 90-100%, and lower for Cu, 70-90%) with maxima in the second half of December. The soluble fraction then increases, and at the end of the season Cd and Pb are approximately equidistributed between the two fractions, while for Cu the soluble fraction reaches its maximum level of 36%. Practically negligible contributions are estimated for crustal and sea-spray sources. Low but significant volcanic contributions are estimated for Cd and Pb (approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively), while there is an evident although not quantified marine biogenic source, at least for Cd. The estimated natural

  20. A linkage between Asian dust, dissolved iron and marine export production in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongxiang; Zhao, Tianliang; Song, Lianchun; Fang, Xiaomin; Yin, Yan; Deng, Zuqin; Wang, Suping; Fan, Shuxian

    2011-08-01

    Iron-addition experiments have revealed that iron supply exerts controls on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean and ultimately influences the Earth's climate system. The iron hypothesis in its broad outlines has been proved to be correct. However, the hypothesis needs to be verified with an observable biological response to specific dust deposition events. Plankton growth following the Asian dust storm over Ocean Station PAPA (50°N, 145°W) in the North Pacific Ocean in April 2001 was the first supportive evidence of natural aeolian iron inputs to ocean; The data were obtained through the SeaWiFS satellite and robot carbon explorers by Bishop et al. Using the NARCM modeling results in this study, the calculated total dust deposition flux was 35 mg m -2 per day in PAPA region from the dust storm of 11-13 April, 2001 into 0.0615 mg m -2 d -1 (about 1100 nM) soluble iron in the surface layer at Station PAPA. It was enough for about 1100 nM to enhance the efficiency of the marine biological pump and trigger the rapid increase of POC and chlorophyll. The iron fertilization hypothesis therefore is plausible. However, even if this specific dust event can support the iron fertilization hypothesis, long-term observation data are lacking in marine export production and continental dust. In this paper, we also conducted a simple correlation analysis between the diatoms and foraminifera at about 3000 m and 4000 m at two subarctic Pacific stations and the dust aerosol production from China's mainland. The correlation coefficient between marine export production and dust storm frequency in the core area of the dust storms was significantly high, suggesting that aerosols generated by Asian dust storm are the source of iron for organic matter fixation in the North Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that there could be an interlocking chain for the change of atmospheric dust aerosol-soluble iron-marine export production.

  1. Secondary Inorganic Soluble Aerosol in Hong Kong: Continuous Measurements, Formation Mechanism Discussion and Improvement of an Observation-Based Model to Study Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian

    Work in this thesis focuses on half-hourly or hourly measurements of PM2.5 secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) in two locations in Hong Kong (HK) using a continuous system, PILS (Particle-into-Liquid System) coupled to two ion chromatographs. The high-resolution data sets allow the examination of SIA temporal dynamics in the scale of hours that the filter-based approach is incapable of providing. (1) Impacts of local emissions, regional transports and their interactions on chemical composition and concentrations of PM2.5 SIA and other ionic species were investigated at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), a receptor site, under three synoptic conditions. (2) Chemical compositions and size characteristics of ionic species were investigated at Tung Chung, a new town area located in the Southwest part of HK. The sampling period was from 17 to 26 December 2009, covering both normal conditions and an aerosol episode. The three major secondary inorganic ions, SO42, NH4+ and NO 3-, accounted for 47 +/- 6% of PM2.5 mass. Further examination of size characteristics of NO3 - shows that fine mode NO3- is more likely to occur in environments when the fine particles are less acidic and the sea-salt aerosol contributions are low. (3) The ionic chemical composition of PM2.5 and meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, RH) obtained at the HKUST site under all three different synoptic conditions are input into Aerosol Inorganic Model (AIM-III) for estimation of in situ pH through calculation of H+ amount and aerosol liquid water content (LWC). The second part of this thesis work is to improve an observation-based model (OBAMAP) for SIA, which was first developed by Dr. Zibing Yuan (2006) to evaluate the sensitivity of formation of nitrate ad sulfate to changes in the emissions of their precursors (i.e., NOx, SO2, and VOCs). The improvement work includes incorporating updated chemical mechanisms, thermodynamic equilibrium for gas-aerosol phase

  2. Water-soluble ions species of size-resolved aerosols: Implications for the atmospheric acidity in São Paulo megacity, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira-Filho, Marcelo; Pedrotti, Jairo J.; Fornaro, Adalgiza

    2016-11-01

    Over the last decade, an increase of ammonium salts in atmospheric deposition has been reported worldwide, especially in megacities. The present study aims to give a better comprehension analysis about particulate matter acidity in São Paulo megacity (MASP), Brazil. Size-resolved aerosols were sampled in MASP, during 2012 winter, showing a bimodal mass concentration distribution, with sulfate concentration exceeding 3.40 μg m- 3, which accounted for over 25% of PM0.56 mass. Regarding the relative distribution of ionic species, 90% of NH4+ levels, were restricted to smaller than 1 μm diameter range. The average neutralization index for PM < 1 μm was 0.62, which indicated an ammonia-limiting atmosphere due to partial neutralization of atmospheric acids. Particles of the accumulation mode presented more acid behavior than other aerosol fractions, with pH value as low as 4.15 in PM0.56. The total neutralization index registered the lowest value for PM0.56, but it did not respond promptly to aerosol variations as the E-AIM model predictions. The highest discrepancies between the acidity proxies occurred in the smaller fractions of particulate matter, especially in the after-filter (AF) stage (diameter < 0.020 μm). In addition, AF stage had the highest contribution to PM total mass, about 14% for all the stages analyzed. Such contribution indicates that acidity in ultrafine particles are still mixed for the MASP and need further investigation.

  3. Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, I.Y.; Meyn, S.K.; Tegen, I.; Doney, S.C.; John, J.; Bishop, J.

    1999-09-29

    Iron is hypothesized to be a limiting micronutrient for ocean primary production. This paper presents an analysis of the iron budget in the upper ocean. The global distribution of annual iron assimilation by phytoplankton was estimated from distributions of satellite-derived oceanic primary production and measured (Fe:C)(cellular) ratios. The distributions of iron supply by upwelling/mixing and aeolian deposition were obtained by applying (Fe:NO3)(dissolved) ratios to the nitrate supply and by assuming the soluble fraction of mineral aerosols. A lower bound on the rate of iron recycling in the photic zone was estimated as the difference between iron assimilation and supply. Global iron assimilation by phytoplankton for the open ocean was estimated to be 12 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1). Atmospheric deposition of total Fe is estimated to be 96 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1) in the open ocean, with the soluble Fe fraction ranging between 1 and 10 percent (or 1-10 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1)). By comparison, the upwelling/entrainment supply of dissolved Fe to the upper ocean is small, similar to 0.7 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1). Uncertainties in the aeolian flux and assimilation may be as large as a factor of 5-10 but remain difficult to quantify, as information is limited about the form and transformation of iron from the soil to phytoplankton incorporation. An iron stress index, relating the (Fe:N) demand to the (Fe:N) supply, confirms the production in the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll regions is indeed limited by iron availability.

  4. A 12-year observation of water-soluble ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-06-01

    In order to characterize the long-term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12-year observation was conducted for water-soluble ions in TSP (total suspended particulate) aerosols collected from 2001 to 2012 in the Asian outflow region at Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of non-sea salt (nss-) SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- (methanesulfonate) exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007 to 2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001 to 2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are being increasingly transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific. This study also demonstrates that Asian dusts can act as an important source of nutrients for phytoplankton and thus sea-to-air emission of dimethyl sulfide over the western North Pacific.

  5. Hygroscopic growth of particles nebulized from water-soluble extracts of PM2.5 aerosols over the Bay of Bengal: Influence of heterogeneity in air masses and formation pathways.

    PubMed

    Boreddy, S K R; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas; Sarin, M M

    2016-02-15

    Hygroscopic properties of water-soluble matter (WSM) extracted from fine-mode aerosols (PM2.5) in the marine atmospheric boundary layer of the Bay of Bengal (BoB) have been investigated during a cruise from 27th December 2008 to 30th January 2009. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured on particles generated from the WSM using an H-TDMA system with an initial dry size of 100 nm in the range of 5-95% relative humidity (RH). The measured hygroscopic growth of WSM at 90% RH, g(90%)WSM, were ranged from 1.11 to 1.74 (mean: 1.43 ± 0.19) over the northern BoB and 1.12 to 1.38 (mean: 1.25 ± 0.09) over the southern BoB. A key finding is that distinct hygroscopic growth factors are associated with the air masses from the Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP), which are clearly distinguishable from those associated with air masses from Southeast Asia (SEA). We found higher (lower) g(90%)WSM over the northern (southern) BoB, which were associated with an IGP (SEA) air masses, probably due the formation of high hygroscopic salts such as (NH4)2SO4. On the other hand, biomass burning influenced SEA air masses confer the low hygroscopic salts such as K2SO4, MgSO4, and organic salts over the southern BoB. Interestingly, mass fractions of water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) showed negative and positive correlations with g(90%)WSM over the northern and southern BoB, respectively, suggesting that the mixing state of organic and inorganic fractions could play a major role on the g(90%)WSM over the BoB. Further, WSOM/SO4(2-) mass ratios suggest that SO4(2-) dominates the g(90%)WSM over the northern BoB whereas WSOM fractions were important over the southern BoB. The present study also suggests that aging process could significantly alter the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles over the BoB, especially over the southern BoB.

  6. Influence of local and regional sources on the observed spatial and temporal variability of size resolved atmospheric aerosol mass concentrations and water-soluble species in the Athens metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Ochsenkuhn, Klaus M.; Lymperopoulou, Theopisti; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Razos, Panayiotis; Ochsenkuhn-Petropoulou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    The variability of common aerosol species in large Metropolitan urban areas is a major air quality issue with strong health impacts of large populations. PM10 and PM2.5 particulate matter samples were obtained at three sites characteristic of industrial, urban traffic and sub-urban residential areas in the Athens basin. Samples were analysed for anions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+) using ion chromatography. The spatial and temporal variability for the particulate matter (PM) concentration mass and water-soluble ionic species concentrations for the investigated sites were studied. Mean PM fine concentration levels were 20% higher at the industrial and the central urban areas compared to those in the suburban area (24.2 μg/m3). The mean values for the coarse fraction at those two sites were two to three times higher compared to those at the suburban site (12.4 μg/m3). Comparable concentration levels of most species were observed in all areas, while SO42- and NO3- differ at a significant level. Furthermore, the average size distributions of the mass and individual ions at the suburban site (NCSR Demokritos) showed a bimodal size distribution. SO42- and NH4+ have their main peak in the fine fraction while NO3- showed equal distribution on the fine and coarse mode.. Good correlation was found for SO42- and NO3- with Ca2+ and Na+ with Cl- for the coarse fraction in the industrial area. NH4+ was closely correlated with SO42- in the fine particles and in all areas. For the urban site the best correlations in coarse particulates were reported between Na+/Mg2+-Cl-, Ca2+/Mg2+-SO42-, explained by neutralization of acidic aerosol by soil dust and sea salt in the coarse fraction. Moreover, time weighted concentrations roses at the industrial and urban sites, showed no significant directional dependence, indicating either uniform generation of mainly the coarse species within the metropolitan area or major influence of the regional background for

  7. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: I. Iron-copper-zinc-lead sulfide solubility relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Cygan, G.L.; Fein, J.B.; Robinson, G.R.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies, using cold-seal and extraction vessel techniques, were conducted on Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cu sulfide solubilities in chloride soultions at temperatures from 300?? to 700??C and pressures from 0.5 to 2 kbars. The solutions were buffered in pH by quartz monzonite and the pure potassium feldspar-muscovite-quartz assemblage and in fS2-fO2 largely by the assemblage pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite. Solubilities increase with increasing temperature and total chloride, and decrease with increasing pressure. The effect of increasing chloride concentration on solubility reflects primarily a shift to lower pH via the silicate buffer reactions. Similarity in behaviour with respect to the temperature and pressure of Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfide solubilities points to similarity in chloride speciation, and the neutral species appear to be dominant in the high-temperature region. -from Authors

  8. [Composition and Regional Characteristics of Atmosphere Aerosol and Its Water Soluble Ions over the Yangtze River Delta Region in a Winter Haze Period].

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-ting; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Hong-lei; Xue, Guo-qiang; He, Jun; Xu, Hong-hui; Cao, Jin-fei

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the pollution characteristics of water soluble ions in fine atmospheric particles in Yangtze River Delta during the haze period from 18th to 24th Jan 2013, a joint sampling campaign using Andersen sampler was conducted at five cities (including Nanjing, Suzhou, Hangzhou, Lin'an and Ningbo). The analysis of size distribution of these ionic species coupled with the local meteorological conditions may shed some insightful light on the haze formation mechanism in this region. The result has shown: firstly, during the observation period, when Yangtze River Delta located at high pressure or in the front of high pressure, and has a large pressure gradient, the lower atmosphere has a significant airflow divergence in favor of pollutant dispersion; while located in weak low pressure and weak high pressure, the equalizing pressure field is not favorable for pollutant dispersion, especially accompanied with lower atmosphere convergence airflow. Secondly, during the hazy period, the concentration of fine particles and total water-soluble inorganic ions (TWSS) has increased dramatically; the increasing proportions of TWSS in fine particles are: Hangzhou 0. 9%, Lin'an 4. 2%, Nanjing 8. 1%. The particle size of secondary ions of SO(4)2-, NO3-, NH4+ complies fine mode(particle size <2. 1 µm), whose peaks migrates from 0. 43-0. 65 µm to 0. 65-1. 1 µm during the observation period, the peak of particle size of Ca2+ , Mg2+ appears at 4.7-5. 8 µm, while the ions of Na+, Cl-, K+ show a bimodal distribution. Moreover, secondary inorganic ions play a significant role in the formation of haze pollution, where the concentrations of secondary inorganic ions of NH4+, SO2- and NO3 have higher increasing rates; their relative proportions of increasing from each monitoring points are: Hangzhou 3%, Lin'an 55% and Nanjing 64.9%. Finally, SO(4)2- has the highest mass contribution to SNA, up to 45% ; also, the NO-/SO- ratios in each monitoring points are always higher than a fair

  9. Electronic and Spatial Structures of Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-Containing Ligands Underlying Their Ability to Act as Nitric Oxide and Nitrosonium Ion Donors

    PubMed Central

    Vanin, Anatoly F.; Burbaev, Dosymzhan Sh.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear dinitrosyl iron commplexes (M-DNICs) with thiolate ligands to act as NO donors and to trigger S-nitrosation of thiols can be explain only in the paradigm of the model of the [Fe+(NO+)2] core ({Fe(NO)2}7 according to the Enemark-Feltham classification). Similarly, the {(RS−)2Fe+(NO+)2}+ structure describing the distribution of unpaired electron density in M-DNIC corresponds to the low-spin (S = 1/2) state with a d7 electron configuration of the iron atom and predominant localization of the unpaired electron on MO(dz2) and the square planar structure of M-DNIC. On the other side, the formation of molecular orbitals of M-DNIC including orbitals of the iron atom, thiolate and nitrosyl ligands results in a transfer of electron density from sulfur atoms to the iron atom and nitrosyl ligands. Under these conditions, the positive charge on the nitrosyl ligands diminishes appreciably, the interaction of the ligands with hydroxyl ions or with thiols slows down and the hydrolysis of nitrosyl ligands and the S-nitrosating effect of the latter are not manifested. Most probably, the S-nitrosating effect of nitrosyl ligands is a result of weak binding of thiolate ligands to the iron atom under conditions favoring destabilization of M-DNIC. PMID:22505886

  10. The anthropogenic influence on Iron deposition over the oceans: a 3-D global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Baker, Alex; Kanakidou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) deposition over oceans is directly linked to the marine biological productivity and consequently to atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Experimental and modeling results support that both inorganic (sulphate, ammonium and nitrate) and organic (e.g. oxalate) ligands can increase the Fe mobilization. Mineral dust deposition is considered as the most important supply of bioavailable Fe in the oceans. Although, due to the low soil soluble iron fractions, atmospheric processes which are also related to anthropogenic emissions, can convert iron to more soluble forms in the atmosphere. Recent studies also support that anthropogenic emissions of Fe from combustion sources also significantly contribute to the dissolved Fe atmospheric pool. The evaluation of the impact of humans on atmospheric soluble or bioavailable Fe deposition remains challenging, since Fe mobilization due to changes in anthropogenic emissions is largely uncertain. In the present study, the global atmospheric Fe cycle is parameterized in the 3-D chemical transport global model TM4-ECPL and the model is used to calculate the Fe deposition over the oceans. The model considers explicitly organic, sulfur and nitrogen gas-phase chemistry, aqueous-phase organic chemistry, including oxalate and all major aerosol constituents. TM4-ECPL simulates the organic and inorganic ligand-promoted mineral Fe dissolution and also aqueous-phase photochemical reactions between different forms of Fe (III/II). Primary emissions of Fe associated with dust and soluble Fe from combustion processes as well as atmospheric processing of the emitted Fe is taken into account in the model Sensitivity simulations are performed to study the impact of anthropogenic emissions on Fe deposition. For this preindustrial, present and future emission scenarios are used in the model in order to examine the response of chemical composition of iron-containing aerosols to environmental changes. The release of soluble iron associated with

  11. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  12. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  13. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    PubMed

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P < 0.0001). ROC curves produced the following cutoffs for sTfR: 21 nmol/L (or 1.55 mg/L), and the sTfR Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P < 0.0001). Use of all three parameters in combination more than doubled the detection of IDA, from 41% (ferritin alone) to 92% (ferritin, sTfR, sTfR Index). Use of sTfR and the sTfR Index improves detection of IDA, particularly in situations where routine markers provide equivocal results. Findings demonstrate a significant advantage in the simultaneous determination of ferritin, sTfR and sTfR Index. Obtaining a ferritin level alone may delay diagnosis of combined IDA and ACD.

  14. Distribution of iron in size resolved aerosols generated by femtosecond laser ablation: Influence of cell geometry and implications for in situ isotopic measurements using LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Abzac, F.; Czaja, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Schauer, J. J.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Laser Ablation (LA) Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a common and reliable method for the in situ chemical analysis in geosciences. In contrast, use of LA for analyzing naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation in geological samples is not widely used because of the difficulties of differentiating laser induced isotope fractionation from naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation. A critical aspect for accurate in situ stable isotope analysis is the chemical and isotopic composition, size, and morphology of aerosols generated by LA. We report on the iron mass distribution over the particle size distribution (PSD) of aerosols produced by femtosecond LA of magnetite and pyrite. A Photon Machines "Analyte" fs-G2 was used that provides τ~150fs pulses in the near UV (λ=263nm) with an adjustable repetition rate 1aerosols were collected on Teflon filters using a MOUDI cascade impactor, according to their aerodynamic diameter, within a range of da<0.056μm to da>18μm (Marple, Rubow et al., 1991). Filters loads were dissolved in HCl (magnetite) or HNO3 (pyrite) and iron concentration was determined spectroscopically using the ferrozine method or by isotope dilution mass spectrometery. The PSD for a given cell is similar for both pyrite and magnetite and is independent of fluence (1-3J.cm-2). However, significant differences appear from one cell to the other. The cylindrical cell gives a unimodal distribution with a peak centered on da=0.18μm and spread from da=0.056μm to 0.56μm (83% of the total Fe mass). Using the Helex cell the PSD is bi modal with ~1/3 of the particles having a da<0.056μm in addition to the peak at da=0.18μm. Importantly we note that for a given mineral

  15. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  16. Ash iron mobilization in volcanic eruption plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, G.; Hort, M.; Langmann, B.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown that volcanic ash fertilizes the Fe-limited areas of the surface ocean through releasing soluble iron. As ash iron is mostly insoluble upon the eruption, it is hypothesized that heterogeneous in-plume and in-cloud processing of the ash promote the iron solubilization. Direct evidences concerning such processes are, however, lacking. In this study, a 1-D numerical model is developed to simulate the physicochemical interactions of gas-ash-aerosol in volcanic eruption plumes focusing on the iron mobilization processes at temperatures between 600 and 0 °C. Results show that sulfuric acid and water vapor condense at ~150 and ~50 °C on the ash surface, respectively. This liquid phase then efficiently scavenges the surrounding gases (>95% of HCl, 3-20% of SO2 and 12-62% of HF) forming an extremely acidic coating at the ash surface. The low pH conditions of the aqueous film promote acid-mediated dissolution of the Fe-bearing phases present in the ash material. We estimate that 0.1 to 33% of the total iron available at the ash surface is dissolved in the aqueous phase before the freezing point is reached. The efficiency of dissolution is controlled by the halogen content of the erupted gas as well as the mineralogy of the iron at ash surface: elevated halogen concentrations and presence of Fe2+-carrying phases lead to the highest dissolution efficiency. Findings of this study are in agreement with the data obtained through leaching experiments.

  17. Updating CMAQ secondary organic aerosol properties relevant for aerosol water interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) compounds in CMAQ are updated with state-of-the-science estimates from structure activity relationships to provide consistency among volatility, molecular weight, degree of oxygenation, and solubility/hygroscopicity. These updated pro...

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  19. [Soluble of Metals within TSP in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Feng, Chong; Qu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The dissolution of metals within aerosol particles is meaningful to evaluate the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected in Shanghai. We extracted the water soluble and acid soluble (pH = 2) metals by the mini-recirculation-leach-system and measured their concentrations by the high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The dissolution kinetics were rapid, the maximum solubility of metals could be reached in a few minutes. Overall, the average water-soluble concentrations were low for Co, Cr, Cd, V and Ni, median for Cu, Pb and Mn and high for Fe, Al, Zn and Mg. Combine the soluble metal concentrations with the back trajectory, the original air mass had significant impacts on water soluble metal concentrations. The water solubility and acid solubility were different for various metals, the water solubility of Fe was the lowest (2.0%), others followed an order: Al, Cr, V, Pb, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn, Mg, Zn. The metals' solubility was increased with the decrease of the solvent pH value. While the chemical speciation of metals was the internal cause of metals' solubility, the metals' ionic potential and the water solubility was negatively correlated.

  20. Properties and sources of individual particles and some chemical species in the aerosol of a metropolitan underground railway station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Pósfai, Mihály; Kovács, Kristóf; Kuzmann, Ernő; Homonnay, Zoltán; Posta, József

    Aerosol samples in PM 10-2.0 and PM 2.0 size fractions were collected on the platform of a metropolitan underground railway station in central Budapest. Individual aerosol particles were studied using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and electron diffraction. The bulk aerosol samples were investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, and they were subjected to chemical speciation analysis for Cr. The particles were classified into groups of iron oxides and iron, carbonates, silicates, quartz and carbonaceous debris. Electron micrographs showed that the Fe-rich particles in the PM 2.0 size fraction typically consisted of aggregates of nano-sized hematite crystals that were randomly oriented, had round shapes and diameters of 5-15 nm. In addition to hematite, a minor fraction of the iron oxide particles also contained magnetite. In addition, the PM 2.0-fraction particles typically had a rugged surface with layered or granular morphologies. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggested that hematite was a major Fe-bearing species in the PM 10-2.0 size fraction; its mass contribution to the Fe was 36%. Further constituents (ferrite, carbides and FeOOH) were also identified. The water soluble amounts of Cr for the underground railway station and city center were similar. In the PM 10-2.0 size fraction, practically all dissolved Cr had an oxidation state of three, which corresponds to ambient conditions. In the PM 2.0 size fraction, however, approximately 7% of the dissolved Cr was present as Cr(VI), which was different from that for the urban aerosol. It is suggested that the increased adverse health effects of aerosol particles in metros with respect to ambient outdoor particles is linked to the differences in the oxidation states, surface properties or morphologies.

  1. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  2. Characterization and Acid-Mobilization Study of Iron-Containing Mineral Dust Source Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cwiertny, David M.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Hunter, Gordon J.; Laskin, Alexander; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-03-04

    Processes that solubilize the iron in mineral dust aerosols may increase the amount of iron supplied to ocean surface waters, and thereby stimulate phytoplankton productivity. It was recently proposed that mixing of mineral dusts with SO2 and HNO3 produces extremely acidic environments that favor the formation of bioavailable Fe(II). Here, four authentic mineral dust source materials (Saudi Beach sand (SB), Inland Saudi sand (IS), Saharan Sand (SS) and China Loess (CL)) and one commercial reference material (Arizona Test Dust (AZTD)) were spectroscopically characterized, and their dissolution at pH 1 was examined in aqueous batch systems. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the bulk and near-surface region of all samples possessed similar elemental compositions and that iron was unevenly distributed among dust 10 particles. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed Fe(III) in all samples, although SB, CL and AZTD also contained appreciable Fe(II). Both Fe(II) and Fe(III) were primarily substituted into aluminosilicates, although CL, AZTD and IS also contained Fe(III) oxides. Total iron solubility (defined as the summed concentration of dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) measured after 24 h) ranged 14 between 4-12% of the source materials’ iron content, but did not scale with either the surface area or the iron content of the samples. This suggests that other factors such as iron speciation and mineralogy may play a key role in iron solubility. Also, the elevated nitrate concentrations encountered from nitric acid at pH 1 suppressed dissolution of Fe(II) from AZTD, CL and SB particles, which we propose results from the surface-mediated, non-photochemical reduction of nitrate by Fe(II).

  3. Aerosol Chemical and Physical Properties Observed over Puerto Rico in the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusino-Atresino, R.; Xia, L.; Song, F.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols that originate in Africa and are transported over the Atlantic Ocean have potential impacts over the Caribbean region. To investigate aerosol properties over this region, air sampling was conducted at San Juan Cape (18.46°N, 66.12°W), Puerto Rico during the summer months in 2006. Aerosol samples were collected by both commercial PM2.5 sampler and in-house fabricated TSP sampler. Analyses of aerosols were made through the use of the following instrumental methods: (1)Ion Chromatography for the determinations of water-soluble cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, methanesulfonate, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate); (2)Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for the concentrations of selected trace elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V); (3)Scanning Electron Microscopy for individual aerosol particle characterization. Crustal enrichment factors were calculated to determine the strength of crustal source. Preliminary results indicate that sodium (22 - 99 μg m- 3) and ammonium (1.1 - 50 μg m-3) were the major cations and chloride (1.5 - 99 μg m-3) and sulfate (35 μg m-3) were the dominant anions. Malonate (3.8 - 6.9 μg m- 3) was the most abundant organic anion. Atmospheric concentrations of iron ranged 0.30 - 3.3 ng m- 3. The elements, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V, were enriched by factors of 600 to 40,000 relative to their natural abundance in crustal soil. Principal components analysis indicates six assemblages of fifteen types of aerosol particles, dominated by Si - rich particles.

  4. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  5. Incorporation of Mg and Ca into nanostructured Fe2O3 improves Fe solubility in dilute acid and sensory characteristics in foods.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Florentine M; Knijnenburg, Jesper T N; Teleki, Alexandra; Krumeich, Frank; Hurrell, Richard F; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide. Food fortification can be an effective and sustainable strategy to reduce Fe deficiency but selection of iron fortificants remains a challenge. Water-soluble compounds, for example, FeSO(4), usually demonstrate high bioavailability but they often cause unacceptable sensory changes in foods. On the other hand, poorly acid-soluble Fe compounds, for example FePO(4), may cause fewer adverse sensory changes in foods but are usually not well bioavailable since they need to be dissolved in the stomach prior to absorption. The solubility and the bioavailability of poorly acid-soluble Fe compounds can be improved by decreasing their primary particle size and thereby increasing their specific surface area. Here, Fe oxide-based nanostructured compounds with added Mg or Ca were produced by scalable flame aerosol technology. The compounds were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fe solubility in dilute acid. Sensory properties of the Fe-based compounds were tested in 2 highly reactive, polyphenol-rich food matrices: chocolate milk and fruit yoghurt. The Fe solubility of nanostructured Fe(2)O(3) doped with Mg or Ca was higher than that of pure Fe(2)O(3). Since good solubility in dilute acid was obtained despite the inhomogeneity of the powders, inexpensive precursors, for example Fe- and Ca-nitrates, can be used for their manufacture. Adding Mg or Ca lightened powder color, while sensory changes when added to foods were less pronounced than for FeSO(4). The combination of high Fe solubility and low reactivity in foods makes these flame-made nanostructured compounds promising for food fortification. Practical Application: The nanostructured iron-containing compounds presented here may prove useful for iron fortification of certain foods; they are highly soluble in dilute acid and likely to be well absorbed in the gut but cause less severe

  6. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  7. Controls on dissolved cobalt in surface waters of the Sargasso Sea: Comparisons with iron and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, R. U.; Sedwick, P. N.; Bibby, T. S.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Church, T. M.; Johnson, R. J.; Macey, A. I.; Marsay, C. M.; Sholkovitz, E. R.; Ussher, S. J.; Worsfold, P. J.; Lohan, M. C.

    2012-06-01

    Dissolved cobalt (dCo), iron (dFe) and aluminum (dAl) were determined in water column samples along a meridional transect (˜31°N to 24°N) south of Bermuda in June 2008. A general north-to-south increase in surface concentrations of dFe (0.3-1.6 nM) and dAl (14-42 nM) was observed, suggesting that aerosol deposition is a significant source of dFe and dAl, whereas no clear trend was observed for near-surface dCo concentrations. Shipboard aerosol samples indicate fractional solubility values of 8-100% for aerosol Co, which are significantly higher than corresponding estimates of the solubility of aerosol Fe (0.44-45%). Hydrographic observations and analysis of time series rain samples from Bermuda indicate that wet deposition accounts for most (>80%) of the total aeolian flux of Co, and hence a significant proportion of the atmospheric input of dCo to our study region. Our aerosol data imply that the atmospheric input of dCo to the Sargasso Sea is modest, although this flux may be more significant in late summer. The water column dCo profiles reveal a vertical distribution that predominantly reflects `nutrient-type' behavior, versus scavenged-type behavior for dAl, and a hybrid of nutrient- and scavenged-type behavior for dFe. Mesoscale eddies also appear to impact on the vertical distribution of dCo. The effects of biological removal of dCo from the upper water column were apparent as pronounced sub-surface minima (21 ± 4 pM dCo), coincident with maxima in Prochlorococcus abundance. These observations imply that Prochlorococcus plays a major role in removing dCo from the euphotic zone, and that the availability of dCo may regulate Prochlorococcus growth in the Sargasso Sea.

  8. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  9. Iron homeostasis in host defence and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element for multicellular organisms and nearly all microorganisms. Although iron is abundant in the environment, common forms of iron are minimally soluble and therefore poorly accessible to biological organisms. Microorganisms entering a mammalian host face multiple mechanisms that further restrict their ability to obtain iron and thereby limit their pathogenicity. Iron levels also modulate host defence, as iron content in macrophages regulates their cytokine production. Here, we review recent advances that highlight the role of systemic and cellular iron-regulating mechanisms in protecting hosts from infection, emphasizing aspects that are applicable to human health and disease. PMID:26160612

  10. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  11. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF LIQUID AEROSOLS CONTAINING DISSOLVED ORGANICS AND ELECTROLYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many tropospheric aerosols contain large fractions of soluble organic material, believed to derive from the oxidation of precursors such alpha-pinene. The chemical composition of aerosol organic matter is complex and not yet fully understood.

    The key properties of solu...

  12. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater. 3. Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maring, H. B.; Duce, R. A.

    1990-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll in the tropical North Pacific were exposed to seawater in laboratory experiments to assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on lead chemistry in surface seawater. The net atmospheric flux of soluble lead to the ocean is between 16 and 32 pmol cm-2 yr-1 at Enewetak. The stable lead isotopic composition of soluble aerosol lead indicates that it is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic aerosol lead from Central and North America appears to be less soluble and/or to dissolve less rapidly than that from Asia. Dissolved organic matter and possibly lower pH appear to increase the nonaluminosilicate aerosol lead solubility and/or dissolution rate. The isotopic composition of lead in air, seawater and dry deposition suggests that after deposition in the ocean, nonaluminosilicate paniculate lead can be reinjected into the atmosphere during sea salt aerosol production.

  13. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Murphy, Benjamin N.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney; Vasilakos, Petros; Wyat Appel, K.; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Surratt, Jason D.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hu, Weiwei; Jimenez, Jose L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM / OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH > SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM / OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were highly water soluble and expected to contribute to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Organic aerosol and SOA precursors were abundant at night, but additional improvements in daytime organic aerosol are needed to close the model-measurement gap. When taking into account deviations from ideality, including both inorganic (when RH > SRH) and organic water in the organic partitioning medium reduced the mean bias in SOA for routine monitoring networks and improved model performance compared to observations from SOAS. Property updates from

  14. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Wright, D.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-05-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguation Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) is described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol mode, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble modes. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various mode configurations are presented. The number concentration of aerosol particles activated to cloud drops depends on the mode configuration. Simulations on the global scale with the GISS climate model are evaluated against aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment.

  15. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  16. CCN activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Price, D.; Praske, E.; Vu, D.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Silva, P. J.; Cocker, D. R., III; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA) and butylamine (BA) reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH) is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ ≤ 0.25). Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA) with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3), contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA) aerosol. TMA + N2O5 form semi-volatile organics in low RH conditions that have κ ~ 0.20, indicative of slightly soluble organic material. As RH increases, several inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) ideal mixing rules. Higher CCN activity (κ > 0.3) was also observed for humid BA+N2O5 aerosols compared with dry aerosol (κ ~ 0.2), as a result of the formation of inorganic salts such as NH4NO3 and butylamine nitrate (C4H11N · HNO3). Compared with TMA, BA+N2O5 reactions produce more volatile aerosols. The BA+N2O5 aerosol products under humid experiments were found to be very sensitive to the temperature within the stream-wise continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter. The CCN counter, when set above a 21 °C temperature difference, evaporates BA+N2O5 aerosol formed at RH ≥ 30%; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 and is dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss) settings. The aerosol behaves non-ideally, hence simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems κ ranges from 0.2 < κ < 0.7. This work indicates that

  17. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  18. In vitro bioavailability of iron from the heme analogue sodium iron chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Miret, Silvia; Tascioglu, Serpil; van der Burg, Monique; Frenken, Leon; Klaffke, Werner

    2010-01-27

    The use of heme analogues from vegetable origin could provide an alternative iron source of potentially high bioavailability. Sodium iron chlorophyllin is a water-soluble semisynthetic chlorophyll derivative where the magnesium in the porphyrin ring has been substituted by iron. We have used an in vitro model that combines gastric and intestinal digestion followed by intestinal iron uptake in Caco-2 cells to determine the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin. Our results demonstrate that sodium iron chlorophyllin is stable under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and is able to deliver bioavailable iron to Caco-2 cells. Similar to the heme, the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin is dependent on the food matrix, and it was inhibited by calcium. Potentially, sodium iron chlorophyllin could be used as an iron fortificant from vegetable origin with high bioavailability.

  19. Soluble dust as source of nutrients to the global ocean and the role of humans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakidou, Maria; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Nikolaou, Panagiota; Daskalakis, Nikos; Theodosi, Christina; Nenes, Athanassios; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition of trace constituents, both of natural and anthropogenic origin, can act as a nutrient source into the open ocean and affect marine ecosystem functioning and subsequently the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the global ocean. Dust is known as a major source of nutrients (Fe and P) into the atmosphere, but only a fraction of these nutrients is released in soluble form that can be assimilated by the ecosystems. Dust is also known to enhance N deposition by interacting with anthropogenic pollutants and neutralisation of part of the acidity of the atmosphere by crustal alkaline species. The link between the soluble iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) atmospheric deposition and atmospheric acidity, as well as anthropogenic sources, is investigated. The global atmospheric Fe, P and N cycle are parameterized in the global 3-D chemical transport model TM4-ECPL. Both primary emissions of total and soluble Fe and P associated with dust and combustion processes are taken into account, as well as inorganic and organic N emissions. The impact of atmospheric acidity on nutrient solubility is parameterised based on experimental findings. The model results are evaluated by comparison with available observations. The impact of air-quality changes on soluble nutrient deposition is studied by performing sensitivity simulations using preindustrial, present and future emission scenarios. The response of the chemical composition of nutrient-containing aerosols to environmental changes is demonstrated and quantified. This work has been supported by ARISTEIA - PANOPLY grant co-financed by European Union (ESF) and Greek national funds NSRF.

  20. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  1. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  2. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  3. Next-Generation Biomarkers for Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Iron is needed for oxygen transport, muscle activity, mitochondrial function, DNA synthesis, and sensing of hypoxia. The hierarchical master determinant of dietary iron absorption and iron distribution within the body is the peptide hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin itself is regulated by a combination of signals derived from iron stores, inflammation, and erythropoietic expansion. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common and important conditions that can be treated with iron preparations. However, other factors besides iron deficiency can cause anemia, especially inflammation, which responds poorly to iron treatment, and inherited disorders of red blood cells, which are associated with accumulation of excess pathogenic iron. Assessment of iron status is challenging, and indices such as serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and zinc protoporphyrin have specific weaknesses. Moreover, a diagnosis of iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia is most useful if the diagnosis also leads to effective treatment. Low levels of hepcidin allow iron absorption and effective iron incorporation into red blood cells. The best 'biomarker' to guide treatment may therefore be the physiological 'determinant' of iron utilization. Iron is also important in transplantation medicine and influences clinical outcome of arterial pulmonary hypertension; here too, biomarkers including hepcidin may be useful to actively and beneficially manage iron status.

  4. Colorimetric determination of zirconium in antiperspirant aerosols.

    PubMed

    Beavin, P

    1976-07-01

    A rapid direct dilution procedure for the estimation of soluble zirconium and a fusion procedure for the determination of total zirconium (soluble and insoluble forms) in cream base concentrates prepared from antiperspirant aerosols are described. The direct dilution procedure involves extraction of soluble zirconium with HCl (55 + 45). The filtered extract is reacted with alizarin red S to form a stable colored complex which is measured spectrophotometrically. The fusion procedure involves ashing the aerosol concentrate followed by fusion of the ash with potassium pyrosulfate to form an acid-soluble melt. Zirconium is precipitated from solution as the hydroxide and washed to eliminate interfering ions, particularly sulfate. After redissolving in HCl (55 + 45) and reacting with alizarin red S, total zirconium is measured. Zirconyl chloride octahydrate, assayed gravimetrically by hydroxide precipitation and conversion to the oxide, is used as the zirconium reference standard. Concentration range of zirconium measured was 200-500 mug/100 ml. Recoveries of standard zirconium added to commercial aerosols labeled to contain aluminum and zirconyl hydroxychlorides ranged from 97 to 101% by the fusion procedure. Analysis of these aerosols by direct dilution gave generally slightly lower results than by fusion. It is recommended that the procedures be collaboratively studied after further testing of their general applicability to a variety of drugs and cosmetics.

  5. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  6. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Wright, D. L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-10-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to

  7. Research on the Iron-Nitrogen System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-01-01

    Boundaries in the Iron-Nitrogen System 71 X Solubility of Nitrogen in Alpha Iron at One Atmosphere Pressure 74 XI The Composition of the Alpha and...compound Fe2 He reported that the maximum I , -. ,* solubility of nitrogen in alpha iron was about 0.02 percent, since no evidence of nitride needles...and Fe8N. The alpha iron at this temperature contained a maximum of 0.108 percent nitrogen. Sawyer also observed a second arrest point at 7000 C

  8. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  9. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    materials determine the range of applicability of each method. A useful microencapsulation method, based on coagulation by inertial force was developed...The generation apparatus, consisting of two aerosol generators in series, was utilized to produce many kinds of microcapsules . A fluid energy mill...was found useful for the production of some microcapsules . The permeability of microcapsule films and the effect of exposure time and humidity were

  10. Effect of nitrate and sulfate relative abundance in PM2.5 on liquid water content explored through half-hourly observations of inorganic soluble aerosols at a polluted receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Griffith, Stephen M.; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Liquid water content (LWC) is the amount of liquid water on aerosols. It contributes to visibility degradation, provides a surface for gas condensation, and acts as a medium for heterogeneous gas/particle reactions. In this study, 520 half-hourly measurements of ionic chemical composition in PM2.5 at a receptor site in Hong Kong are used to investigate the dependence of LWC on ionic chemical composition, particularly on the relative abundance of sulfate and nitrate. LWC was estimated using a thermodynamic model (AIM-III). Within this data set of PM2.5 ionic compositions, LWC was highly correlated with the multivariate combination of sulfate and nitrate concentrations and RH (R2 = 0.90). The empirical linear regression result indicates that LWC is more sensitive to nitrate mass than sulfate. During a nitrate episode, the highest LWC (80.6 ± 17.9 μg m-3) was observed and the level was 70% higher than that during a sulfate episode despite a similar ionic PM2.5 mass concentration. A series of sensitivity tests were conducted to study LWC change as a function of the relative nitrate and sulfate abundance, the trend of which is expected to shift to more nitrate in China as a result of SO2 reduction and increase in NOx emission. Starting from a base case that uses the average of measured PM2.5 ionic chemical composition (63% SO42-, 11% NO3-, 19% NH4+, and 7% other ions) and an ionic equivalence ratio, [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]), set constant to 0.72, the results show LWC would increase by 204% at RH = 40% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. This is largely due to inhibition of (NH4)3H(SO4)2 crystallization while PM2.5 ionic species persist in the aqueous phase. At RH = 90%, LWC would increase by 12% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. The results of this study highlight the important implications to aerosol chemistry and visibility degradation associated with LWC as a result of a shift in PM2.5 ionic chemical

  11. Acceleration of oxygen decline in the tropical Pacific over the past decades by aerosol pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Nenes, A.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Deutsch, C.

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved oxygen in the mid-depth tropical Pacific Ocean has declined in the past several decades. The resulting expansion of the oxygen minimum zone has consequences for the region's ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, but the causes of the oxygen decline are not yet fully understood. Here we combine models of atmospheric chemistry, ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling to test the hypothesis that atmospheric pollution over the Pacific Ocean contributed to the redistribution of oxygen in deeper waters. We simulate the pollution-induced enhancement of atmospheric soluble iron and fixed nitrogen deposition, as well as its impacts on ocean productivity and biogeochemical cycling for the late twentieth century. The model reproduces the magnitude and large-scale pattern of the observed oxygen changes from the 1970s to the 1990s, and the sensitivity experiments reveal the reinforcing effects of pollution-enhanced iron deposition and natural climate variability. Despite the aerosol deposition being the largest in mid-latitudes, its effect on oceanic oxygen is most pronounced in the tropics, where ocean circulation transports added iron to the tropics, leading to an increased regional productivity, respiration and subsurface oxygen depletion. These results suggest that anthropogenic pollution can interact and amplify climate-driven impacts on ocean biogeochemistry, even in remote ocean biomes.

  12. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis.

  13. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  14. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  15. Targeted delivery of magnetic aerosol droplets to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dames, Petra; Gleich, Bernhard; Flemmer, Andreas; Hajek, Kerstin; Seidl, Nicole; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bittmann, Iris; Bergemann, Christian; Weyh, Thomas; Trahms, Lutz; Rosenecker, Joseph; Rudolph, Carsten

    2007-08-01

    The inhalation of medical aerosols is widely used for the treatment of lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection and, more recently, lung cancer. Targeted aerosol delivery to the affected lung tissue may improve therapeutic efficiency and minimize unwanted side effects. Despite enormous progress in optimizing aerosol delivery to the lung, targeted aerosol delivery to specific lung regions other than the airways or the lung periphery has not been adequately achieved to date. Here, we show theoretically by computer-aided simulation, and for the first time experimentally in mice, that targeted aerosol delivery to the lung can be achieved with aerosol droplets comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles--so-called nanomagnetosols--in combination with a target-directed magnetic gradient field. We suggest that nanomagnetosols may be useful for treating localized lung disease, by targeting foci of bacterial infection or tumour nodules.

  16. Changes in soluble transferrin receptor and hemoglobin concentrations in Malawian mothers are associated with those values in their exclusively breastfed, HIV-exposed infants.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infant iron status at birth is influenced bymaternal iron status during pregnancy; however, there are limited data on the extent to which maternal iron status is associated with infant iron status during exclusive breastfeeding. We evaluated how maternal and infant hemoglobin and iron status [solubl...

  17. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  18. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indi...

  19. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-01-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snow flakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snow flakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. However, the processes not only impact the total aerosol number and mass, but also the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble accumulation mode and generating coarse mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice

  20. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  1. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  2. Solubility of HCL in sulfuric acid at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Golden, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid was measured using a Knudsen cell technique. Effective Henry's law constants are reported for sulfuric acid concentrations between 50 and 60 weight percent and for temperatures between 220 and 230 K. The measured values indicate that very little HCl will be dissolved in the stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles.

  3. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  4. Influences of relative humidity on aerosol optical properties and aerosol radiative forcing during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung

    In situ measurements at Gosan, South Korea, and onboard C-130 aircraft during ACE-Asia were analyzed to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. The temporal variation of aerosol chemical composition at the Gosan super-site was highly dependent on the air mass transport pathways and source region. RH in the springtime over East Asia were distributed with very high spatial and temporal variation. The RH profile onboard C-130 aircraft measurements exhibits a mixed layer height of about 2 km. Aerosol scattering coefficient ( σsp) under ambient RH was greatly enhanced as compared with that at dry RH (RH<40%). From the aerosol optical and radiative transfer modeling studies, we found that the extinction and scattering coefficients are greatly enhanced with RH. Single scattering albedo with RH is also sensitively changed in the longer wavelength. Asymmetry parameter ( g) is gradually increased with RH although g decreases with wavelength at a given RH. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and RH of 50% increased to factors 1.24, 1.51, 2.16, and 3.20 at different RH levels 70, 80, 90, and 95%, respectively. Diurnal-averaged aerosol radiative forcings for surface, TOA, and atmosphere were increased with RH because AOD was increased with RH due to hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. This result implies that the hygroscopic growth due to water-soluble or hydrophilic particles in the lower troposphere may significantly modify the magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing both at the surface and TOA. However, the diurnal-averaged radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface, TOA, and atmosphere were decreased with increasing RH. The decrease of the forcing efficiency with RH results from the fact that increasing rate of aerosol optical depth with RH is greater than the increasing rate of aerosol radiative forcing with RH.

  5. Ash iron mobilization through physicochemical processing in volcanic eruption plumes: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, G. A.; Hort, M.; Langmann, B.

    2015-08-01

    It has been shown that volcanic ash fertilizes the Fe-limited areas of the surface ocean through releasing soluble iron. As ash iron is mostly insoluble upon the eruption, it is hypothesized that heterogeneous in-plume and in-cloud processing of the ash promote the iron solubilization. Direct evidences concerning such processes are, however, lacking. In this study, a 1-D numerical model is developed to simulate the physicochemical interactions of the gas-ash-aerosol in volcanic eruption plumes focusing on the iron mobilization processes at temperatures between 600 and 0 °C. Results show that sulfuric acid and water vapor condense at ~ 150 and ~ 50 °C on the ash surface, respectively. This liquid phase then efficiently scavenges the surrounding gases (> 95 % of HCl, 3-20 % of SO2 and 12-62 % of HF) forming an extremely acidic coating at the ash surface. The low pH conditions of the aqueous film promote acid-mediated dissolution of the Fe-bearing phases present in the ash material. We estimate that 0.1-33 % of the total iron available at the ash surface is dissolved in the aqueous phase before the freezing point is reached. The efficiency of dissolution is controlled by the halogen content of the erupted gas as well as the mineralogy of the iron at ash surface: elevated halogen concentrations and presence of Fe2+-carrying phases lead to the highest dissolution efficiency. Findings of this study are in agreement with the data obtained through leaching experiments.

  6. Toxicity of chelated iron (Fe-DTPA) in American cranberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is naturally adapted to environments with high concentrations of soluble iron. Yet, there is a need to further explore iron nutrition in cranberry given concerns of toxicity problems from irrigation with iron-rich water. This study investigated the threat o...

  7. Climatic Effects of Marine Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Y.; Gantt, B.; Ghan, S. J.; Nenes, A.; Liu, X.; Easter, R. C.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that the emissions of primary organic matter (POM) of marine biogenic origin and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from phytoplankton-produced volatile organic compounds can lead to changes of chemical composition and size distribution of marine aerosol, thus modifying the cloud droplet activation potential and affecting climate. In this study, the effects of marine organic aerosol emissions and the dissolved marine organic aerosol components as surfactant are explored using the National Center of Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model, coupled with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Modal Aerosol Model (CAM-MAM). Primary marine organic aerosol emissions are separated into sub- and super-micron modes, and calculated based on wind speed-dependent sea-spray mass flux and remotely-sensed surface chlorophyll-a concentration. Two distinct sea spray emission functions used in this study yield different amounts and spatial distributions of sub-micron marine POM mass flux. The super-micron sea-spray flux is determined based on simulated sea-spray number flux. Both sub and super-micron marine POM are assumed to be mostly water-insoluble and added in the accumulation mode and coarse sea-salt mode, respectively. A prescribed soluble mass fraction of 50% is assumed for marine SOA, formed from phytoplankton-emitted isoprene and allowed to be condensed on existing aerosols in different modes. Surfactant effects from the soluble part of sub-micron marine POM are included in the cloud droplet activation parameterization by some modifications based on the mass fraction of dissolved marine POM. 10 year model simulations are conducted to examine the effects of marine organic aerosols on cloud microphysical and optical properties. Analyses of model results show that different marine aerosol emissions and cloud droplet activation mechanisms can yield 9% to 16% increase in global maritime mean cloud droplet number concentration. Changes

  8. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  9. Atmospheric acidification of mineral aerosols: a source of bioavailable phosphorus for the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Krom, M. D.; Mihalopoulos, N.; van Cappellen, P.; Shi, Z.; Bougiatioti, A.; Zarmpas, P.; Herut, B.

    2011-07-01

    Primary productivity of continental and marine ecosystems is often limited or co-limited by phosphorus. Deposition of atmospheric aerosols provides the major external source of phosphorus to marine surface waters. However, only a fraction of deposited aerosol phosphorus is water soluble and available for uptake by phytoplankton. We propose that atmospheric acidification of aerosols is a prime mechanism producing soluble phosphorus from soil-derived minerals. Acid mobilization is expected to be pronounced where polluted and dust-laden air masses mix. Our hypothesis is supported by the soluble compositions and reconstructed pH values for atmospheric particulate matter samples collected over a 5-yr period at Finokalia, Crete. In addition, at least tenfold increase in soluble phosphorus was observed when Saharan soil and dust were acidified in laboratory experiments which simulate atmospheric conditions. Aerosol acidification links bioavailable phosphorus supply to anthropogenic and natural acidic gas emissions, and may be a key regulator of ocean biogeochemistry.

  10. Atmospheric acidification of mineral aerosols: a source of bioavailable phosphorus for the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Krom, M. D.; Mihalopoulos, N.; van Cappellen, P.; Shi, Z.; Bougiatioti, A.; Zarmpas, P.; Herut, B.

    2011-02-01

    Primary productivity of continental and marine ecosystems is often limited or co-limited by phosphorus. Deposition of atmospheric aerosols provides the major external source of phosphorus to surface waters. However, only a fraction of deposited aerosol phosphorus is water soluble and available for uptake by phytoplankton. We propose that atmospheric acidification of aerosols is a prime mechanism producing soluble phosphorus from soil-derived minerals. Acid mobilization is expected to be pronounced where polluted and dust-laden air masses mix. Our hypothesis is supported by the soluble compositions and reconstructed pH values for atmospheric particulate matter samples collected over a 5-year period at Finokalia, Crete. At least tenfold increase in soluble phosphorus is observed when Saharan soil and dust were acidified in laboratory experiments which simulate atmospheric conditions. Aerosol acidification links bioavailable phosphorus supply to anthropogenic and natural acidic gas emissions, and may be a key regulator of ocean biogeochemistry.

  11. Aerosol Phosphorus Composition: New Insights from Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, A.; Ingall, E. D.; Diaz, J. M.; Oakes, M. M.; King, L.; Nenes, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Violaki, K.; Avila, A.; Benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Brandes, J. A.; McNulty, I.; Vine, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biological productivity in many ocean regions is controlled by the availability of the nutrient phosphorus (P), including the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Aerosol deposition is a key source of P in the Mediterranean. Understanding the composition of this P is critical for determining its solubility and therefore potential bioavailability. We investigated aerosol P composition in European and North African air masses, the main sources of aerosol deposition to the Mediterranean Sea, using Phosphorus Near Edge X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (P-NEXFS). We show that European aerosols are a significant source of soluble P to the Mediterranean Sea. The traditionally studied North African sourced air masses carry more total P to the Mediterranean Sea than European sourced air masses and contain mostly apatite, a largely insoluble calcium phosphate mineral. However, European aerosols deliver P that is on average 3.5 times more soluble than North African aerosols and furthermore are dominated by organic P compounds. The increased solubility of European aerosols leads to comparable amounts of soluble P by mass delivered to the Mediterranean Sea by both air masses. The ultimate origin of organic P does not stem from common primary emission sources, such as coal fly ash and diesel emissions. Rather, P associated with bacteria best explains the presence of organic P in Mediterranean aerosols. The soluble organic nature of the P in European sourced air masses underscores the need to examine aerosols from this region as a source of P to the Mediterranean Sea. This study also demonstrates that synchrotron-based techniques are effective tools for characterizing aerosols and gaining new insights.

  12. Atmospheric Deposition of Soluble Organic Nitrogen due to Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Lin, G.; Penner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) species from large fires may contribute to enrichment of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. Here we use an atmospheric chemistry transport model to investigate the supply of soluble organic nitrogen (ON) from open biomass burning to the ocean. The model results show that the annual deposition rate of soluble ON to the oceans is increased globally by 13% with the increase being particularly notable over the coastal water downwind from the source regions. The estimated deposition of soluble ON due to haze events from the secondary formation is more than half of that from the primary sources. We examine the secondary formation of particulate C-N compounds (e.g., imidazole) from the reactions of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with atmospheric ammonium in wet aerosols and upon cloud evaporation. These ON sources result in a significant contribution to the open ocean, suggesting that atmospheric processing in aqueous phase may have a large effect. We compare the soluble ON concentration in aerosols with and without open biomass burning as a case study in Singapore. The model results demonstrate that the soluble ON concentration in aerosols is episodically enriched during the fire events, compared to the without smoke simulations. However, the model results show that the daily soluble ON concentration can be also enhanced in the without smoke simulations during the same period, compared to the monthly averages. This indicates that care should be taken when using in-situ observations to constrain the soluble ON source strength from biomass burning. More accurate quantification of the soluble ON burdens with no smoke sources is therefore needed to assess the effect of biomass burning on bioavailable ON input to the oceans.

  13. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  15. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  16. Steady generation of aerosols with an improved constant output atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.; Katz, U.

    1981-01-01

    It is common practice to generate laboratory aerosols of soluble materials with pneumatic atomizers. In a typical device, a solution of the substance to be aerosolized is injected into a jet of air and the liquid is broken up into very small droplets. After forced evaporation, a dry aerosol of the solute is produced. A number of commercially available devices were tested, and despite differences in design, all the atomizers tested suffered from short- and/or long-term fluctuations of their output particle number concentrations. The mechanisms responsible for atomizer instabilities are discussed and methods for alleviating these problems are considered.

  17. Nanostructured Polyphase Catalysts Based on the Solid Component of Welding Aerosol for Ozone Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitskaya, Tatyana; Truba, Alla; Ennan, Alim; Volkova, Vitaliya

    2015-12-01

    Samples of the solid component of welding aerosols (SCWAs) were obtained as a result of steel welding by ANO-4, TsL-11, and UONI13/55 electrodes of Ukrainian manufacture. The phase compositions of the samples, both freshly prepared (FP) and modified (M) by water treatment at 60 °C, were studied by X-ray phase analysis and IR spectroscopy. All samples contain magnetite demonstrating its reflex at 2 θ ~ 35° characteristic of cubic spinel as well as manganochromite and iron oxides. FP SCWA-TsL and FP SCWA-UONI contain such phases as CaF2, water-soluble fluorides, chromates, and carbonates of alkali metals. After modification of the SCWA samples, water-soluble phases in their composition are undetectable. The size of magnetite nanoparticles varies from 15 to 68 nm depending on the chemical composition of electrodes under study. IR spectral investigations confirm the polyphase composition of the SCWAs. As to IR spectra, the biggest differences are apparent in the regions of deformation vibrations of M-O-H bonds and stretching vibrations of M-O bonds (M-Fe, Cr). The catalytic activity of the SCWAs in the reaction of ozone decomposition decreases in the order SCWA-ANO > SCWA-UONI > SCWA-TsL corresponding to the decrease in the content of catalytically active phases in their compositions.

  18. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  19. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  20. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  1. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  2. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  3. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  4. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    PubMed

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (P<0.05) upon succinylation. Stability of bound iron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (P<0.05) of bound iron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source.

  5. The biogeochemical cycle of iron in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Ellwood, M. J.

    2010-10-01

    Advances in iron biogeochemistry have transformed our understanding of the oceanic iron cycle over the past three decades: multiple sources of iron to the ocean were discovered, including dust, coastal and shallow sediments, sea ice and hydrothermal fluids. This new iron is rapidly recycled in the upper ocean by a range of organisms; up to 50% of the total soluble iron pool is turned over weekly in this way in some ocean regions. For example, bacteria dissolve particulate iron and at the same time release compounds - iron-binding ligands - that complex with iron and therefore help to keep it in solution. Sinking particles, on the other hand, also scavenge iron from solution. The balance between these supply and removal processes determines the concentration of dissolved iron in the ocean. Whether this balance, and many other facets of the biogeochemical cycle, will change as the climate warms remains to be seen.

  6. Aerosol algorithm evaluation within aerosol-CCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael; Griesfeller, Jan

    Properties of aerosol retrievals from space are difficult. Even data from dedicated satellite sensors face contaminations which limit the accuracy of aerosol retrieval products. Issues are the identification of complete cloud-free scenes, the need to assume aerosol compositional features in an underdetermined solution space and the requirement to characterize the background at high accuracy. Usually the development of aerosol is a slow process, requiring continuous feedback from evaluations. To demonstrate maturity, these evaluations need to cover different regions and seasons and many different aerosol properties, because aerosol composition is quite diverse and highly variable in space and time, as atmospheric aerosol lifetimes are only a few days. Three years ago the ESA Climate Change Initiative started to support aerosol retrieval efforts in order to develop aerosol retrieval products for the climate community from underutilized ESA satellite sensors. The initial focus was on retrievals of AOD (a measure for the atmospheric column amount) and of Angstrom (a proxy for aerosol size) from the ATSR and MERIS sensors on ENVISAT. The goal was to offer retrieval products that are comparable or better in accuracy than commonly used NASA products of MODIS or MISR. Fortunately, accurate reference data of ground based sun-/sky-photometry networks exist. Thus, retrieval assessments could and were conducted independently by different evaluation groups. Here, results of these evaluations for the year 2008 are summarized. The capability of these newly developed retrievals is analyzed and quantified in scores. These scores allowed a ranking of competing efforts and also allow skill comparisons of these new retrievals against existing and commonly used retrievals.

  7. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM ∕ OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM ∕ OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH  >  SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM ∕ OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were hig

  8. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  9. Applications of Solubility Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  10. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  11. On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding OrganicAerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

    2005-04-01

    This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass (OM) concentration has been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC) factor, usually 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This large uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health. New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) averaged 1.13. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6 {+-} 0.2 for urban and 2.1 {+-} 0.2 for non-urban areas). This analysis suggests that, when aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1 g per 100 g water.

  12. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  13. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Hepatic Storage Iron in Transfusional Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiying; Jensen, Jens H.; Sammet, Christina L.; Sheth, Sujit; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Hultman, Kristi; Kim, Daniel; Wu, Ed X.; Brown, Truman R.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the two principal forms of hepatic storage iron, diffuse, soluble iron (primarily ferritin), and aggregated, insoluble iron (primarily hemosiderin) using a new MRI method in patients with transfusional iron overload. Materials and Methods Six healthy volunteers and twenty patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes and iron overload were examined. Ferritin- and hemosiderin-like iron were determined based on the measurement of two distinct relaxation parameters: the “reduced” transverse relaxation rate, RR2 and the “aggregation index,” A, using three sets of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) datasets with different interecho spacings. Agarose phantoms, simulating the relaxation and susceptibility properties of tissue with different concentrations of dispersed (ferritin-like) and aggregated (hemosiderin-like) iron, were employed for validation. Results Both phantom and in vivo human data confirmed that transverse relaxation components associated with the dispersed and aggregated iron could be separated using the two-parameter (RR2, A) method. The MRI-determined total hepatic storage iron was highly correlated (r = 0.95) with measurements derived from biopsy or biosusceptometry. As total hepatic storage iron increased, the proportion stored as aggregated iron became greater. Conclusion This method provides a new means for non-invasive MRI determination of the partition of hepatic storage iron between ferritin and hemosiderin in iron overload disorders. PMID:23720394

  14. Iron fertilisation of the ocean through major volcanic eruptions. A case study of the Kasatochi eruption 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenthal, A.; Langmann, B.; Hort, M.; Hoshyaripour, G.; Paetsch, J.; Lorkowski, I.

    2012-04-01

    Until recently it was more or less common sense that once volcanic ash enters the ocean it simply deposits into the sediments without any further impact on ocean biochemistry. This view has been notably revised after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in 2008. During the eruption significant amounts of ash were deposited into oceanic NE Pacific. The NE Pacific is known as a high-nutrient-low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region where algae growth is limited by the bio-available, i.e. soluble iron. These bio-available iron salts residing on the volcanic ash are most likely formed by gas-ash/aerosol interactions inside the volcanic plume. The physico-chemical mechanisms behind the processes contributing to bio-available iron production in volcanic plumes, however, are still poorly constrained. As the eruption occurred in early August, the atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom as was observed by satellite instruments and in-situ measurements. Here we investigate this event with the marine biogeochemical model ECOHAM, which is a regional scale three-dimensional ocean biogeochemistry model, coupled to the hydrodynamic model HAMSON. It has been successfully applied mainly over the NW European continental shelf area where iron limitation does not play a role. For applications of this model to the eruption of Kasatochi volcano, an iron cycle model has been implemented, which considers the influence of iron addition to the euphotic zone on diatoms, flagellates, and carbon dioxide concentrations. This model-approach assumes that all dissolved iron in the first meters of seawater is bio-available for phytoplankton uptake. It describes the limitation of phytoplankton growth rates by iron in addition to the limitation by the macro-nutrients nitrogen, phosphate and silicate as well as by light. The surface ocean iron input associated with the eruption of Kasatochi volcano has been determined by an atmospheric-aerosol model to be on the

  15. The Remote Sensing of Mineral Aerosols and their Impact on Phytoplankton Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tindale, Neil W.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this experiment was to test the iron hypothesis does the addition of iron to nutrient rich surface waters enhance productivity? Our specific objectives in this experiment included sampling and studying the marine aerosol size and type (which are related to chemical reactivity) during the PlumEx cruise to determine the importance of local (Galapagos Islands) versus long-range sources of atmospheric material. Detailed results of single particle analysis of our samples are being prepared for publication in two papers. We collect aerosol samples and they have been analyzed for trace metals and other elements. We are mapped aerosol distribution and the desert source areas around the Arabian Sea region. We did record a clear relationship between the aerosol radiance and synoptic weather patterns with distinct signals over the ocean northwest and southwest of Australia. While the interpretation was limited an aerosol climatology pattern was presented.

  16. What Should We Teach Beginners about Solubility and Solubility Products?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that consideration should be given to whether teaching solubility product calculations is at all useful. Claims that experienced teachers seriously misunderstand and misuse solubility product calculations. (DDR)

  17. Marine submicron aerosol gradients, sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceburnis, Darius; Rinaldi, Matteo; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Martucci, Giovanni; Giulianelli, Lara; O'Dowd, Colin D.

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol principal sources and sinks over eastern North Atlantic waters were studied through the deployment of an aerosol chemistry gradient sampling system. The chemical gradients of primary and secondary aerosol components - specifically, sea salt (SS), water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM), water-soluble organic matter (WSOM), nitrate, ammonium, oxalate, amines, methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) - were examined in great detail. Sea salt fluxes were estimated by the boundary layer box model and ranged from 0.3 to 3.5 ng m-2 s-1 over the wind speed range of 5-12 m s-1 and compared well with the derived fluxes from existing sea salt source parameterisations. The observed seasonal pattern of sea salt gradients was mainly driven by wind stress in addition to the yet unquantified effect of marine OM modifying fractional contributions of SS and OM in sea spray. WIOM gradients were a complex combination of rising and waning biological activity, especially in the flux footprint area, and wind-driven primary sea spray production supporting the coupling of recently developed sea spray and marine OM parameterisations.

  18. CAPRAM modelling of the speciation and redox-cycling of iron in deliquescent particles and cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilgner, A.; Wolke, R.; Herrmann, H.

    2009-04-01

    The most abundant TMI in tropospheric particles is iron which plays a crucial role in aqueous phase chemistry of fog and cloud droplets. The redox-cycling of iron is responsible for many chemical interactions such as the HOx/HOy processing. However, still large uncertainties of TMI chemistry exist and less is known about the TMI speciation in the particulate phase. To this end, the iron speciation and redox cycling in deliquescent particles and cloud droplets were investigated in more detail by means of model studies using the SPectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model (SPACCIM). The parcel model SPACCIM includes a complex microphysical and multiphase chemistry model. In chemistry model, the multiphase mechanism RACM-MIM2ext/CAPRAM 3.0i with about 1100 processes was applied incorporating a detailed description of the tropospheric multiphase processes. Simulations were carried out for different environmental conditions using a non-permanent meteorological scenario. The model results have been analysed including time-resolved source and sinks studies. The model studies were particularly focused on temporal variations in the of iron speciation and redox-cycling in the condensed phase including its importance for other important chemical subsystems such as the multiphase HOx,y and organic chemistry. For this purpose, sensitivity studies have been performed on the importance of the water soluble iron content for the aqueous phase oxidation capacity and chemical organic processing. The model results have shown characteristic diurnal profiles of the iron speciation in both deliquescent particles and clouds. Moreover, up to about 20 to 50% of the soluble iron is shown to be still present as Fe2+ during the night which reflects an efficient nighttime iron-redox-cycling under polluted environmental conditions. Performed comparisons with available cloud water measurements and former model calculations revealed reasonable agreements as well as some differences. The

  19. Deliquescence behavior of organic/ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Sarah D.; Wise, Matthew E.; Cushing, Melinda; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2002-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that tropospheric aerosols composed of internal mixtures of organics with sulfates are quite common with the organic composing up to 50% of the particle mass. The influences of the organics on the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol are not known. In this paper, we report the solubility of a series of dicarboxylic acids in saturated ammonium sulfate solution as a function of temperature. We also report the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the pure dicarboxylic acids and of mixtures of dicarboxylic acids with ammonium sulfate. For the systems studied, we find that the presence of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids caused deliquescence to occur at a lower relative humidity (RH) than pure ammonium sulfate. In contrast, the less soluble dicarboxylic acids had no measurable effect on the deliquescence relative humidity of ammonium sulfate.

  20. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    demonstrated in the aerosol mass spectra shown in Figure 2. The aromatic aerosol also demonstrates strong chemical reactivity when exposed to laboratory air, indicating substantial stored chemical potential. Oxidatoin and solubility studies wil be presented and implicatoins for prebiotic chemistry o nTitan will be discussed.

  1. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  2. Learning about Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  3. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Optimizing solubility: kinetic versus thermodynamic solubility temptations and risks.

    PubMed

    Saal, Christoph; Petereit, Anna Christine

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data in guiding medicinal chemistry during lead optimization. The solubility of 465 research compounds was measured using a kinetic and a thermodynamic solubility assay. In the thermodynamic assay, polarized-light microscopy was used to investigate whether the result referred to the crystalline or to the amorphous compound. From the comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data it was noted that kinetic solubility measurements frequently yielded results which show considerably higher solubility compared to thermodynamic solubility. This observation is ascribed to the fact that a kinetic solubility assay typically delivers results which refer to the amorphous compound. In contrast, results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase. Accordingly, thermodynamic solubility data--especially when used together with an assessment of the solid state form--are deemed to be more useful in guiding solubility optimization for research compounds.

  5. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  6. Overview of Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate. I shall discuss these topics and application of the data to air quality monitoring.

  7. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  8. Aerosol, radiation, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne, spaceborne, and ground-based measurements are used to study the radiative and climatic effects of aerosols. The data, which are modelled with a hierarchy of radiation and climate models, and their implications are summarized. Consideration is given to volcanic aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds, and the Arctic haze. It is shown that several types of aerosols (volcanic particles and the Arctic haze) cause significant alterations to the radiation budget of the regions where they are located.

  9. Solubility of hematite revisited: effects of hydration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Je-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2007-11-01

    Measured pH and dissolved ferric iron concentration ([Fe(III)diss]) in contact with well-characterized hematite indicated an equilibrium with hematite immediately after synthesis, but [Fe(III)diss] increased with hydration time to be consistent with the predicted solubility of goethite or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), hydrated analogues of hematite. X-ray diffraction did not detect structural modification of hematite after 190 days of hydration, but Mössbauer spectroscopy detected hydration that penetrated several crystalline layers. When the hematite suspension was diluted with water, solids were invariably identified as hematite, but [Fe(III)diss] and pH indicated an equilibrium with goethite or HFO. This is the first experimental confirmation that the interfacial hydration of anhydrous hematite results in higher solubility than predicted by bulk thermodynamic properties of hematite. Correspondence of the results with previously published measurements and implications for environmental chemistry of ferric oxides are also discussed.

  10. Liposomal aerosols in the management of pulmonary infections.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B E

    1996-01-01

    The combination of liposomes and aerosols has been utilized to directly target the lungs with chemotherapeutic agents that might not have been used because of low solubility or toxicity. There are a variety of antibacterials, antifungals, and antivirals that have good in vitro activity, but are not effective because of their systemic toxicity and/or poor penetration into the lungs. Incorporation of many lipophilic drugs into liposomes decreases their toxicity without affecting effectiveness, thus increasing the therapeutic index. We have focused on aerosol delivery of amphotericin B (ampB) for the treatment of pulmonary and systemic fungal diseases. We have tested a variety of ampB-lipid formulations for the optimal treatment regimen for Cryptococcus and Candida infections in mouse models. The AeroTech II nebulizer (MMADs of 1.8-2.2 microns) produced aerosols with the highest concentrations in the breathable range. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that pulmonary drug was present for hours to weeks. AmBisome retained its anticryptococcal activity even when animals were challenged 14 days after aerosol treatment. Aerosols may also be effective in systemic diseases. In our Candida-mouse model, systemic candidiasis and mortality were reduced by aerosolized ampB-liposome treatment. The ability to utilize lipophilic drugs, to deliver high concentrations of drug directly to the site of infection, and to reduce toxicity makes aerosol liposomes an attractive, alternative route of administration.

  11. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  12. Airborne studies of aerosol emissions from savanna fires in southern Africa: 2. Aerosol chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Annegarn, H.; Beer, J.; Cachier, H.; Le Canut, P.; Elbert, W.; Maenhaut, W.; Salma, I.; Wienhold, F. G.; Zenker, T.

    1998-12-01

    We investigated smoke emissions from fires in savanna, forest, and agricultural ecosystems by airborne sampling of plumes close to prescribed burns and incidental fires in southern Africa. Aerosol samples were collected on glass fiber filters and on stacked filter units, consisting of a Nuclepore prefilter for particles larger than ˜1-2 μm and a Teflon second filter stage for the submicron fraction. The samples were analyzed for soluble ionic components, organic carbon, and black carbon. Onboard the research aircraft, particle number and volume distributions as a function of size were determined with a laser-optical particle counter and the black carbon content of the aerosol with an aethalometer. We determined the emission ratios (relative to CO2 and CO) and emission factors (relative to the amount of biomass burnt) for the various aerosol constituents. The smoke aerosols were rich in organic and black carbon, the latter representing 10-30% of the aerosol mass. K+ and NH4+ were the dominant cationic species in the smoke of most fires, while Cl- and SO42- were the most important anions. The aerosols were unusually rich in Cl-, probably due to the high Cl content of the semiarid vegetation. Comparison of the element budget of the fuel before and after the fires shows that the fraction of the elements released during combustion is highly variable between elements. In the case of the halogen elements, almost the entire amount released during the fire is present in the aerosol phase, while in the case of C, N, and S, only a small proportion ends up as particulate matter. This suggests that the latter elements are present predominantly as gaseous species in the fresh fire plumes studied here.

  13. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols and particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3), and the coarse particles were found to have higher concentrations of amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition in the aerosol collected at Dome C had also changed compared to the coastal site, suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V Italica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material (as microorganisms or plant material) in the sample.

  14. Biogenic sulfur emissions and aerosols over the tropical South Atlantic: 3. Atmospheric dimethylsulfide, aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Elbert, Wolfgang; de Mora, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    We measured dimethylsulfide in air (DMSa) and the number concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, including the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), during February-March 1991 over the tropical South Atlantic along 19°S (F/S Meteor, cruise 15/3). Aerosol number/size distributions were determined with a laser-optical particle counter, condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations with a TSI 3020, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with a Hudson-type supersaturation chamber. Aerosol samples were collected on two-stage stacked filters and analyzed by ion chromatography for soluble ion concentrations. Black carbon in aerosols was measured by visible light absorption and used to identify and eliminate periods with anthropogenic pollution from the data set. Meteorological analysis shows that most of the air masses sampled had spent extended periods over remote marine areas in the tropical and subtropical region. DMSa was closely correlated with the sea-to- air DMS flux calculated from DMS concentrations in seawater and meteorological data. Sea salt made the largest contribution to aerosol mass and volume but provided only a small fraction of the aerosol number concentration. The submicron aerosol had a mean composition close to ammonium bisulfate, with the addition of some methanesulfonate. Aerosol (CN and CCN) number and non-sea-salt sulfate concentrations were significantly correlated with DMS concentration and flux. This suggests that DMS oxidation followed by aerosol nucleation and growth in the marine boundary layer is an important, if not dominating, source of CN and possibly CCN. The degree of correlation between DMS and particle concentrations in the marine boundary layer may be strongly influenced by the different time scales of the processes regulating these concentrations. Our results provide strong support for several aspects of the CLAW hypothesis, which proposes the existence of a feedback loop linking DMS

  15. Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Hoose, Corinna

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds by uptake into cloud particles, collision-coalescence, chemical processing inside the cloud particles and release back into the atmosphere has important effects on aerosol concentration, size distribution, chemical composition and mixing state. Aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei. Cloud droplets can take up further aerosol particles by collisions. Atmospheric gases may also be transferred into the cloud droplets and undergo chemical reactions, e.g. the production of atmospheric sulphate. Aerosol particles are also processed in ice crystals. They may be taken up by homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets below -38° C or by heterogeneous freezing above -38° C. This includes immersion freezing of already immersed aerosol particles in the droplets and contact freezing of particles colliding with a droplet. Many clouds do not form precipitation and also much of the precipitation evaporates before it reaches the ground. The water soluble part of the aerosol particles concentrates in the hydrometeors and together with the insoluble part forms a single, mixed, larger particle, which is released. We have implemented aerosol processing into the current version of the general circulation model ECHAM6 (Stevens et al., 2013) coupled to the aerosol module HAM (Stier et al., 2005). ECHAM6-HAM solves prognostic equations for the cloud droplet number and ice crystal number concentrations. In the standard version of HAM, seven modes are used to describe the total aerosol. The modes are divided into soluble/mixed and insoluble modes and the number concentrations and masses of different chemical components (sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt and mineral dust) are prognostic variables. We extended this by an explicit representation of aerosol particles in cloud droplets and ice crystals in stratiform clouds similar to Hoose et al. (2008a,b). Aerosol particles in cloud droplets are represented by 5 tracers for the

  16. Modeling aerosol water uptake in the arctic based on the κ-Kohler theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, N.; Ekman, A.; Silvergren, S.; Zieger, P.; Wideqvist, U.; Ström, J.; Svenningsson, B.; Tunved, P.; Riipinen, I.

    2013-05-01

    Water uptake or hygroscopicity is one of the most fundamental properties of atmospheric aerosols. Aerosol particles containing soluble materials can grow in size by absorbing water in ambient atmosphere. This property is measured by a parameter known as growth factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the wet diameter to the dry diameter. Hygroscopicity controls the size of an aerosol particle and therefore its optical properties in the atmosphere. Hygroscopic growth depends on the dry size of the particle, its chemical composition and the relative humidity in the ambient air (Fitzgerald, 1975; Pilinis et al., 1995). One of the typical problems in aerosol studies is the lack of measurements of aerosol size distributions and optical properties in ambient conditions. The gap between dry measurements and the real humid atmosphere is filled in this study by utilizing a hygroscopic model which calculates the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard during 2008.

  17. Volcanic ash as an iron-fertilizer in ocean surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgun, N.; Duggen, S.; Croot, P.; Dietze, H.; Schacht, U.; Oskarsson, N.; Siebe, C.; Auer, A.

    2007-12-01

    Surface ocean fertilisation with iron may affect the marine primary productivity, C-cycles and eventually climate development. Volcanic ash has the potential to release iron on contact with seawater and to stimulate phytoplankton growth (1,2) but the relative importance of volcanism at destructive plate margins (subduction zones, SZ) and intraplate volcanic settings (ocean islands at hot spots) remains unknown. Here we present new results from geochemical experiments with natural seawater and numerous volcanic ash samples from SZ volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire (Alaska, Japan, Kamchatka, Northern and Central America and Papua New Guinea) and hot spot volcanoes (on Iceland and Hawaii). The release of iron as a function of time was determined in situ in seawater by means of Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry. Our experiments show that: A) volcanic ash from both SZ and hot spot volcanic areas mobilise significant amounts of iron, B) with the highest mobilisation rates within the first 10-20 minutes and C) indicate that volcanic ash from hot spot volcanoes mobilise less iron than volcanic ash from SZ. We propose that the higher iron-mobilisation potential of SZ volcanic ash results from higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases that seem to be involved in the formation of Fe-bearing soluble salt coatings (condensed gases and adsorbed aerosols) on ash particles (1,2,3). Higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases thus appear to be linked to the recycling of seawater through subduction of oceanic lithosphere at destructive plate margins. Together, taking into account differences in ash-fluxes from SZ and hot spot volcanoes into the oceans, our study suggests that SZ volcanic ash plays a more important role for the global surface ocean iron budget than ash from volcanoes in hot spot areas. 1 Frogner, Gislason, Oskarsson (2001). Geology, 29, 487-490. 2 Duggen, Croot, Schacht, Hofmann (2007) Geoph. Res. Letters 34, 5. 3 Oskarsson (1980), J. Volc. and Geoth. Res. 8, 251-266.

  18. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  19. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  20. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  1. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  2. Solid dispersions of itraconazole for inhalation with enhanced dissolution, solubility and dispersion properties.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Sebti, Thami; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to produce a dry powder for inhalation (DPI) of a poorly soluble active ingredient (itraconazole: ITZ) that would present an improved dissolution rate and enhanced solubility with good aerosolization properties. Solid dispersions of amorphous ITZ, mannitol and, when applicable, D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) were produced by spray-drying hydro-alcoholic solutions in which all agents were dissolved. These dry formulations were characterized in terms of their aerosol performances and their dissolution, solubility and physical properties. Modulate differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction analyses showed that ITZ recovered from the different spray-dried solutions was in an amorphous state and that mannitol was crystalline. The inlet drying temperature and, indirectly, the outlet temperature selected during the spray-drying were critical parameters. The outlet temperature should be below the ITZ glass transition temperature to avoid severe particle agglomeration. The formation of a solid dispersion between amorphous ITZ and mannitol allowed the dry powder to be produced with an improved dissolution rate, greater saturation solubility than bulk ITZ and good aerosol properties. The use of a polymeric surfactant (such as TPGS) was beneficial in terms of dissolution rate acceleration and solubility enhancement, but it also reduced aerosol performance. For example, significant dissolution rate acceleration (f(2)<50) and greater saturation solubility were obtained when introducing 1% (w/w) TPGS (mean dissolution time dropped from 50.4 min to 36.9 min and saturation solubility increased from 20 ± 3 ng/ml to 46 ± 2 ng/ml). However, the fine particle fraction dropped from 47 ± 2% to 37.2 ± 0.4%. This study showed that mannitol solid dispersions may provide an effective formulation type for producing DPIs of poorly soluble active ingredients, as exemplified by ITZ.

  3. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  4. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  5. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Hassler, Christel S.; Nichols, Carol Mancuso; Butler, Edward C. V.; Boyd, Philip W.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron bioavailability have focused on the role of siderophores; however, eukaryotic phytoplankton do not produce or release siderophores. Here, we report on the pivotal role of saccharides—which may act like an organic ligand—in enhancing iron bioavailability to a Southern Ocean cultured diatom, a prymnesiophyte, as well as to natural populations of eukaryotic phytoplankton. Addition of a monosaccharide (>2 nM of glucuronic acid, GLU) to natural planktonic assemblages from both the polar front and subantarctic zones resulted in an increase in iron bioavailability for eukaryotic phytoplankton, relative to bacterioplankton. The enhanced iron bioavailability observed for several groups of eukaryotic phytoplankton (i.e., cultured and natural populations) using three saccharides, suggests it is a common phenomenon. Increased iron bioavailability resulted from the combination of saccharides forming highly bioavailable organic associations with iron and increasing iron solubility, mainly as colloidal iron. As saccharides are ubiquitous, present at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations, and produced by biota in surface waters, they also satisfy the prerequisites to be important constituents of the poorly defined “ligand soup,” known to weakly bind iron. Our findings point to an additional type of organic ligand, controlling iron bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton—a key unknown in iron biogeochemistry. PMID:21169217

  6. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  7. Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors: The REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Glynn, Simone A.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Murphy, Edward L.; Wright, David J.; Sacher, Ronald A.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Tobler, Leslie H.; Simon, Toby L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood donors are at risk of iron deficiency. We evaluated the effects of blood donation intensity on iron and hemoglobin in a prospective study. Methods Four cohorts of frequent and first time or reactivated blood donors (no donation in 2 years), female and male, totaling 2425 were characterized and followed as they donated blood frequently. At enrollment and the final visit, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hemoglobin were determined. Models to predict iron deficiency and hemoglobin deferral were developed. Iron depletion was defined at two levels: Iron Deficient Erythropoiesis (IDE) [log (soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin ≥ 2.07)] and Absent Iron Stores (AIS) (ferritin < 12 ng/mL). Results Among returning female first time/reactivated donors, 20% and 51% had AIS and IDE at their final visit, respectively; corresponding proportions for males were 8% and 20%. Among female frequent donors who returned, 27% and 62% had AIS and IDE, respectively, while corresponding proportions for males were 18% and 47%. Predictors of IDE and/or AIS included a higher frequency of blood donation in the last 2 years, a shorter interdonation interval, and being female and young; conversely, taking iron supplements reduced the risk of iron depletion. Predictors of hemoglobin deferral included female gender, Black race and a shorter interdonation interval. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of iron depletion in frequent blood donors. Increasing the interdonation interval would reduce the prevalence of iron depletion and hemoglobin deferral. Alternatively, replacement with iron supplements may allow frequent donation without the adverse outcome of iron depletion. PMID:22023513

  8. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  9. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  10. Iron release from corroded iron pipes in drinking water distribution systems: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sarin, P; Snoeyink, V L; Bebee, J; Jim, K K; Beckett, M A; Kriven, W M; Clement, J A

    2004-03-01

    Iron release from corroded iron pipes is the principal cause of "colored water" problems in drinking water distribution systems. The corrosion scales present in corroded iron pipes restrict the flow of water, and can also deteriorate the water quality. This research was focused on understanding the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO), a key water quality parameter, on iron release from the old corroded iron pipes. Corrosion scales from 70-year-old galvanized iron pipe were characterized as porous deposits of Fe(III) phases (goethite (alpha-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), and maghemite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3))) with a shell-like, dense layer near the top of the scales. High concentrations of readily soluble Fe(II) content was present inside the scales. Iron release from these corroded pipes was investigated for both flow and stagnant water conditions. Our studies confirmed that iron was released to bulk water primarily in the ferrous form. When DO was present in water, higher amounts of iron release was observed during stagnation in comparison to flowing water conditions. Additionally, it was found that increasing the DO concentration in water during stagnation reduced the amount of iron release. Our studies substantiate that increasing the concentration of oxidants in water and maintaining flowing conditions can reduce the amount of iron release from corroded iron pipes. Based on our studies, it is proposed that iron is released from corroded iron pipes by dissolution of corrosion scales, and that the microstructure and composition of corrosion scales are important parameters that can influence the amount of iron released from such systems.

  11. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  12. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  13. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  15. Chemical Speciation of Water Soluble Ions and Metals of Cloud and Rain Water During the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Valle Diaz, C. J.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fitzgerald, E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Prather, K. A.; Sánchez, M.; McDowell, W. H.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2013-05-01

    The underlying physico-chemical processes of dust particles interactions are poorly understood; even less understood is how aging impacts cloud properties and climate as the particles travel from Africa to the Caribbean region. Caribbean landmasses have tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) that are tightly coupled to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. TMCFs are ecosystems to study the effects African Dust (AD) on cloud formation and precipitation as these are very sensitive ecosystems that respond to small changes in climate. As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS), chemical analyses were performed on cloud and rain water samples collected at Pico del Este (PE) station in Luquillo, PR (1051 masl) during campaigns held from 2010 to 2012. At PE, two cloud collectors (i.e., single stage (Aluminum version), a 2-stage (Teflon version) Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC)), a rainwater collector, and anAerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) were operated. Chemical analyses performed on collected samples include pH, conductivity, ion chromatography (IC), and inductive coupled plasma (ICP). Results from these campaigns showed that on days that had air masses with the influence of AD, cloud water samples had higher conductivity and pH values on average (up to 5.7 and 180μS/cm, respectively) than those with air masses without AD influence. An increase in the concentrations of water-soluble ions like non-sea salt calcium and magnesium, and metals like magnesium, calcium and aluminum was observed and the appearance of iron was seen on ICP analyses. The ATOFMS, showed an increase on the amount of particles during AD influence with composition of aluminum, silicates, potassium, iron and titanium aerosols. The increase on the aforementioned species was constant in the three years of sampling, which give us confidence in the identification of the chemical species that are present during the influence of AD.

  16. Aerosol transport from Chiang Mai, Thailand to Mt. Lulin, Taiwan - Implication of aerosol aging during long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Engling, Guenter; Chang, Shih-Yu; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chang, You-Jia; Hong, Guo-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosol from Indochina may cause a potential effect on climate change in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Western Pacific. Up to now, the understanding of BB aerosol composition modification during long-range transport (LRT) is still very limited due to the lack of observational data. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at the Suthep/Doi Ang Khang (DAK) mountain sites in Chiang Mai, Thailand and the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (Mt. Lulin) in central Taiwan from March to April 2010 and from February to April 2013, respectively. During the study period, an upwind and downwind relationship between the Suthep/DAK and Lulin sites (2400 km apart) was validated by backward trajectories. Comprehensive aerosol properties were resolved for PM2.5 water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous content, water-soluble/insoluble organic carbon (WSOC/WIOC), dicarboxylic acids and their salts (DCAS), and anhydrosugars. A Modification Factor (MF) is proposed by employing non-sea-salt potassium ion (nss-K+) or fractionalized elemental carbon evolved at 580 °C after pyrolized OC correction (EC1-OP) as a BB aerosol tracer to evaluate the mass fraction changes of aerosol components from source to receptor regions during LRT. The MF values of nss-SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, OC1 (fractionalized organic carbon evolved from room temperature to 140 °C), OP (pyrolized OC fraction), DCAS, and WSOC were above unity, which indicated that these aerosol components were enhanced during LRT as compared with those in the near-source region. In contrast, the MF values of anhydrosugars ranged from 0.1 to 0.3, indicating anhydrosugars have degraded during LRT.

  17. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols, particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3) and the coarse particles were found to be enriched with amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition had also changed suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V talica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material in the sample.

  18. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  19. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  1. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Law, C. S.; Hutchins, D. A.; Abraham, E. R.; Croot, P. L.; Ellwood, M.; Frew, R. D.; Hadfield, M.; Hall, J.; Handy, S.; Hare, C.; Higgins, J.; Hill, P.; Hunter, K. A.; Leblanc, K.; Maldonado, M. T.; McKay, R. M.; Mioni, C.; Oliver, M.; Pickmere, S.; Pinkerton, M.; Safi, K.; Sander, S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Smith, M.; Strzepek, R.; Tovar-Sanchez, A.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    An improved knowledge of iron biogeochemistry is needed to better understand key controls on the functioning of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic regions. Iron budgets for HNLC waters have been constructed using data from disparate sources ranging from laboratory algal cultures to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE of New Zealand, and measured concurrently all sources (with the exception of aerosol deposition) to, sinks of iron from, and rates of iron recycling within, the surface mixed layer. A pelagic iron budget (timescale of days) indicated that oceanic supply terms (lateral advection and vertical diffusion) were relatively small compared to the main sink (downward particulate export). Remote sensing and terrestrial monitoring reveal 13 dust or wildfire events in Australia, prior to and during FeCycle, one of which may have deposited iron at the study location. However, iron deposition rates cannot be derived from such observations, illustrating the difficulties in closing iron budgets without quantification of episodic atmospheric supply. Despite the threefold uncertainties reported for rates of aerosol deposition (Duce et al., 1991), published atmospheric iron supply for the New Zealand region is ˜50-fold (i.e., 7- to 150-fold) greater than the oceanic iron supply measured in our budget, and thus was comparable (i.e., a third to threefold) to our estimates of downward export of particulate iron. During FeCycle, the fluxes due to short term (hours) biological iron uptake and regeneration were indicative of rapid recycling and were tenfold greater than for new iron (i.e. estimated atmospheric and measured oceanic supply), giving an "fe" ratio (uptake of new iron/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.17 (i.e., a range of 0.06 to 0.51 due to uncertainties on aerosol iron supply), and an "Fe" ratio (biogenic Fe export/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.09 (i.e., 0.03 to 0.24).

  2. Enhanced solubility and ecological impact of atmospheric phosphorus deposition upon extended seawater exposure.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Roberts, Kathryn; Lomas, Michael W; Saito, Mak A; Post, Anton F; Paytan, Adina

    2012-10-02

    Atmospheric P solubility affects the amount of P available for phytoplankton in the surface ocean, yet our understanding of the timing and extent of atmospheric P solubility is based on short-term leaching experiments where conditions may differ substantially from the surface ocean. We conducted longer- term dissolution experiments of atmospheric aerosols in filtered seawater, and found up to 9-fold greater dissolution of P after 72 h compared to instantaneous leaching. Samples rich in anthropogenic materials released dissolved inorganic P (DIP) faster than mineral dust. To gauge the effect of biota on the fate of atmospheric P, we conducted field incubations with aerosol samples collected in the Sargasso Sea and Red Sea. In the Sargasso Sea phytoplankton were not P limited, and biological activity enhanced DIP release from aerosols, and aerosols induced biological mineralization of dissolved organic P in seawater, leading to DIP accumulation. However, in the Red Sea where phytoplankton were colimited by P and N, soluble P was rapidly consumed by phytoplankton following aerosol enrichment. Our results suggest that atmospheric P dissolution could continue over multiple days once reaching the surface ocean, and that previous estimates of atmospheric P deposition may underestimate the contribution from this source.

  3. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, D.; Tost, H.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-09-01

    Major population centers (MPCs) or mega-cities represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 MPC locations are used to study the balance between local pollution build up and pollution export, either vertically into the upper troposphere or horizontally, but remaining in the lower atmosphere. The insoluble gas phase tracers with fixed lifetimes are transported with the atmospheric circulation, while the aerosol tracers also undergo gravitational sedimentation as well as dry and wet deposition processes. The strength of low-level tracer export depends on the location of the emission source and prevailing meteorology, in particular on atmospheric stability and the height of the boundary layer and the mixing out of this layer. In contrast, vertical transport of tracer mass depends on the tracer's solubility: the more soluble a tracer is the less mass reaches altitudes above five kilometers. Hence, the mass of insoluble gas phase tracer above five kilometers can be up to ten times higher than the hydrophilic aerosol mass from the same source. In the case of aerosol tracers, pollution build up around the source is determined by meteorological factors which have only indirect effects on tracer lifetime, like surface wind, boundary layer height, and turbulent mixing as well as those which affect the lifetime of the tracers such as precipitation. The longer a tracer stays in the atmosphere, the lower is the relative importance of the location of the source to the atmospheric mass and thus the lower is the relative local pollution build up. We further use aerosol deposition

  4. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, D.; Tost, H.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2013-04-01

    Major population centers (MPCs), or megacities, represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality, they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas-phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 MPC locations are used to study the balance between local pollution build-up and pollution export, either vertically into the upper troposphere or horizontally in the lower troposphere. The insoluble gas-phase tracers with fixed lifetimes are transported with the atmospheric circulation, while the aerosol tracers also undergo gravitational sedimentation as well as dry and wet deposition processes. The strength of low-level tracer export depends on the location of the emission source and prevailing meteorology, in particular on atmospheric stability and the height of the boundary layer and the mixing out of this layer. In contrast, vertical transport of tracer mass depends on the tracer's solubility: the more soluble a tracer is, the less mass reaches altitudes above five kilometers. Hence, the mass of insoluble gas-phase tracer above five kilometers can be up to ten times higher than the hydrophilic aerosol mass from the same source. In the case of aerosol tracers, pollution build-up around the source is determined by meteorological factors which have only indirect effects on tracer lifetime, like surface wind, boundary layer height, and turbulent mixing, as well as those which affect the lifetime of the tracers such as precipitation. The longer a tracer stays in the atmosphere, the lower is the relative importance of the location of the source to the atmospheric mass, and thus the lower is the relative local pollution build-up. We further use aerosol deposition fields to

  5. Organic nitrogen in rain and aerosol in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere: An association with atmospheric dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Kimberly A.; Kubilay, Nilgün; Duce, Robert A.

    2003-05-01

    From March through early May of 2000, rain and bulk aerosol samples were collected at a coastal site on the eastern Mediterranean Sea at Erdemli, Turkey, and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species, including nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonium (NH4+), water-soluble organic N, urea, and dissolved free amino acids. Other ions were also analyzed, including Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Cl-, and SO42-. Water-soluble organic N was found to contribute ˜17% and ˜26% of the total water-soluble N in rain and aerosols, respectively. Organic N concentrations within rain and aerosols exhibited statistically significant linear relationships to Ca2+ ion (Rsqr ˜ 0.75, P < 0.05), suggesting a relationship to calcite (CaCO3) in atmospheric dust. Kinematic trajectory analyses indicated the origin of winds from arid regions, mainly in northern Africa, in 70% of the aerosols sampled. Earth Probe/Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index data also confirmed the influence of atmospheric dust in the region on days when Ca2+ concentrations were elevated, and trajectory analyses suggested northern Africa as a source region. The combined ion, trajectory, and aerosol index data suggest that organic N is associated with atmospheric dust in this region. Urea N and amino N represented a small percentage of the organic N fraction. In rain and aerosols, urea represented ˜11% and <1%, respectively, of the total organic N. While amino N contributed minimally to organic N totals (˜1% of total organic N in aerosols), the individual amino acids contributing ˜75% of amino N were indicative of biological organisms. Further research is needed to decipher the influence from biology and gas phase adsorption of anthropogenically derived water-soluble organics on organic N totals.

  6. Fluorite solubility equilibria in selected geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Jenne, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Calculation of chemical equilibria in 351 hot springs and surface waters from selected geothermal areas in the western United States indicate that the solubility of the mineral fluorite, CaF2, provides an equilibrium control on dissolved fluoride activity. Waters that are undersaturated have undergone dilution by non-thermal waters as shown by decreased conductivity and temperature values, and only 2% of the samples are supersaturated by more than the expected error. Calculations also demonstrate that simultaneous chemical equilibria between the thermal waters and calcite as well as fluorite minerals exist under a variety of conditions. Testing for fluorite solubility required a critical review of the thermodynamic data for fluorite. By applying multiple regression of a mathematical model to selected published data we have obtained revised estimates of the pK (10,96), ??Gof (-280.08 kcal/mole), ??Hof (-292.59 kcal/mole), S?? (16.39 cal/deg/mole) and CoP (16.16 cal/deg/mole) for CaF2 at 25??C and 1 atm. Association constants and reaction enthalpies for fluoride complexes with boron, calcium and iron are included in this review. The excellent agreement between the computer-based activity products and the revised pK suggests that the chemistry of geothermal waters may also be a guide to evaluating mineral solubility data where major discrepancies are evident. ?? 1977.

  7. Aerosol impacts in the Met Office global NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Jane P.; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Milton, Sean F.

    2010-05-01

    An accurate representation of the direct and indirect effect of aerosols is of growing concern for global numerical weather prediction (NWP). Increased scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave (SW) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) fields due to the presence of aerosol layers in the atmosphere modifies the atmospheric heating profile and can affect large-scale circulation patterns. The current representation of aerosols in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified ModelTM (MetUM) is based on a simple aerosol climatology (Cusack et al., 1998). Profiles of water soluble dust, soot, oceanic and stratospheric sulphate aerosols are described separately for land and ocean surfaces and are distributed over the boundary layer, free troposphere and stratosphere (sulphates only). While this improved the reflected SW radiative bias at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), there is evidence that the climatology is too absorbing leading to a temperature bias in the lower troposphere of approximately 0.5 K/day. Furthermore, the omission of the scattering and absorption properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol particles in particular, is believed to be the principal cause of significant model biases (in the region of 50-56 W m-2) in both the model OLR at the TOA (Haywood et al., 2005) and the surface SW radiation fields (Milton et al., 2008). One of the objectives of the Global Aerosols (G-AER) component of the MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) project is to evaluate the impact of an improved aerosol representation on the performance of global NWP models. In a stepwise approach of increasing the aerosol complexity in the MetUM, the Cusack climatology is being replaced by the CLASSIC (Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies in Climate) aerosol scheme, developed for the HadGEM (Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model) climate model. CLASSIC includes representations of external mixtures of sulphate, black carbon, organic

  8. simpleGAMMA - a reduced model of secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous aerosol phase (aaSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. L.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the uptake and aqueous processing of water-soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by wet aerosols or cloud droplets is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We recently developed GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a zero-dimensional kinetic model that couples gas-phase and detailed aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry for speciated prediction of SOA and organosulfate formation in cloudwater or aqueous aerosols. Results from GAMMA simulations of SOA formation in aerosol water (McNeill et al., 2012) indicate that it is dominated by two pathways: isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) uptake followed by ring-opening chemistry (under low-NOx conditions) and glyoxal uptake. This suggested that it is possible to model the majority of aqueous aerosol phase SOA mass using a highly simplified reaction scheme. We have therefore developed a reduced version of GAMMA, simpleGAMMA. Close agreement in predicted aaSOA mass is observed between simpleGAMMA and GAMMA under all conditions tested (between pH 1-4 and RH 40-80%) after 12 h of simulation. simpleGAMMA is computationally efficient and suitable for coupling with larger-scale atmospheric chemistry models.

  9. Ablation, flux, and atmospheric implications of meteors inferred from stratospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, D J; Thomson, D S; Murphy, D M

    2001-03-02

    Single-particle analyses of stratospheric aerosol show that about half of the particles contain 0.5 to 1.0 weight percent meteoritic iron by mass, requiring a total extraterrestrial influx of 8 to 38 gigagrams per year. The sodium/iron ratio in these stratospheric particles is higher and the magnesium/iron and calcium/iron ratios are lower than in chondritic meteorites, implying that the fraction of material that is ablated must lie at the low end of previous estimates and that the extraterrestrial component that resides in the mesosphere and stratosphere is not of chondritic composition.

  10. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  11. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  12. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  13. Aerosol Optical Depth over Africa retrieved from AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriques, Edith

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols produced over the African continent have important consequences for climate. In particular, large amounts of desert dust are produced over the Sahara and transported across the North Atlantic where desert dust deposition influences the eco system by iron fertilization, and further North over Europe with outbreaks as far as Scandinavia. Biomass burning occurs in most of the African continent south of the Sahara and causes a net positive radiating forcing resulting in local warming of the atmosphere layers. These effects have been studied during large field campaigns. Satellites can systematically provide information on aerosols over a large area such as Africa and beyond. To this end, we retrieved the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at three wavelengths (555nm, 670nm, and 1600nm) over Africa from the reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere by the AATSR (Advances Along Track Scanning Radiometer) flying on ENVISAT, for one year (1 May 2008 to 30 April 2009) to obtain information on the seasonal and spatial behaviour of the AOD, episodes of high AOD events and connect the retrieved AOD with the ground-based aerosol measurements. The AOD retrieval algorithm, which is applied to cloud-free pixels over land, is based on the comparison of the measured and modeled reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The algorithm uses look-up-tables (LUTs) to compute the modeled TOA reflectance. For AOD retrieval, an aerosol in the atmosphere is assumed to be an external mixture of fine and coarse mode particles. The two aerosol types are mixed such that the spectral behavior of the reflectance due to aerosol best fits the measurements. Comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Roboric NETwork), which is a network of ground-based sun photometers which measure atmospheric aerosol properties, shows good agreement but with some overestimation of the AATSR retrieved AOD. Different aerosol models have been used to improve the comparison. The lack of AERONET stations in Africa

  14. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  15. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  16. The hygroscopicity of indoor aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-07-01

    A system to study the hygroscopic growth of particle was developed by combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a wetted wall reactor. This system is capable of mimicking the conditions in human respiratory tract, and measuring the particle size change due to the hygroscopic growth. The performance of the system was tested with three kinds of particles of known composition, NaCl, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and (NH{sub 4})HS0{sub 4} particles. The hygroscopicity of a variety of common indoor aerosol particles was studied including combustion aerosols (cigarette smoking, cooking, incenses and candles) and consumer spray products such as glass cleaner, general purpose cleaner, hair spray, furniture polish spray, disinfectant, and insect killer. Experiments indicate that most of the indoor aerosols show some hygroscopic growth and only a few materials do not. The magnitude of hygroscopic growth ranges from 20% to 300% depending on the particle size and fraction of water soluble components.

  17. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  18. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  19. The Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-08): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Kostenidou, E.; Mohr, C.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Kouvarakis, G.; Zarmpas, P.; Burkhart, J. F.; Lee, B.-H.; Psichoudaki, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Pilinis, C.; Stohl, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-03-01

    A month (4 May to 8 June 2008) of ambient aerosol, air ion and gas phase sampling (Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment 2008, FAME-08) was conducted at Finokalia, on the island of Crete, Greece. The purpose of the study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of aged aerosol and to investigate new particle formation. Measurements included aerosol and air ion size distributions, size-resolved chemical composition, organic aerosol thermal volatility, water uptake and particle optical properties (light scattering and absorption). Statistical analysis of the aerosol mass concentration variations revealed the absence of diurnal patterns suggesting the lack of strong local sources. Sulfates accounted for approximately half of the particulate matter less than 1 micrometer in diameter (PM1) and organics for 26%. The PM1 organic aerosol fraction was highly oxidized with 80% water soluble. The supermicrometer particles were dominated by crustal components (50%), sea salt (24%) and nitrates (16%). The organic carbon to elemental carbon (OC/EC) ratio correlated with ozone measurements but with a one-day lag. The average OC/EC ratio for the study period was equal to 5.4. For three days air masses from North Africa resulted in a 6-fold increase of particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in diameter (PM10) and a decrease of the OC/EC ratio by a factor of 2. Back trajectory analysis, based on FLEXPART footprint plots, identified five source regions (Athens, Greece, Africa, other continental and marine), each of which influenced the PM1 aerosol composition and properties. Marine air masses had the lowest PM1 concentrations and air masses from the Balkans, Turkey and Eastern Europe the highest.

  20. The Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-08): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Bougiatioti, A.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Kostenidou, E.; Mohr, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Kouvarakis, G.; Zarmpas, P.; Burkhart, J. F.; Lee, B.-H.; Psichoudaki, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Pilinis, C.; Stohl, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A month (4 May to 8 June 2008) of ambient aerosol, air ion and gas phase sampling (Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment 2008, FAME-08) was conducted at Finokalia, on the island of Crete, Greece. The purpose of the study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of aged aerosol and to investigate new particle formation. Measurements included aerosol and air ion size distributions, size-resolved chemical composition, organic aerosol thermal volatility, water uptake and particle optical properties (light scattering and absorption). Statistical analysis of the aerosol mass concentration variations revealed the absence of diurnal patterns suggesting the lack of strong local sources. Sulfates accounted for approximately half of the particulate matter less than 1 micrometer in diameter (PM1) and organics for 28%. The PM1 organic aerosol fraction was highly oxidized with 80% water soluble. The supermicrometer particles were dominated by crustal components (50%), sea salt (24%) and nitrates (16%). The organic carbon to elemental carbon (OC/EC) ratio correlated with ozone measurements but with a one-day lag. The average OC/EC ratio for the study period was equal to 5.4. For three days air masses from North Africa resulted in a 6-fold increase of particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in diameter (PM10) and a decrease of the OC/EC ratio by a factor of 2. Back trajectory analysis, based on FLEXPART footprint plots, identified five source regions (Athens, Greece, Africa, other continental and marine), each of which influenced the PM1 aerosol composition and properties. Marine air masses had the lowest PM1 concentrations and air masses from the Balkans, Turkey and Eastern Europe the highest.

  1. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    oxygenated aerosol. The origin of HOA and OOA (the sum of LV-OOA and SV-OOA) has been further confirmed by the statistics that primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC), estimated by the EC tracer method, were closely correlated with HOA and OOA, respectively. The results of the EC tracer method and of the PMF model revealed that primary organic aerosol (POA) constituted ~34-47% of OA mass and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constituted ~53-66% of regional organic aerosol in PRD during summer reason. The presence of abundant SOA was consistent with water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) results (accounting for ~60% of OC on average) by Miyazaki et al. (2009) for the same campaign. OOA correlated well with WSOC at the BG site, indicating that most OOA were water soluble. More specifically, approximately 86% of LV-OOA and 61% of SV-OOA were estimated as water soluble species on the basis of carbon content comparison.

  2. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    oxygenated aerosol. The origin of HOA and OOA (the sum of LV-OOA and SV-OOA) has been further confirmed by the statistics that primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC), estimated by the EC tracer method, were closely correlated with HOA and OOA, respectively. The results of the EC tracer method and of the PMF model revealed that primary organic aerosol (POA) constituted ~34-47 % of OA mass and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constituted ~53-66 % of regional organic aerosol in PRD during summer season. The presence of abundant SOA was consistent with water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) results (accounting for ~60 % of OC on average) by Miyazaki et al. (2009) for the same campaign. OOA correlated well with WSOC at the BG site, indicating that most OOA were water soluble. More specifically, approximately 86 % of LV-OOA and 61 % of SV-OOA were estimated as water soluble species on the basis of carbon content comparison.

  3. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  4. Adsorptive uptake of water by semisolid secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Lambe, Andrew T.; Hakala, Jani; Rastak, Narges; Cummings, Molly J.; Brogan, James F.; Hao, Liqing; Paramonov, Mikhail; Hong, Juan; Prisle, Nønne L.; Malila, Jussi; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Laaksonen, Ari; Kulmala, Markku; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B.; Donahue, Neil M.; Riipinen, Ilona; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Virtanen, Annele

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol climate effects are intimately tied to interactions with water. Here we combine hygroscopicity measurements with direct observations about the phase of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles to show that water uptake by slightly oxygenated SOA is an adsorption-dominated process under subsaturated conditions, where low solubility inhibits water uptake until the humidity is high enough for dissolution to occur. This reconciles reported discrepancies in previous hygroscopicity closure studies. We demonstrate that the difference in SOA hygroscopic behavior in subsaturated and supersaturated conditions can lead to an effect up to about 30% in the direct aerosol forcing—highlighting the need to implement correct descriptions of these processes in atmospheric models. Obtaining closure across the water saturation point is therefore a critical issue for accurate climate modeling.

  5. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  6. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  7. Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions in Atmospheric Forecast Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    succinic and adipic acids show no growth. Airborne measurements of hygroscopic growth factors of ship exhaust aerosol during the 2007 Marine Stratus...presented for several organic acids . Oxalic, malonic, glutaric, and glyoxylic acids grow gradually with increasing relative humidity up to 94%, while...respectively. These values agree with previously reported values for water-soluble organics such as dicarboxylic and multifunctional acids , and correspond

  8. Diurnal variations in the hygroscopic growth cycles of ambient aerosol populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarpia, Joshua L.; Gasparini, Roberto; Li, Runjun; Collins, Don R.

    2005-02-01

    During August and September of 2002, a relative humidity (RH) scanning tandem differential mobility analyzer system was used to measure the deliquescence/crystallization properties of ambient aerosol populations in southeast Texas. During August, sampling was conducted at a rural site on the Texas A&M campus in College Station, and in September, sampling was conducted at an urban site near the Houston ship channel. Measurements from both sites indicate that there are cyclical changes in the composition of the soluble fraction of the aerosol, which are not strongly linked to the local aerosol source. The observations show that as temperature increases and RH decreases, the hysteresis loop describing the RH dependence of aerosol hygroscopic growth collapses. On the basis of results from other studies that have shown the dominant ions present in aerosols in this region to be ammonium and sulfate, it is proposed that this collapse is due to a decrease in the ammonium to sulfate ratio in the aerosol particles, which coincides with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. This cyclical change in aerosol acidity may influence secondary organic aerosol production and may exaggerate the impact of the aerosol on human health. The compositional changes also result in a daily cycle in crystallization RH that is in phase with that of the ambient RH, which reduces the probability that hygroscopic particles will crystallize in the afternoon when the ambient RH is a minimum.

  9. Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, Ronald Lyn

    1996-08-15

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

  10. Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), a study was initiated to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this experimental study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. The aerosol sampling system designed for these tests consisted of filter cassettes, cascade impactors, a five-stage cyclone, and a moving filter. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. The aerosol samples were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and in vitro solubility. These data will provide input for use in future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of DU aerosols.

  11. Impact of springtime biomass-burning aerosols on radiative forcing over northern Thailand during the 7SEAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Lee, Chung-Te; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Janjai, Serm; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chantara, Somporn

    2016-04-01

    Biomass-burning (BB) aerosols are the significant contributor to the regional/global aerosol loading and radiation budgets. BB aerosols affect the radiation budget of the earth and atmosphere by scattering and absorbing directly the incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. These aerosols can exert either cooling or warming effect on climate, depending on the balance between scattering and absorption. BB activities in the form of wildland forest fires and agricultural crop burning are very pronounced in the Indochina peninsular regions in Southeast Asia mainly in spring (late February to April) season. The region of interest includes Doi Ang Khang (19.93° N, 99.05° E, 1536 msl) in northern Thailand, as part of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles & Interactions Experiment) campaign in 2013. In this study, for the first time, the direct aerosol radiative effects of BB aerosols over near-source BB emissions, during the peak loading spring season, in northern Indochina were investigated by using ground-based physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols as well as the aerosol optical and radiative transfer models. Information on aerosol parameters in the field campaign was used in the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) model to estimate various optical properties corresponding to aerosol compositions. Clear-sky shortwave direct aerosol radiative effects were further estimated with a raditive transfer model SBDART (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer). The columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD500) was found to be ranged from 0.26 to 1.13 (with the mean value 0.71 ± 0.24). Fine-mode (fine mode fraction ≈0.98, angstrom exponent ≈1.8) and significantly absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo ≈0.89, asymmetry-parameter ≈0.67 at 441 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. Water soluble and black carbon (BC) aerosols mainly

  12. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  13. Iron deficiency: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Polin, Vanessa; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Abitbol, Vered; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of anaemia worldwide. It impairs quality of life, increases asthenia and can lead to clinical worsening of patients. In addition, iron deficiency has a complex mechanism whose pathologic pathway is recently becoming better understood. The discovery of hepcidin has allowed a better clarification of iron metabolism regulation. Furthermore, the ratio of concentration of soluble transferrin receptor to the log of the ferritin level, has been developed as a tool to detect iron deficiency in most situations. The cause of iron deficiency should always be sought because the underlying condition can be serious. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding diagnostic algorithms for iron deficiency anaemia. The majority of aetiologies occur in the digestive tract, in men and postmenopausal women, and justify morphological examination of the gut. First line investigations are upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy, and when negative, the small bowel should be explored; newer tools such as video capsule endoscopy have also been developed. The treatment of iron deficiency is aetiological if possible and iron supplementation whether in oral or in parenteral form. New parenteral formulations are available and seem to have promising results in terms of efficacy and safety.

  14. Microdiffraction Study Of Iron-Containing Nanotube Carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Pichot, V.; Launois, P.; Pinault, M.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.; Reynaud, C.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.

    2005-09-27

    X-ray microdiffraction can be a powerful technique to study nanotube-based materials, as shown here for carpets of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes synthesized by aerosol-assisted Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition. Catalytic particles are found to be iron oxide. Moreover, local analysis of nanotube alignment allows one to understand the effects of the synthesis procedure.

  15. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Study on the Equilibrium Between Liquid Iron and Calcium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Martin; Lee, Jaewoo; Sichen, Du

    2017-02-01

    The solubility of calcium in liquid iron at 1823 K and 1873 K (1550 °C and 1600 °C) as a function of calcium potential was studied experimentally. The measurements were performed using a closed molybdenum holder in which liquid calcium and liquid iron were held at different temperatures. The results indicate a linear relationship between the activity of calcium, relative to pure liquid calcium, and the mole fraction of dissolved calcium in liquid iron, with a negligible temperature dependency in the ranges studied. The activity coefficient of calcium in liquid iron at infinite dilution, γ_{Ca}({l}^°, was calculated as 1551.

  17. Bioconcentration factors and lipid solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S. ); Baughman, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The log-log relationship between bioconcentration and hydrophobicity breaks down for several medium and high molecular weight solutes that bioconcentrate either to a small extent or not at all. Much of the failure is attributed to the relatively low solubility of these compounds in lipid. Inclusion of a term in octanol solubility (in place of lipid solubility, which is generally unavailable) considerably improves the quality of the relationship (r = 0.95). It is speculated that the octanol solubility term compensates for the relatively low solubility of large compounds in lipid.

  18. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  19. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  20. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  1. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  2. CCN activity of multi-component organic particles: The role of the water solubility distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Riipinen, Ilona; Pandis, Spyros

    2014-05-01

    Introduction Interactions of atmospheric aerosol particles with the ambient water vapour determine to a large extent the influence that aerosols have on climate. To pin down the climate effects of aerosol particles on clouds and climate it is thus necessary to know how much they absorb water at sub-saturated conditions and at which conditions they can activate as CCN and form cloud droplets. The solubility in water is one of the key properties governing the water-absorption and CCN activation behaviour of aerosol particles. Organic constituents contribute a large fraction (20-90%, depending on the environment) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass which is the part of the aerosol size distribution that typically dominates the CCN numbers. Atmospheric organic compounds have a wide range of solubilities, spanning from practically insoluble material to highly water soluble compounds (e.g. Raymond and Pandis 2003). To accurately predict the water content and CCN activation of atmospheric OA information on the dissolution behaviour and aqueous phase interactions of these complex mixtures is needed. We investigate the dissolution behaviour of complex organic mixtures and their CCN activity using a theoretical framework (Solubility Basis Set, SBS) representing the mixture components with a continuous distribution of solubilities, similar to the VBS (Donahue et al., 2006). Method In this study we consider a monodisperse population of spherical aerosol particles consisting of an internal mixture of organic compounds. When exposed to water vapour, these particles grow reaching a thermodynamic equilibrium between the water vapour and the particle phase. The wet particle is allowed to consist of maximum two phases: the insoluble organic phase and the aqueous phase. The compositions of the organic and aqueous phases are determined on one hand by the equilibrium between the aqueous phase and the water vapour, and on the other hand by the equilibrium of the aqueous phase with

  3. Prediction of iron deficiency in chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease anaemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kurer, S; Seifert, B; Michel, B; Ruegg, R; Fehr, J

    1995-12-01

    We prospectively studied 45 anaemic patients (37 women, 8 men) with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The combination of serum ferritin and CRP (as well as ESR) in its predictive capacity for bone marrow iron stores was examined. The relationship between other iron-related measurements (transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, erythrocyte porphyrins and percentage of hypochromic/microcytic erythrocytes) and bone marrow iron stores was also investigated. Stainable bone marrow iron was taken as the most suitable standard to separate iron-deficient from iron-replete patients. 14 patients (31%) were lacking bone marrow iron. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between ferritin and bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.721, P < 0.0001). The combination of ferritin and CRP (ESR) did not improve the predictive power for bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.715) in this cohort of patients with low systemic inflammatory activity. With respect to the bone marrow iron content the best predictive cut-off value of ferritin was 30 micrograms/l (86% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The other iron-related parameters both individually and when combined were less powerful in predicting bone marrow iron than ferritin alone. Only zinc bound erythrocyte protoporphyrin in combination with ferritin slightly improved prediction (adjusted R2 = 0.731). A cut-off point of 11% hypochromic erythrocytes reached a high specificity (90%), but was less sensitive (77%).

  4. The type of fortificant and the leaf matrix both influence iron and zinc bioaccessibility in iron-fortified green leafy vegetable sauces from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Icard-Vernière, C; Picq, C; Courbis, L; Mouquet-Rivier, C

    2016-02-01

    Leafy vegetable sauces from Burkina Faso were assessed as a potential vehicle for food fortification. First, iron and zinc bioaccessibility were measured by dialysability method in amaranth and Jew's mallow sauces and in traditional whole dishes consisting of maize paste plus leafy vegetable sauces. Iron dialysability and solubility were higher in amaranth than in Jew's mallow sauce, pointing to a marked effect of the matrix. Iron dialysability was hardly affected by the maize paste contrary to zinc dialysability, which was reduced. Second, iron and zinc bioaccessibility was assessed in the same sauces fortified with NaFeEDTA or iron sulfate. Added iron, i.e. iron supplied by fortification, represented 60% of total iron at the low fortification level and 80% at high level. In amaranth sauces with the high level of fortification using NaFeEDTA and iron sulfate, fractional dialysable iron reached respectively 66% and 26% compared to only 8.1% in the unfortified sauce. Similarly, in Jew's mallow sauces, fractional dialysable iron was 57% and 5% respectively with NaFeEDTA and iron sulfate and less than 1% in the unfortified sauce. Concomitantly, fractional dialysable zinc increased by respectively 20% and 40% in amaranth and Jew's mallow sauces fortified with NaFeEDTA whereas it remained unchanged with iron sulfate. Iron fortification could be an efficient way to greatly increase the available iron content of green leafy vegetable sauces and for this purpose NaFeEDTA is more effective than iron sulfate whatever the food matrix.

  5. Solubility of Fe(III) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1998-01-01

    Recently Kuma et al. [K. Kuma, J. Nishioka, K. Matsunaga, Controls on iron (III) hydroxide solubility in seawater: The influence of pH and natural organic chelators, Limnol. Oceanogr. 41 (1996) 396-407] made some careful measurements of the solubility of Fe(III) in UV and non-UV irradiated seawater as a function of pH (5-8). They showed that organic compounds can increase the solubility (32-65%) at pH=8.1, apparently due to the formation of Fe(III) organic complexes. In this paper I have examined how these results can be quantified using a speciation model for Fe(III). The results indicate that the effect of pH (2-9) on coastal and open ocean waters by Kuma et al. and the earlier filtration measurement of Byrne and Kester [R.H. Byrne, D.R. Kester, Solubility of hydrous ferric oxide and iron speciation in sea water, Mar. Chem. 4 (1976) 255-274] can be adequately represented by considering the formation of FeOH 2+ and Fe(OH) 2+ using the hydrolysis constants ( K ∗1=10 -2.62, K ∗2=10 -6.0) determined by Millero et al. [F.J. Millero, W. Yao, J. Aicher, The speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters, Mar. Chem. 50 (1995) 21-39]. The solubility measurements [Kuma et al., 1996] on unaltered coastal and open ocean waters appear to require the consideration of the formation of Fe(OH) 30 ( K ∗3=10 -13.3-10 -14.3). A more careful look at these measurements indicates that the curvature between pH 7 and 8 can be attributed to the formation of complexes of Fe 3+ with organic ligands (FeL). Model speciation calculations (pH 6-8) yield total ligand concentrations of [L] T=1.2 nM and 0.17 nM for unaltered coastal and open ocean waters, respectively, assuming K' FeL=10 21. These estimates are in good agreement with the values found for ocean waters by voltammetric methods. The model calculations for the solubility of Fe(III) (0.2 nM at pH=8.1 and 0.6 nM at pH=7.65) are in good agreement with measured open ocean surface (0.2 nM) and deep waters (0.6 nM) determined by

  6. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type - such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity - and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH), and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35 ng m-3 in the free troposphere (above

  7. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  8. An exposure system to study the effects of water-soluble gases on PM-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, T H; Hooper, K A; Fischer, E; Laskin, D L; Buckley, B; Turpin, B J

    2000-06-01

    An aerosol generation and exposure system to evaluate the role of water-soluble gases in particulate matter (PM)-induced injury was designed, built, and validated by generating test atmospheres to study the role of hydrogen peroxide in PM-induced toxicity. In this system, particle number concentration, size distribution, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and water concentration can all be varied. An ammonium sulfate aerosol with mass median diameter 0.46 +/- 0.01 microm was used as a model atmospheric aerosol because ammonium sulfate is a major component of the fine aerosol, and the water uptake of ammonium sulfate aerosol is well characterized. The following four test atmospheres were generated: (1) ammonium sulfate aerosol, (2) an aerosol containing hydrogen peroxide and ammonium sulfate, (3) vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide, and (4) particle-free air. All test atmospheres were maintained at a relative humidity of 85%. Particle size distribution, number concentration, total hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, and relative humidity were measured continuously in the exposure chamber. The gas-particle partitioning of hydrogen peroxide was calculated using total hydrogen peroxide concentration, the Henry's law constant for hydrogen peroxide in water, and aerosol water content. We found that the aerosol generation system produced stable concentrations throughout the 2-hour exposures.

  9. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  10. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols shift lake ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, Harry J.

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols over the Chinese Loess Plateau have diminished monsoon precipitation and concomitant soil erosion that plagues the region. Now, a reconstruction documents the differences between historical warming events and the present, highlighting the paradoxical implications of decreasing atmospheric aerosols.

  11. Generation of aerosolized drugs.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R K; Niven, R W

    1994-01-01

    The expanding use of inhalation therapy has placed demands on current aerosol generation systems that are difficult to meet with current inhalers. The desire to deliver novel drug entities such as proteins and peptides, as well as complex formulations including liposomes and microspheres, requires delivery systems of improved efficiency that will target the lung in a reproducible manner. These efforts have also been spurred by the phase out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and this has included a directed search for alternative propellants. Consequently, a variety of new aerosol devices and methods of generating aerosols are being studied. This includes the use of freon replacement propellants, dry powder generation systems, aqueous unit spray systems and microprocessor controlled technologies. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages depending upon each principle of action and set of design variables. In addition, specific drugs may be better suited for one type of inhaler device vs. another. The extent to which aerosol generation systems achieve their goals is discussed together with a summary of selected papers presented at the recent International Congress of Aerosols in Medicine.

  12. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  13. Stable isotopes as a tool to apportion atmospheric iron.

    PubMed

    Majestic, Brian J; Anbar, Ariel D; Herckes, Pierre

    2009-06-15

    Identification of atmospheric iron is a key parameter to understanding the source of iron in urban and remote areas. Atmospheric deposition of desert dust, which also can include an anthropogenic component, is a primary nutrient source for most of the open ocean. To better assess particulate matter (PM) sources specific to iron, we measured the iron isotopic composition of aerosols in two size fractions: PM with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm and less than 10 microm (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively). Using colocated samplers, atmospheric aerosol samples were collected in the U.S. desert Southwest at a mixed suburban/agricultural site near Phoenix, AZ. The measurements are presented as delta56Fe relative to the IRMM-014 (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements) standard. Using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we found differences in iron isotopic composition within the PM10 aerosol. Half of the PM10 samples had an iron isotopic signature similar to crustal material (+0.03 per thousand), which implicates wind-blown soil-dust as the primary source. The other PM10 samples showed a lighter iron isotopic composition, centered at -0.18 per thousand. Further analysis showed thatthe lighter iron was associated with winds originating from the southwest. This strongly suggests that there is a different PM10 source in this direction, with a distinct iron isotopic composition. The iron in the PM2.5 samples was usually substantially lighter than the corresponding PM10 samples, which is consistent with coarse and fine particles having different sources, again with distinctively different isotopic compositions. The magnitude of the iron isotopic difference between the PM10 and the PM2.5 size fractions (delta56Fe(PM10) - delta56Fe(PM2.5)) correlated with the PM2.5 concentrations of elements known to be emitted from industrial sources (Pb, Cd, As, V, and Cr). This observation implies that the isotopically light iron is created or

  14. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  15. Predicting the mineral composition of dust aerosols - Part 1: Representing key processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in