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Sample records for aerosol jet printing

  1. Fabrication and characterization of aerosol-jet printed strain sensors for multifunctional composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Da; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Mei; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben

    2012-11-01

    Traditional multifunctional composite structures are produced by embedding parasitic parts, such as foil sensors, optical fibers and bulky connectors. As a result, the mechanical properties of the composites, especially the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), could be largely undermined. In the present study, we demonstrated an innovative aerosol-jet printing technology for printing electronics inside composite structures without degrading the mechanical properties. Using the maskless fine feature deposition (below 10 μm) characteristics of this printing technology and a pre-cure protocol, strain sensors were successfully printed onto carbon fiber prepregs to enable fabricating composites with intrinsic sensing capabilities. The degree of pre-cure of the carbon fiber prepreg on which strain sensors were printed was demonstrated to be critical. Without pre-curing, the printed strain sensors were unable to remain intact due to the resin flow during curing. The resin flow-induced sensor deformation can be overcome by introducing 10% degree of cure of the prepreg. In this condition, the fabricated composites with printed strain sensors showed almost no mechanical degradation (short beam shearing ILSS) as compared to the control samples. Also, the failure modes examined by optical microscopy showed no difference. The resistance change of the printed strain sensors in the composite structures were measured under a cyclic loading and proved to be a reliable mean strain gauge factor of 2.2 ± 0.06, which is comparable to commercial foil metal strain gauge.

  2. A study on Aerosol jet printing technology in LED module manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudorfer, Andreas; Tscherner, Martin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hartmann, Paul; Seferis, Ioannis E.; Zych, Eugeniusz; Wenzl, Franz P.

    2016-09-01

    State of the art fabrication of LED modules based on chip-on-board (COB) technology comprises some shortcomings both with respect to the manufacturing process itself but also with regard to potential sources of failures and manufacturing impreciseness. One promising alternative is additive manufacturing, a technology which has gained a lot of attention during the last years due to its materials and cost saving capabilities. Especially direct-write technologies like Aerosol jet printing have demonstrated advantages compared to other technological approaches when printing high precision layers or high precision electronic circuits on substrates which, as an additional advantage, also can be flexible and 3D shaped. Based on test samples and test structures manufactured by Aerosol jet printing technology, in this context we discuss the potentials of additive manufacturing in various aspects of LED module fabrication, ranging from the deposition of the die-attach material, wire bond replacement by printed electrical connects as well as aspects of high-precision phosphor layer deposition for color conversion and white light generation.

  3. Selective light sintering of Aerosol-Jet printed silver nanoparticle inks on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, K. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de Hoerber, J. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de Franke, J. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-05-15

    Printing silver nanoparticle inks to generate conductive structures for electronics on polymer substrates has gained increasing relevance in recent years. In this context, the Aerosol-Jet Technology is well suited to print silver ink on 3D-Molded Interconnect Devices (MID). The deposited ink requires thermal post-treatment to obtain sufficient electrical conductivity and adhesion. However, commonly used oven sintering cannot be applied for many thermoplastic substrates due to low melting temperatures. In this study a new sintering technology, selective light sintering, is presented, based on the focused, continuous light beam of a xenon lamp. Sintering experiments were conducted with Aerosol-Jet printed structures on various polycarbonate (PC) substrates. Especially on neat, light transparent PC, silver tracks were evenly sintered with marginal impact to the substrate. Electrical conductivities significantly exceed the values obtained with conventional oven sintering. Adhesive strength is sufficient for conductive tracks. Experiments with non-transparent PC substrates led to substrate damage due to increased light absorption. Therefore a concept for a variation of light sintering was developed, using optical filters. First experiments showed significant reduction of substrate damage and good sintering qualities. The highly promising results of the conducted experiments provide a base for further investigations to increase adhesion and qualifying the technology for MID applications and a broad spectrum of thermoplastic substrates.

  4. Selective light sintering of Aerosol-Jet printed silver nanoparticle inks on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, K.; Hoerber, J.; Franke, J.

    2014-05-01

    Printing silver nanoparticle inks to generate conductive structures for electronics on polymer substrates has gained increasing relevance in recent years. In this context, the Aerosol-Jet Technology is well suited to print silver ink on 3D-Molded Interconnect Devices (MID). The deposited ink requires thermal post-treatment to obtain sufficient electrical conductivity and adhesion. However, commonly used oven sintering cannot be applied for many thermoplastic substrates due to low melting temperatures. In this study a new sintering technology, selective light sintering, is presented, based on the focused, continuous light beam of a xenon lamp. Sintering experiments were conducted with Aerosol-Jet printed structures on various polycarbonate (PC) substrates. Especially on neat, light transparent PC, silver tracks were evenly sintered with marginal impact to the substrate. Electrical conductivities significantly exceed the values obtained with conventional oven sintering. Adhesive strength is sufficient for conductive tracks. Experiments with non-transparent PC substrates led to substrate damage due to increased light absorption. Therefore a concept for a variation of light sintering was developed, using optical filters. First experiments showed significant reduction of substrate damage and good sintering qualities. The highly promising results of the conducted experiments provide a base for further investigations to increase adhesion and qualifying the technology for MID applications and a broad spectrum of thermoplastic substrates.

  5. Printing polymer optical waveguides on conditioned transparent flexible foils by using the aerosol jet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, Thomas; Hoffmann, Gerd-Albert; Wolfer, Tim; Overmeyer, Ludger; Franke, Joerg

    2016-09-01

    The optical data transfer is considered as the future of signal transfer due to its various advantages compared to conventional copper-based technologies. The Aerosol Jet Printing (AJP) technology offers the opportunity to print materials with high viscosities, such as liquid transparent polymer adhesives (epoxy resins), on almost any possible substrate material and even in third dimension. This paper introduces a new flexible and comparatively cost-effective way of generating polymer optical waveguides through AJP. Furthermore, the conditioning of the substrate material and the printing process of planar waveguides are presented. In the first step, two lines with hydrophobic behavior are applied on foil material (PMMA, PVC, PI) by using a flexographic printing machine. These silicone based patterns containing functional polymer form barriers for the core material due to their low surface energy after curing. In the second step, the core material (liquid polymer, varnish) is printed between the barrier lines. Because of the hydrophobic behavior of the lines, the contact angle between the substrate surface and the liquid core material is increased which yields to higher aspect ratio. The distance between the barrier lines is at least 100 μm, which defines the width of the waveguide. The minimum height of the core shall be 50 μm. After UV-curing of the core polymer, the cladding material is printed on the top. This is also applied by using the AJP technology. Various tests were performed to achieve the optimal surface properties for adequate adhesion and machine process parameters.

  6. Aerosol-Jet-Printing silicone layers and electrodes for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators in one processing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Göttler, Michael; Schmidt, Philip; Treffer, Philipp; Landgraf, Maximilian; Franke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution we present recent findings of our efforts to qualify the so called Aerosol-Jet-Printing process as an additive manufacturing approach for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). With the presented system we are able to print the two essential structural elements dielectric layer and electrode in one machine. The system is capable of generating RTV-2 silicone layers made of Wacker Elastosil P 7670. Therefore, two aerosol streams of both precursor components A and B are generated in parallel and mixed in one printing nozzle that is attached to a 4-axis kinematic. At maximum speed the printing of one circular Elastosil layer with a calculated thickness of 10 μm and a diameter of 1 cm takes 12 seconds while the process keeps stable for 4.5 hours allowing a quite high overall material output and the generation of numerous silicone layers. By adding a second printing nozzle and the infrastructure to generate a third aerosol, the system is also capable of printing inks with conductive particles in parallel to the silicone. We have printed a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) ink prepared in our lab to generate electrodes on VHB 4905, Elastosil foils and finally on Aerosol-Jet-Printed Elastosil layers. With rGO ink printed on Elastosil foil, layers with a 4-point measured sheet resistance as low as 4 kΩ can be realized leaving room for improving the electrode printing time, which at the moment is not as good as the quite good time-frame for printing the silicone layers. Up to now we have used the system to print a fully functional two-layer stacked DEA to demonstrate the principle of continuously 3D printing actuators.

  7. Preparation of active layers in polymer solar cells by aerosol jet printing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhe; Zhou, Erjun; Miyanishi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Tajima, Keisuke

    2011-10-01

    Active layers of polymer solar cells were prepared by aerosol jet printing of organic inks. Various solvents and additives with high boiling points were screened for the preparation of high-quality polymer films. The effects on device performance of treating the films by thermal and solvent vapor annealing were also investigated. The components of the solvent were important for controlling the drying rate of the liquid films, reducing the number of particle-like protrusions on the film surface, and realizing high molecular ordering in the polymer phases. The optimized solar cell device with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and a C(60) derivative showed a high fill factor of 67% and power conversion efficiency of 2.53% without thermal annealing. The combination of poly[N-9-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-3,6-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,5-diethylhexyl-2,5-dihydropyrrolo-[3,4-]pyrrole-1,4-dione] and a C(70) derivative led to power conversion efficiency of 3.92 and 3.14% for device areas of 0.03 and 1 cm(2), respectively.

  8. Formation of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Thin Films from Colloidal Nanocrystal Dispersions via Aerosol-Jet Printing and Compaction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryce A; Mahajan, Ankit; Smeaton, Michelle A; Holgate, Collin S; Aydil, Eray S; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-06-03

    A three-step method to create dense polycrystalline semiconductor thin films from nanocrystal liquid dispersions is described. First, suitable substrates are coated with nanocrystals using aerosol-jet printing. Second, the porous nanocrystal coatings are compacted using a weighted roller or a hydraulic press to increase the coating density. Finally, the resulting coating is annealed for grain growth. The approach is demonstrated for making polycrystalline films of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), a new solar absorber composed of earth-abundant elements. The range of coating morphologies accessible through aerosol-jet printing is examined and their formation mechanisms are revealed. Crack-free albeit porous films are obtained if most of the solvent in the aerosolized dispersion droplets containing the nanocrystals evaporates before they impinge on the substrate. In this case, nanocrystals agglomerate in flight and arrive at the substrate as solid spherical agglomerates. These porous coatings are mechanically compacted, and the density of the coating increases with compaction pressure. Dense coatings annealed in sulfur produce large-grain (>1 μm) polycrystalline CZTS films with microstructure suitable for thin-film solar cells.

  9. Aerosol-jet-printed, 1 volt H-bridge drive circuit on plastic with integrated electrochromic pixel.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mingjing; Zhang, Wei; Braga, Daniele; Renn, Michael J; Kim, Chris H; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-12-26

    In this report, we demonstrate a printed, flexible, and low-voltage circuit that successfully drives a polymer electrochromic (EC) pixel as large as 4 mm(2) that is printed on the same substrate. All of the key components of the drive circuitry, namely, resistors, capacitors, and transistors, were aerosol-jet-printed onto a plastic foil; metallic electrodes and interconnects were the only components prepatterned on the plastic by conventional photolithography. The large milliampere drive currents necessary to switch a 4 mm(2) EC pixel were controlled by printed electrolyte-gated transistors (EGTs) that incorporate printable ion gels for the gate insulator layers and poly(3-hexylthiophene) for the semiconductor channels. Upon application of a 1 V input pulse, the circuit switches the printed EC pixel ON (red) and OFF (blue) two times in approximately 4 s. The performance of the circuit and the behavior of the individual resistors, capacitors, EGTs, and the EC pixel are analyzed as functions of the printing parameters and operating conditions.

  10. Aerosol jet printed p- and n-type electrolyte-gated transistors with a variety of electrode materials: exploring practical routes to printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kihyon; Kim, Se Hyun; Mahajan, Ankit; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-11-12

    Printing electrically functional liquid inks is a promising approach for achieving low-cost, large-area, additive manufacturing of flexible electronic circuits. To print thin-film transistors, a basic building block of thin-film electronics, it is important to have several options for printable electrode materials that exhibit high conductivity, high stability, and low-cost. Here we report completely aerosol jet printed (AJP) p- and n-type electrolyte-gated transistors (EGTs) using a variety of different electrode materials including highly conductive metal nanoparticles (Ag), conducting polymers (polystyrenesulfonate doped poly(3,4-ethylendedioxythiophene, PEDOT:PSS), transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide), and carbon-based materials (reduced graphene oxide). Using these source-drain electrode materials and a PEDOT:PSS/ion gel gate stack, we demonstrated all-printed p- and n-type EGTs in combination with poly(3-hexythiophene) and ZnO semiconductors. All transistor components (including electrodes, semiconductors, and gate insulators) were printed by AJP. Both kinds of devices showed typical p- and n-type transistor characteristics, and exhibited both low-threshold voltages (<2 V) and high hole and electron mobilities. Our assessment suggests Ag electrodes may be the best option in terms of overall performance for both types of EGTs.

  11. Run-time Ink Stability in Pneumatic Aerosol Jet Printing Using a Split Stream Solvent Add Back System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Arjun

    Aerosol Jet printing is a non-contact process capable of printing nano-ink patterns on conformal and flexible surfaces. Aqueous or solvent nano-inks are pneumatically atomized by the flow of nitrogen gas. The flow of atomizing gas into and out of the cup leads to evaporation and removal of volatile solvent(s). As the solid loading fraction of the ink increases, the rheological changes eventually lead to instabilities in print output. A potential solution to this problem is to moisten the atomizing ink by running it through a bubbler. In this study, neat co-solvent solutions of ethanol and ethylene glycol at 85: 15 and 30:70 mixing ratios were atomized using nitrogen flow rates ranging from 600 to 1000 ccm. It was observed that ethanol, being the more volatile solvent, was depleted from the neat solution. When using a bubbler solvent add-back system, an excessive amount of ethanol was returned to the neat solution. The rate of solvent loss from an ethanol rich neat solution (80%) was higher compared to an ethylene glycol rich neat solution. A mixture of dry and wet (ethanol moistened) nitrogen gas was used to equalize the rate of ethanol evaporation. Ethanol equilibrium in neat solutions with higher ethylene glycol loading (70%) was achieved with a 40-60% wet nitrogen component while neat solutions with higher ethanol loading (85%) were stable with 85 -90% wet nitrogen gas. The results were validated with copper nano ink with similar co-solvent ratios. The solid content of the ink remained constant over four hours of printing when the optimal dry: wet nitrogen gas ratios were used. Copper ink with 85% ethanol being atomized at 1000 ccm exhibited increase in copper loading (3%) despite the dry: wet solvent add back system.

  12. Silver Ink For Jet Printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Singaram, Saraswathi

    1989-01-01

    Metallo-organic ink containing silver (with some bismuth as adhesion agent) applied to printed-circuit boards and pyrolized in air to form electrically conductive patterns. Ink contains no particles of silver, does not have to be mixed during use to maintain homogeneity, and applied to boards by ink-jet printing heads. Consists of silver neodecanoate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene and/or toluene.

  13. A multimaterial electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanto, E.; Shigeta, K.; Kim, Y. K.; Graf, P. G.; Hoelzle, D. J.; Barton, K. L.; Alleyne, A. G.; Ferreira, P. M.; Rogers, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing has emerged as a high-resolution alternative to other forms of direct solution-based fabrication approaches, such as ink-jet printing. This paper discusses the design, integration and operation of a unique E-jet printing platform. The uniqueness lies in the ability to utilize multiple materials in the same overall print-head, thereby enabling increased degrees of heterogeneous integration of different functionalities on a single substrate. By utilizing multiple individual print-heads, with a carrousel indexing among them, increased material flexibility is achieved. The hardware design and system operation for a relatively inexpensive system are developed and presented. Crossover interconnects and multiple fluorescent tagged proteins, demonstrating printed electronics and biological sensing applications, respectively.

  14. Biosurface engineering through ink jet printing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Fon, Deniece; Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Forsythe, John; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of thermal ink jet printing as a robust process for biosurface engineering was demonstrated. The strategy investigated was to reconstruct a commercial printer and take advantage of its colour management interface. High printing resolution was achieved by formulating bio-inks of viscosity and surface tension similar to those of commercial inks. Protein and enzyme denaturation during thermal ink jet printing was shown to be insignificant. This is because the time spent by the biomolecules in the heating zone of the printer is negligible; in addition, the air and substrate of high heat capacity absorb any residual heat from the droplet. Gradients of trophic/tropic factors can serve as driving force for cell growth or migration for tissue regeneration. Concentration gradients of proteins were printed on scaffolds to show the capability of ink jet printing. The printed proteins did not desorb upon prolonged immersion in aqueous solutions, thus allowing printed scaffold to be used under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Our group portrait was ink jet printed with a protein on paper, illustrating that complex biopatterns can be printed on large area. Finally, patterns of enzymes were ink jet printed within the detection and reaction zones of a paper diagnostic.

  15. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  16. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stepehen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-27

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  17. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; McGraw, Gregory

    2016-02-02

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  18. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S; Alleyne, Andrew G; Georgiadis, John G; Ferreira, Placid M; Rogers, John A

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1 mum demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  19. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  20. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  1. Functional protein microarrays by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Kazuyo; He, Ying; Sutanto, Erick; Kang, Somi; Le, An-Phong; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Alleyne, Andrew G; Ferreira, Placid M; Lu, Yi; Rogers, John A

    2012-11-20

    This paper reports the use of advanced forms of electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing for creating micro- and nanoscale patterns of proteins on various surfaces ranging from flat silica substrates to structured plasmonic crystals, suitable for micro/nanoarray analysis and other applications in both fluorescent and plasmonic detection modes. The approaches function well with diverse classes of proteins, including streptavidin, IgG, fibrinogen, and γ-globulin. Detailed study reveals that the printing process does not adversely alter the protein structure or function, as demonstrated in the specific case of streptavidin through measurements of its binding specificity to biotin-modified DNA. Multinozzle printing systems enable several types of proteins (up to four currently) to be patterned on a single substrate, in rapid fashion and with excellent control over spatial dimensions and registration. High-speed, pulsed operational modes allow large-area printing, with narrow statistical distributions of drop size and spacing in patterns that include millions of droplets. The process is also compatible with the structured surfaces of plasmonic crystal substrates to enable detection without fluorescence. These collective characteristics suggest potential utility of e-jet techniques in wide-ranging areas of biotechnology, where its compatibility with various biomaterials and substrates with different topographies and surface chemistries, and ability to form deposits that range from thick films to submonolayer coatings, derive from the remote, noncontacting physical material transfer mode of operation.

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as a Dry Alternative to Inkjet Printing in Flexible Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Lopez, Arlene; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an atmospheric pressure plasma jet printing system that works at room temperature to 50 deg C unlike conventional aerosol assisted techniques which require a high temperature sintering step to obtain desired thin films. Multiple jets can be configured to increase throughput or to deposit multiple materials, and the jet(s) can be moved across large areas using a x-y stage. The plasma jet has been used to deposit carbon nanotubes, graphene, silver nanowires, copper nanoparticles and other materials on substrates such as paper, cotton, plastic and thin metal foils.

  3. Ink-jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the ink-jet printing program at Purdue University is described. The drop-on-demand printing system was modified to use metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) inks. Also, an IBM AT computer was integrated into the ink-jet printer system to provide operational functions and contact pattern configuration. The integration of the ink-jet printing system, problems encountered, and solutions derived were described in detail. The status of ink-jet printing using a MOD ink was discussed. The ink contained silver neodecanate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in toluene; the MOD ink decomposition products being 99 wt% AG, and 1 wt% Bi.

  4. Inks And Papers For Ink Jet Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreottola, Michael A.

    1989-07-01

    In designing ink jet printing devices, the greatest challenge is not in the design of the mechanism nor control aspects of the head. Surprising to many, it is the difficult task associated with the formulation of inks, toners and papers which will give you a suitable image. This image must possess good chromatic and archival characteristics. In the past, inks were the cause of much criticism associated with the bad reputation of ink jet printers; and rightly so. The inks used in ink jet printing were expected to perform many difficult tasks. They were subjected to evaporation and stability tests at high temperatures. They were expected to retain their physical parameters of viscosity, surface tension and pH for months in an oven at 40-60° C. Yet, when they were emitted onto a piece of paper at ambient conditions, they were expected to dry within 3 seconds. Chemists who were formulating inks based on criteria established by mechanical and electrical engineers were at a disadvantage. Inks were not considered a major component to other groups in the development program. Yet inherently, the ink was causing the majority of system failures due to head clogging, component breakdown, etc. The ink chemist was at a distinct disadvantage to begin with. A major cause for orifice clogging was the precipitation of salts out of the dye. Dyes may contain as much as 20 percent salt. A dye with less than 1 percent salt content was not available a few years ago. Today, however, dye manufacturers see the increase of requests for purer dyes and are making them available for a premium. There were not any specialty papers available for ink jet applications. Inks would either sit on the surface of the paper and not dry, or they would cause feathering or bleeding problems. Today there is a variety of papers available for ink jet systems.

  5. Drop-on-demand printing of carbon black ink by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Back, Sung Yul; Song, Chi Ho; Yu, Seongil; Lee, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Beom Soo; Yang, Nam Yeo; Jeong, Soo Hoa; Ahn, Heejoon

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing is a technique using electric fields to eject inks through nozzle apertures. EHD jet printing is very attractive due to its non-contacting nature and compatibility with diverse materials and substrates. In this research, we have fabricated micron-sized dot arrays and line patterns with carbon black ink on Si wafer substrates using EHD jet printing. The effect of operating conditions such as applied voltage, working distance and stage speed on the size and shape of the jetted patterns and jetting cycles is investigated by using optical microscope, high speed camera and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have also demonstrated the drop-on-demand feature of the EHD jet printing system by patterning carbon black ink lines with various widths and dot arrays with desired diameters and spacing by controlling the operating conditions.

  6. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  7. Jet-based methods to print living cells.

    PubMed

    Ringeisen, Bradley R; Othon, Christina M; Barron, Jason A; Young, Daniel; Spargo, Barry J

    2006-09-01

    Cell printing has been popularized over the past few years as a revolutionary advance in tissue engineering has potentially enabled heterogeneous 3-D scaffolds to be built cell-by-cell. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art cell printing techniques that utilize fluid jetting phenomena to deposit 2- and 3-D patterns of living eukaryotic cells. There are four distinct categories of jetbased approaches to printing cells. Laser guidance direct write (LG DW) was the first reported technique to print viable cells by forming patterns of embryonic-chick spinal-cord cells on a glass slide (1999). Shortly after this, modified laser-induced forward transfer techniques (LIFT) and modified ink jet printers were also used to print viable cells, followed by the most recent demonstration using an electrohydrodynamic jetting (EHDJ) method. The low cost of some of these printing technologies has spurred debate as to whether they could be used on a large scale to manufacture tissue and possibly even whole organs. This review summarizes the published results of these cell printers (cell viability, retained genotype and phenotype), and also includes a physical description of the various jetting processes with a discussion of the stresses and forces that may be encountered by cells during printing. We conclude the review by comparing and contrasting the different jet-based techniques, while providing a map for future experiments that could lead to significant advances in the field of tissue engineering.

  8. Development of PZT Suspensions for Ceramic Ink-Jet Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Ink-jet printing is now a mature technology and has widespread applications in the fields of printing, product marking and microdosing ...LPI can be used with octadecanoic acid (stearic acid ) and octadecylamine to produce suspensions of alumina in wax with very low viscosity [5, 61

  9. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Nordlund, Dennis; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  10. Patterned hydrogel substrates for cell culture with electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Poellmann, Michael J; Barton, Kira L; Mishra, Sandipan; Johnson, Amy J Wagoner

    2011-09-09

    Cells respond to and are directed by physiochemical cues in their microenvironment, including geometry and substrate stiffness. The development of substrates for cell culture with precisely controlled physiochemical characteristics has the potential to advance the understanding of cell biology considerably. In this communication, E-jet printing is introduced as a method for creating high-resolution protein patterns on substrates with controlled elasticity. It is the first application of E-jet printing on a soft surface. Protein spots as small as 5 µm in diameter on polyacrylamide are demonstrated. The patterned hydrogels are shown to support cell attachment and spreading. Polyacrylamide substrates patterned by E-jet printing may be applied to further the study of cellular mechanobiology.

  11. Ink-jet printing an optimal multi-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifei; Lyu, Fengjiao; Ge, Jun; Liu, Zheng

    2014-11-04

    A method using ink-jet printing for constructing multi-enzyme systems was proposed, in which a precisely defined enzyme ratio and two-dimensional distribution was obtained by the preset 'color' values. The applications of the print-on-paper multi-enzyme systems were exemplified by the detection of glucose and the design of an enzyme-enabled two-dimensional code.

  12. Ink-Jet Printing on Plain-Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bares, Steven J.

    1989-07-01

    The introduction of letter-quality, plain-paper, ink-jet printers such as Hewlett-Packard's DeskJet Printer portents a dramatic change in the 1990's office. The ability of ink-jet to offer low-cost, letter-quality print on plain paper positions this technology squarely along with others used for mainstream office printing. The ability of ink-jet to operate on "plain-papers", coupled with the rising use of paper in office printers, suggests that users will begin to demand office papers that are compatible with this technology. Hewlett-Packard is actively working to understand what customers need from office printers and how these needs impact office papers.

  13. Recent trends in ink-jet printing inks and papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kohichi

    1993-06-01

    Ink-jet printers (IJ) were developed in the early 1980s and recently, their use has spread in the fields of business applications and computer graphics. IJs feature a faster printing speed than a thermal transfer printer. The printing quality of IJs has been improved to 400 DPI. It is said that even 600 DPI can be realized. Accordingly, almost the same level of printing quality as that of a laser beam printer (LBP) is possible. A compact model requires space of less than 50% of an LBP and smaller power consumption also should expand the demand of IJs for business application. In addition, with the extension of computer graphics, IJ color printers have been increasing remarkably lately. IJs have many advantages compared with the conventional electro photographic system. In the use of color ink-jet printers, an image quality is important and it is influenced by the applied ink and paper. In this connection, the recent trends are explained.

  14. Nozzle geometry for organic vapor jet printing

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-13

    A first device is provided. The device includes a print head. The print head further includes a first nozzle hermetically sealed to a first source of gas. The first nozzle has an aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns in a direction perpendicular to a flow direction of the first nozzle. At a distance from the aperture into the first nozzle that is 5 times the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle, the smallest dimension perpendicular to the flow direction is at least twice the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle.

  15. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Progress was made in the continuing development of the ink jet printing system for thick film circuits. The unit being used is a prototype ink jet printer. One of the first tasks completed was the complete documentation of this ink jet printing system as it existed. It was determined that this was an essential step in deciding what modifications were needed to the system and how these modifications would be implemented. Design modification studies were started for electronic, mechanical, and programming aspects of the ystem. The areas needeing improvement were discussed and applicable changes decided upon. Some improvments were completed. Although the general areas needing improving were identified and some changes decided upon, the exact details of how other changes can be implemented are yet been decided.

  16. INK-JET PRINTING OF PF6 FOR OLED APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Burrasca, G.; Fasolino, T.; Miscioscia, R.; Nenna, G.; Vacca, P.; Villani, F.; Minarini, C.; Della Sala, D.

    2008-08-28

    In the last years there has been much interest in applying ink-jet printing (IJP) technology to the deposition of several materials for organic electronics applications, including metals, polymers and nanoparticles dispersions on flexible substrates. The aim of this work is to study the effect of ink-jet deposition of polymer films in the manufacturing of OLED devices comparing their performances to standard technologies. The ink-jet printed polymer is introduced in an hybrid structure in which other layers are deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation. The electrical and optical properties of the obtained devices are investigated.OLEDs with the same structure were fabricated by spin-coating a polymer film by the same solution used as ink. Results have been compared to the above ones to determine how the deposition method affects the device optoelectronic properties.

  17. Non-contact printing of high aspect ratio Ag electrodes for polycrystalline silicone solar cell with electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yonghee; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Tak, Hyowon; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Kang, TaeSam; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a non-contact printing mechanism for high aspect ratio silver (Ag) electrodes fabricated by an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technique. Using high viscosity Ag paste ink, we were able to fabricate narrow and high aspect ratio electrodes. We investigated the effect of the surface energy of the substrate and improved the aspect ratio of printed lines through multiple printing. We fabricated the polycrystalline silicone solar cell with the Ag electrode and achieved cell efficiency of around 13.7%. The EHD jet printing mechanism may be an alternative method for non-contact fabrication of solar cells electrodes.

  18. Direct alignment and patterning of silver nanowires by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungdong; Seong, Baekhoon; Kim, Jihoon; Jang, Yonghee; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-10-15

    Highly aligned and patterned silver nanowires (Ag NWs) are investigated by using electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. Interaction between the flow field and the electric field as well as the mechanical stretching of the fiber jet can successfully align the Ag NWs inside the jet fiber. This technique can be applied in fabricating 1D nanostructures-based printed micro/nanoscale devices.

  19. Jet-Printed Active-Matrix Backplanes and Electrophoretic Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jurgen; Arias, Ana Claudia; Wong, William; Lujan, Rene; Ready, Steve; Krusor, Brent; Street, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The fabrication of large-area electronics, such as active-matrix pixel circuits in flat-panel displays, is becoming increasingly challenging. Particularly for applications such as electronic paper, flexibility of the display and fabrication at extremely low cost is important. Therefore, novel fabrication methods have to be explored. We have developed jet-printing technology to fabricate active-matrix backplanes for paper-like electrophoretic displays. In three approaches we implement several stages of evolution of the printing technology. First, the photolithographic patterning of photoresist used in conventional fabrication is replaced by digital printing of a wax etch mask. Second, the amorphous silicon semiconductor for the thin-film-transistors is replaced with a printed organic semiconductor. Third, the active-matrix pixel circuit is fabricated in an all-additive printing process. In order to test our backplanes we are developing electrophoretic display media. The media is based on microfabricated cell-structures which contain the electrophoretic ink. Particularly for flexible displays, the cells have to be individually sealed and several methods are being explored.

  20. Design of electrohydrodynamic lens for stabilizing of eletrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Eun; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Shin, Yoon-Soo; Yu, Tae-U.; Hwang, Jungho

    2008-12-01

    The generation of micro patterns from conductive material suspensions is gaining significant interests for its usages in the fabrication of flexible display elements and flexible printed circuit boards. In this paper, we presented the results of line patterns of silver nanoparticles obtained by using various types of focusing lenses for electrohydrodynamic jet printing. The pattern widths were measured as 80~100 μm when the electrohydrodynamic lens having a cone-type inner hole and a cone-type outer wall was used. Electric field strengths were calculated by a commercial solver packages for the four types of electrohydrodynamic lenses. A lens having a cone-type inner hole and a cone-type outer wall of thinner thickness was found to be the best design.

  1. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-08-01

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  2. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  3. High-resolution ac-pulse modulated electrohydrodynamic jet printing on highly insulating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chuang; Qin, Hantang; Ramírez-Iglesias, Nakaira A.; Chiu, Chia-Pin; Lee, Yuan-shin; Dong, Jingyan

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new high-resolution ac-pulse modulated electrohydrodynamic (EHD)-jet printing technology on highly insulating substrates for drop-on-demand fabrication of electrical features and interconnects using silver nanoink. In traditional EHD-jet printing, the remained charge of the printed droplets changes the electrostatic field distribution and interrupts the follow-on printing behavior, especially for highly insulating substrates which have slow charge decay rates. The residue charge makes the control of EHD-jet printing very challenging for high-resolution continuous features. In this paper, by using modulated ac-pulsed voltage, the EHD-jet printing process switches the charge polarity of the consequent droplets to neutralize the charge on the substrate. The effect of the residue charge is minimized, which enables high-resolution printing of continuous patterns. Moreover, by modulating the pulse frequency, voltage, and duration, the EHD-jet printing behavior can be controlled with respect to printing speed/frequency and droplet size. Printing frequency is directly controlled by the pulse frequency, and the droplet dimension is controlled by the voltage and the duration of the pulse. We demonstrated that ac-pulse modulated EHD-jet printing can overcome the long-predicated charge accumulation problem on highly insulating substrates, and potentially be applied to many flexible electronics applications.

  4. Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae-Young; Shin, Yun-Soo; Park, Sung-Eun; Yu, Tae-U; Hwang, Jungho

    2007-02-19

    As a direct write technology, the electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet is introduced. In this letter, two categorized types of examples of two-dimensional patterning were printed by using the electrohydrodynamic printing method. A spiral-type inductor was printed to demonstrate the feasibility of the electrohydrodynamic printing as a fabrication process. The printed spiral inductor produced 9.45 {mu}H and exhibited approximately five times larger resistivity (9.5 {mu}{omega} cm) than that of bulk silver after the sintering process. Then, complex geometries having square- and round-shape patterns were also printed.

  5. Electrohydrodynamic jet-printed zinc-tin oxide TFTs and their bias stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Gu; Choi, Woon-Seop

    2014-07-23

    Zinc-tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated using an electrohydrodynamic-jet (EHD-jet) printing technique at annealing temperatures ranging from 300 to 500 °C. An EHD-jet-printed ZTO active layer was patterned with a 60 μm width using a 100 μm inner diameter metal nozzle. The electrical properties of an EHD-jet-printed ZTO TFT showed a mobility of 9.82 cm(2)/(V s), an on-off current ratio of 3.7 × 10(6), a threshold voltage of 2.36 V, and a subthreshold slope of 0.73 V/dec at 500 °C. Significantly improved properties were obtained compared to the spin-coated and inkjet-printed ones. Better hysteresis behavior and positive bias stability of the ZTO TFTs were also achieved using EHD-jet printing technology.

  6. Multimaterial polyacrylamide: fabrication with electrohydrodynamic jet printing, applications, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Poellmann, Michael J; Johnson, Amy J Wagoner

    2014-09-01

    Micropatterned, multimaterial hydrogels have a wide range of applications, including the study of microenvironmental factors on cell behavior, and complex materials that rapidly change shape in response to fluid composition. This paper presents a method to fabricate microscale polyacrylamide features embedded in a second hydrogel of a different composition. An electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printer was used to pattern hemispherical droplets of polyacrylamide prepolymer on a passive substrate. After photopolymerization, the droplets were backfilled with a second polyacrylamide mixture, the second mixture was polymerized and the sample was peeled off the substrate. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy confirmed multimaterial patterning, while scanning probe microscopy revealed a patterned topography with printed spots forming shallow wells. Finite element modeling was used to understand the mechanics of the formation of the topographical features during backfill and subsequent polymerization. Finally, polyacrylamide containing acrylic acid was used to demonstrate two applications of the micropatterned hydrogels: stimuli-responsive materials and patterned substrates for cell culture. The e-jet fabrication technique described here is a highly flexible, high resolution method for creating multimaterial hydrogels.

  7. Optimization of experimental parameters to determine the jetting regimes in electrohydrodynamic printing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ayoung; Jin, Howon; Dang, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Ahn, Kyung Hyun

    2013-11-05

    The harmony of ink and printing method is of importance in producing on-demand droplets and jets of ink. Many factors including the material properties, the processing conditions, and the nozzle geometry affect the printing quality. In electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing where droplets or jets are generated by the electrostatic force, the physical as well as the electrical properties of the fluid should be taken into account to achieve the desired performance. In this study, a systematic approach was suggested for finding the processing windows of the EHD printing. Six dimensionless parameters were organized and applied to the printing system of ethanol/terpineol mixtures. On the basis of the correlation of the dimensionless voltage and the charge relaxation length, the jet diameter of cone-jet mode was characterized, and the semicone angle was compared with the theoretical Taylor angle. In addition, the ratio of electric normal force and electric tangential force on the charged surface of the Taylor cone was recommended as a parameter that determines the degree of cone-jet stability. The cone-jet became more stable as this ratio got smaller. This approach was a systematic and effective way of obtaining the Taylor cone of the cone-jet mode and evaluating the jetting stability. The control of the inks with optimized experimental parameters by this method will improve the jetting performance in EHD inkjet printing.

  8. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing and a preliminary electrochemistry test of graphene micro-scale electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dazhi; Zha, Wen; Feng, Li; Ma, Qian; Liu, Xianming; Yang, Ning; Xu, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Junsheng; Ren, Tongqun; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the use of electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing technique for producing a wide range of graphene micro-scale structures. Ethyl cellulose-dispersed graphene ink and Nafion-dispersed graphene ink were prepared and used for E-Jet printing. A glass slide and PDMS substrate were used for E-Jet printing of graphene ink. The E-jet printed graphene micro-scale structures using ethyl cellulose-dispersed graphene ink presented a feature of center arrayed graphene surrounded by the track of evaporated solution. However, the E-Jet printed graphene structures using Nafion-dispersed graphene ink exhibited uniform arranged features. It was observed that the resistivity of the graphene structures printed from the ethyl cellulose-dispersed graphene ink was much lower than that from the Nafion-dispersed graphene ink. In addition, the graphene micro-scale electrodes were E-Jet printed for preliminary electrochemical applications. The results showed that the graphene micro-scale electrodes had a distinct response for the lead ion. Furthermore, a Pt/graphene composite electrode was formed and an electrochemistry test was conducted. It was found that the Pt /graphene composite electrode had a more sensitive response compared with the pure Pt electrode for electrochemical sensing.

  9. Addressable multi-nozzle electrohydrodynamic jet printing with high consistency by multi-level voltage method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yanqiao; Huang, YongAn; Guo, Lei; Ding, Yajiang; Yin, Zhouping

    2015-04-01

    It is critical and challenging to achieve the individual jetting ability and high consistency in multi-nozzle electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jet printing). We proposed multi-level voltage method (MVM) to implement the addressable E-jet printing using multiple parallel nozzles with high consistency. The fabricated multi-nozzle printhead for MVM consists of three parts: PMMA holder, stainless steel capillaries (27G, outer diameter 400 μm) and FR-4 extractor layer. The key of MVM is to control the maximum meniscus electric field on each nozzle. The individual jetting control can be implemented when the rings under the jetting nozzles are 0 kV and the other rings are 0.5 kV. The onset electric field for each nozzle is ˜3.4 kV/mm by numerical simulation. Furthermore, a series of printing experiments are performed to show the advantage of MVM in printing consistency than the "one-voltage method" and "improved E-jet method", by combination with finite element analyses. The good dimension consistency (274μm, 276μm, 280μm) and position consistency of the droplet array on the hydrophobic Si substrate verified the enhancements. It shows that MVM is an effective technique to implement the addressable E-jet printing with multiple parallel nozzles in high consistency.

  10. Ag dot morphologies printed using electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing based on a drop-on-demand (DOD) operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Fariza Dian; Teguh Yudistira, Hadi; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-09-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technology is an attractive method for micro-scale electronic device fabrication. The primary advantage of EHD jet printing compared with conventional inkjet printing is the capability to print at resolutions below 10 µm and to eject high-viscosity ink. In this study, by using drop-on-demand (DOD) jetting, we printed silver (Ag) dots onto a silicon (Si)-wafer and evaluated the dot uniformity. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of substrate surface energy and substrate temperature on the dot morphology. We also investigated the effects of overprinting on the dot morphologies. Our results show that we successfully created uniform dot patterns under 10 µm by using EHD jet printing. In addition the dot diameter approached 14 µm while the substrate was heated up to 40 °C. We also found that on the hydrophobic Si-wafer, increasing the substrate temperature and the number of overprinting could be used as an alternative method for increasing the aspect ratio of dot and suppressing the coffee-stain effect.

  11. Time-Resolved Imaging Study of Jetting Dynamics during Laser Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Xiong, Ruitong; Mei, Renwei; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-06-16

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write (MAPLE DW) has been successfully implemented as a promising laser printing technology for various fabrication applications, in particular, three-dimensional bioprinting. Since most bioinks used in bioprinting are viscoelastic, it is of importance to understand the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of viscoelastic fluids in order to control and optimize the laser printing performance. In this study, MAPLE DW was implemented to study the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of representative viscoelastic alginate bioinks and evaluate the effects of operating conditions (e.g., laser fluence) and material properties (e.g., alginate concentration) on the jet formation performance. Through a time-resolved imaging approach, it is found that when the laser fluence increases or the alginate concentration decreases, the jetting behavior changes from no material transferring to well-defined jetting to well-defined jetting with an initial bulgy shape to jetting with a bulgy shape to pluming/splashing. For the desirable well-defined jetting regimes, as the laser fluence increases, the jet velocity and breakup length increase while the breakup time and primary droplet size decrease. As the alginate concentration increases, the jet velocity and breakup length decrease while the breakup time and primary droplet size increase. In addition, Ohnesorge, elasto-capillary, and Weber number based phase diagrams are presented to better appreciate the dependence of jetting regimes on the laser fluence and alginate concentration.

  12. Effects of PCC fillers on plain paper ink-jet print quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Alan J.; Donigian, Douglas W.; Gill, Robert A.

    1997-08-01

    Ink jet printability is rapidly becoming a requirement for all multipurpose office papers. These papers must have an optimized balance of properties so they can perform equally well under various printing methods such as xerography, ink jet, and thermal imaging. The office paper of today truly must be a multipurpose copy paper capable of providing good toner adhesion as well as controlled absorption of aqueous ink jet solutions. The demand for ink jet paper is increasing rapidly. The global market for cut-size ink jet papers will expand to nearly 1.4 million tons by the year 2000. By that time the global market for all cut-size multipurpose plain printing papers will grow to nearly twenty million tons. The ink jet printing process places a large volume of aqueous ink on the surface of a substrate. The manner in which the substrate handles that volume of ink determines in large part the quality of the print. Multipurpose office papers are composed chiefly of cellulose fibers, inorganic fillers, and chemical additives. All of these components affect the quality of the sheet as an ink jet substrate. The particle morphology, surface area, and surface treatment of PCC fillers affect the ink jet printability of multipurpose office papers. This paper focuses on results from pilot paper machine and commercial trials performed in an effort to turn 'plain' office papers into high quality multipurpose papers capable of meeting or exceeding ink jet print quality specifications.

  13. Infiltration of Nanoparticles into Porous Binder Jet Printed Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amelia; AlSalihi, Sarah; Merriman, Abbey L.; Basti, Mufeed M.

    2016-01-01

    The densification of parts that are produced by binder jetting Additive Manufacturing (AM; a.k.a. “3D Printing”) is an essential step in making them mechanically useful. By increasing the packing factor of the powder bed by incorporating nanoparticles into the binder has potential to alleviate the amount of shrinkage needed for full densification of binder jet parts. We present preliminary data on the use of 316L Stainless Steel Nanoparticles (SSN) to densify 316L stainless steel binder jet parts. Aqueous solutions of Diethylene Glycol (DEG) or Ethylene Glycol (EG) were prepared at different DEG/water and EG/water molar ratios; pH of the solutions was adjusted by the use of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide. Nanoparticles were suspended in a resulted solution at a volume percentage of SSN/solution at 0.5%. The suspension was then sonicated for thirty minutes. One milliliter of the suspension was added stepwise to a sintered, printed disk with the dimensions: (d = 10 mm, h = 3 mm) in the presence of a small magnet. The 3D part was then sintered again. Moreover, the increase in the mass of the 3D part was used as indication of the amount of nanoparticles that diffused in the 3D part. This mass percent increase was studied as a function of pH of the suspension and as function DEG/water molar ratio. Unlike EG, data show that change in pH affects the mass percent when the suspension was made with DEG. Finally, optical analysis of the discs’ cross sections revealed trends metallic densities similar to trends in the data for mass increase with changing pH and water molar ratio.

  14. Infiltration of Nanoparticles into Porous Binder Jet Printed Parts

    DOE PAGES

    Elliott, Amelia; AlSalihi, Sarah; Merriman, Abbey L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    The densification of parts that are produced by binder jetting Additive Manufacturing (AM; a.k.a. “3D Printing”) is an essential step in making them mechanically useful. By increasing the packing factor of the powder bed by incorporating nanoparticles into the binder has potential to alleviate the amount of shrinkage needed for full densification of binder jet parts. We present preliminary data on the use of 316L Stainless Steel Nanoparticles (SSN) to densify 316L stainless steel binder jet parts. Aqueous solutions of Diethylene Glycol (DEG) or Ethylene Glycol (EG) were prepared at different DEG/water and EG/water molar ratios; pH of the solutionsmore » was adjusted by the use of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide. Nanoparticles were suspended in a resulted solution at a volume percentage of SSN/solution at 0.5%. The suspension was then sonicated for thirty minutes. One milliliter of the suspension was added stepwise to a sintered, printed disk with the dimensions: (d = 10 mm, h = 3 mm) in the presence of a small magnet. The 3D part was then sintered again. Moreover, the increase in the mass of the 3D part was used as indication of the amount of nanoparticles that diffused in the 3D part. This mass percent increase was studied as a function of pH of the suspension and as function DEG/water molar ratio. Unlike EG, data show that change in pH affects the mass percent when the suspension was made with DEG. Finally, optical analysis of the discs’ cross sections revealed trends metallic densities similar to trends in the data for mass increase with changing pH and water molar ratio.« less

  15. Spreading on and penetration into thin, permeable print media: application to ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Richard C; Berg, John C

    2006-11-16

    This paper examines spreading and penetration of surfactant-laden drops on thin-permeable media with reference to ink-jet printing. A detailed review of the interaction of both pure liquids and surfactant containing solutions with porous substrates is given for individual spreading and penetration and for the combined processes. A new model based on energy arguments is derived and compared to current hydrodynamic equations used to describe simultaneous spreading and penetration. Three studies of how surfactant solutions interact with thin commercial ink-jet photographic quality papers are presented. Here, two relevant systems are examined: Tergitol 15-S-5 and 1,2-octanediol. The first study examines the spreading and penetration profiles for surfactant solutions over a range of concentrations spanning their critical micelle concentration. As expected, these profiles depend on the concentration of surfactant and the chemistry of the medium with which it interacts. In many cases, partial vertical penetration of the region directly beneath the drop dominates at low interaction times and will be significant in ink-jet applications. The second study consists of a parametric investigation of the energy-based model derived herein. It shows that the model can capture all of the behaviors observed in the first study. In the final study, the ability of the energy-based model to fully predict the spreading behavior of Tergitol 15-S-5 solutions is tested. It is found that the model produces good quantitative agreement at the highest concentrations and, as such, will be useful in screening spreading dynamics concentrated systems like ink-jet inks. Agreement at low to intermediate concentrations is often limited by finite induction periods prior to significant spreading and penetration. Possible corrections that could improve the agreement for weakly concentrated solutions are discussed, and directions for future studies of simultaneous spreading and penetration are proposed.

  16. Jet and ultrasonic nebuliser output: use of a new method for direct measurement of aerosol output.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, J H; Stenton, S C; Beach, J R; Avery, A J; Walters, E H; Hendrick, D J

    1990-01-01

    Output from jet nebulisers is calibrated traditionally by weighing them before and after nebulisation, but the assumption that the weight difference is a close measure of aerosol generation could be invalidated by the concomitant process of evaporation. A method has been developed for measuring aerosol output directly by using a solute (fluoride) tracer and aerosol impaction, and this has been compared with the traditional weight loss method for two Wright, six Turbo, and four Micro-Cirrus jet nebulisers and two Microinhaler ultrasonic nebulisers. The weight loss method overestimated true aerosol output for all jet nebulisers. The mean aerosol content, expressed as a percentage of the total weight loss, varied from as little as 15% for the Wright jet nebulisers to 54% (range 45-61%) for the Turbo and Micro-Cirrus jet nebulisers under the operating conditions used. In contrast, there was no discrepancy between weight loss and aerosol output for the ultrasonic nebulisers. These findings, along with evidence of both concentrating and cooling effects from jet nebulisation, confirm that total output from jet nebulisers contains two distinct fractions, vapour and aerosol. The vapour fraction, but not the aerosol fraction, was greatly influenced by reservoir temperature within the nebuliser; so the ratio of aerosol output to total weight loss varied considerably with temperature. It is concluded that weight loss is an inappropriate method of calibrating jet nebuliser aerosol output, and that this should be measured directly. PMID:2247862

  17. Surface biofunctionalization and production of miniaturized sensor structures using aerosol printing technologies.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Ingo; Groth, Esther; Wirth, Ingo; Schumacher, Julian; Maiwald, Marcus; Zoellmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    The work described in this paper demonstrates that very small protein and DNA structures can be applied to various substrates without denaturation using aerosol printing technology. This technology allows high-resolution deposition of various nanoscaled metal and biological suspensions. Before printing, metal and biological suspensions were formulated and then nebulized to form an aerosol which is aerodynamically focused on the printing module of the system in order to achieve precise structuring of the nanoscale material on a substrate. In this way, it is possible to focus the aerosol stream at a distance of about 5 mm from the printhead to the surface. This technology is useful for printing fluorescence-marked proteins and printing enzymes without affecting their biological activity. Furthermore, higher molecular weight DNA can be printed without shearing. The advantages, such as printing on complex, non-planar 3D structured surfaces, and disadvantages of the aerosol printing technology are also discussed and are compared with other printing technologies. In addition, miniaturized sensor structures with line thicknesses in the range of a few micrometers are fabricated by applying a silver sensor structure to glass. After sintering using an integrated laser or in an oven process, electrical conductivity is achieved within the sensor structure. Finally, we printed BSA in small micrometre-sized areas within the sensor structure using the same deposition system. The aerosol printing technology combined with material development offers great advantages for future-oriented applications involving biological surface functionalization on small areas. This is important for innovative biomedical micro-device development and for production solutions which bridge the disciplines of biology and electronics.

  18. Metal-mesh based transparent electrode on a 3-D curved surface by electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Yoo, Hyunwoong; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Jang, Yonghee; Ryu, Changkook; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-09-01

    Invisible Ag mesh transparent electrodes (TEs), with a width of 7 μm, were prepared on a curved glass surface by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. With a 100 μm pitch, the EHD jet printed the Ag mesh on the convex glass which had a sheet resistance of 1.49 Ω/□. The printing speed was 30 cm s-1 using Ag ink, which had a 10 000 cPs viscosity and a 70 wt% Ag nanoparticle concentration. We further showed the performance of a 3-D transparent heater using the Ag mesh transparent electrode. The EHD jet printed an invisible Ag grid transparent electrode with good electrical and optical properties with promising applications on printed optoelectronic devices.

  19. Airflow assisted printhead for high-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing onto non-conductive and tilted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Leo; Barton, Kira

    2015-08-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet printing (e-jet printing) is a growing high resolution (<20 μm) printing technology. It is cost effective for small scale and highly customized feature production and it is compatible with a large range of materials. Conventional e-jet is generally restricted to surfaces with high flatness, therefore limiting the application of e-jet in research and industry. This paper will present an airflow assisted e-jet printhead that incorporates the use of airflow within the printhead to direct electrohydrodynamically generated ink droplets onto non-conductive and tilted surfaces. The printhead runs in open loop yet achieves consistent printing performance across large changes in standoff height (800 μm) between the printhead and printing surface. The printhead is able to print <20 μm droplets, which surpasses traditional inkjet technology. In conclusion, this printhead design has the potential to enable e-jet printing to be applied in unprecedented application areas.

  20. Confined Aerosol Jet in Fiber Classification and Dustiness Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Prahit

    The focus of this dissertation is the numerical analysis of confined aerosol jets used in fiber classification and dustiness measurement. Of relevance to the present work are two devices, namely, the Baron Fiber Classifier (BFC), and the Venturi Dustiness Tester (VDT). The BFC is a device used to length-separate fibers, important for toxicological research. The Flow Combination Section (FCS) of this device consists of an upstream region, where an aerosol of uncharged fibers is introduced in the form of an annular jet, in-between two sheath flows. Length-separation occurs by dielectrophoresis, downstream of the FCS in the Fiber Classification Section (FClS). In its standard operation, BFC processes only small quantities of fibers. In order to increase its throughput, higher aerosol flow rates must be considered. The goal of the present investigation is to understand the interaction of sheath and aerosol flows inside the FCS, and to identify possible limits to increasing aerosol flow rates using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Simulations involve solution of Navier-Stokes equations for axisymmetric and 3D models of the FCS for six different flow rates, and a pure aerodynamic treatment of the aerosol jet. The results show that the geometry of the FCS, and the two sheath flows, are successful in preventing the emergence of vortices in the FCS for aerosol-to-sheath flow inlet velocity ratios below ≈ 50. For larger aerosol-to-sheath flow inlet velocity ratios, two vortices are formed, one near the inner cylinder and one near the outer cylinder. The VDT is a novel device for measuring the dustiness of powders, relevant for dust management and controlling hazardous exposure. It uses just 10 mg of the test powder for its operation, during which the powder is aerosolized and turbulently dispersed (Re = 19,900) for 1.5s into a 5.7 liter chamber; the aerosol is then gently sampled (Re = 2050) for 240s through two filters located at the chamber top. Pump-driven suction at

  1. Invisible metal-grid transparent electrode prepared by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Jihoon; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-04-01

    Invisible Ag-grid transparent electrodes (TEs) were prepared by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing using Ag nano-particle inks. Ag-grid width less than 10 µm was achieved by the EHD jet printing, which was invisible to the naked eye. The Ag-grid line-to-line distance (pitch) was modulated in order to investigate the electrical and optical properties of the EHD jet-printed Ag-grid TEs. The decrease in the sheet resistance at the expense of the transmittance was observed as the Ag-grid pitch decreased. The figure of merit of Ag-grid TEs with various Ag-grid pitches was investigated in order to determine the optimum pitch condition for both electrical and optical properties. With the 150 µm Ag-grid pitch, the EHD jet-printed Ag-grid TE has the sheet resistance of 4.87 Ω sq-1 and the transmittance of 81.75% after annealing at 200 °C under near-infrared. Ag filling factor (FF) was defined to predict the electrical and optical properties of Ag-grid TEs. It was found that the measured electrical and optical properties were well simulated by the theoretical equations incorporating FF. The EHD jet-printed invisible Ag-grid TE with good electrical and optical properties implies its promising application to the printed optoelectronic devices.

  2. Methodology to set up nozzle-to-substrate gap for high resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Park, Ji-Woon; Nasrabadi, Ali Mohamadi; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-09-01

    Several efforts have been made for the prediction of jet diameter in electrohydrodynamic jet printing; however, not much attention has been paid to the jet length, which is the distance from the cone apex to the location where the jet is unstable and is broken into atomized droplets. In this study, we measured both the cone length and the jet length using a high-speed camera, and measured the line pattern width with an optical microscope to investigate the effects of cone length and jet length on the pattern quality. Measurements were carried out with variations in nozzle diameter, flow rate, and applied voltage. The pattern width was theoretically predicted for the case when the nozzle-to-substrate distance was more than the cone length, and smaller than the summation of the cone and jet lengths (which is the case when there is no jet breakup).

  3. Patterned oxide semiconductor by electrohydrodynamic jet printing for transparent thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Kim, Jeonghyun; Choi, Junghyun; Park, Hyunjung; Ha, Jaehwan; Kim, Yongkwan; Rogers, John A.; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores transport in transparent thin film transistors formed using a liquid precursor to indium zinc oxide, delivered to target substrates by electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing. Under optimized conditions, we observe field effect mobilities as high as 32 cm2V-1s-1, with on/off current ratios of 103 and threshold voltages of 2 V. These results provide evidence that material manipulated in fine-jet, electric field induced liquid flows can yield semiconductor devices without any adverse effects of residual charge or unintentional doping. E-jet printing methods provide levels of resolution (˜1.5 μm) that provide a path to printed transistors with small critical dimensions.

  4. Characterization of inks and ink application for ink-jet printing: model and simulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li

    2003-07-01

    Ink-jet printing quality is determined primarily by, among other factors, the printing engine and its inks. The printing engine controls the process of ink application and the scheme of ink mixing for th e generation of secondary and tertiary colors. The inks selectively absorb different wavelengths from the illumination and result in the visible color output. Therefore characterizations of the output print in terms of ink distribution and volume, the scheme of ink mixing, light absorption, and light scattering are of essential importance in controlling and understanding the quality of the color reproduction. I present a method to characterize the ink volume and the properties of the ink by means of spectral reflectance measurements and simulations. The simulations are based on the Kubelka-Munk theory, whose applicability to ink-jet printing is also discussed.

  5. Organ printing: computer-aided jet-based 3D tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Boland, Thomas; Trusk, Thomas; Forgacs, Gabor; Markwald, Roger R

    2003-04-01

    Tissue engineering technology promises to solve the organ transplantation crisis. However, assembly of vascularized 3D soft organs remains a big challenge. Organ printing, which we define as computer-aided, jet-based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, offers a possible solution. Organ printing involves three sequential steps: pre-processing or development of "blueprints" for organs; processing or actual organ printing; and postprocessing or organ conditioning and accelerated organ maturation. A cell printer that can print gels, single cells and cell aggregates has been developed. Layer-by-layer sequentially placed and solidified thin layers of a thermo-reversible gel could serve as "printing paper". Combination of an engineering approach with the developmental biology concept of embryonic tissue fluidity enables the creation of a new rapid prototyping 3D organ printing technology, which will dramatically accelerate and optimize tissue and organ assembly.

  6. Direct patterning using aerodynamically assisted electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangyeon; Seong, Baekhoon; Lee, Wonyoung; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-11-01

    Electrical force and aerodynamic force are considered to be preferred sources for generating a liquid jet to emit the target fluid on a tiny scale. The former is known as an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet, while the latter is called flow focusing. Here, we report the effect of a combined energy source on the micro scale jet and patterns and investigate the scaling law of pattern width according to the ratio of two energy sources. In a conventional EHD jet, after a short length of straight section the charged viscous jet turns into complex shape which occurs difficulty in patterning fine lines. A coaxially driven gas stream smoothed the asymmetric jet lengthening the straight section of the jet. The jet could be issued constantly within the range that did not exceed the stable region in the parametric space. Under such stable conditions, the jet became narrow as compared to the one from the normal EHD jet. Hence, the patterns formed at a high gas pressure were noticeably smaller than the others, demonstrating the controllability of jet thickness. Various liquids had been used as the target fluids to investigate the effect of liquid properties. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grand Number: 2014-023284.

  7. Mechanisms, Capabilities, and Applications of High-Resolution Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printing.

    PubMed

    Onses, M Serdar; Sutanto, Erick; Ferreira, Placid M; Alleyne, Andrew G; Rogers, John A

    2015-09-09

    This review gives an overview of techniques used for high-resolution jet printing that rely on electrohydrodynamically induced flows. Such methods enable the direct, additive patterning of materials with a resolution that can extend below 100 nm to provide unique opportunities not only in scientific studies but also in a range of applications that includes printed electronics, tissue engineering, and photonic and plasmonic devices. Following a brief historical perspective, this review presents descriptions of the underlying processes involved in the formation of liquid cones and jets to establish critical factors in the printing process. Different printing systems that share similar principles are then described, along with key advances that have been made in the last decade. Capabilities in terms of printable materials and levels of resolution are reviewed, with a strong emphasis on areas of potential application.

  8. Structuring of conductive silver line by electrohydrodynamic jet printing and its electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Jae-Chang; Shin, Yun-Soo; Park, Sung-Eun; Yu, Tae-U.; Kim, Yong-Jun; Hwang, Jungho

    2008-12-01

    A set of silver lines with a few hundred nanometers in thickness and with a few hundred micrometers in width were obtained using the electrohydrodynamic jet printing. The lines exhibited about three times higher resistivity (4.8 μΩcm) than that of bulk silver after thermal sintering process. The characteristic impedance of the silver line was about 18 Ω while the value calculated was 20 Ω. This paper demonstrated the possibility of using electrohydrodynamic jet printing of silver nanoparticles to obtain conductive line onto circuit boards.

  9. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing of small-molecule organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Gyeomuk; Lee, Bo Ram; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; An, Byeong Wan; Song, Myoung Hoon; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-28

    The development of alternative organic light-emitting diode (OLED) fabrication technologies for high-definition and low-cost displays is an important research topic as conventional fine metal mask-assisted vacuum evaporation has reached its limit to reduce pixel sizes and manufacturing costs. Here, we report an electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing method to fabricate small-molecule OLED pixels with high resolution (pixel width of 5 μm), which significantly exceeds the resolutions of conventional inkjet or commercial OLED display pixels. In addition, we print small-molecule emitting materials which provide a significant advantage in terms of device efficiency and lifetime compared to those with polymers.

  10. High-speed and drop-on-demand printing with a pulsed electrohydrodynamic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Barton, K. L.; Alleyne, A. G.; Ferreira, P. M.; Rogers, J. A.

    2010-09-01

    We present a pulsed dc voltage printing regime for high-speed, high-resolution and high-precision electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing. The voltage pulse peak induces a very fast E-jetting mode from the nozzle for a short duration, while a baseline dc voltage is picked to ensure that the meniscus is always deformed to nearly a conical shape but not in a jetting mode. The duration of the pulse determines the volume of the droplet and therefore the feature size on the substrate. The droplet deposition rate is controlled by the time interval between two successive pulses. Through a suitable choice of the pulse width and frequency, a jet-printing regime with a specified droplet size and droplet spacing can be created. Further, by properly coordinating the pulsing with positioning commands, high spatial resolution can also be achieved. We demonstrate high-speed printing capabilities at 1 kHz with drop-on-demand and registration capabilities with 3-5 µm droplet size for an aqueous ink and 1-2 µm for a photocurable polymer ink.

  11. Self-positioning microlens arrays prepared using ink-jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jhih-Ping; Huang, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2009-07-01

    We have employed ink-jet printing (IJP) technology to fabricate self-positioning microlens arrays (MLAs). The glass substrates were first prepatterned through microcontact printing (μCP) hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to divide the surface into hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. After IJP of the hydrophilic prepolymer liquids, the lenses were effectively repelled by the patterned SAMs. We obtained high-quality MLAs having diameters of 75 and 100 μm after polymerization of the prepolymers. The lenses' shapes could be controlled by varying the number of printed droplets.

  12. Fine-resolution patterning of copper nanoparticles through electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Khalid; Khan, Arshad; Malik Muhammad, Nauman; Jo, Jeongdai; Choi, Kyung-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the low-cost, fine-resolution printing of conductive copper patterns on silicon substrate. The colloidal solution containing copper nanoparticles is deposited through electrohydrodynamic printing technology. Conductive copper tracks of different width are printed by varying the operating conditions (applied voltage and flow rate) and controlling the jet diameter. The minimum pattern width achieved was approximately 12 µm with the average thickness of 82 nm across the width after the sintering process. The achieved pattern width is five times smaller than the capillary used for patterning. The morphology and purity of the printed copper tracks were analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the printed copper tracks showed linear Ohmic behavior and exhibited resistivity ranging from 5.98 × 10-8 Ω m-1 to 2.42 × 10-7 Ω m-1.

  13. Substrate stiffness influences high resolution printing of living cells with an ink-jet system.

    PubMed

    Tirella, Annalisa; Vozzi, Federico; De Maria, Carmelo; Vozzi, Giovanni; Sandri, Tazio; Sassano, Duccio; Cognolato, Livio; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2011-07-01

    The adaptation of inkjet printing technology for the realisation of controlled micro- and nano-scaled biological structures is of great potential in tissue and biomaterial engineering. In this paper we present the Olivetti BioJet system and its applications in tissue engineering and cell printing. BioJet, which employs a thermal inkjet cartridge, was used to print biomolecules and living cells. It is well known that high stresses and forces are developed during the inkjet printing process. When printing living particles (i.e., cell suspensions) the mechanical loading profile can dramatically damage the processed cells. Therefore computational models were developed to predict the velocity profile and the mechanical load acting on a droplet during the printing process. The model was used to investigate the role of the stiffness of the deposition substrate during droplet impact and compared with experimental investigations on cell viability after printing on different materials. The computational model and the experimental results confirm that impact forces are highly dependent on the deposition substrate and that soft and viscous surfaces can reduce the forces acting on the droplet, preventing cell damage. These results have high relevance for cell bioprinting; substrates should be designed to have a good compromise between substrate stiffness to conserve spatial patterning without droplet coalescence but soft enough to absorb the kinetic energy of droplets in order to maintain cell viability.

  14. Scaling laws for jet pulsations associated with high-resolution electrohydrodynamic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hong Kyoon; Park, Jang-Ung; Park, O. Ok; Ferreira, Placid M.; Georgiadis, John G.; Rogers, John A.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents simple scaling laws that describe the intrinsic pulsation of a liquid jet that forms at the tips of fine nozzles under electrohydrodynamically induced flows. The jet diameter is proportional to the square root of the nozzle size and inversely proportional to the electric field strength. The fundamental pulsation frequency is proportional to the electric field strength raised to the power of 1.5. These scaling relationships are confirmed by experiments presented here and by data from the literature. The results are important for recently developed high-resolution ink jet printing techniques and other applications using electrohydrodynamics.

  15. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing of small-molecule organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Gyeomuk; Lee, Bo Ram; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; An, Byeong Wan; Song, Myoung Hoon; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-01

    The development of alternative organic light-emitting diode (OLED) fabrication technologies for high-definition and low-cost displays is an important research topic as conventional fine metal mask-assisted vacuum evaporation has reached its limit to reduce pixel sizes and manufacturing costs. Here, we report an electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing method to fabricate small-molecule OLED pixels with high resolution (pixel width of 5 μm), which significantly exceeds the resolutions of conventional inkjet or commercial OLED display pixels. In addition, we print small-molecule emitting materials which provide a significant advantage in terms of device efficiency and lifetime compared to those with polymers.The development of alternative organic light-emitting diode (OLED) fabrication technologies for high-definition and low-cost displays is an important research topic as conventional fine metal mask-assisted vacuum evaporation has reached its limit to reduce pixel sizes and manufacturing costs. Here, we report an electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing method to fabricate small-molecule OLED pixels with high resolution (pixel width of 5 μm), which significantly exceeds the resolutions of conventional inkjet or commercial OLED display pixels. In addition, we print small-molecule emitting materials which provide a significant advantage in terms of device efficiency and lifetime compared to those with polymers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03034j

  16. Nano-sized ceramic inks for drop-on-demand ink-jet printing in quadrichromy.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Davide; Dondi, Michele; Costa, Anna Luisa; Matteucci, Francesco; Blosi, Magda; Galassi, Carmen; Baldi, Giovanni; Cinotti, Elenia

    2008-04-01

    Nano-sized ceramic inks suitable for ink-jet printing have been developed for the four-colours CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) process. Nano-inks of different pigment composition (Co(1-x)O, Au(0), Ti(1-x-y)Sb(x)Cr(y)O2, CoFe2O4) have been prepared with various solid loadings and their chemicophysical properties (particle size, viscosity, surface tension, zeta-potential) were tailored for the ink-jet application. The pigment particle size is in the 20-80 nm range. All these nano-suspensions are stable for long time (i.e., several months) due to either electrostatic (high zeta-potential values) or steric stabilization mechanisms. Both nanometric size and high stability avoid problems of nozzle clogging from particles agglomeration and settling. Nano-inks have a Newtonian behaviour with relatively low viscosities at room temperature. More concentrated inks fulfil the viscosity requirement of ink-jet applications (i.e., < 35 mPa x s) for printing temperatures in between 30 and 70 degrees C. Surface tension constraints for ink-jet printing are fulfilled by nano-inks, being in the 35-45 mN x m(-1) range. The nano-sized inks investigated behave satisfactorily in preliminary printing tests on several unfired industrial ceramic tiles, developing saturated colours in a wide range of firing temperatures (1000-1200 degrees C).

  17. Fabrication of a flexible Ag-grid transparent electrode using ac based electrohydrodynamic Jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-10-01

    In the dc voltage-applied electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing of metal nanoparticles, the residual charge of droplets deposited on a substrate changes the electrostatic field distribution and interrupts the subsequent printing behaviour, especially for insulating substrates that have slow charge decay rates. In this paper, a sinusoidal ac voltage was used in the EHD jet printing process to switch the charge polarity of droplets containing Ag nanoparticles, thereby neutralizing the charge on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Printed Ag lines with a width of 10 µm were invisible to the naked eye. After sintering lines with 500 µm of line pitch at 180 °C, a grid-type transparent electrode (TE) with a sheet resistance of ˜7 Ω sq-1 and a dc to optical conductivity ratio of ˜300 at ˜84.2% optical transmittance was obtained, values that were superior to previously reported results. In order to evaluate the durability of the TE under bending stresses, the sheet resistance was measured as the number of bending cycles was increased. The sheet resistance of the Ag grid electrode increased only slightly, by less than 20% from its original value, even after 500 cycles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that Ag (invisible) grid TEs have been fabricated on PET substrates by ac voltage applied EHD jet printing.

  18. Methodology and technological aspects of the flexible substrate preparation for ink-jet printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarapata, Grzegorz; Marzecki, Michał

    2013-10-01

    The ink-jet printing technology becomes especially promising for wide volume of production of cheap sensors, consumable electronics and other dedicated applications of everyday life like smart packaging, smart textiles, smart labels, etc. To achieve this goal new materials compatible with ink-jet printing should be developed. Currently on the market there is a growing number of inks with different properties, but their use requires many tests related to its printability and their interaction with other materials. The paper presents technological problems that are encountered by people associated with fabrication of various devices with using of inkjet printing techniques. Results presented in the paper show the influence of surface preparation techniques on the quality of achieved shapes, the impact of other materials already deposited and the impact of another external factors. During carried out experiments the printer Dimatix DMP 2831 and several inks base on nanosilver or dielectric UV curable was used.

  19. Ink-Jet Printed CMOS Electronics from Oxide Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Garlapati, Suresh Kumar; Baby, Tessy Theres; Dehm, Simone; Hammad, Mohammed; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-08-05

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology with high transconductance and signal gain is mandatory for practicable digital/analog logic electronics. However, high performance all-oxide CMOS logics are scarcely reported in the literature; specifically, not at all for solution-processed/printed transistors. As a major step toward solution-processed all-oxide electronics, here it is shown that using a highly efficient electrolyte-gating approach one can obtain printed and low-voltage operated oxide CMOS logics with high signal gain (≈21 at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V) and low static power dissipation.

  20. A field shaping printhead for high-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing onto non-conductive and uneven surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Leo; Barton, Kira

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing is a cost effective, flexible, multi-material, high-resolution (sub 10 μm) additive manufacturing process. In this paper, we present an electric field shaping printhead capable of controlled high-resolution (sub 10 μm) e-jet printing and demonstrate printhead capabilities by creating patterns with both an optical adhesive and silver nanoparticle ink material with equivalent accuracy to state-of-the-art e-jet printing. Importantly, we demonstrate controlled printing onto non-conductive and height varying surfaces without the use of a grounded substrate at a previously unattainable length scale. This ability to print onto highly varied non-conductive substrates will enable the generalization of the 2D process to a controlled 3D printing technology at the micro-scale.

  1. Plasma jet printing of electronic materials on flexible and nonconformal objects.

    PubMed

    Gandhiraman, Ram P; Jayan, Vivek; Han, Jin-Woo; Chen, Bin; Koehne, Jessica E; Meyyappan, M

    2014-12-10

    We present a novel approach for the room-temperature fabrication of conductive traces and their subsequent site-selective dielectric encapsulation for use in flexible electronics. We have developed an aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma-based deposition process for efficiently depositing materials on flexible substrates. Silver nanowire conductive traces and silicon dioxide dielectric coatings for encapsulation were deposited using this approach as a demonstration. The paper substrate with silver nanowires exhibited a very low change in resistance upon 50 cycles of systematic deformation, exhibiting high mechanical flexibility. The applicability of this process to print conductive traces on nonconformal 3D objects was also demonstrated through deposition on a 3D-printed thermoplastic object, indicating the potential to combine plasma printing with 3D printing technology. The role of plasma here includes activation of the material present in the aerosol for deposition, increasing the deposition rate, and plasma polymerization in the case of inorganic coatings. The demonstration here establishes a low-cost, high-throughput, and facile process for printing electronic components on nonconventional platforms.

  2. Direct fabrication of electrically functional microstructures by fully voltage-controlled electrohydrodynamic jet printing of silver nano-ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Stark, John P. W.

    2010-06-01

    We report electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing of a commercialised silver nano-ink in fully voltage-controlled fashion. Metallic pads and conducting tracks with hundred-micron feature size were drop-on-demands produced on Si substrates. Layer-by-layer printing was further performed, demonstrating a capability in creating 3D multistructures. Planar pattern with a large inductance of 2.5 μH and an excellent resistivity of 4.2×10-8 Ω m was fabricated, showing a true inductive device. Our result demonstrates a feasibility of E-jet printing in the application of smart electronic devices fabrication.

  3. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles for ink-jet printed flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; Zhang, Xingye; Xin, Zhiqing; Deng, Mengmeng; Wen, Yongqiang; Song, Yanlin

    2011-10-01

    In this study, monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized with a new reduction system consisting of adipoyl hydrazide and dextrose at ambient temperature. By this facile and rapid approach, high concentration monodisperse silver nanoparticles were obtained on a large scale at low protectant/AgNO3 mass ratio which was highly beneficial to low cost and high conductivity. Based on the synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles, conductive inks were prepared with water, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents, and were expected to be more environmentally friendly. A series of electrocircuits were fabricated by ink-jet printing silver nanoparticle ink on paper substrate with a commercial printer, and they had low resistivity in the range of 9.18 × 10 - 8-8.76 × 10 - 8 Ω m after thermal treatment at 160 °C for 30 min, which was about five times that of bulk silver (1.586 × 10 - 8 Ω m). Moreover, a radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by ink-jet printing, and 6 m wireless identification was realized after an Alien higgs-3 chip was mounted on the printed antenna by the flip-chip method. These flexible electrocircuits produced by ink-jet printing would have enormous potential for low cost electrodes and sensor devices.

  4. Powder bed binder jet 3D printing of Inconel 718: Densification, microstructural evolution and challenges

    DOE PAGES

    Nandwana, Peeyush; Elliott, Amy M.; Siddel, Derek; ...

    2017-01-03

    Traditional manufacturing of Inconel 718 components from castings and thermomechanical processing routes involve extensive post processing and machining to attain the desired geometry. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies including direct energy deposition (DED), selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam melting (EBM) and binder jet 3D printing (BJ3DP) can minimize scrap generation and reduce lead times. While there is extensive literature on the use of melting and solidification based AM technologies, there has been limited research on the use of binder jet 3D printing. In this paper, a brief review on binder jet additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 is presented. In addition,more » existing knowledge on sintering of Inconel 718 has been extended to binder jet 3D printing. We found that supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS) is necessary to achieve full densification of Inconel 718. SLPS is sensitive to the feedstock chemistry that has a strong influence on the liquid volume fraction at the processing temperature. Based on these results, we discuss an empirical framework to determine the role of powder particle size and liquid volume fraction on sintering kinetics. In conclusion, the role of powder packing factor and binder saturation on microstructural evolution is discussed. The current challenges in the use of BJ3DP for fabrication of Inconel 718, as well as, extension to other metal systems, are presented.« less

  5. Modeling micro-droplet formation in near-field electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popell, George Colin

    Near-field electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing has recently gained significant interest within the manufacturing research community because of its ability to produce micro/sub-micron-scale droplets using a wide variety of inks and substrates. However, the process currently operates in open-loop and as a result suffers from unpredictable printing quality. The use of physics-based, control-oriented process models is expected to enable closed-loop control of this printing technique. The objective of this research is to perform a fundamental study of the substrate-side droplet shape-evolution in near-field E-jet printing and to develop a physics-based model of the same that links input parameters such as voltage magnitude and ink properties to the height and diameter of the printed droplet. In order to achieve this objective, a synchronized high-speed imaging and substrate-side current-detection system was used implemented to enable a correlation between the droplet shape parameters and the measured current signal. The experimental data reveals characteristic process signatures and droplet spreading regimes. The results of these studies are then used as the basis for a model that predicts the droplet diameter and height using the measured current signal as the input. A unique scaling factor based on the measured current signal is used in this model instead of relying on empirical scaling laws found in literature. For each of the three inks tested in this study, the average absolute error in the model predictions is under 4.6% for diameter predictions and under 10.6% for height predictions of the steady-state droplet. While printing under non-conducive ambient conditions of low humidity and high temperatures, the use of the environmental correction factor in the model is seen to result in average absolute errors of 10.35% and 12.5% for diameter and height predictions.

  6. Direct-patterning of porphyrin dot arrays and lines using electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Song, Chi Ho; Back, Sung Yul; Yu, Sung Il; Lee, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Beom Soo; Yang, Nam Yeol; Jeong, Soo Hoa; Ahn, Heejoon

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we have fabricated micron-sized patterns of porphyrins on silicon substrates using an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technique. Optical and fluorescence microscopies have been used to examine the shape and fluorescence property of porphyrin patterns. The morphology of the porphyrin patterns printed with variously formulated porphyrin inks and the effects of applied voltage, working distance, and substrate properties on the morphology of patterns were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have also demonstrated the acid-vapor sensing capability of the porphyrins by exposing the porphyrin patterns on Si substrates to nitric acid vapor.

  7. Film patterned retarder for stereoscopic three-dimensional display using ink-jet printing method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young Jin; Yu, Ji Hoon; Song, Ki Hoon; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Ren, Hongwen; Mun, Byung-June; Lee, Gi-Dong; Lee, Seung Hee

    2014-09-22

    We propose a film patterned retarder (FPR) for stereoscopic three-dimensional display with polarization glasses using ink-jet printing method. Conventional FPR process requires coating of photo-alignment and then UV exposure using wire-grid mask, which is very expensive and difficult. The proposed novel fabrication method utilizes a plastic substrate made of polyether sulfone and an alignment layer, poly (4, 4' - (9, 9 -fluorenyl) diphenylene cyclobutanyltetracarboximide) (9FDA/CBDA) in which the former and the latter aligns reactive mesogen along and perpendicular to the rubbing direction, respectively. The ink-jet printing of 9FDA/CBDA line by line allows fabricating the cost effective FPR which can be widely applied for 3D display applications.

  8. Improving reactive ink jet printing via cationization of cellulosic linen fabric.

    PubMed

    Rekaby, M; Abd-El Thalouth, J I; Abd El-Salam, Sh H

    2013-11-06

    Cellulose linen fabric samples subjected to cationization using different cationizing agents: dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and Quat-188, via pad batch technique, followed by ink jet printing with reactive dyes. The %N as well as the K/S of the cationized samples was found to be depends on: (a) the nature of the cationizing agent and (b) on the time of batching. As the latter increases both of the nitrogen content and K/S increases to a maximum depending on the nature of the reagent used. Further increase in the batching time up to 30 h is accompanied by a decrease in both the %N and K/S irrespective of the nature of the cationizing agent used. Cationization improves the printability of reactive dye ink jet printed linen fabrics with no remarkable effect on the overall color fastness properties.

  9. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    PubMed Central

    Zenou, M.; Sa’ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  10. A super ink jet printed zinc-silver 3D microbattery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. C.; Murata, K.; Steingart, D. A.; Evans, J. W.; Wright, P. K.

    2009-09-01

    A novel super ink jet printing (SIJP) system was used to fabricate 3D zinc-silver microbatteries directly on a substrate. The SIJP provides a simple and flexible method to deposit interesting 2D and 3D structures of varying morphologies without the waste and large energy inputs typical of standard microfabrication technologies. The system was used to print pairs of silver electrodes with arrays of pillars on glass substrates, and in the presence of an electrolyte, the battery self-assembled during the first charge. Using an aqueous electrolyte solution of KOH with dissolved ZnO, the SIJP printed structures showed similar electrochemical behavior to batteries composed of silver foil electrodes. For a sparse array of pillars (~2.5% footprint area of each electrode pad occupied by pillars), a capacity increase of 60% was achieved in comparison with a cell with planar electrodes.

  11. Bead-on-string structure printed by electrohydrodynamic jet under alternating current electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Lin, Yihuang; Jiang, Jiaxin; Liu, Haiyan; Zhao, Yang; Zheng, Gaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Electrohydrodynamic printing (EHDP) under alternating current (AC) electric field provides a novel way for the precise micro-/nano-droplet printing. The AC electric field induces the free charge to reciprocate along the EHDP jet and changes the electric field force on the jet periodically. The stability of jet can be enhanced by increasing the voltage frequency, and the regular bead-on-string structure is direct-written along the trajectory of collector. The deposition frequency of bead structure increases with the increasing of voltage frequency, due to the short period of AC electric field. As the voltage frequency is increased from 10 to 60 Hz, the diameter of bead structure decreases from 200 to 110 µm. As the duty ration increased from 10 to 60 %, the diameter of bead structure increased from 100 to 140 µm. This work would accelerate the development and the application of micro-/nano-printing technology in the fields of flexible electronic and micro-/nano-system.

  12. High performance nanocomposite thin film transistors with bilayer carbon nanotube-polythiophene active channel by ink-jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Gen-Wen; Li, Flora M.; Beecher, Paul; Nathan, Arokia; Wu, Yiliang; Ong, Beng S.; Milne, William I.

    2009-12-01

    Nanocomposite thin film transistors (TFTs) based on nonpercolating networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polythiophene semiconductor [poly[5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] (PQT-12)] thin film hosts are demonstrated by ink-jet printing. A systematic study on the effect of CNT loading on the transistor performance and channel morphology is conducted. With an appropriate loading of CNTs into the active channel, ink-jet printed composite transistors show an effective hole mobility of 0.23 cm2 V-1 s-1, which is an enhancement of more than a factor of 7 over ink-jet printed pristine PQT-12 TFTs. In addition, these devices display reasonable on/off current ratio of 105-106, low off currents of the order of 10 pA, and a sharp subthreshold slope (<0.8 V dec-1). The work presented here furthers our understanding of the interaction between polythiophene polymers and nonpercolating CNTs, where the CNT density in the bilayer structure substantially influences the morphology and transistor performance of polythiophene. Therefore, optimized loading of ink-jet printed CNTs is crucial to achieve device performance enhancement. High performance ink-jet printed nanocomposite TFTs can present a promising alternative to organic TFTs in printed electronic applications, including displays, sensors, radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, and disposable electronics.

  13. Producing a superhydrophobic paper and altering its repellency through ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Barona, David; Amirfazli, A

    2011-03-07

    A new method for making superhydrophobic (SH) paper based on spraying a nanocomposite film is developed. Furthermore, manipulating the wetting characteristics of SH paper has been demonstrated through a new method, i.e. printing solid grey patterns of different intensities with simple printing technology (home or office grade ink-jet and laser printers). It has been found that for a range of ink intensities (0-85%), water drop mobility can be changed at a different rate (almost independently) from repellency. The repellency of water decreases minimally up to 85% ink intensity with a sharp decrease up to 100% ink intensity. Drop mobility remains constant up to 30% ink intensity with a steady decrease up to 100% ink intensity. It was observed that using ink-jet or laser printing would yield different results for the change of mobility or repellency with higher amounts of ink/toner used. Being able to achieve almost independent control of water drop mobility over water drop repellency on SH paper would allow inexpensive lab-on-paper devices to be used for sampling, mixing and transport of liquids.

  14. Direct E-jet printing of three-dimensional fibrous scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Zuyong; Ying Hsi Fuh, Jerry; San Wong, Yoke; Wang, Wilson; San Thian, Eng

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) offers a promising strategy to restore diseased tendon tissue. However, a suitable scaffold for tendon TE has not been achieved with current fabrication techniques. Herein, we report the development of a novel electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jetting) for engineering 3D tendon scaffold with high porosity and orientated micrometer-size fibers. The E-jetted scaffold comprised tubular multilayered micrometer-size fibrous bundles, with interconnected spacing and geometric anisotropy along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold. Fiber diameter, stacking pattern, and interfiber distance have been observed to affect the structural stability of the scaffold, of which the enhanced mechanical strength can be obtained for scaffolds with thick fibers as the supporting layer. Human tenocytes showed a significant increase in cellular metabolism on the E-jetted scaffolds as compared to that on conventional electrospun scaffolds (2.7-, 2.8-, and 3.1-fold increase for 150, 300, and 600 µm interfiber distance, respectively; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the scaffolds provided structural support for human tenocytes to align with controlled orientation along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold, and promoted the expression of collagen type I. For the first time, E-jetting has been explored as a novel scaffolding approach for tendon TE, and offers a 3D fibrous scaffold to promote organized tissue reconstruction for potential tendon healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 616-627, 2017.

  15. Microchip-Based Electrochemical Detection using a 3-D Printed Wall-Jet Electrode Device

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Akash S.; Martin, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3-D) printing technology has evolved dramatically in the last few years, offering the capability of printing objects with a variety of materials. Printing microfluidic devices using this technology offers various advantages such as ease and uniformity of fabrication, file sharing between laboratories, and increased device-to-device reproducibility. One unique aspects of this technology, when used with electrochemical detection, is the ability to produce a microfluidic device as one unit while also allowing the reuse of the device and electrode for multiple analyses. Here we present an alternate electrode configuration for microfluidic devices, a wall-jet electrode (WJE) approach, created by 3-D printing. Using microchip-based flow injection analysis, we compared the WJE design with the conventionally used thin-layer electrode (TLE) design. It was found that the optimized WJE system enhances analytical performance (as compared to the TLE design), with improvements in sensitivity and the limit of detection. Experiments were conducted using two working electrodes – 500 μm platinum and 1 mm glassy carbon. Using the 500 μm platinum electrode the calibration sensitivity was 16 times higher for the WJE device (as compared to the TLE design). In addition, use of the 1 mm glassy carbon electrode led to limit of detection of 500 nM for catechol, as compared to 6 μM for the TLE device. Finally, to demonstrate the versatility and applicability of the 3-D printed WJE approach, the device was used as an inexpensive electrochemical detector for HPLC. The number of theoretical plates was comparable to the use of commercially available UV and MS detectors, with the WJE device being inexpensive to utilize. These results show that 3D-printing can be a powerful tool to fabricate reusable and integrated microfluidic detectors in configurations that are not easily achieved with more traditional lithographic methods. PMID:26649363

  16. Microchip-based electrochemical detection using a 3-D printed wall-jet electrode device.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Akash S; Martin, R Scott

    2016-02-07

    Three dimensional (3-D) printing technology has evolved dramatically in the last few years, offering the capability of printing objects with a variety of materials. Printing microfluidic devices using this technology offers various advantages such as ease and uniformity of fabrication, file sharing between laboratories, and increased device-to-device reproducibility. One unique aspect of this technology, when used with electrochemical detection, is the ability to produce a microfluidic device as one unit while also allowing the reuse of the device and electrode for multiple analyses. Here we present an alternate electrode configuration for microfluidic devices, a wall-jet electrode (WJE) approach, created by 3-D printing. Using microchip-based flow injection analysis, we compared the WJE design with the conventionally used thin-layer electrode (TLE) design. It was found that the optimized WJE system enhances analytical performance (as compared to the TLE design), with improvements in sensitivity and the limit of detection. Experiments were conducted using two working electrodes - 500 μm platinum and 1 mm glassy carbon. Using the 500 μm platinum electrode the calibration sensitivity was 16 times higher for the WJE device (as compared to the TLE design). In addition, use of the 1 mm glassy carbon electrode led to limit of detection of 500 nM for catechol, as compared to 6 μM for the TLE device. Finally, to demonstrate the versatility and applicability of the 3-D printed WJE approach, the device was used as an inexpensive electrochemical detector for HPLC. The number of theoretical plates was comparable to the use of commercially available UV and MS detectors, with the WJE device being inexpensive to utilize. These results show that 3-D-printing can be a powerful tool to fabricate reusable and integrated microfluidic detectors in configurations that are not easily achieved with more traditional lithographic methods.

  17. Direct Write Printing on Thin and Flexible Substrates for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paquette, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the work done on direct-write printing conductive traces for a flexible detector application. A Repeatability Plan was established to define detector requirements, material and printer selections, printing facilities, and tests to verify requirements are met. Designs were created for the detector, and printed using an aerosol jet printer. Testing for requirement verification is ongoing.

  18. Fully voltage-controlled electrohydrodynamic jet printing of conductive silver tracks with a sub-100 μm linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Paine, Mark D.; Stark, John P. W.

    2009-07-01

    Silver microtracks with excellent electrical functionality were created by electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of commercial metallo-organic ink. Novel e-jet printing was performed in a fully voltage-controlled fashion. By using a 20 μm nozzle and reducing the printing distance to 50 μm, metallic tracks with a sub-100 μm linewidth were successfully achieved on Si substrates. The physical properties of the printed tracks were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrum analysis, and electrical measurements. A low resistivity in the range (2-4)×10-8 Ω m, 1.7-2.4 times of the theoretical value of silver, was obtained for the printed microtracks. A uniform fine track with a 35 μm feature size was produced by pulsed jet printing operating at low voltage, and a drop-on-demand capability of ˜7 pl/drop was estimated.

  19. In-air microfluidics: Drop and jet coalescence enables rapid multi-phase 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Kamperman, Tom; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Marcel; University of Twente Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we connect and integrate the fields of microfluidics and additive manufacturing, by presenting a unifying technology that we call In-air microfluidics (IAMF). We impact two liquid jets or a jet and a droplet train while flying in-air, and control their coalescence and solidification. This approach enables producing monodisperse emulsions, particles, and fibers with controlled shape and size (10 to 300 µm) and production rates 100x higher than droplet microfluidics. A single device is sufficient to process a variety of materials, and to produce different particle or fiber shapes, in marked contrast to current microfluidic devices or printers. In-air microfluidics also enables rapid deposition onto substrates, for example to form 3D printed (bio)materials which are partly-liquid but still shape-stable.

  20. Binder-Jet Printing of Fine Stainless Steel Powder with Varied Final Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaee, Mohsen; Tridas, Eric M.; Crane, Nathan B.

    2017-03-01

    Binder jetting is an additive manufacturing process that produces weak porous parts that are strengthened through sintering and/or infiltration. This article reports on two different methods of preparing fine 316 stainless steel powder and their impact on the final sintered density and dimensions relative to direct printing into <22 micron powder . The first method uses agglomerates of fine powder. In the second, nylon 12 powders are mixed with the steel powder as a fugitive space holder to increase porosity. Sintered density and sintering shrinkage of agglomerate material are shown to vary with the density of the spread powder bed. Nevertheless, with added nylon, the shrinkage correlates with the shrinkage of the base steel powder, whereas the density depends on the quantity of the nylon. Thus, it is possible to create varied sintered density with compatible shrinkage levels—a key step toward creating binder-jetting systems with spatially controlled porosity.

  1. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée.

  2. Guard Flow-enhanced Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Molecular Materials in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shaurjo

    Rapid advances in the research and development of organic electronics have re-sulted in many exciting discoveries and applications, including OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs. Devices based on small molecular organic materials often call for sharp interfaces and highly pure materials for improved device performance. Solvent-free deposition and additive patterning of the active layers without the use of vacuum is preferred, calling for specialized processing approaches. Guard flow-enhanced organic vapor jet printing (GF-OVJP), enables addi-tive, rapid, mask-free, solvent-free printing of molecular organic semiconductors in ambient atmosphere by evaporating organic source material into an inert carrier gas jet and collimating and impinging it onto a substrate where the organic molecules condense. A surrounding annular "guard flow" hydrodynamically focuses the primary jet carrying the hot organic vapor and shields it from contact with the ambient oxygen and moisture, enabling device-quality deposits. Deposition in air entails non-trivial effects at the boundary between ambient surroundings and the gas jet carrying the semiconductor vapor that influence the morphology and properties of the resulting electronic devices. This thesis demonstrates the deposition of active layers of OLEDs, OPVs and OTFTs by GF-OVJP in air. Process-structure-property relationships are elucidated, using a combination of film deposition and structural characterization (e.g. AFM, XRD, SEM, spectroscopies), device fabrication and testing, as well as compressible fluid flow, heat and mass transport modeling, thus laying the groundwork for rigorous, quantitative design of film deposition apparatus and small molecular organic semiconductor processing.

  3. Alignment of One-Dimensional SnO2 Lines by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hanna; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Chang-Yeoul

    2016-02-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) SnO2 line as a representative semiconducting oxide were formed by electro- hydrodynamic jet-printing (EHD) of tin chloride pentahydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 1,200 k, Aldrich) solution ink. The 1-D polymer lines including Sn precursors were created by controlling the viscosity, that is, polymer/tin precursor ratio, and adjusting printing conditions such as tip to substrate distance, applying voltage, flow rate of ink and velocity. The printed lines were dried at 200 degrees C to get rid of solvent and finally heat-treated at 600 degrees C to burn out PVP and form tin oxide line. We found out that the linearity and shape of the aligned 1-D SnO2 could be controlled by adjusting various parameters such as the viscosity of a precursor solution, the ratio of Sn to PVP polymer in the solution, the shape of a cone, the size of a droplet, the applied voltages, the working distance, the flow rate on the glass slides and the Si wafers with a SiPO2 layer, respectively. It is found out that the heat-treatment for the removal of polymers should be tailored to produce continuous 1-D SnO2 lines due to the drastic volume reduction (>90%) of the aligned fibers in the annealing process. The electrical properties of the 1-D SnO2 aligned on the Si wafers with Au electrode patterns were evaluated.

  4. Nanoscale, electrified liquid jets for high-resolution printing of charge.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Lee, Sangkyu; Unarunotai, Sakulsuk; Sun, Yugang; Dunham, Simon; Song, Taeseup; Ferreira, Placid M; Alleyene, Andrew G; Paik, Ungyu; Rogers, John A

    2010-02-10

    Nearly all research in micro- and nanofabrication focuses on the formation of solid structures of materials that perform some mechanical, electrical, optical, or related function. Fabricating patterns of charges, by contrast, is a much less well explored area that is of separate and growing interesting because the associated electric fields can be exploited to control the behavior of nanoscale electronic and mechanical devices, guide the assembly of nanomaterials, or modulate the properties of biological systems. This paper describes a versatile technique that uses fine, electrified liquid jets formed by electrohydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscale nozzles to print complex patterns of both positive and negative charges, with resolution that can extend into the submicrometer and nanometer regime. The reported results establish the basic aspects of this process and demonstrate the capabilities through printed patterns with diverse geometries and charge configurations in a variety of liquid inks, including suspensions of nanoparticles and nanowires. The use of printed charge to control the properties of silicon nanomembrane transistors provides an application example.

  5. Biomolecule storage on non-modified thermoplastic microfluidic chip by ink-jet printing of ionogels

    PubMed Central

    Tijero, M.; Díez-Ahedo, R.; Benito-Lopez, F.; Basabe-Desmonts, L.; Castro-López, V.; Valero, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an innovative technique for reagents storage in microfluidic devices by means of a one-step UV-photoprintable ionogel-based microarray on non-modified polymeric substrates. Although the ionogel and the ink-jet printing technology are well published, this is the first study where both are used for long-term reagent storage in lab-on-a-chip devices. This technology for reagent storage is perfectly compatible with mass production fabrication processes since pre-treatment of the device substrate is not necessary and inkjet printing allows for an efficient reagent deposition process. The functionality of this microarray is demonstrated by testing the release of biotin-647 after being stored for 1 month at room temperature. Analysis of the fluorescence of the ionogel-based microarray that contains biotin-647 demonstrated that 90% of the biotin-647 present was released from the ionogel-based microarray after pumping PBS 0.1% Tween at 37 °C. Moreover, the activity of biotin-647 after being released from the ionogel-based microarray was investigated trough the binding capability of this biotin to a microcontact printed chip surface with avidin. These findings pave the way for a novel, one-step, cheap and mass production on-chip reagents storage method applicable to other reagents such as antibodies and proteins and enzymes. PMID:26339323

  6. Pyro-EHD ink-jet printing for direct functionalization of 3D lab-on-chip devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Vespini, V.; Bianco, V.; Mecozzi, L.; Olivieri, F.; Todino, M.; Paturzo, M.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    A challenging request in the fabrication of microfluidics and biomedical microsystems is a flexible ink-jet printing for breaking the rigidity of classical lithography. A pyroelectric-EHD system is presented. The system has proved challenging spatial resolution down to nanoscale, printing of high ordered patterns, capability of dispensing bio-ink as DNA and protein array for biosensing fabrication, single cells printing and direct printing of nanoparticles. With the method proposed high viscous polymers could be easily printed at high resolution in 2D or in 3D configuration. The pyro-EHD process has been proved for the fabrication of biodegradable microneedles for trasndermal drug delivery and 3D optical waveguides.

  7. Aerosol spectral optical depths: Jet fuel and forest fire smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Livingston, J. M.

    1990-12-01

    The Ames autotracking airborne sun photometer was used to investigate the spectral optical depth between 380 and 1020 nm of smokes from a jet fuel pool fire and a forest fire in May and August 1988, respectively. Results show that the forest fire smoke exhibited a stronger wavelength dependence of optical depths than did the jet fuel fire smoke at optical depths less than unity. At optical depths greater than or equal to 1, both smokes showed neutral wavelength dependence, similar to that of an optically thin stratus deck. These results verify findings of earlier investigations and have implications both on the climatic impact of large-scale smokes and on the wavelength-dependent transmission of electromagnetic signals.

  8. Comparison of jet and ultrasonic nebulizer pulmonary aerosol deposition during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C J; O'Doherty, M J; Page, C J; Thomas, S H; Nunan, T O; Treacher, D F

    1997-04-01

    Increased delivery of aerosol to a model lung (attached to a mechanical ventilator) has been demonstrated with an ultrasonic nebulizer as compared to a jet nebulizer. This study examined whether the increased aerosol deposition with an ultrasonic nebulizer could also be demonstrated in vivo. Seven patients (6 male and 1 female) were studied during mechanical ventilalion (Siemens Servo 900C, Middlesex, UK) after open heart surgery. Two studies were performed in each patient. In the first study, aerosol was delivered via a Siemens Servo 945 nebulizer system (high setting) driving a System 22 Acorn jet nebulizer (Medic-Aid, Sussex, UK) containing 3 mL (99m)technetium-labelled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) (50 microg; activity 74 MBq). In the second study, a DP100 ultrasonic nebulizer (DP Medical, Meylan, France) containing 12 mL 99mTc-HSA (50 microg; activity 185 MBq) was used. Pulmonary deposition was quantified using a gamma camera. The humidification of the circuit and the ventilator settings were kept constant according to the patient's clinical requirements. The total lung aerosol deposition (mean+/-SD), as a percentage of initial nebulizer activity, was greater using the ultrasonic nebulizer than using the jet nebulizer (53+/-1.4 vs 2.3+/-0.9%; p<0.002). The ultrasonic nebulizer was also associated with a reduction in the time required to complete nebulization (9 vs 21 min, respectively) (p<0.0001). Use of the DP100 ultrasonic nebulizer more than doubled lung deposition compared with the System 22 jet nebulizers in mechanically-ventilated patients. Their efficiency, speed of drug delivery, and compatibility with mechanical ventilator circuits make ultrasonic nebulizers potentially attractive for use during mechanical ventilation.

  9. Ink Jet Printing for Silicon Photovoltaics: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-00139

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D. S.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to combine the strengths of NREL and Evergreen Solar in the area of ink jet printing to develop a new manufacturing technology necessary to produce Si solar cells based on ribbon technology comparable to or exceeding current technologies.

  10. Brief data overview of differently heat treated binder jet printed samples made from argon atomized alloy 625 powder.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, Amir; Behnamian, Yashar; Krimer, Yuval L; Stevens, Erica L; Luo, Jing Li; Chmielus, Markus

    2016-12-01

    Powder bed binder jet printing (BJP) is an additive manufacturing method in which powder is deposited layer-by-layer and selectively joined in each layer with binder. The data presented here relates to the characterization of the as-received feedstock powder, BJP processing parameters, sample preparation and sintering profile ("Effect of solutionizing and aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder bed binder jet printed nickel-based superalloy 625" (A. Mostafaei, Y. Behnamian, Y.L. Krimer, E.L. Stevens, J.L. Luo, M. Chmielus, 2016) [1], "Powder bed binder jet printed alloy 625: densification, microstructure and mechanical properties" (A. Mostafaei, E. Stevens, E. Hughes, S. Biery, C. Hilla, M. Chmielus, 2016) [2]). The data presented here relates to the characterization of the as-received feedstock powder, BJP processing parameters, sample preparation and sintering profile. Effect of post heat treatments including solutionizing and aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder bed binder jet printed nickel-based superalloy 625 were compared to that of sintered samples.

  11. Supersonic jet deposition of silver nanoparticle aerosols: Correlations of impact conditions and film morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chong; Nichols, William T.; O'Brien, Daniel T.; Becker, Michael F.; Kovar, Desiderio; Keto, John W.

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments and modeling for the deposition of silver lines and films via the impaction of a silver nanoparticle aerosol delivered through a supersonic jet. The aerosol gas dynamics of the jet flow field, nanoparticle acceleration in the jet, and deposition by impaction onto the substrate were modeled for both a flat-plate nozzle and for a conical nozzle designed to obtain higher impaction velocities. We modeled nanoparticle dynamics for He, Ar, and N{sub 2} gasses, all initially at room temperature and 1 atm pressure, flowing through a 250 {mu}m orifice into vacuum with a pressure ratio of {approx}5000. Experiments were conducted to deposit silver nanoparticle aerosols under the same conditions as were modeled. The silver nanoparticles were generated by laser ablation of a flowing microparticle aerosol entrained in either He or Ar that produced nanoparticles 5-10 and 15-20 nm in diameter, respectively. Deposition was made onto an unheated substrate in vacuum. The morphology of the deposited films was determined by scanning electron microscope cross-section images and crystallite size was determined by x-ray diffraction analysis. The morphological features and crystallite size were correlated with the nanoparticle impaction velocity and impaction energy derived from the model. We found that, for a given gas type, the size of the grains and morphological features within the impacted films were similar to the size of the nanoparticles from which the films were formed. The density and the degree of consolidation of the films were highly dependent on the nanoparticle impaction velocity/energy and were highest for helium. Control of film morphology, grain size, and film density during supersonic impaction of nanoparticle aerosols are discussed in light of these results.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic micropatterning of silver ink using near-field electrohydrodynamic jet printing with tilted-outlet nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Yang, Yong-Suk; Lim, Sang-Chul; Kim, Seong-Jin; Ahn, Su-Han; Sim, Hyo-Sun; Ryu, Seung-Myoung; Shin, Dong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2009-09-01

    This paper introduces for the first time near-field electrohydrodynamic jet printing with tilted-outlet nozzle to obtain the fine and highly conductive patterns of silver (Ag) ink. Line widths produced by near-field electrohydrodynamic jet printing are less than 6 μm, which is approximately twenty times smaller than that of inkjet printing. Under optimized Ag ink annealing ranges 3-9 min for 30 wt% at 150°C, we observed Ag line pattern resistivities as low as 7×10-6 Ωṡcm. Ag ink conduction mechanisms were brought to light from microstructure analysis and post-thermal-annealing examination of electrical characteristics.

  13. Effect of Complex Agent on Characteristics of Copper Conductive Pattern Formed by Ink-jet Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-In; Lee, Kun-Jae; Goo, Yong-Sung; Kim, Nam-Woo; Byun, Younghoon; Kim, Joong-Do; Yoo, Bongyoung; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2010-08-01

    In this study, Cu ion complex ink was successfully synthesized by a modified electrolysis method in which the Cu ions generated from bulk metal plates by an electric field were coordinated with complex agents. The synthesized ink was ink-jet-printed on a flexible substrate and converted to a dense Cu pattern after sintering at 250 °C. The pattern was characterized by X-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscope, and four-point probe method to confirm the crystal structure, microstructure, and electrical conductivity, respectively. The effect of the type of complex agent on the characteristics of a Cu conductive pattern was also determined using the analysis results. Finally, we conducted the direct writing of conductive dots and lines using the Cu ion complex ink, and confirmed that fine patterning for application in electronics is possible with the Cu ion complex ink.

  14. Fabrication of terahertz metamaterial with high refractive index using high-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teguh Yudistira, Hadi; Pradhipta Tenggara, Ayodya; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Teun Kim, Teun; Dian Prasetyo, Fariza; Choi, Choon-gi; Choi, Muhan; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-11-01

    Metamaterial is an engineered material whose electromagnetic properties can be determined by the unit structure. Lithography is one of main methods to fabricate metamaterials for fine patterning which has limitations in large-area fabrication. We present a direct fabrication method for metamaterial using the electrohydrodynamic jet printing. An electrical pulse was controlled to make drop-on-demand operation, through which flexible high refractive-index metamaterial could be fabricated in the form of I-shaped silver electrodes with 10-μm widths and 5-μm gaps on polyimide substrate. The peak value of the refractive index was 18.4 at a frequency of around 0.48 THz.

  15. Formation of Ceramic Nanoparticle Patterns Using Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printing with Pin-to-Pin Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Young; Yu, Jae-Hun; Shin, Yun-Soo; Park, Dongho; Yu, Tae-U.; Hwang, Jungho

    2008-03-01

    As one of the direct write technologies, electrohydrodynamic jet printing was used in obtaining fine ceramic lines. We used pin electrodes of various diameters, each of which was located below the substrate, and analyzed the effects of pin diameter on Al2O3 nanoparticle one- and two-dimensional patterns formed with pin (nozzle)-to-pin (ground) electrodes. The onset voltage required to start the formation of a pattern for a 1-µm-diameter electrode was fourfold lower than the voltage required for a 1000-µm-diameter electrode. Additionally, an Al2O3 nanoparticle pattern with a uniform width as fine as 25 µm was obtained despite using the very large diameter of the nozzle (920 µm) used.

  16. Direct printing of patterned three-dimensional ultrafine fibrous scaffolds by stable jet electrospinning for cellular ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huihua; Zhou, Qihui; Li, Biyun; Bao, Min; Lou, Xiangxin; Zhang, Yanzhong

    2015-11-05

    Electrospinning has been widely used to produce ultrafine fibers in microscale and nanoscale; however, traditional electrospinning processes are currently beset by troublesome limitations in fabrication of 3D periodic porous structures because of the chaotic nature of the electrospinning jet. Here we report a novel strategy to print 3D poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) ultrafine fibrous scaffolds with the fiber diameter of approximately 2 μm by combining a stable jet electrospinning method and an X-Y stage technique. Our approach allows linearly deposited electrospun ultrafine fibers to assemble into 3D structures with tunable pore sizes and desired patterns. Process conditions (e.g., plotting speed, feeding rate, and collecting distance) were investigated in order to achieve stable jet printing of ultrafine PLLA fibers. The proposed 3D scaffold was successfully used for cell penetration and growth, demonstrating great potential for tissue engineering applications.

  17. Block copolymer assembly on nanoscale patterns of polymer brushes formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Onses, M Serdar; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Hur, Su-Mi; Sutanto, Erick; Williamson, Lance; Alleyne, Andrew G; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J; Rogers, John A

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental understanding of the self-assembly of domains in block copolymers (BCPs) and capabilities in control of these processes are important for their use as nanoscale templates in various applications. This paper focuses on the self-assembly of spin-cast and printed poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) BCPs on patterned surface wetting layers formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing of random copolymer brushes. Here, end-grafted brushes that present groups of styrene and methyl methacrylate in geometries with nanoscale resolution deterministically define the morphologies of BCP nanostructures. The materials and methods can also be integrated with lithographically defined templates for directed self-assembly of BCPs at multiple length scales. The results provide not only engineering routes to controlled formation of complex patterns but also vehicles for experimental and simulation studies of the effects of chemical transitions on the processes of self-assembly. In particular, we show that the methodology developed here provides the means to explore exotic phenomena displayed by the wetting behavior of BCPs, where 3-D soft confinement, chain elasticity, interfacial energies, and substrate's surface energy cooperate to yield nonclassical wetting behavior.

  18. Highly selective creation of hydrophilic micro-craters on super hydrophobic surface using electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Hwang, Sangyeon; Prasetyo, Fariza Dian; Nguyen, Vu Dat; Hong, Jungwoo; Shin, Jennifer H.; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-11-01

    Selective surface modification is considered as an alternative to conventional printing techniques in high resolution patterning. Here, we present fabrication of hydrophilic patterns on the super hydrophobic surface, which makes structure on the hydrophilic region. The super hydrophobic surface is able to be chemically changed to hydrophilic with alcohols. As a consecutive process, electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was utilized to fabricate local hydrophilic craters with 30-200 μm sizes. 3 kinds of target liquids were deposited well on hydrophilic region; PEDOT (poly 3,4 ethylenediocythiophene), polystyrene nano-particles, and salmonella bacteria medium. Additionally, qualitative analysis were presented for modification mechanism and surface properties on super hydrophobic/hydrophilic by analysis of surface energy with contact angle, SEM (scanning electron microscopy) image, and SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) analysis. This new simple modification method provides possibility to be utilizing in bio-patterning engineering such as cell culturing microchip and lab on a chip. This research was supported by the Basi Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grand Number: 2014-023284).

  19. Fabrication of terahertz metamaterials using electrohydrodynamic jet printing for sensitive detection of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhipta Tenggara, Ayodya; Park, S. J.; Teguh Yudistira, Hadi; Ahn, Y. H.; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of terahertz metamaterial sensor for the accurate and on-site detection of yeast using electrohydrodynamic jet printing, which is inexpensive, simple, and environmentally friendly. The very small sized pattern up to 5 µm-width of electrical split ring resonator unit structures could be printed on a large area on both a rigid substrate and flexible substrate, i.e. silicon wafer and polyimide film using the drop on demand technique to eject liquid ink containing silver nanoparticles. Experimental characterization and simulation were performed to study their performances in detecting yeast of different weights. It was shown that the metamaterial sensor fabricated on a flexible polyimide film had higher sensitivity by more than six times than the metamaterial sensor fabricated on a silicon wafer, due to the low refractive index of the PI substrate and due to the extremely thin substrate thickness which lowers the effective index further. The resonance frequency shift saturated when the yeast weights were 145 µg and 215 µg for metamaterial structures with gap size 6.5 µm fabricated on the silicon substrate and on the polyimide substrate, respectively.

  20. Directly drawn poly(3-hexylthiophene) field-effect transistors by electrohydrodynamic jet printing: improving performance with surface modification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Jin; Lee, Hyungdong; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Park, Seonuk; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Choong, Chwee-Lin; Park, Jong-Jin; Park, Chan Eon; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-07-09

    In this study, direct micropatterning lines of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) without any polymer binder were prepared by electrohydrodynamic jet printing to form organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). We controlled the dielectric surface by introducing self-assembled monolayers and polymer thin films to investigate the effect of surface modifications on the characteristics of printed P3HT lines and electrical performances of the OFETs. The morphology of the printed P3HT lines depended on the surface energy and type of substrate. The resulting OFETs exhibited high performance on octadecyltrichlorosilane-modified substrates, which was comparable to that of other printed P3HT OFETs. In order to realize the commercialization of the OFETs, we also fabricated a large-area transistor array, including 100 OFETs and low-operating-voltage flexible OFETs.

  1. Design and evaluation of a silicon based multi-nozzle for addressable jetting using a controlled flow rate in electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Sung; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Young-Jae; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Yong; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2008-12-01

    This letter reports on the development and evaluation of a electrohydrodynamic jet printing that uses an addressable multinozzle. To reduce the interference and distortion in the electric field, a multinozzle was fabricated from a silicon wafer. The experimental conditions were optimized to prevent the jet from bending at the end of the multinozzle and to allow for independent control of each nozzle. To better evaluate this technique, simulations were performed and compared with the experimental results. We observed a strong correlation between the simulated and experimental results. In addition, each nozzle in this multinozzle could be individually controlled.

  2. Rapid 3D Printing of Multifunctional Calcium Alginate Gel Pipes using Coaxial Jet Extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Damle, Viraj

    2014-11-01

    Calcium alginate (CA) forms when solution containing sodium alginate (SA) comes in contact with a CaCl2 solution. The resulting gel is biocompatible as well as edible and is used in production of bio-scaffolds, artificial plant seeds, and edible substances. In the latter application, referred to in the culinary world as ``spherification,'' flavored liquids are mixed with the SA and dripped into CaCl2 solution to form gel encapsulated flavored ``marbles.'' Previously, crude 3D printing of CA structures has been achieved by stacking of such flavored liquid filled marbles. In turn, solid CA rods have been fabricated by properly mixing flow of the two solutions using a microfluidic device. Here we show that by using two circular cross-section coaxial nozzles to produce coaxial jets of the SA and CaCl2 solutions, liquid filled CA micro-to-mili scale gel pipes can be produced at speeds around ~ 150 mm/s. Such extrusion rate is compatible with most commercially available 3D printers, facilitating adoption of the CA pipe coaxial jet extruder. Here, the impact of inner and outer liquid properties and flow speeds on the gel pipe extrusion process is discussed. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  3. Stratospheric dynamics and midlatitude jets under geoengineering with space mirrors and sulfate and titania aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, A. J.; Charlton-Perez, A. J.; Highwood, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact on the dynamics of the stratosphere of three approaches to geoengineering by solar radiation management is investigated using idealized simulations of a global climate model. The approaches are geoengineering with sulfate aerosols, titania aerosols, and reduction in total solar irradiance (representing mirrors placed in space). If it were possible to use stratospheric aerosols to counterbalance the surface warming produced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, tropical lower stratospheric radiative heating would drive a thermal wind response which would intensify the stratospheric polar vortices. In the Northern Hemisphere this intensification results in strong dynamical cooling of the polar stratosphere. Northern Hemisphere stratospheric sudden warming events become rare (one and two in 65 years for sulfate and titania, respectively). The intensification of the polar vortices results in a poleward shift of the tropospheric midlatitude jets in winter. The aerosol radiative heating enhances the tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere, influencing the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation. In contrast, solar dimming does not produce heating of the tropical lower stratosphere, and so there is little intensification of the polar vortex and no enhanced tropical upwelling. The dynamical response to titania aerosol is qualitatively similar to the response to sulfate.

  4. Ultrasonic and jet aerosolization of phospholipids and the effects on surface activity.

    PubMed

    Marks, L B; Notter, R H; Oberdorster, G; McBride, J T

    1983-09-01

    Surface active aerosols were produced from aqueous dispersions of mixed lipids (CLL), extracted from bovine lung lavage. Particle size distributions were measured as a function of humidity for two types of aerosol generators: ultrasonic and jet. Lipid dispersions before aerosolization were prepared by sonication in an ice bath and by mechanical vortexing. Over a range of high humidity greater than 60-70%, ultrasonic nebulization gave CLL aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of 1.4 +/- 0.1 micron, compatible with predicted alveolar deposition fractions of 0.2-0.3 according to current deposition models. For humidities of 30-95%, jet nebulization gave MMAD values of 0.4-0.5 micron, which have lower predicted alveolar deposition. The surface pressure-time (pi - t) adsorption characteristics at 35 +/- 2 degrees C of CLL dispersions prepared initially by vortexing or sonication were not significantly affected by ultrasonic nebulization over a 1-2 h time period. In addition, the dynamic surface tension lowering of both kinds of CLL dispersion was not affected by ultrasonic nebulization (minimum surface tension less than 1 dyne/cm at 37 degrees C and 100% humidity). Current interest in the treatment of the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant replacement has focused largely on the delivery of surfactant replacement has focused largely on h delivery of surfactants to infants by tracheal instillation at birth. However, the ability to form multi-component surfactant aerosols with appreciable alveolar deposition fractions and high surface activity may help to expand the utility of replacement therapy to patients with aerated lungs.

  5. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or shaped

  6. Drop-on-demand hybrid printing using a piezoelectric MEMS printhead at various waveforms, high voltages and jetting frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Sangjin; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, electrohydrodynamic jetting is investigated in order to print ultra-fine dots and lines in drop-on-demand (DOD) mode, using micro-electromechanical system-based printhead with a piezoelectric actuator. In such hybrid system, jetting ultra-fine droplets in DOD mode, without applying an extremely high-voltage pulse, is possible as the meniscus is first disturbed by a piezoelectric actuator and the droplet is ejected by the applied electric field. As the amplitude of the drive waveform of the piezoelectric actuator is varied, droplets with volumes of 3.4 to 46.8 pL are realized. As the amplitude of the electric field is increased, the ejected droplets lengthen and at 8 kV, thin elliptical dots are printed. Although changing the jetting frequency from 0.1 to 2.0 kHz resulted in volume reduction from 9.4 pL down to 2.9 pL, the DOD characteristic is well maintained throughout. Such hybrid jetting characteristics enable the generation of diverse patterns in the printed electronics area.

  7. Detecting the Spur Marks of Ink-Jet Printed Documents Using a Multiband Scanner in NIR Mode and Image Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi

    Ink-jet printers are frequently used in crime such as counterfeiting bank notes, driving licenses, and identification cards. Police investigators required us to identify makers or brands of ink-jet printers from counterfeits. In such demands, classifying ink-jet printers according to spur marks which were made by spur gears located in front of print heads for paper feed has been addressed by document examiners. However, spur marks are significantly faint so that it is difficult to detect them. In this study, we propose the new method for detecting spur marks using a multiband scanner in near infrared (NIR) mode and estimations of point spread function (PSF). As estimating PSF we used cepstrum which is inverse Fourier transform of logarithm spectrum. The proposed method provided the clear image of the spur marks.

  8. Non-Contact Printed Aluminum Metallization of Si Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, H. A. S.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Li, Y.; Novak, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    Alternative solution-based techniques such as aerosol jet printing offer the dual benefits of contactless pattern deposition and high material utilization. We have used aerosol jet printing to investigate non-contact printed Al metal ink as a replacement for screen printed Al back contacts on wafer Si solar cells. This particle-based ink can be prepared at high loadings of 60 weight % metal, which enables rapid deposition of 1 - 10 um thick lines. Al lines printed on Si wafers and heated between 550 and 800 degrees C form low resistance contacts suitable for current extraction. The effectiveness of these printed Al back contacts has further been demonstrated by incorporating them into a series of 21 cm2 crystalline Si solar cells that produced a champion power conversion efficiency of 13%.

  9. Binder-jetting 3D printing and alloy development of new biodegradable Fe-Mn-Ca/Mg alloys.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daeho; Chou, Da-Tren; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun; Swink, Isaac; Issaev, Ilona; Kuhn, Howard A; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-11-01

    3D printing of various biomaterials including titanium and stainless steel has been studied for treating patients with cranio-maxillofacial bone defect. The potential long term complications with use of inert biometals have opened the opportunities for use of biodegradable metals in the clinical arena. The authors previously reported that binder-jet 3D printing technique enhanced the degradation rates of biodegradable Fe-Mn alloy by creating engineered micropores rendering the system attractive as biodegradable implantable devices. In the present study, the authors employed CALPHAD modeling to systematically study and modify the Fe-Mn alloy composition to achieve enhanced degradation rates. Accordingly, Ca and Mg addition to Fe-35wt% Mn solid solution predicted increase in degradation rates. In order to validate the CALPHAD results, Fe - (35-y)wt% Mn - ywt% X (X=Ca, Mg, and y=0, 1, 2) were synthesized by using high energy mechanical alloying (HEMA). Sintered pellets of Fe-Mn-Ca and Fe-Mn-Mg were then subjected to potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and live/dead cell viability tests. Sintered pellets of Fe-Mn, Fe-Mn-Ca, and Fe-Mn-Mg also exhibited MC3T3 murine pre-osteoblast cells viability in the live/dead assay results. Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-1Ca were thus accordingly selected for 3D printing and the results further confirmed enhanced degradation of Ca addition to 3D printed constructs validating the theoretical and alloy development studies. Live/dead and MTT cell viability results also confirmed good cytocompatibility of the 3D-printed Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-1Ca constructs.

  10. Controlled deposition of a high-performance small-molecule organic single-crystal transistor array by direct ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Byungwook; Anthony, John E; Park, Sung Kyu

    2012-01-24

    Ink-jet printed small-molecule organic single-crystal transistors are realized by using selective surface energy modification, precise control of volume density of ink droplets on spatially patterned areas, and a co-solvent system to control solvent evaporation properties. The single-crystal formation in bottom-contact-structured transistors via direct printing is expected to permit high-density array fabrication in large-area electronics.

  11. Hierarchical patterns of three-dimensional block-copolymer films formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing and self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onses, M. Serdar; Song, Chiho; Williamson, Lance; Sutanto, Erick; Ferreira, Placid M.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Nealey, Paul F.; Ahn, Heejoon; Rogers, John A.

    2013-09-01

    Self-assembly of block-copolymers provides a route to the fabrication of small (size, <50 nm) and dense (pitch, <100 nm) features with an accuracy that approaches even the demanding specifications for nanomanufacturing set by the semiconductor industry. A key requirement for practical applications, however, is a rapid, high-resolution method for patterning block-copolymers with different molecular weights and compositions across a wafer surface, with complex geometries and diverse feature sizes. Here we demonstrate that an ultrahigh-resolution jet printing technique that exploits electrohydrodynamic effects can pattern large areas with block-copolymers based on poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) with various molecular weights and compositions. The printed geometries have diameters and linewidths in the sub-500 nm range, line edge roughness as small as ~45 nm, and thickness uniformity and repeatability that can approach molecular length scales (~2 nm). Upon thermal annealing on bare, or chemically or topographically structured substrates, such printed patterns yield nanodomains of block-copolymers with well-defined sizes, periodicities and morphologies, in overall layouts that span dimensions from the scale of nanometres (with sizes continuously tunable between 13 nm and 20 nm) to centimetres. As well as its engineering relevance, this methodology enables systematic studies of unusual behaviours of block-copolymers in geometrically confined films.

  12. Hierarchical patterns of three-dimensional block-copolymer films formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Onses, M Serdar; Song, Chiho; Williamson, Lance; Sutanto, Erick; Ferreira, Placid M; Alleyne, Andrew G; Nealey, Paul F; Ahn, Heejoon; Rogers, John A

    2013-09-01

    Self-assembly of block-copolymers provides a route to the fabrication of small (size, <50 nm) and dense (pitch, <100 nm) features with an accuracy that approaches even the demanding specifications for nanomanufacturing set by the semiconductor industry. A key requirement for practical applications, however, is a rapid, high-resolution method for patterning block-copolymers with different molecular weights and compositions across a wafer surface, with complex geometries and diverse feature sizes. Here we demonstrate that an ultrahigh-resolution jet printing technique that exploits electrohydrodynamic effects can pattern large areas with block-copolymers based on poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) with various molecular weights and compositions. The printed geometries have diameters and linewidths in the sub-500 nm range, line edge roughness as small as ∼45 nm, and thickness uniformity and repeatability that can approach molecular length scales (∼2 nm). Upon thermal annealing on bare, or chemically or topographically structured substrates, such printed patterns yield nanodomains of block-copolymers with well-defined sizes, periodicities and morphologies, in overall layouts that span dimensions from the scale of nanometres (with sizes continuously tunable between 13 nm and 20 nm) to centimetres. As well as its engineering relevance, this methodology enables systematic studies of unusual behaviours of block-copolymers in geometrically confined films.

  13. Engineering chemically exfoliated dispersions of two-dimensional graphite and molybdenum disulphide for ink-jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Monica; Desai, Jay A.; Biswas, Chandan; Kaul, Anupama B.

    2016-12-01

    Stable ink dispersions of two-dimensional-layered-materials (2DLMs) MoS2 and graphite are successfully obtained in organic solvents exhibiting a wide range of polarities and surface energies. The role of sonication time, ink viscosity and surface tension is explored in the context of dispersion stability using these solvents, which include N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMA), dimethylformamide (DMF), Cyclohexanone (C), as well as less-toxic and more environmentally friendly Isopropanol (IPA) and Terpineol (T). The ink viscosity is engineered through the addition of Ethyl-Cellulose (EC) which has been shown to optimize the jettability of the dispersions. In contrast to prior work, the addition of EC after sonication—instead of prior to it—is noted to be effective in generating a high-density dispersion, yielding a uniform film morphology. High-quality inks are obtained using C/T and NMP as solvents for MoS2 and graphite, respectively, as gauged through optical absorption spectroscopy. Electronic transport data on the solution-cast inks is gathered at room temperature. Arrays of 2D graphite-rod based inks are printed on rigid Si, as well as flexible and transparent polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. The results clearly show the promise of ink-jet printing for casting 2DLMs into hierarchically assembled structures over a range of substrates for flexible and printed-electronics applications.

  14. Ink-jet printing technology enables self-aligned mould patterning for electroplating in a single step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, M. V.; Spengler, N.; Mager, D.; Wang, N.; Kiss, S. Z.; Höfflin, J.; While, P. T.; Korvink, J. G.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new self-aligned, mask-free micro-fabrication method with which to form thick-layered conductive metal micro-structures inside electroplating moulds. Seed layer patterning for electroplating was performed by ink-jet printing using a silver nano-particle ink deposited on SU-8 or Ordyl SY permanent resist. The silver ink contact angle on SU-8 was adjusted by oxygen plasma followed by a hard bake. Besides functioning as a seed layer, the printed structures further served as a shadow mask during patterning of electroplating moulds into negative photoresist. The printed silver tracks remained in strong adhesion to the substrate when exposed to the acidic chemistry of the electroplating bath. To demonstrate the process, we manufactured rectangular, low-resistivity planar micro-coils for use in magnetic resonance microscopy. MRI images of a spring onion with an in-plane resolution down to 10 µm × 10 µm were acquired using a micro-coil on an 11.7 T MRI scanner.

  15. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO II jet stream cirrus case study: Possible influences of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Starr, David O'C.; Mace, Gerald G.; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1995-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 Project First ISCCP Region Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Fields Observation (IFO) II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols friom the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cloud-forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper-level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600/L), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 and -50 C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and usual (nonvolcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  16. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO 2 jet stream cirrus case study: The influence of volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1993-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, KS, during the 5-6 Dec. 1992 Project FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur-based particles that became effective cirrus cloud-forming nuclei. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded within the upper level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol-enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600 l(sup -1), small but complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 to -50 C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects, and usual (non-volcanic aerosol) jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  17. The 5-6 December 1991 FIRE IFO 2 Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Starr, David OC.; Mace, Gerald G.; Poellot, Michael R.; Melfi, S. H.; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hagen, Donald E.; Hallett, John

    1996-01-01

    In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5-6 December 1992 First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) intensive field observation (IFO) case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols from the June 1991 Pinatubo eruptions may have significantly influenced the formation and maintenance of the cirrus. Following the local appearance of a spur of stratospheric volcanic debris from the subtropics, a series of jet streaks subsequently conditioned the troposphere through tropopause foldings with sulfur based particles that became effective cloud forming nuclei in cirrus clouds. Aerosol and ozone measurements suggest a complicated history of stratospheric-tropospheric exchanges embedded with the upper level flow, and cirrus cloud formation was noted to occur locally at the boundaries of stratospheric aerosol enriched layers that became humidified through diffusion, precipitation, or advective processes. Apparent cirrus cloud alterations include abnormally high ice crystal concentrations (up to approximately 600 L(exp. 1)), complex radial ice crystal types, and relatively large haze particles in cirrus uncinus cell heads at temperatures between -40 and -50 degrees C. Implications for volcanic-cirrus cloud climate effects and unusual (nonvolcanic) aerosol jet stream cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  18. Printing artificial sweat using ink jet printers for the test set generation in forensics: an image quality assessment of the reproducibility of the printing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Sturm, Jennifer; Dittmann, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In order to use scientific expert evidence in court hearings, several criteria must be met. In the US jurisdiction the Daubert decision2 has defined several criteria that might be assessed if a testimony is challenged. In particular the potential for testing or actual testing, as well as known or potential error rate are two very important criteria. In order to be able to compare the results with each other, the reproducible creation of evaluation samples is necessary. However, each latent fingerprint is unique due to external inuence factors such as sweat composition or pressure during the application of a trace. Hence, Schwarz1 introduces a method to print latent fingerprints using ink jet printers equipped with artificial sweat. In this paper we assess the image quality in terms of reproducibility and clarity of the printed artificial sweat patterns. For that, we determine the intra class variance from one printer on the same and on different substrates based on a subjective assessment, as well as the inter class variance between different printers of the same model using pattern recognition techniques. Our results indicate that the intra class variance is primarily inuenced by the drying behavior of the amino acid. The inter class is surprisingly large between identical models of one printer. Our evaluation is performed using 100 samples on an overhead foil and 50 samples on a compact disk surface with 5 different patterns (two line structures, a fingerprint image and two di_erent arrows with a larger area with amino acid) acquired with a Keyence VK-X110 laser scanning confocal microscope.11 The results show a significant difference between the two identical printers allowing for differentiating between them with an accuracy of up to 99%.

  19. Printing silicone-based hydrophobic barriers on paper for microfluidic assays using low-cost ink jet printers.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, Vinodh; Sicard, Clémence; Brennan, John D; Brook, Michael A

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based microfluidic devices exhibit many advantages for biological assays. Normally, the assays are restricted to certain areas of the paper by hydrophobic barriers comprised of wax or alkyl ketene dimers (AKD). Neither hydrophobic barrier is able to constrain aqueous solutions of surfactants, which are frequently used in biological assays. We demonstrate that rapidly curing silicone resins can be inkjet printed onto pure cellulose paper using inexpensive thermal ink-jet printers. The Piers-Rubinsztajn (PR) reaction dominates the cure chemistry leading to cellulose fibers that are surface coated with a silicone resin. The resulting barriers are able to resist penetration by surfactant solutions and even by the lower surface energy solvents DMF and DMSO. The utility of the barrier was demonstrated using a coliform assay based on detection of β-galactosidase.

  20. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing for the direct fabrication of 3D multilayer terahertz metamaterial of high refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teguh Yudistira, Hadi; Pradhipta Tenggara, Ayodya; Oh, Sang Soon; Nguyen, VuDat; Choi, Muhan; Choi, Choon-gi; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-01

    The fabrication of 3D metamaterials, such as multilayer structures, is of great interest in practical applications of the metamaterial. Here we present an electrohydrodynamic jet printing technique as a direct fabrication method of 3D multilayer metamaterial. By alignment of the nozzle movement, we could fabricate multiple layers of the metamaterial. Controlling an electrical pulse to make droplets on-demand, we fabricated a high refractive index metamaterial and compared the optical performances of a single layer and multiple layers, with 10 µm width and 5 µm gap of I-shaped meta-atoms on the polyimide substrate. The peak refractive index was 25.7 at 0.46 THz for a four-layer metamaterial.

  1. Utilization of calcium carbonate particles from eggshell waste as coating pigments for ink-jet printing paper.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sukjoon; Hsieh, Jeffery S; Zou, Peter; Kokoszka, John

    2009-12-01

    The effective treatment and utilization of biowaste have been emphasized in our society for environmental and economic concerns. Recently, the eggshell waste in the poultry industry has been highlighted because of its reclamation potential. This study presents an economical treatment process to recover useful bioproducts from eggshell waste and their utilization in commercial products. We developed the dissolved air floatation (DAF) separation unit, which successfully recovered 96% of eggshell membrane and 99% of eggshell calcium carbonate (ECC) particles from eggshell waste within 2 h of operation. The recovered ECC particles were utilized as coating pigments for ink-jet printing paper and their impact on the ink density and paper gloss were investigated. The addition of the ECC particles as coating pigments enhances the optical density of cyan, magenta and yellow inks while decreasing the black ink density and the gloss of the coated paper.

  2. Synthesis of one-dimensional SnO2 lines by using electrohydrodynamic jet printing for a NO gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Yeoul; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Hannah; Choi, Duck-kyun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) SnO2 lines as a representative semiconducting oxide were formed by using electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet-printing of a tin chloride pentahydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, 1,200k, Aldrich) solution ink. The 1-D polymer lines, including Sn precursors, were created by controlling the viscosity, that is, the polymer/tin precursor ratio, and by adjusting printing conditions such as the tip-to-substrate distance, the applied voltage, the flow rate of ink and its velocity. The printed lines were dried at 200 °C to get rid of solvent and were finally heat-treated at 600 °C to burn out PVP and form a tin oxide line. We found that the linearity and the shape of the aligned 1-D SnO2 could be controlled by adjusting various parameters such as the viscosity of the precursor solution, the ratio of Sn to the PVP polymer in the solution, the shape of the cone, the size of a droplet, the applied voltage, the working distance, and the flow rate on glass slides and Si wafers with a SiO2 layer. We found that the heat treatment for removal of the polymers should be tailored to produce continuous 1-D SnO2 lines due to the drastic volume reduction (> 90%) of the aligned fibers during the annealing process. The electrical and the NO-gas-sensing properties of the 1-D SnO2 aligned on Si wafers with Au electrode patterns were evaluated.

  3. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  4. Nanoscale patterns of oligonucleotides formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing with applications in biosensing and nanomaterials assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Lee, Jung Heon; Paik, Ungyu; Lu, Yi; Rogers, John A

    2008-12-01

    The widespread use of DNA in microarrays for applications in biotechnology, combined with its promise in programmed nanomaterials assembly, unusual electronic devices, and other areas has created interest in methods for patterning DNA with high spatial resolution. Techniques based on thermal or piezoelectric inkjet printing are attractive due to their noncontacting nature and their compatibility with diverse materials and substrate types; their modest resolution (i.e., 10-20 microm) represents a major limitation for certain systems. Here we demonstrate the use of an operationally similar printing approach that exploits electrohydrodynamic forces, rather than thermal or acoustic energy, to eject DNA inks through fine nozzles, in a controlled fashion. This DNA printer is capable of resolution approaching 100 nm. A range of experiments on patterns of DNA formed with this printer demonstrates its key features. Example applications in DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly and DNA aptamer-based biosensing illustrate two representative uses of the patterns that can be formed.

  5. Ink-Jet Printing: A Versatile Method for Multilayer Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Fabrication (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    formulation and printing parameters that need to be addressed. I. Introduction SOLID oxide fuel cells ( SOFCs ) have attracted considerableinterest owing...cogeneration.1,2 A typical yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte-based SOFC oper- ates at 8001–10001C and consists of both bulk and thick-film...cells with complex geometries, in- cluding segmented in-series SOFCs , have been shown to have high-power densities comparable to planar cells. These

  6. Ink-jet printing of graphene for flexible electronics: An environmentally-friendly approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, A.; Del Rio Castillo, A. E.; Sun, H.; Ansaldo, A.; Pellegrini, V.; Bonaccorso, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical flexibility is considered an asset in consumer electronics and next-generation electronic systems. Printed and flexible electronic devices could be embedded into clothing or other surfaces at home or office or in many products such as low-cost sensors integrated in transparent and flexible surfaces. In this context inks based on graphene and related two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are gaining increasing attention owing to their exceptional (opto)electronic, electrochemical and mechanical properties. The current limitation relies on the use of solvents, providing stable dispersions of graphene and 2DMs and fitting the proper fluidic requirements for printing, which are in general not environmentally benign, and with high boiling point. Non-toxic and low boiling point solvents do not possess the required rheological properties (i.e., surface tension, viscosity and density) for the solution processing of graphene and 2DMs. Such solvents (e.g., water, alcohols) require the addition of stabilizing agents such as polymers or surfactants for the dispersion of graphene and 2DMs, which however unavoidably corrupt their properties, thus preventing their use for the target application. Here, we demonstrate a viable strategy to tune the fluidic properties of water/ethanol mixtures (low-boiling point solvents) to first effectively exfoliate graphite and then disperse graphene flakes to formulate graphene-based inks. We demonstrate that such inks can be used to print conductive stripes (sheet resistance of ~13 kΩ/□) on flexible substrates (polyethylene terephthalate), moving a step forward towards the realization of graphene-based printed electronic devices.

  7. Stable Drop Formation and Deposition Control in Ink Jet Printing of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Nathaniel; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying; Complex Fluids and Multiphase Transport Lab-Drexel University Team

    2013-11-01

    Using inkjet printing as an additive fabrication method is an enabling technology for low-cost, high-throughput production of flexible electronics and photonics. Polymeric materials, such as Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), are widely used as dielectric materials for microelectronics, batteries, among others. However, due to its large molecular weight and incompatibility with moisture in air, the stable drop formation of PVDF solution is quite challenging. In this study, we examine the effects of solute concentration, nozzle back pressure, ejection waveform, and ambient moisture on the formation of PVDF droplets. The deposition dynamics of inkjet-printed PVDF solutions are then examined as a function of the solvent concentration. Bi-solvents of different surface tensions and vapor pressures are used to induce Marangoni flows in order to suppress the coffee-ring effect. The deposition of a single droplet and the interactions between multiple drops are examined for a better control of the deposition uniformity. Printing of lines and patterns with reduced instability is also discussed.

  8. Design and evaluation of single nozzle with a non-conductive tip for reducing applied voltage and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing (EHDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Yong; Park, Jaehong; Hwang, Jungho

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a non-conductive tip inserted into a capillary nozzle (inner diameter of 860 µm) on jet formation and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Simulated and experimental results showed that the non-conductive tip stabilized the jet, and reduced the effective nozzle diameter and the onset voltage needed for the cone-jet mode, by eliminating the backflow near the apex of the liquid cone while a tiny backflow away from the apex of the liquid cone still remained. Silver nanocolloid patterns with an average width of 18.5 µm (standard deviation: 1.5 µm) were obtained with an applied voltage of 2.7 kV, a flow rate of 3 µl min-1 and a stage velocity of 200 mm s-1.

  9. Performance of three image-quality metrics in ink-jet printing of plain papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David L.; Winslow, Alan T.

    1993-07-01

    Three image-quality metrics are evaluated: Hamerly's edge raggedness, or tangential edge profile; Granger and Cupery's subjective quality factor (SQF) derived from the second moment of the line spread function; and SQF derived from Gur and O'Donnell's reflectance transfer function. These metrics are but a handful of many in the literature. Standard office papers from North America and Europe representing a broad spectrum of what is commercially available were printed with a 300-dpi Hewlett-Packard Deskjet printer. An untrained panel of eight judges viewed text, in a variety of fonts, and a graphics target and assigned each print an integer score based on its overall quality. Analysis of the metrics revealed that Granger's SQF had the highest correlation with panel rank, and achieved a level of precision approaching single-judge error, that is, the ranking error made by an individual judge. While the other measures correlated in varying degrees, they were less precise. This paper reviews their theory, measurement, and performance.

  10. Modeling coverage-dependent ink thickness in ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Coppel, Ludovic G; Slavuj, Radovan; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2016-02-10

    We propose a simple extension of the Murray-Davis halftone reflectance model that accounts for the change of ink dot reflectance due to ink spreading. Significant improvement of the prediction accuracy is obtained for a range of paper substrates and printer combinations compared to the classical Yule-Nielsen and Clapper-Yule models. The results show that ink dot thickness dependency is the main factor limiting the validity of the Murray-Davis model and that optical dot gain can be neglected when the model is calibrated for one specific printer, ink, and substrate combination. The proposed model provides a better understanding of the reflectance from halftone prints that contributes to the development of physical models for simpler and faster printer calibration to different substrates.

  11. Airflow dynamics of human jets: sneezing and breathing - potential sources of infectious aerosols.

    PubMed

    Tang, Julian W; Nicolle, Andre D; Klettner, Christian A; Pantelic, Jovan; Wang, Liangde; Suhaimi, Amin Bin; Tan, Ashlynn Y L; Ong, Garrett W X; Su, Ruikun; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David D W; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2013-01-01

    Natural human exhalation flows such as coughing, sneezing and breathing can be considered as 'jet-like' airflows in the sense that they are produced from a single source in a single exhalation effort, with a relatively symmetrical, conical geometry. Although coughing and sneezing have garnered much attention as potential, explosive sources of infectious aerosols, these are relatively rare events during daily life, whereas breathing is necessary for life and is performed continuously. Real-time shadowgraph imaging was used to visualise and capture high-speed images of healthy volunteers sneezing and breathing (through the nose - nasally, and through the mouth - orally). Six volunteers, who were able to respond to the pepper sneeze stimulus, were recruited for the sneezing experiments (2 women: 27.5±6.36 years; 4 men: 29.25±10.53 years). The maximum visible distance over which the sneeze plumes (or puffs) travelled was 0.6 m, the maximum sneeze velocity derived from these measured distances was 4.5 m/s. The maximum 2-dimensional (2-D) area of dissemination of these sneezes was 0.2 m(2). The corresponding derived parameter, the maximum 2-D area expansion rate of these sneezes was 2 m(2)/s. For nasal breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.6 m and 1.4 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.11 m(2) and 0.16 m(2)/s, respectively. Similarly, for mouth breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.8 m and 1.3 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.18 m(2) and 0.17 m(2)/s, respectively. Surprisingly, a comparison of the maximum exit velocities of sneezing reported here with those obtained from coughing (published previously) demonstrated that they are relatively similar, and not extremely high. This is in contrast with some earlier estimates of sneeze velocities, and some reasons for this difference are discussed.

  12. Airflow Dynamics of Human Jets: Sneezing and Breathing - Potential Sources of Infectious Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre D.; Klettner, Christian A.; Pantelic, Jovan; Wang, Liangde; Suhaimi, Amin Bin; Tan, Ashlynn Y. L.; Ong, Garrett W. X.; Su, Ruikun; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David D. W.; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2013-01-01

    Natural human exhalation flows such as coughing, sneezing and breathing can be considered as ‘jet-like’ airflows in the sense that they are produced from a single source in a single exhalation effort, with a relatively symmetrical, conical geometry. Although coughing and sneezing have garnered much attention as potential, explosive sources of infectious aerosols, these are relatively rare events during daily life, whereas breathing is necessary for life and is performed continuously. Real-time shadowgraph imaging was used to visualise and capture high-speed images of healthy volunteers sneezing and breathing (through the nose – nasally, and through the mouth - orally). Six volunteers, who were able to respond to the pepper sneeze stimulus, were recruited for the sneezing experiments (2 women: 27.5±6.36 years; 4 men: 29.25±10.53 years). The maximum visible distance over which the sneeze plumes (or puffs) travelled was 0.6 m, the maximum sneeze velocity derived from these measured distances was 4.5 m/s. The maximum 2-dimensional (2-D) area of dissemination of these sneezes was 0.2 m2. The corresponding derived parameter, the maximum 2-D area expansion rate of these sneezes was 2 m2/s. For nasal breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.6 m and 1.4 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.11 m2 and 0.16 m2/s, respectively. Similarly, for mouth breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.8 m and 1.3 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.18 m2 and 0.17 m2/s, respectively. Surprisingly, a comparison of the maximum exit velocities of sneezing reported here with those obtained from coughing (published previously) demonstrated that they are relatively similar, and not extremely high. This is in contrast with some earlier estimates of sneeze velocities, and some reasons for this difference are discussed. PMID

  13. Jets.

    PubMed

    Rhines, Peter B.

    1994-06-01

    This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of

  14. MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF AN AEROSOL GENERATOR FOR VERY HIGH NUMBER CURRENTS BASED ON A FREE TURBULENT JET. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we report on theoretical and experimental work on aerosol formation in a free turbulent jet. A hot DEHS vapor issues through a circular nozzle into slowly moving cold air. Vapor concentration and temperatures are such that particles are formed via homogeneous nuc...

  15. New Approaches for Printed Electronics Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ankit

    In printed electronics, electronic inks are patterned onto flexible substrates using roll-to-roll (R2R) compatible graphic printing methods. For applications where large-area, conformal electronics are necessary, printed electronics holds a competitive advantage over rigid, semiconductor circuitry, which does not scale efficiently to large areas. However, in order to fully realize the true potential of printed electronics, several manufacturing hurdles need to be overcome. Firstly, minimum feature sizes produced by graphic printing methods are typically greater than 25 microm, which is at least an order of magnitude higher for dense, high performing electronics. In this thesis, conductive features down to 1.5 microm are demonstrated using a novel inkjet printing-based process. Secondly, high-resolution printed conductors usually have poor current-carrying capacity, especially for longer wires in large-area applications. This thesis explores the fundamentals of aerosol-jet printing and reveals the regime for printing high-resolution lines with excellent current carrying capacity. Additionally, a novel manufacturing process is demonstrated, which can process 2.5 microm wide conductive wires with linear resistances as small as 5 O mm -1. Another challenge for printed electronics manufacturing is to deal with topography produced on the substrate surface by printed features. Besides complicating the subsequent use of contact-printing methods, surface topography is a source of poor device yields as well. This thesis describes two novel methodologies of creating topography-free printed surfaces. In the first method, nanometer-level smooth, planarized silver lines are obtained using a transfer printing approach. In the second method, open microchannels, imprinted in plastic substrates, are filled with a controlled amount of metal using liquid-based additive processes, to obtain conductive wires flush with the substrate surface. Finally, this thesis addresses the issue of

  16. Data on the densification during sintering of binder jet printed samples made from water- and gas-atomized alloy 625 powders.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, Amir; Hughes, Eamonn T; Hilla, Colleen; Stevens, Erica L; Chmielus, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Binder jet printing (BJP) is a metal additive manufacturing method that manufactures parts with complex geometry by depositing powder layer-by-layer, selectively joining particles in each layer with a polymeric binder and finally curing the binder. After the printing process, the parts still in the powder bed must be sintered to achieve full densification (A. Mostafaei, Y. Behnamian, Y.L. Krimer, E.L. Stevens, J.L. Luo, M. Chmielus, 2016; A. Mostafaei, E. Stevens, E. Hughes, S. Biery, C. Hilla, M. Chmielus, 2016; A. Mostafaei, Y. Behnamian, Y.L. Krimer, E.L. Stevens, J.L. Luo, M. Chmielus, 2016) [1-3]. The collected data presents the characterization of the as-received gas- and water-atomized alloy 625 powders, BJP processing parameters and density of the sintered samples. The effect of sintering temperatures on the microstructure and the relative density of binder jet printed parts made from differently atomized nickel-based superalloy 625 powders are briefly compared in this paper. Detailed data can be found in the original published papers by authors in (A. Mostafaei, J. Toman, E.L. Stevens, E.T. Hughes, Y.L. Krimer, M. Chmielus, 2017) [4].

  17. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  18. Extreme ultra-low lasing threshold of full-polymeric fundamental microdisk printed with room-temperature atmospheric ink-jet technique.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Ota, Tomoya; Chen, Cong; Ryu, Soichiro; Yasui, Kei; Oki, Yuji

    2015-05-29

    We experimentally demonstrated an extreme ultra-low lasing threshold from full-polymeric fundamental microdisk cavities fabricated by a novel fabrication method, the ink-jet printing method, which is much simpler and easier than previous methods such as lithography. The ink-jet printing method provides additive, room-temperature atmospheric, rapid fabrication with only two steps: (i) stacking cladding pedestal and waveguiding disk spots using the ink-jet technique, and (ii) partial etching of the cladding pedestal envelope. Two kinds of low-viscosity polymers successfully formed microdisks with high surface homogeneity, and one of the polymers doped with LDS798 dye yielded whispering-gallery-mode lasing. The fundamental disks exhibited an extremely ultra-low lasing threshold of 0.33 μJ/mm(2) at a wavelength of 817.3 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this lasing threshold is the lowest threshold obtained among both organic and inorganic fundamental microdisk cavity lasers with a highly confined structure.

  19. Extreme ultra-low lasing threshold of full-polymeric fundamental microdisk printed with room-temperature atmospheric ink-jet technique

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Ota, Tomoya; Chen, Cong; Ryu, Soichiro; Yasui, Kei; Oki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated an extreme ultra-low lasing threshold from full-polymeric fundamental microdisk cavities fabricated by a novel fabrication method, the ink-jet printing method, which is much simpler and easier than previous methods such as lithography. The ink-jet printing method provides additive, room-temperature atmospheric, rapid fabrication with only two steps: (i) stacking cladding pedestal and waveguiding disk spots using the ink-jet technique, and (ii) partial etching of the cladding pedestal envelope. Two kinds of low-viscosity polymers successfully formed microdisks with high surface homogeneity, and one of the polymers doped with LDS798 dye yielded whispering-gallery-mode lasing. The fundamental disks exhibited an extremely ultra-low lasing threshold of 0.33 μJ/mm2 at a wavelength of 817.3 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this lasing threshold is the lowest threshold obtained among both organic and inorganic fundamental microdisk cavity lasers with a highly confined structure. PMID:26024514

  20. Investigation of the Changes in Aerosolization Behavior Between the Jet-Milled and Spray-Dried Colistin Powders Through Surface Energy Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jong, Teresa; Li, Jian; Morton, David A V; Zhou, Qi Tony; Larson, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface energy factors behind improved aerosolization performance of spray-dried colistin powder formulations compared with those produced by jet milling. Inhalable colistin powder formulations were produced by jet milling or spray drying (with or without l-leucine). Scanning electron micrographs showed the jet-milled particles had irregularly angular shapes, whereas the spray-dried particles were more spherical. Significantly higher fine particle fractions were measured for the spray-dried (43.8%-49.6%) versus the jet-milled formulation (28.4%) from a Rotahaler at 60 L/min; albeit the size distribution of the jet-milled powder was smaller. Surprisingly, addition of l-leucine in the spray drying feed solution gave no significant improvement in fine particle fraction. As measured by inverse gas chromatography, spray-dried formulations had significantly (p < 0.001) lower dispersive, specific, and total surface energy values and more uniform surface energy distributions than the jet-milled powder. Interestingly, no significant difference was measured in the specific and total surface energy values between the spray-dried formulation with or without l-leucine. Based on our previous findings in the self-assembling behavior of colistin in aqueous solution and the surface energy data obtained here, we propose the self-assembly of colistin molecules during spray drying contributed significantly to the reduction of surface free energy and the superior aerosolization performance.

  1. Investigation of the changes in aerosolization behavior between the jet-milled and spray-dried colistin powders through surface energy characterization

    PubMed Central

    Jong, Teresa; Li, Jian; Mortonx, David A.V.; Zhou, Qi (Tony); Larson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface energy factors behind improved aerosolization performance of spray-dried colistin powder formulations compared to those produced by jet-milling. Inhalable colistin powder formulations were produced by jet-milling or spray-drying (with or without L-leucine). Scanning electron micrographs showed the jet-milled particles had irregularly angular shapes, while the spray-dried particles were more spherical. Significantly higher fine particle fractions (FPFs) were measured for the spray-dried (43.8-49.6%) vs. the jet-milled formulation (28.4 %) from a Rotahaler at 60L/min; albeit the size distribution of the jet-milled powder was smaller. Surprisingly, addition of L-leucine in the spray drying feed-solution gave no significant improvement in FPF. As measured by inverse gas chromatography, spray-dried formulations had significantly (p<0.001) lower dispersive, specific and total surface energy values and more uniform surface energy distributions than the jet-milled powder. Interestingly, no significant difference was measured in the specific and total surface energy values between the spray-dried formulation with or without L-leucine. Based upon our previous findings in the self-assembling behavior of colistin in aqueous solution and the surface energy data obtained here, we propose the self-assembly of colistin molecules during spray-drying, contributed significantly to the reduction of surface free energy and the superior aerosolization performance. PMID:26886330

  2. Ceramic materials of low-temperature synthesis for dielectric coating applied by 3D aerosol printing used in nano- and microelectronics, lighting engineering, and spacecraft control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Tuev, V. I.; Nisan, A. V.; Potapov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    A synthesis technique of low-temperature ceramic material based on aluminosilicates of dendrimer morphology capable to contain up to 80 wt % of nitrides and oxides of high-melting compounds as filler has been developed. The synthesis is based on a sol-gel method followed by mechanochemical treatment and ultrasonic dispersing. Dielectric ceramic layers with the layer thickness in the nanometer range and high thermal conductivity have been obtained for the first time by 3D aerosol printing of the synthesized material. The study of the obtained ceramic coating on the metal surface (Al) has proved its use prospects in microelectronics, light engineering, and devices for special purposes.

  3. Physical stability and aerosol properties of liposomes delivered using an air-jet nebulizer and a novel micropump device with large mesh apertures.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, A M A; Faizi, M; Naji, W F; Gill, H S; Taylor, K M G

    2007-04-04

    The aerosol properties of liposomes and their physical stability to aerosolization were evaluated using an air-jet nebulizer (Pari LC Plus) and a customized large aperture vibrating-mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm). Soya phosphatidylcholine: cholesterol (1:1 mole ratio) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) entrapping salbutamol sulfate were nebulized directly, or after being reduced in size by extrusion through 1 or 0.4microm polycarbonate membrane filters. MLVs were very unstable to jet nebulization and stability was not markedly enhanced when vesicles were extruded before nebulization, such that drug losses from delivered liposomes using the Pari nebulizer were up to 88% (i.e. only 12% retained in liposomes). The Aeroneb Pro-8microm nebulizer was less disruptive to liposomes, completed nebulization in a much shorter time, and produced greater mass output rate than the Pari nebulizer. However, aerosol droplets were larger, total drug and mass outputs were lower and aerosolization performance was dependent on formulation. Vibrating-mesh nebulization was less disruptive to liposomes extruded through the 1microm membranes compared with the non-extruded MLVs, so that the retained entrapment of the drug in the nebulized vesicles was 56% and 37%, respectively. However, extrusion of liposomes to 0.4microm resulted in reduced stability of liposomes to vibrating-mesh nebulization (retained entrapment=41%) which was attributed to the reduced liposome lamellarity and subsequent reduced resistance to nebulization-induced shearing. This study has shown that vibrating-mesh nebulization using the customized large aperture mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm) had a less disruptive effect on liposomes and produced a higher output rate compared with the Pari LC Plus air-jet nebulizer. On the other hand, the air-jet nebulizer produced higher total mass and drug outputs and smaller aerosol droplets.

  4. Influence of Jet Fuel Composition on Aircraft Engine Emissions: A Synthesis of Aerosol Emissions Data from the NASA APEX, AAFEX, and ACCESS Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C.; Herndon, S. C.; Knighton, W. B.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Yu, Z.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    We statistically analyze the impact of jet fuel properties on aerosols emitted by the NASA McDonnell Douglas DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engines burning fifteen different aviation fuels. Data were collected for this single engine type during four different, comprehensive ground tests conducted over the past decade, which allow us to clearly link changes in aerosol emissions to fuel compositional changes. It is found that the volatile aerosol fraction dominates the number and volume emissions indices (EIs) over all engine powers, which are driven by changes in fuel aromatic and sulfur content. Meanwhile, the naphthalenic content of the fuel determines the magnitude of the non-volatile number and volume EI as well as the black carbon mass EI. Linear regression coefficients are reported for each aerosol EI in terms of these properties, engine fuel flow rate, and ambient temperature, and show that reducing both fuel sulfur content and napththalenes to near-zero levels would result in roughly a ten-fold decrease in aerosol number emitted per kg of fuel burn. This work informs future efforts to model aircraft emissions changes as the aviation fleet gradually begins to transition toward low-aromatic, low-sulfur alternative jet fuels from bio-based or Fischer-Tropsch production pathways.

  5. Fabrication and evaluation of electrohydrodynamic jet 3D printed polycaprolactone/chitosan cell carriers using human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Sriram, Gopu; Fawzy, Amr S; Fuh, Jerry Yh; Rosa, Vinicius; Cao, Tong; Wong, Yoke San

    2016-08-01

    Biological function of adherent cells depends on the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in three-dimensional space. To understand the behavior of cells in 3D environment and their interactions with neighboring cells and matrix requires 3D culture systems. Here, we present a novel 3D cell carrier scaffold that provides an environment for routine 3D cell growth in vitro We have developed thin, mechanically stable electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan macroporous scaffolds with precise fiber orientation for basic 3D cell culture application. We have evaluated the application of this technology by growing human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts within these 3D scaffolds. Assessment of cell viability and proliferation of cells seeded on polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan 3D-scaffolds show that the human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts could adhere and proliferate on the scaffolds over time. Further, using confocal microscopy we demonstrate the ability to use fluorescence-labelled cells that could be microscopically monitored in real-time. Hence, these 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan scaffolds could be used as a cell carrier for in vitro 3D cell culture-, bioreactor- and tissue engineering-related applications in the future.

  6. Experimental study of the maximum resolution and packing density achievable in sintered and non-sintered binder-jet 3D printed steel microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub; Benedict, Michael; Kiggans Jr, James O

    2015-01-01

    Developing high resolution 3D printed metallic microchannels is a challenge especially when there is an essential need for high packing density of the primary material. While high packing density could be achieved by heating the structure to the sintering temperature, some heat sensitive applications require other strategies to improve the packing density of primary materials. In this study the goal is to develop high green or pack densities microchannels on the scale of 2-300 microns which have a robust mechanical structure. Binder-jet 3D printing is an additive manufacturing process in which droplets of binder are deposited via inkjet into a bed of powder. By repeatedly spreading thin layers of powder and depositing binder into the appropriate 2D profiles, complex 3D objects can be created one layer at time. Microchannels with features on the order of 500 microns were fabricated via binder jetting of steel powder and then sintered and/or infiltrated with a secondary material. The average particle size of the steel powder was varied along with the droplet volume of the inkjet-deposited binder. The resolution of the process, packing density of the primary material, the subsequent features sizes of the microchannels, and the overall microchannel quality were characterized as a function of particle size distribution, droplet sizes and heat treatment temperatures.

  7. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of spray-dried and jet-milled microparticles containing bosentan hydrate for dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hong-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Eun-Seok; Park, Chun-Woong

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare bosentan hydrate (BST) microparticles as dry powder inhalations (DPIs) via spray drying and jet milling under various parameters, to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of the BST hydrate microparticles, and to evaluate the aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs. The BST microparticles were successfully prepared for DPIs by spray drying from feeding solution concentrations of 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/v) and by jet milling at grinding pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa. The physicochemical properties of the spray-dried (SD) and jet-milled (JM) microparticles were determined via scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering particle size analysis, Karl Fischer titration, surface analysis, pycnometry, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and drug dissolution behavior were evaluated using an Anderson cascade impactor and a Franz diffusion cell, respectively. The JM microparticles exhibited an irregular corrugated surface and a crystalline solid state, while the SD microparticles were spherical with a smooth surface and an amorphous solid state. Thus, the in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs were considerably different due to the differences in the physicochemical properties of the SD and JM microparticles. In particular, the highest grinding pressures under jet milling exhibited excellent aerosol dispersion performance with statistically higher values of 56.8%±2.0% of respirable fraction and 33.8%±2.3% of fine particle fraction and lower mass median aerodynamic diameter of 5.0±0.3 μm than the others (P<0.05, analysis of variance/Tukey). The drug dissolution mechanism was also affected by the physicochemical properties that determine the dissolution kinetics of the SD and JM microparticles, which were well

  8. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of spray-dried and jet-milled microparticles containing bosentan hydrate for dry powder inhalation aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hong-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Eun-Seok; Park, Chun-Woong

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare bosentan hydrate (BST) microparticles as dry powder inhalations (DPIs) via spray drying and jet milling under various parameters, to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of the BST hydrate microparticles, and to evaluate the aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs. The BST microparticles were successfully prepared for DPIs by spray drying from feeding solution concentrations of 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/v) and by jet milling at grinding pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa. The physicochemical properties of the spray-dried (SD) and jet-milled (JM) microparticles were determined via scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering particle size analysis, Karl Fischer titration, surface analysis, pycnometry, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and drug dissolution behavior were evaluated using an Anderson cascade impactor and a Franz diffusion cell, respectively. The JM microparticles exhibited an irregular corrugated surface and a crystalline solid state, while the SD microparticles were spherical with a smooth surface and an amorphous solid state. Thus, the in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs were considerably different due to the differences in the physicochemical properties of the SD and JM microparticles. In particular, the highest grinding pressures under jet milling exhibited excellent aerosol dispersion performance with statistically higher values of 56.8%±2.0% of respirable fraction and 33.8%±2.3% of fine particle fraction and lower mass median aerodynamic diameter of 5.0±0.3 μm than the others (P<0.05, analysis of variance/Tukey). The drug dissolution mechanism was also affected by the physicochemical properties that determine the dissolution kinetics of the SD and JM microparticles, which were well

  9. Prediction of drop-on-demand (DOD) pattern size in pulse voltage-applied electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing of Ag colloid ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Kim, Beomsoo; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-12-01

    Drop-on-demand printing is receiving a great deal of interest in industrial applications; however, the desired pattern sizes are realized by trial and error, through repeated printing experiments with varied materials (ink and suspended particles), operating conditions (voltage, flow rate, nozzle-to-plate distance, etc.), and substrate wettability. Since this approach requires a great deal of time, cost, and effort, a more convenient and efficient method that will predict pattern sizes with a minimal number of experiments is needed. In this study, we patterned a series of Ag dots and lines using a pulsed voltage-applied electrohydrodynamic jet printing system and measured their sizes with an optical microscope. We then applied a model suggested by Stringer and Derby (J Eur Ceram Soc 29:913-918, 2009) and Gao and Sonin (Proc R Soc Lond Ser A 444:533-554, 1994) to predict the pattern sizes, comparing these predictions with the measured sizes. Finally, we demonstrated our methodology on disconnected line repairing.

  10. Rapid jetting status inspection and accurate droplet volume measurement for a piezo drop-on-demand inkjet print head using a scanning mirror for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Kim, Minsung

    2017-02-01

    Despite the inherent fabrication simplicity of piezo drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the non-uniform deposition of colourants or electroluminescent organic materials leads to faulty display products, and hence, the importance of rapid jetting status inspection and accurate droplet volume measurement increases from a process perspective. In this work, various jetting status inspections and droplet volume measurement methods are reviewed by discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and then, the opportunities for the developed prototype with a scanning mirror are explored. This work demonstrates that jetting status inspection of 384 fictitious droplets can be performed within 17 s with maximum and minimum measurement accuracies of 0.2 ± 0.5 μ m for the fictitious droplets of 50 μ m in diameter and -1.2 ± 0.3 μ m for the fictitious droplets of 30 μ m in diameter, respectively. In addition to the new design of an inkjet monitoring instrument with a scanning mirror, two novel methods to accurately measure the droplet volume by amplifying a minute droplet volume difference and then converting to other physical properties are suggested and the droplet volume difference of ±0.3% is demonstrated to be discernible using numerical simulations, even with the low measurement accuracy of 1 μ m . When the fact is considered that the conventional vision-based method with a CCD camera requires the optical measurement accuracy less than 25 nm to measure the volume of an in-flight droplet in the nominal diameter of 50 μ m at the same volume measurement accuracy, the suggested method with the developed prototype offers a whole new opportunity to inkjet printing for display applications.

  11. Rapid jetting status inspection and accurate droplet volume measurement for a piezo drop-on-demand inkjet print head using a scanning mirror for display applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Kim, Minsung

    2017-02-01

    Despite the inherent fabrication simplicity of piezo drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the non-uniform deposition of colourants or electroluminescent organic materials leads to faulty display products, and hence, the importance of rapid jetting status inspection and accurate droplet volume measurement increases from a process perspective. In this work, various jetting status inspections and droplet volume measurement methods are reviewed by discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and then, the opportunities for the developed prototype with a scanning mirror are explored. This work demonstrates that jetting status inspection of 384 fictitious droplets can be performed within 17 s with maximum and minimum measurement accuracies of 0.2 ± 0.5 μm for the fictitious droplets of 50 μm in diameter and -1.2 ± 0.3 μm for the fictitious droplets of 30 μm in diameter, respectively. In addition to the new design of an inkjet monitoring instrument with a scanning mirror, two novel methods to accurately measure the droplet volume by amplifying a minute droplet volume difference and then converting to other physical properties are suggested and the droplet volume difference of ±0.3% is demonstrated to be discernible using numerical simulations, even with the low measurement accuracy of 1 μm. When the fact is considered that the conventional vision-based method with a CCD camera requires the optical measurement accuracy less than 25 nm to measure the volume of an in-flight droplet in the nominal diameter of 50 μm at the same volume measurement accuracy, the suggested method with the developed prototype offers a whole new opportunity to inkjet printing for display applications.

  12. High-resolution patterns of quantum dots formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing for light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Hoon; Onses, M Serdar; Lim, Jong Bin; Nam, Sooji; Oh, Nuri; Kim, Hojun; Yu, Ki Jun; Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Lee, Chi Hwan; Lee, Jungyup; Shin, Jae Ho; Kim, Nam Heon; Leal, Cecilia; Shim, Moonsub; Rogers, John A

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate materials and operating conditions that allow for high-resolution printing of layers of quantum dots (QDs) with precise control over thickness and submicron lateral resolution and capabilities for use as active layers of QD light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The shapes and thicknesses of the QD patterns exhibit systematic dependence on the dimensions of the printing nozzle and the ink composition in ways that allow nearly arbitrary, systematic control when exploited in a fully automated printing tool. Homogeneous arrays of patterns of QDs serve as the basis for corresponding arrays of QD LEDs that exhibit excellent performance. Sequential printing of different types of QDs in a multilayer stack or in an interdigitated geometry provides strategies for continuous tuning of the effective, overall emission wavelengths of the resulting QD LEDs. This strategy is useful to efficient, additive use of QDs for wide ranging types of electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  13. Printed and flexible biosensor for antioxidants using interdigitated ink-jetted electrodes and gravure-deposited active layer.

    PubMed

    Pavinatto, Felippe J; Paschoal, Carlos W A; Arias, Ana C

    2015-05-15

    Printing techniques have been extensively used in the fabrication of organic electronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes and display backplanes. These techniques, in particular inkjet printing, are being employed for the localized dispensing of solutions containing biological molecules and cells, leading to the fabrication of bio-functional microarrays and biosensors. Here, we report the fabrication of an all-printed and flexible biosensor for antioxidants. Gold (Au) interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) with sub-100 µm features were directly inkjet-printed on plastic substrates using a nanoparticle-based ink. Conductivities as high as 5×10(6) S/m (12% of bulk Au) were attained after sintering was conducted at plastic-compatible 200 °C for 6 h. The enzyme Tyrosinase (Tyr) was used in the active layer of the biosensors, being innovatively deposited by large-area rotogravure printing. A tailor-made ink was studied, and the residual activity of the enzyme was 85% after additives incorporation, and 15.5% after gravure printing. Au IDEs were coated with gravure films of the Tyr-containing ink, and the biosensor was encapsulated with a cellulose acetate dip-coating film to avoid dissolution. The biosensor impedance magnitude increases linearly with the concentration of a model antioxidant, allowing for the construction of a calibration curve. Control experiments demonstrated the molecular recognition characteristic inferred by the enzyme. We found that the biosensor sensitivity and the limit of detection were, respectively, 5.68 Ω/µm and 200 µM. In conclusion, a disposable, light-weight, all-printed and flexible biosensor for antioxidants was successfully fabricated using fast and large-area printing techniques. This opens the door for the fabrication of technological products using roll-to-roll processes.

  14. Electrical and Physical Property Characterization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Ink for Flexible Printed Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    3D printers which could possibly combine the structural and electronic aspects of traditional devices into a single functionality. In a sponsored paper...published in October of 2013 titled “ 3D printed electronics”, Steven Ready, et al. describe a combined printer they have constructed which has the...using an aerosol jet printer , but not an inkjet printer . The ink is shown to have a sheet resistance on the order of 5 kΩ/. The thickness is shown to be

  15. Ink for Ink-Jet Printing of Electrically Conductive Structures on Flexible Substrates with Low Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościcki, A.; Smolarek-Nowak, A.; Felba, J.; Kinart, A.

    2017-02-01

    The development of new technologies in electronics related to flexible polymeric substrates forces the industry to introduce suitable tools (special type of dispensers) and modern conductive materials for printing electronic circuits. Moreover, due to the wide use of inexpensive polymeric foils (polyethene, PE, or poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET), there is a need to develop materials with the lowest possible processing temperatures. The present paper presents the selection criteria of suitable components and their preparation for obtaining electrically conductive ink with a special nanosilver base. In the case of the discussed solution, all components allow to make circuits in relatively low sintering temperature (even below 130°C). Additionally, the authors show the most significant ink parameters that should be taken into consideration during Research and Development (R&D) works with electrically conductive inks. Moreover, ink stability parameters are discussed and some examples of printed circuits are presented.

  16. A facile method for integrating direct-write devices into three-dimensional printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yung-Hang; Wang, Kan; Wu, Changsheng; Chen, Yiwen; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2015-06-01

    Integrating direct-write (DW) devices into three-dimensional (3D) printed parts is key to continuing innovation in engineering applications such as smart material systems and structural health monitoring. However, this integration is challenging because: (1) most 3D printing techniques leave rough or porous surfaces if they are untreated; (2) the thermal sintering process required for most conductive inks could degrade the polymeric materials of 3D printed parts; and (3) the extensive pause needed for the DW process during layer-by-layer fabrication may cause weaker interlayer bonding and create structural weak points. These challenges are rather common during the insertion of conductive patterns inside 3D printed structures. As an avoidance tactic, we developed a simple ‘print-stick-peel’ method to transfer the DW device from the polytetrafluoroethylene or perfluoroalkoxy alkanes film onto any layer of a 3D printed object. This transfer can be achieved using the self-adhesion of 3D printing materials or applying additional adhesive. We demonstrated this method by transferring Aerosol Jet® printed strain sensors into parts fabricated by PolyJet™ printing. This report provides an investigation and discussion on the sensitivity, reliability, and influence embedding the sensor has on mechanical properties.

  17. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  18. Impact of Interactive Aerosol on the African Easterly Jet in the NASA GEOS-5 Global Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, K. M.; da Silva, A.

    2010-01-01

    The real-time treatment of interactive realistically varying aerosol in a global operational forecasting system, as opposed to prescribed (fixed or climatologically varying) aerosols, is a very difficult challenge that only recently begins to be addressed. Experiment results from a recent version of the NASA GEOS-5 forecasting system, inclusive of interactive aerosol treatment, are presented in this work. Four sets of 30 5-day forecasts are initialized from a high quality set of analyses previously produced and documented to cover the period from 15 August to 16 September 2006, which corresponds to the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) observing campaign. The four forecast sets are at two different horizontal resolutions and with and without interactive aerosol treatment. The net impact of aerosol, at times in which there is a strong dust outbreak, is a temperature increase at the dust level and decrease in the near-surface levels, in complete agreement with previous observational and modeling studies. Moreover, forecasts in which interactive aerosols are included depict an African Easterly (AEJ) at slightly higher elevation, and slightly displace northward, with respect to the forecasts in which aerosols are not include. The shift in the AEJ position goes in the direction of observations and agrees with previous results.

  19. Leaf Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  20. Security printing of covert quick response codes using upconverting nanoparticle inks.

    PubMed

    Meruga, Jeevan M; Cross, William M; Stanley May, P; Luu, QuocAnh; Crawford, Grant A; Kellar, Jon J

    2012-10-05

    Counterfeiting costs governments and private industries billions of dollars annually due to loss of value in currency and other printed items. This research involves using lanthanide doped β-NaYF(4) nanoparticles for security printing applications. Inks comprised of Yb(3+)/Er(3+) and Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) doped β-NaYF(4) nanoparticles with oleic acid as the capping agent in toluene and methyl benzoate with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the binding agent were used to print quick response (QR) codes. The QR codes were made using an AutoCAD file and printed with Optomec direct-write aerosol jetting(®). The printed QR codes are invisible under ambient lighting conditions, but are readable using a near-IR laser, and were successfully scanned using a smart phone. This research demonstrates that QR codes, which have been used primarily for information sharing applications, can also be used for security purposes. Higher levels of security were achieved by printing both green and blue upconverting inks, based on combinations of Er(3+)/Yb(3+) and Tm(3+)/Yb(3+), respectively, in a single QR code. The near-infrared (NIR)-to-visible upconversion luminescence properties of the two-ink QR codes were analyzed, including the influence of NIR excitation power density on perceived color, in term of the CIE 1931 chromaticity index. It was also shown that this security ink can be optimized for line width, thickness and stability on different substrates.

  1. Security printing of covert quick response codes using upconverting nanoparticle inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meruga, Jeevan M.; Cross, William M.; May, P. Stanley; Luu, QuocAnh; Crawford, Grant A.; Kellar, Jon J.

    2012-10-01

    Counterfeiting costs governments and private industries billions of dollars annually due to loss of value in currency and other printed items. This research involves using lanthanide doped β-NaYF4 nanoparticles for security printing applications. Inks comprised of Yb3+/Er3+ and Yb3+/Tm3+ doped β-NaYF4 nanoparticles with oleic acid as the capping agent in toluene and methyl benzoate with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the binding agent were used to print quick response (QR) codes. The QR codes were made using an AutoCAD file and printed with Optomec direct-write aerosol jetting®. The printed QR codes are invisible under ambient lighting conditions, but are readable using a near-IR laser, and were successfully scanned using a smart phone. This research demonstrates that QR codes, which have been used primarily for information sharing applications, can also be used for security purposes. Higher levels of security were achieved by printing both green and blue upconverting inks, based on combinations of Er3+/Yb3+ and Tm3+/Yb3+, respectively, in a single QR code. The near-infrared (NIR)-to-visible upconversion luminescence properties of the two-ink QR codes were analyzed, including the influence of NIR excitation power density on perceived color, in term of the CIE 1931 chromaticity index. It was also shown that this security ink can be optimized for line width, thickness and stability on different substrates.

  2. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  3. Emerging Carbon and Post-Carbon Nanomaterial Inks for Printed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-02-19

    Carbon and post-carbon nanomaterials present desirable electrical, optical, chemical, and mechanical attributes for printed electronics, offering low-cost, large-area functionality on flexible substrates. In this Perspective, recent developments in carbon nanomaterial inks are highlighted. Monodisperse semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes compatible with inkjet and aerosol jet printing are ideal channels for thin-film transistors, while inkjet, gravure, and screen-printable graphene-based inks are better-suited for electrodes and interconnects. Despite the high performance achieved in prototype devices, additional effort is required to address materials integration issues encountered in more complex systems. In this regard, post-carbon nanomaterial inks (e.g., electrically insulating boron nitride and optically active transition-metal dichalcogenides) present promising opportunities. Finally, emerging work to extend these nanomaterial inks to three-dimensional printing provides a path toward nonplanar devices. Overall, the superlative properties of these materials, coupled with versatile assembly by printing techniques, offer a powerful platform for next-generation printed electronics.

  4. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.

  5. Wind Power Charged Aerosol Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    This describes experimental results on a Charged Aerosol Wind/Electric Power Generator, using Induction Electric Charging with a water jet issuing under water pressure from a small diameter (25-100 ..mu..m) orifice.

  6. Optimization of printing techniques for electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Ahmad Anwar; Mansor, Ahmad Fairuzabadi Mohd; Rahim, Rosminazuin Ab; Nordin, Anis Nurashikin

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical biosensors show great promise for point-of-care applications due to their low cost, portability and compatibility with microfluidics. The miniature size of these sensors provides advantages in terms of sensitivity, specificity and allows them to be mass produced in arrays. The most reliable fabrication technique for these sensors is lithography followed by metal deposition using sputtering or chemical vapor deposition techniques. This technique which is usually done in the cleanroom requires expensive masking followed by deposition. Recently, cheaper printing techniques such as screen-printing and ink-jet printing have become popular due to its low cost, ease of fabrication and mask-less method. In this paper, two different printing techniques namely inkjet and screen printing are demonstrated for an electrochemical biosensor. For ink-jet printing technique, optimization of key printing parameters, such as pulse voltages, drop spacing and waveform setting, in-house temperature and cure annealing for obtaining the high quality droplets, are discussed. These factors are compared with screen-printing parameters such as mesh size, emulsion thickness, minimum spacing of lines and curing times. The reliability and reproducibility of the sensors are evaluated using scotch tape test, resistivity and profile-meter measurements. It was found that inkjet printing is superior because it is mask-less, has minimum resolution of 100 µm compared to 200 µm for screen printing and higher reproducibility rate of 90% compared to 78% for screen printing.

  7. Effects of Saharan Mineral Dust Aerosols on the Dynamics of an Idealized African Easterly Jet-African Easterly Wave System over North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Dustin Francis Phillip

    The central objective of this work is to examine the direct radiative effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on the dynamics of African easterly waves (AEWs) and the African easterly jet (AEJ). Achieving this objective is built around two tasks that use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to an online dust model (WRF-dust model). The first task (Chapter 2) examines the linear dynamics of AEWs; the second task (Chapter 3) examines the nonlinear evolution of AEWs and their interactions with the AEJ. In Chapter 2, the direct radiative effects of dust on the linear dynamics of AEWs are examined analytically and numerically. The analytical analysis combines the thermodynamic equation with a dust continuity equation to form an expression for the generation of eddy available potential energy (APE) by the dust field. The generation of eddy APE is a function of the transmissivity and spatial gradients of the dust, which are modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency. The expression predicts that for a fixed dust distribution, the wave response will be largest in regions where the dust gradients are maximized and the Doppler-shifted frequency vanishes. The numerical analysis calculates the linear dynamics of AEWs using zonally averaged basic states for wind, temperature and dust consistent with summertime conditions over North Africa. For the fastest growing AEW, the dust increases the growth rate from ~15% to 90% for aerosol optical depths ranging from tau=1.0 to tau=2.5. A local energetics analysis shows that for tau=1.0, the dust increases the maximum barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions by ~50% and ~100%, respectively. The maxima in the generation of APE and conversions of energy are co-located and occur where the meridional dust gradient is maximized near the critical layer, i.e., where the Doppler-shifted frequency is small, in agreement with the prediction from the analytical analysis. In Chapter 3, the direct radiative effects of dust

  8. Metabolomics Characterization of U.S. and Japanese F-15 and C-130 Flight Line Crews Exposed to Jet Fuel Volatile Organic Compounds and Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    concerning level of exposure and the corresponding biological response associated with human jet fuel exposure, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based...Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Jet Fuel, Human, Biomarkers 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...associated with human jet fuel exposure, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics analysis of human urine was utilized for characterization of

  9. Heterojunction solar cells based on single-crystal silicon with an inkjet-printed contact grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, S. N.; Abramov, A. S.; Ivanov, G. A.; Terukov, E. I.; Emtsev, K. V.; Nyapshaev, I. A.; Bazeley, A. A.; Gubin, S. P.; Kornilov, D. Yu.; Tkachev, S. V.; Kim, V. P.; Ryndin, D. A.; Levchenkova, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Results on the creation of a current-collecting grid for heterojunction silicon solar cells by ink-jet printing are presented. Characteristics of the obtained solar cells are compared with those of the samples obtained using standard screen printing.

  10. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  11. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  12. Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  13. Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel A. (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  14. Printed electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel A. (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  15. Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  16. Face Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadash, Dre Ann

    1984-01-01

    Eighth graders made prints of their own faces, using photographic papers and chemicals. Describes the supplies needed and the printing process involved. Because junior high school students are so concerned with self, this was a very meaningful activity for them. (CS)

  17. Digital printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Werner K.

    1997-02-01

    Digital printing is described as a tool to replace conventional printing machines completely. Still this goal was not reached until now with any of the digital printing technologies to be described in the paper. Productivity and costs are still the main parameters and are not really solved until now. Quality in digital printing is no problem anymore. Definition of digital printing is to transfer digital datas directly on the paper surface. This step can be carried out directly or with the use of an intermediate image carrier. Keywords in digital printing are: computer- to-press; erasable image carrier; image carrier with memory. Digital printing is also the logical development of the new digital area as it is pointed out in Nicholas Negropotes book 'Being Digital' and also the answer to networking and Internet technologies. Creating images text and color in one country and publishing the datas in another country or continent is the main advantage. Printing on demand another big advantage and last but not least personalization the last big advantage. Costs and being able to coop with this new world of prepress technology is the biggest disadvantage. Therefore the very optimistic growth rates for the next few years are really nonexistent. The development of complete new markets is too slow and the replacing of old markets is too small.

  18. High resolution printing of charge

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-16

    Provided are methods of printing a pattern of charge on a substrate surface, such as by electrohydrodynamic (e-jet) printing. The methods relate to providing a nozzle containing a printable fluid, providing a substrate having a substrate surface and generating from the nozzle an ejected printable fluid containing net charge. The ejected printable fluid containing net charge is directed to the substrate surface, wherein the net charge does not substantially degrade and the net charge retained on the substrate surface. Also provided are functional devices made by any of the disclosed methods.

  19. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  20. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  1. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (+/-2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec-1), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm2 V-1 s-1) and high on/off ratio (104-107). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge

  2. Sorting of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube and printed flexible driving circuit for organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Zhao, Jianwen; Qian, Long; Han, Xianying; Wu, Liangzhuan; Wu, Weichen; Song, Minshun; Zhou, Lu; Su, Wenming; Wang, Chao; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving circuit, showing the potential as backplanes for active matrix OLED applications.A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving

  3. Overview of Thermal Ink Jet Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Francis C.

    1989-07-01

    In the recent years, thermal ink jet (bubble jet) has emerged to become a fast growing printing technology with market applications first aimed at the low end, high quality and color workstation printers. The break-through in this ink jet technology came in the areas of low cost/high volume manufacture using semiconductor thin-film processing, improved apparent reliability and the ability of high quality printing on wide range of office papers. Although the print head technology appears simple and compact, the underlining thin-film structures, micro fluid channels and drop generation process are by no mean straight-forward. In fact, the ink chemistry, the material integrity and the device physics are closely coupled to provide the proper functionality of the print engine. Hence optimization of the technology can only be achieved through complete device integration. In this paper, the basic implementations of the thermal ink jet technology is presented. The physics of bubble/drop formation process is described using results obtained from our experimental studies. Different failure modes of the electro-thermal drop generator (in particular, the thin-film resistive heater) are discussed. Results can be extrapolated to obtain a basic understanding in the requirements of the ink media and the material structure. Based on the current knowledge of this printing method, projections of the technology limitations in practical implementations can be made to support a view that thermal ink jet will become the dominant low end printing technology in the near future.

  4. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  5. Jetting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Szarka, D.D.; Schwegman, S.L.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an apparatus for hydraulically jetting a well tool disposed in a well, the well tool having a sliding member. It comprises positioner means for operably engaging the sliding member of the well tool; and a jetting means, connected at a rotatable connection to the positioner means so that the jetting means is rotatable relative to the positioner means and the well tool, for hydraulically jetting the well tool as the jetting means is rotated relative thereto.

  6. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  7. Effect of surface wettability properties on the electrical properties of printed carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on SiO2/Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Jianwen; Xu, Wenya; Qian, Long; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-07-09

    The precise placement and efficient deposition of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) on substrates are challenges for achieving printed high-performance SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) with independent gates. It was found that the wettability of the substrate played a key role in the electrical properties of TFTs for sc-SWCNTs sorted by poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole)] (PFO-BT). In the present work we report a simple and scalable method which can rapidly and selectively deposit a high concentration of sc-SWCNTs in TFT channels by aerosol-jet-printing. The method is based on oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, which tunes the surface wettability. TFTs printed on the treated substrates demonstrated a low operation voltage, small hysteresis, high mobility up to 32.3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and high on/off ratio up to 10(6) after only two printings. Their mobilities were 10 and 30 times higher than those of TFTs fabricated on untreated and low-wettability substrates. The uniformity of printed TFTs was also greatly improved. Inverters were constructed by printed top-gate TFTs, and a maximum voltage gain of 17 at Vdd = 5 V was achieved. The mechanism of such improvements is that the PFO-BT-functionalized sc-SWCNTs are preferably immobilized on the oxygen plasma treated substrates due to the strong hydrogen bonds between sc-SWCNTs and hydroxyl groups on the substrates.

  8. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  9. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  10. Electro-hydrodynamic printing using hole-type electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungmi; Kim, Ho; Chung, Jaewon

    2012-03-01

    Additive direct writing has many advantages compared with the subtractive conventional MEMS fabrication process. With its reduced manufacturing steps, the processing time is shortened and the overall process costs less. Also, the process is non-toxic and its flexibility in the manufacturing gives the capability to alter printing patterns promptly. Among many direct writing methods, electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) printing is also receiving a huge interest due to its capability of high resolution printing. However, there are still many issues to be resolved for the high volume fabrication process, such as the realization of multi-nozzle drop on demand system, etc. In this work, EHD printing was demonstrated using a hole-type electrode with stainless steel nozzle to which the liquid is supplied from a constant pressure reservoir. With varying square voltage pulses between the nozzle and the electrode, three types of jet emission modes are observed; continuous mode, fine jet pulsating mode and droplet pulsating mode. Among these modes, the droplet pulsating mode and the fine jet pulsating mode were optimized to print relatively large patterns and high resolution patterns, respectively. In addition, to demonstrate near field printing for high position accuracy, EHD printing was carried out with a nozzle penetrating the hole-type electrode, so that the distance between nozzle tip and the substrate could be shortened.

  11. Collodial cluster arrays by electrohydrodynamic printing.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2008-11-04

    A "stable" electrohydrodynamic jet is used to print arrays of colloidal suspensions on hydrophobic surfaces. Printed lines break up into sessile drops, and capillary forces guide the self-assembly of colloidal particles during the evaporation of the liquid, resulting in arrays of colloidal single particles or particle clusters depending on the concentration of the suspensions. The clusters differ from those formed in the absence of a substrate when the number of particles is larger than three. Multiple structures are found for the same number of particles.

  12. Three-dimensional microarchitected materials and devices using nanoparticle assembly by pointwise spatial printing

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohammad Sadeq; Hu, Chunshan; Panat, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical materials are important to a wide range of emerging technological applications. We report a method to synthesize complex 3D microengineered materials, such as microlattices, with nearly fully dense truss elements with a minimum diameter of approximately 20 μm and having high aspect ratios (up to 20:1) without using any templating or supporting materials. By varying the postprocessing conditions, we have also introduced an additional control over the internal porosity of the truss elements to demonstrate a hierarchical porous structure with an overall void size and feature size control of over five orders of magnitudes in length scale. The method uses direct printing of nanoparticle dispersions using the Aerosol Jet technology in 3D space without templating or supporting materials followed by binder removal and sintering. In addition to 3D microlattices, we have also demonstrated directly printed stretchable interconnects, spirals, and pillars. This assembly method could be implemented by a variety of microdroplet generation methods for fast and large-scale fabrication of the hierarchical materials for applications in tissue engineering, ultralight or multifunctional materials, microfluidics, and micro-optoelectronics. PMID:28275733

  13. Three-dimensional microarchitected materials and devices using nanoparticle assembly by pointwise spatial printing.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad Sadeq; Hu, Chunshan; Panat, Rahul

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical materials are important to a wide range of emerging technological applications. We report a method to synthesize complex 3D microengineered materials, such as microlattices, with nearly fully dense truss elements with a minimum diameter of approximately 20 μm and having high aspect ratios (up to 20:1) without using any templating or supporting materials. By varying the postprocessing conditions, we have also introduced an additional control over the internal porosity of the truss elements to demonstrate a hierarchical porous structure with an overall void size and feature size control of over five orders of magnitudes in length scale. The method uses direct printing of nanoparticle dispersions using the Aerosol Jet technology in 3D space without templating or supporting materials followed by binder removal and sintering. In addition to 3D microlattices, we have also demonstrated directly printed stretchable interconnects, spirals, and pillars. This assembly method could be implemented by a variety of microdroplet generation methods for fast and large-scale fabrication of the hierarchical materials for applications in tissue engineering, ultralight or multifunctional materials, microfluidics, and micro-optoelectronics.

  14. Early prints depicting eyeglasses.

    PubMed

    Letocha, Charles E; Dreyfus, John

    2002-11-01

    Much of the history of eyeglasses has been gleaned from studies of paintings and prints that illustrate them. A few prints from the first century of printing include spectacles and are reproduced in this article. In addition to showing their form and method of use, these prints also illustrate their symbolic value.

  15. Plume Mechanics and Aerosol Growth Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO NO ACCESSION NO %. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423 II 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Plume Mechanics and...formulation and a finite element sc hem e ......... ..................... 192 c. Diffusion of aerosols in laminar flow in a cylindrical tube...The principal elements are the liquid oil and carrier gas metering systems, the oil vaporizer, coaxial jet system, and the sampling and aerosol

  16. Controlling laser-induced jet formation for bioprinting mesenchymal stem cells with high viability and high resolution.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Pages, Emeline; Ducom, Alexandre; Fontaine, Aurelien; Guillemot, Fabien

    2014-09-12

    Laser-assisted bioprinting is a versatile, non-contact, nozzle-free printing technique which has demonstrated high potential for cell printing with high resolution. Improving cell viability requires determining printing conditions which minimize shear stress for cells within the jet and cell impact at droplet landing. In this context, this study deals with laser-induced jet dynamics to determine conditions from which jets arise with minimum kinetic energies. The transition from a sub-threshold regime to jetting regime has been associated with a geometrical parameter (vertex angle) which can be harnessed to print mesenchymal stem cells with high viability using slow jet conditions. Finally, hydrodynamic jet stability is also studied for higher laser pulse energies which give rise to supersonic but turbulent jets.

  17. Inkjet printing of bioadhesives.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, Anand; Dunaway, Timothy M; Wilker, Jonathan J; Narayan, Roger J

    2009-04-01

    Over the past century, synthetic adhesives have largely displaced their natural counterparts in medical applications. However, rising concerns over the environmental and toxicological effects of the solvents, monomers, and additives used in synthetic adhesives have recently led the scientific community to seek natural substitutes. Marine mussel adhesive protein is a formaldehyde-free natural adhesive that demonstrates excellent adhesion to several classes of materials, including glasses, metals, metal oxides, and polymers. In this study, we have demonstrated computer aided design (CAD) patterning of various biological adhesives using piezoelectric inkjet technology. A MEMS-based piezoelectric actuator was used to control the flow of the mussel adhesive protein solution through the ink jet nozzles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), microscopy, and adhesion studies were performed to examine the chemical, structural, and functional properties of these patterns, respectively. FTIR revealed the piezoelectric inkjet technology technique to be nondestructive. Atomic force microscopy was used to determine the extent of chelation caused by Fe(III). The adhesive strength in these materials was correlated with the extent of chelation by Fe(III). Piezoelectric inkjet printing of naturally-derived biological adhesives may overcome several problems associated with conventional tissue bonding materials. This technique may significantly improve wound repair in next generation eye repair, fracture fixation, wound closure, and drug delivery devices.

  18. Personalised dosing: Printing a dose of one's own medicine.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mustafa; Mohamed, Fatima H; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    Ink-jet printing is a versatile, precise and relatively inexpensive method of depositing small volumes of solutions with remarkable accuracy and repeatability. Although developed primarily as a technology for image reproduction, its areas of application have expanded significantly in recent years. It is particularly suited to the manufacture of low dose medicines or to short production runs and so offers a potential manufacturing solution for the paradigm of personalised medicines. This review discusses the technical and clinical aspects of ink-jet printing that must be considered in order for the technology to become widely adopted in the pharmaceutical arena and considers applications in the literature.

  19. The Role of Anthropogenic Aerosol in Atmospheric Circulation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, L.; Polvani, L. M.; Highwood, E.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in atmospheric circulation patterns play a dominant role in determining the impacts of a changing climate at the continental scale. Using CMIP5 single forcing experiments from an ensemble of models that provided anthropogenic aerosol only simulations to the archive, we quantify the influence of anthropogenic aerosol on several aspects of the atmospheric circulation, including tropical width, jet position, and jet strength. We show that there is a robust circulation response to anthropogenic aerosol in the mid twentieth century, induced by the large increases in emissions at that time. Although most anthropogenic aerosol is found in the Northern Hemisphere, a response is found in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We investigate the extent to which diversity in the temperature and circulation responses to aerosol are related to diversity in aerosol loading and radiative forcing.

  20. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  1. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  2. Enhanced Stability of Electrohydrodynamic Jets through Gas Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  3. Enhanced stability of electrohydrodynamic jets through gas ionization.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel; Saville, Dudley A; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2008-01-25

    Theoretical predictions of the nonaxisymmetric instability growth rate of an electrohydrodynamic jet based on the measured total current overestimate experimental values. We show that this apparent discrepancy is the result of gas ionization in the surrounding gas and its effect on the surface charge density of the jet. As a result of gas ionization, a sudden drop in the instability growth rate occurs below a critical electrode separation, yielding highly stable jets that can be used for nano- to microscale printing.

  4. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  5. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  6. Color-managed 3D printing with highly translucent printing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Can Ates; Brunton, Alan; Tanksale, Tejas Madan; Urban, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Many 3D printing applications require the reproduction of an object's color in addition to its shape. One 3D printing technology, called multi-jetting (or poly-jetting), allows full color 3D reproductions by arranging multiple colored materials (UV curing photo-polymers) on a droplet level in a single object. One property of such printing materials is their high translucency posing new challenges for characterizing such 3D printers to create ICC profiles. In this paper, we will first describe the whole color-managed 3D printing workflow and will then focus on measuring the colors of highly translucent printing materials. We will show that measurements made by spectrophotometers used in the graphic arts industry are systematically biased towards lower reflection. We will then propose a trichromatic camera-based approach for measuring such colors. Error rates obtained in comparison with spectroradiometric measurements for the same viewing conditions are within the interinstrument-variability of hand-held spectrophotometers used in graphic arts.

  7. APPLICATION OF JET REMPI AND LIBS TO AIR TOXIC MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses three advanced, laser-based monitoring techniques that the EPA is assisting in developing for real time measurement of toxic aerosol compounds. One of the three techniques is jet resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (Jet REMPI) coupled with a time-of-flig...

  8. Commercial printing and electronic color printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Joseph W.

    1995-04-01

    Technologies such as Xeikon, Indigo, and the Heidelberg/Presstek GTO-DI can change both the way print buyers may purchase printed material and the way printers and trade services respond to changing demands. Our recent study surveys the graphic arts industry for their current views of these new products and provides forecasts of installations and usage with breakdowns by market segment and size of firm. The acceptance of desktop publishing and electronic prepress have not only paved the way for a totally electronic printing process, but it has broadened the base of people who develop color originals for reproduction. Electronic printing adds the ability to customize jobs on the fly. How print providers will respond to the impact of electronic color printing depends on how each firm perceives the 'threat.' Most printing companies are run by entrepreneurial individuals who have, as their highest priority, their own economic survival. Service bureaus are already looking at electronic color printing as yet another way to differentiate their businesses. The study was based on a mail survey with 682 responses from graphic arts firms, interviews with printers, suppliers, associations and industry executives, and detailed secondary research. Results of a new survey in progress in January 1995 is also presented.

  9. Numerical study of nanoparticle formation in a free turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfanov, A. K.; Koch, W.; Zaripov, S. K.; Rybdylova, O. D.

    2016-11-01

    Di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) aerosol nanoparticle formation in a free turbulent jet as a result of nucleation, condensation and coagulation is studied using fluid flow simulation and the method of moments under the assumption of lognormal particle size distribution. The case of high nucleation rates and the coagulation-controlled growth of particles is considered. The formed aerosol performance is jet is numerically investigated for the various nozzle diameters and two approximations of the saturation pressure dependence on the temperature. It is demonstrated that a higher polydispersity of the aerosol is obtained for smaller nozzle diameters.

  10. Large Print Bibliography, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Library, Pierre.

    This bibliography lists materials that are available in large print format from the South Dakota State Library. The annotated entries are printed in large print and include the title of the material and its author, call number, publication date, and type of story or subject area covered. Some recorded items are included in the list. The entries…

  11. Colour changes in prints during long-term dark storage of prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2010-06-01

    The most significant impact on colour fading in prints is exposure to light and air. However what happens to coloured prints during long-term storage in boxes, drawers and on shelves? Measurements of samples, printed in July 2005, stored in a range of light and darkened storage conditions have shown some interesting initial results. As more emphasis is placed on the effects of light, the dark stability of inkjet prints is relatively overlooked when considering how to preserve or store coloured prints. This study and presentation builds on previous research [1] and has concentrated on the changes to colour during storage. With reference to ASTM F2035 - 00(2006) Standard Practice for Measuring the Dark Stability of Ink Jet Prints, the Standards outline points out that whilst natural aging is the most reliable method of assessing image stability, materials and inks any data that is produced quickly becomes redundant; therefore accelerated aging is more preferred. However, the fine art materials in this study are still very much in circulation. The leading fine art papers, and pigmented ink-sets used in these trials are still being used by artists. We can therefore demonstrate the characteristics of colour changes and the impact of ink on paper that utilises natural aging methods.

  12. Bouncing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-11-01

    Contrary to common intuition, free jets of fluid can ``bounce'' off each other on collision in mid-air, through the effect of a lubricating air film that separates the jets. We have developed a simple experimental setup to stably demonstrate and study the non-coalescence of jets on collision. We present the results of an experimental investigation of oblique collision between two silicone oil jets, supported by a simple analytical explanation. Our focus is on elucidating the role of various physical forces at play such as viscous stresses, capillary force and inertia. A parametric study conducted by varying the nozzle diameter, jet velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity reveals the scaling laws for the quantities involved such as contact time. We observed a transition from bouncing to coalescence with an increase in jet velocity and inclination angle. We propose that a balance between the contact time of jets and the time required for drainage of the trapped air film can provide a criterion for transition from non-coalescence to coalescence.

  13. Investigation of pulse voltage shape effects on electrohydrodynamic jets using a vision measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Lee, Dae-Yong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a vision measurement technique to evaluate electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet behavior, and discuss the effects of the pulse voltage shape on the EHD jets for drop-on-demand printing, including the falling and rising time in the pulse voltage. Sequential images acquired by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with a strobe light-emitting diode (LED) were used to visualize EHD jet behavior with respect to time. A vision algorithm was implemented in an EHD jet system to enable in situ measurement and analysis of EHD jets. A guideline for selecting pulse shape parameters is also presented, to enable the achievement of high-frequency reliable jets for drop-on-demand printing. Printing results are presented to demonstrate the drop consistency of jets.

  14. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  15. Mass absorption indices of various types of natural aerosol particles in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K

    1975-12-01

    The mass absorption index of aerosol particles has been measured in the 2-17-microm wavelength region. The measurements were performed on films of aerosol particles that were collected by an automatic jet impactor at polluted and various uncontaminated remote sites. All but marine aerosols possess strong absorption bands in the transparent part of the atmospheric long-wave spectrum, indicating marked influence of aerosol particles on the radiation budget of the atmosphere.

  16. Coalescence, evaporation and particle deposition of consecutively printed colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Yang, Xin; Shah, Jaymeen; Sun, Ying

    2012-11-01

    In applications such as inkjet printing and spray deposition, colloid drops are often used as building blocks for line and pattern printing where their interactions play important roles in determining the deposition morphology and properties. In this study, the particle deposition dynamics of two consecutively printed evaporating colloidal drops is examined using a fluorescence microscope and a synchronized side-view camera. The results show that the relaxation time of the water-air interface of the merged drop is shorter than that of a single drop impacting on a dry surface. It is also found that both morphology and particle distribution uniformity of the deposit change significantly with varying jetting delay and spatial spacing between two drops. As the drop spacing increases while keeping jetting delay constant, the circularity of the coalesced drop reduces. For the regime where the time scale for drop evaporation is comparable with the relaxation time scale for two drops to completely coalesce, the capillary flow induced by the local curvature variation of the air-water interface redistributes particles inside a merged drop, causing suppression of the coffee-ring effect for the case of a high jetting frequency while resulting in a region of particle accumulation in the middle of the merged drop at a low jetting frequency. By tuning the interplay of wetting, evaporation, capillary relaxation, and particle assembly, the deposition morphology of consecutively printed colloidal drops can be controlled.

  17. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  18. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  19. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  20. Drop-on-demand printing of conductive ink by electrostatic field induced inkjet head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeyong; Kim, Yong-Jae; Lee, Sukhan; Son, Sang Uk; Ko, Han Seo; Nguyen, Vu Dat; Byun, Doyoung

    2008-11-01

    Recently, inkjet printing technology has become crucial in many industrial fabrication fields mainly due to its advantages of noncontact and fast pattern generation. In this paper, we investigate an electrostatic field induced inkjet printing system, which is based on an electrohydrodynamic process, for drop-on-demand jetting. In order to locate the optimal jetting conditions, we tested jetting performance for various bias voltages and pulse signals. To investigate the characteristics of drop-on-demand operation and micropatterning, we used conductive silver ink and examined the drops and lines patterned on a substrate.

  1. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  2. Fully Printed and Encapsulated SWCNT-Based Thin Film Transistors via a Combination of R2R Gravure and Inkjet Printing.

    PubMed

    Homenick, Christa M; James, Robert; Lopinski, Gregory P; Dunford, Jeffrey; Sun, Junfeng; Park, Hyejin; Jung, Younsu; Cho, Gyoujin; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2016-10-04

    Fully printed thin film transistors (TFT) based on poly(9,9-di-n-dodecylfluorene) (PFDD) wrapped semiconducting single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) channels are fabricated by a practical route that combines roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure and ink jet printing. SWCNT network density is easily controlled via ink formulation (concentration and polymer:CNT ratio) and jetting conditions (droplet size, drop spacing, and number of printed layers). Optimum inkjet printing conditions are established on Si/SiO2 in which an ink consisting of 6:1 PFDD:SWCNT ratio with 50 mg L(-1) SWCNT concentration printed at a drop spacing of 20 μm results in TFTs with mobilities of ∼25 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and on-/off-current ratios > 10(5). These conditions yield excellent network uniformity and are used in a fully additive process to fabricate fully printed TFTs on PET substrates with mobility values > 5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (R2R printed gate electrode and dielectric; inkjet printed channel and source/drain electrodes). An inkjet printed encapsulation layer completes the TFT process (fabricated in bottom gate, top contact TFT configuration) and provides mobilities > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with good operational stability, based on the performance of an inverter circuit. An array of 20 TFTs shows that most have less than 10% variability in terms of threshold voltage, transconductance, on-current, and subthreshold swing.

  3. Inkjet Printing of Viscous Monodisperse Microdroplets by Laser-Induced Flow Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrot, Paul; Modestino, Miguel A.; Gallaire, François; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The on-demand generation of viscous microdroplets to print functional or biological materials remains challenging using conventional inkjet-printing methods, mainly due to aggregation and clogging issues. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we implement a jetting method to print viscous microdroplets by laser-induced shockwaves. We experimentally investigate the dependence of the jetting regimes and the droplet size on the laser-pulse energy and on the inks' physical properties. The range of printable liquids with our device is significantly extended compared to conventional inkjet printers's performances. In addition, the laser-induced flow-focusing phenomenon allows us to controllably generate viscous microdroplets up to 210 mPa s with a diameter smaller than the nozzle from which they originated (200 μ m ). Inks containing proteins are printed without altering their functional properties, thus demonstrating that this jetting technique is potentially suitable for bioprinting.

  4. Pulsating Electrohydrodynamic Cone-Jets: from Choked Jet to Oscillating Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bober, David; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2011-11-01

    Pulsating cone-jets occur in a variety of electrostatic spraying and printing systems. We report an experimental study of the pulsation frequency to reconcile two models based on a choked jet and an oscillating cone, respectively. The two regimes are demarcated by the ratio of the supplied flow rate (Qs) to the minimum flow rate (Qm) required for a steady Taylor cone-jet. When Qs jet, when on, emits mass at the minimum flow rate; the pulsation frequency in the choked jet regime is proportional to Qs /Qm . When Qs >Qm , the Taylor cone anchored at the nozzle experiences a capillary oscillation analogous to the Rayleigh mode of a free drop; the pulsation frequency in the oscillating cone regime plateaus to the capillary oscillation frequency which is independent of Qs /Qm .

  5. Behavior of printable formulations of loperamide and caffeine on different substrates--effect of print density in inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Genina, Natalja; Fors, Daniela; Palo, Mirja; Peltonen, Jouko; Sandler, Niklas

    2013-09-10

    The primary goal of the current work was to study the applicability of precision inkjet printing in fabrication of personalized doses of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) and caffeine (CAF) were used as model compounds. Different doses of the drugs in a single dosage unit were produced, using a drop-on-demand inkjet printer by varying printing parameters such as the distance between jetted droplets (drop spacing) and the physical dimensions of the printed dosage forms. The behavior of the formulated printable inks for both APIs was investigated on the model substrates, using different analytical tools. The obtained results showed that printed LOP did not recrystallize on any substrates studied, whereas at least partial recrystallization of printed CAF was observed on all carrier surfaces. Flexible doses of both APIs were easily obtained by adjusting the drop spacing of the depositing inks, and the results were relevant with regards to the theoretical content. Adapting the dose by varying physical dimensions of single dosage units was less successful than the approach in which drop spacing was altered. In conclusion, controlled printing technology, by means of adjusting the distance between jetted droplets, offers a means to fabricate dosage forms with individualized doses.

  6. Engraving Print Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelck, Daniel; Barbe, Joaquim

    2008-04-15

    A print is a mark, or drawing, made in or upon a plate, stone, woodblock or other material which is cover with ink and then is press usually into a paper reproducing the image on the paper. Engraving prints usually are image composed of a group of binary lines, specially those are made with relief and intaglio techniques. Varying the number and the orientation of lines, the drawing of the engraving print is conformed. For this reason we propose an application based on image processing methods to classify engraving prints.

  7. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  8. Complex light in 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Christophe; Delrot, Paul; Loterie, Damien; Morales Delgado, Edgar; Modestino, Miguel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    3D printing as a tool to generate complicated shapes from CAD files, on demand, with different materials from plastics to metals, is shortening product development cycles, enabling new design possibilities and can provide a mean to manufacture small volumes cost effectively. There are many technologies for 3D printing and the majority uses light in the process. In one process (Multi-jet modeling, polyjet, printoptical©), a printhead prints layers of ultra-violet curable liquid plastic. Here, each nozzle deposits the material, which is then flooded by a UV curing lamp to harden it. In another process (Stereolithography), a focused UV laser beam provides both the spatial localization and the photo-hardening of the resin. Similarly, laser sintering works with metal powders by locally melting the material point by point and layer by layer. When the laser delivers ultra-fast focused pulses, nonlinear effects polymerize the material with high spatial resolution. In these processes, light is either focused in one spot and the part is made by scanning it or the light is expanded and covers a wide area for photopolymerization. Hence a fairly "simple" light field is used in both cases. Here, we give examples of how "complex light" brings additional level of complexity in 3D printing.

  9. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  10. Selective Conversion from p-Type to n-Type of Printed Bottom-Gate Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors and Application in Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Inverters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiqi; Zhao, Jianwen; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Xu, Wenya; Zhou, Chunshan; Dou, Junyan; Gu, Weibing; Lin, Jian; Mo, Lixin; Zhao, Yanfei; Cui, Zheng

    2017-04-12

    The fabrication of printed high-performance and environmentally stable n-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors and their integration into complementary (i.e., complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor, CMOS) circuits are widely recognized as key to achieving the full potential of carbon nanotube electronics. Here, we report a simple, efficient, and robust method to convert the polarity of SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) using cheap and readily available ethanolamine as an electron doping agent. Printed p-type bottom-gate SWCNT TFTs can be selectively converted into n-type by deposition of ethanolamine inks on the transistor active region via aerosol jet printing. Resulted n-type TFTs show excellent electrical properties with an on/off ratio of 10(6), effective mobility up to 30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), small hysteresis, and small subthreshold swing (90-140 mV dec(-1)), which are superior compared to the original p-type SWCNT devices. The n-type SWCNT TFTs also show good stability in air, and any deterioration of performance due to shelf storage can be fully recovered by a short low-temperature annealing. The easy polarity conversion process allows construction of CMOS circuitry. As an example, CMOS inverters were fabricated using printed p-type and n-type TFTs and exhibited a large noise margin (50 and 103% of 1/2 Vdd = 1 V) and a voltage gain as high as 30 (at Vdd = 1 V). Additionally, the CMOS inverters show full rail-to-rail output voltage swing and low power dissipation (0.1 μW at Vdd = 1 V). The new method paves the way to construct fully functional complex CMOS circuitry by printed TFTs.

  11. Offset Printing, Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bly, Ervin; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Prepared by an instructor and a curriculum development specialist, this course of study was designed to meet the individual needs of the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth by providing skill training, related information, and supportive services knowledge about offset printing. The course provides training in offset printing and related…

  12. The Circle Block Print

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Annita

    2011-01-01

    Most students enjoy the printing process. Some may have experimented with printing in the past using found objects or cutouts made of cardboard. In this article, students create a design on a pie-shaped piece and then repeat it to make a radial design.

  13. Print like an Egyptian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisensee, Marilyn

    1990-01-01

    Describes a relief printmaking unit for sixth graders with the objective of decorating the inside of a pyramid. Ancient Egyptian imagery was used to help students become familiar with the style. Students designed and printed linoleum prints in different colors. They then critiqued their work and made their selection for the pyramid. (KM)

  14. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  15. Atmospheric responses to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Angus; Highwood, Eleanor; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, also called solar radiation management (SRM), involves the injection of aerosol into the stratosphere to increase the planetary albedo. It has been conceieved as a policy option in response to human-induced global warming. It is well-established from modelling studies and observations following volcanic eruptions that stratospheric sulphate aerosols cause global cooling. Some aspects of the climate response, especially those involving large-scale dynamical changes, are more uncertain. This work attempts to identify the physical mechanisms operating in the climate response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering using idealised model experiments. The radiative forcing produced by the aerosol depends on its type (species) and size. Aerosols absorb terrestrial and solar radiation, which drives stratospheric temperature change. The stratospheric temperature change also depends on aerosol type and size. We calculate the stratospheric temperature change due to geoengineering with sulphate, titania, limestone and soot in a fixed-dynamical-heating radiative model. Sulphate produces tropical heating of up to ~6 K. Titania produces much less heating, whereas soot produces much more. Most aerosols increase the meridional temperature gradient in the lower stratosphere which, by thermal wind balance, would be expected to intensify the zonal winds in the polar vortex. An intermediate-complexity general circulation model is used to investigate the dynamical response to geoengineering aerosols. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The carbon dioxide forcing is then balanced using stratospheric sulphate aerosol. We assess dynamical changes in the stratosphere, for example, the frequency of stratospheric sudden warmings and the strength of the Brewer-Dobson overturning circulation. We also assess changes in the strength and position of the tropospheric jets. We compare results for sulphate with those for titania.

  16. Testing the efficiency of aerosol containment during cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Schmid, I; Hultin, L E; Ferbas, J

    2001-05-01

    Production of droplets and microdroplets (aerosols) is part of the normal operation of a cell sorter. These aerosols may contain toxic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic fluorophores or known or unknown pathogens from viable biological specimens. Most newer models of commercially available instruments incorporate features designed to reduce the production of aerosols and prevent their release into the room. This unit presents two protocols for assessment of aerosol containment on jet-in-air flow sorters. In both procedures, lytic T4 bacteriophage is run through the instrument at high concentrations to tag aerosol droplets. The instrument is tested in normal operating mode and in simulated failure mode. Aerosols are detected by plaque formation on susceptible E. coli lawns. With the continuing increase in the sorting of viable human cells, it is vital for cytometrists to be aware of the potential dangers.

  17. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  18. Stable electric-field driven cone-jetting of concentrated biosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, S N; Townsend-Nicholson, A

    2006-08-01

    Electrospraying, or electrohydrodynamic jetting, is one of several jet-based technologies being explored to process living biological organisms. One of the key advantages of electrospraying is its ability to deposit advanced materials with high resolution that cannot be obtained with other competing technologies, such as ink-jet printing. However, to generate a controlled droplet size distribution in the micrometre range necessary for precision drop and placement of materials requires jetting in stable cone-jet mode. In this paper, we describe the experimental set-up and conditions by which electrospray jetting in stable cone-jet is achieved and use this methodology to process a highly concentrated biological suspension having 10(7) cells ml(-1), the highest cellular loading processed to this day by a jetting approach in this jet based category. The areas of study to which this technology may be applied span the physical and the life sciences.

  19. Whither ink jet? Current patent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, Stephen F.; Karz, Robert S.

    1995-04-01

    The status and potential of ink jet technology is discernible in its major technical literature forum: worldwide patents. Most ink jet technical activity is focused in commercial research and development laboratories where proprietary considerations make patents the norm for publication. Currently there are about 2,000 ink jet disclosures issued annually with over 200 enterprises represented. Ink jet patent activity is increasing about 25% per year driven by a rapidly expanding base of products, applications, and revenue. An analysis of the ink jet patent literature reveals a few major themes (i.e. continuous ink jet, piezoelectric drop-on-demand, and thermal ink jet) and numerous minor ones (i.e. electrohydro-dynamic extraction, magnetic drop-on-demand, Hertz continuous, acoustic ink printing). Patents bear witness to transformations in the industry as dominant players of the 1970's have given way to new leaders in the 1990's. They also foretell important commercial developments in ink jet's near term future. When studied in aggregate, the patent record reveals patterns for the industry in general as well as for individual companies. It becomes possible to use the patent data base not only to identify technical approaches and problems for specific firms, but also to track progress and monitor changing strategies. In addition, international filing patterns can provide insights into industry priorities. This paper presents an overview of ink jet technology as revealed by the patent literature. It will include a 25 year perspective, a review of trends over the past five years, and a survey of today's most active companies and their technical approaches. With this analysis, it will be shown that the information inherent in the patent record is more than the sum of its individual disclosures. Indeed, by using it, we can outlook whither goes ink jet.

  20. Proceedings of the Scientific Conference on Obscuration and Aerosol Research Held in Aberdeen Maryland on 27-30 June 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    OF EXPLOSION AND BREAKDOWN THRESHOLDS 107 A. Biswas, B.S. Park, R.L. Armstrong, R.G. Pinnick, J.D. Pendleton, S.G. Jennings, G. Fernandez MOMENT...study of aerosol filtration by fibrous filters. Aerosol Sci. and Technol. 1, 147 (1982). R. Leers. Die Abscheidung von Schwebstoffen in Faserfiltem. Staub ...Kuhn, "Binary aerosol formation in a laminar coaxial jet", 3. Aerosol Sol. 4 462 (1988). 3. J. Carls and J. Brock, " Explosive vaporization of single

  1. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic inkjet printing of stretchable metal oxide semiconductor transistors with high performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-Y; Kim, K; Hwang, Y H; Park, J; Jang, J; Nam, Y; Kang, Y; Kim, M; Park, H J; Lee, Z; Choi, J; Kim, Y; Jeong, S; Bae, B-S; Park, J-U

    2016-10-06

    As demands for high pixel densities and wearable forms of displays increase, high-resolution printing technologies to achieve high performance transistors beyond current amorphous silicon levels and to allow low-temperature solution processability for plastic substrates have been explored as key processes in emerging flexible electronics. This study describes electrohydrodynamic inkjet (e-jet) technology for direct printing of oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) with high resolution (minimum line width: 2 μm) and superb performance, including high mobility (∼230 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Logic operations of the amplifier circuits composed of these e-jet-printed metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) TFTs demonstrate their high performance. Printed In2O TFTs with e-jet printing-assisted high-resolution S/D electrodes were prepared, and the direct printing of passivation layers on these channels enhanced their gate-bias stabilities significantly. Moreover, low process temperatures (<250 °C) enable the use of thin plastic substrates; highly flexible and stretchable TFT arrays have been demonstrated, suggesting promise for next-generation printed electronics.

  2. [Characterization of an atmospheric pressure DC microplasma jet].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pei-Chao; Wang, Hong-Mei; Li, Jian-Quan; Han, Hai-Yan; Xu, Guo-Hua; Shen, Cheng-Yin; Chu, Yan-Nan

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, a simply designed and easy made micrometer plasma jet device operating under atmospheric pressure was characterized. The microplasma jet operates in many kinds of working gas at atmospheric pressure, such as Ar, He, N2 etc, and is powered by a direct current power source. It can generate high current density glow discharge. In order to identify various excited species generated by the direct current microplasma jet device, the optical emission spectra of the jet with argon or nitrogen as working gas were studied. Based on the optical emission spectroscopy analysis of argon microplasma jet, the electron excitation temperature was determined to be about 3 000 K by the intensity ratio of two spectral lines. It is much lower than the electron excitation temperature of atmospheric pressure plasma torch, and hints that the atmospheric pressure direct current microplasma jet is cold compared with the atmospheric pressure plasma torch. The emission spectra of the N2 second positive band system were used to determine the vibrational temperature of the atmospheric pressure direct current microplasma jet. The experimental result shows that the molecular vibrational temperature of N2 is about 2 500 K. The electron density of the microplasma jet is about 10(13) cm(-3), which can be estimated from the electrical parameters of the discharge in the microplasma jet. A simple example of application of the microplasma jet is given. General print paper surface was modified with the microplasma jet and afterwards a droplet test was carried out. It was shown that the microplasma jet is more efficient in changing the hydrophilicity of general print paper.

  3. Application of 3D printing technology in aerodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasek, K.; Wiklak, P.

    2014-08-01

    3D printing, as an additive process, offers much more than traditional machining techniques in terms of achievable complexity of a model shape. That fact was a motivation to adapt discussed technology as a method for creating objects purposed for aerodynamic testing. The following paper provides an overview of various 3D printing techniques. Four models of a standard NACA0018 aerofoil were manufactured in different materials and methods: MultiJet Modelling (MJM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). Various parameters of the models have been included in the analysis: surface roughness, strength, details quality, surface imperfections and irregularities as well as thermal properties.

  4. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    materials determine the range of applicability of each method. A useful microencapsulation method, based on coagulation by inertial force was developed...The generation apparatus, consisting of two aerosol generators in series, was utilized to produce many kinds of microcapsules . A fluid energy mill...was found useful for the production of some microcapsules . The permeability of microcapsule films and the effect of exposure time and humidity were

  5. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Q.; Han, Y. X.; Zhao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols.

  6. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  7. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  8. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  9. Stop, Look, Listen, Print

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwing, Pauline E.

    1972-01-01

    Article describes the use of audiovisual aids in teaching third-graders how to make brayer, string, Styrofoam and gadget prints. Author advises close cooperation between art and classroom teachers. Printmaking as a means of communication is touched upon. (PD)

  10. Centralize Printing, and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1984-01-01

    Describes the operations of a centralized printing office in a California school district. Centralization greatly increased the efficiency and lowered the cost of generating publications, information services, newsletters, and press releases throughout the school year. (TE)

  11. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  12. Standard Printing Screen System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    area pattern screens. It also describes the creation of a 100-step continuous growth halftone scale for the purpose of specifying quality control tolerances of screen tints for the printed product. (Author)

  13. Design of Aerosol Coating Reactors: Precursor Injection

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Particles are coated with thin shells to facilitate their processing and incorporation into liquid or solid matrixes without altering core particle properties (coloristic, magnetic, etc.). Here, computational fluid and particle dynamics are combined to investigate the geometry of an aerosol reactor for continuous coating of freshly-made titanium dioxide core nanoparticles with nanothin silica shells by injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapor downstream of TiO2 particle formation. The focus is on the influence of HMDSO vapor jet number and direction in terms of azimuth and inclination jet angles on process temperature and coated particle characteristics (shell thickness and fraction of uncoated particles). Rapid and homogeneous mixing of core particle aerosol and coating precursor vapor facilitates synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with uniform shell thickness and high coating efficiency (minimal uncoated core and free coating particles). PMID:23658471

  14. Easy Aerosol - a model intercomparison project to study aerosol-radiative interactions and their impact on regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, A.; Bony, S.; Stevens, B. B.; Boucher, O.; Medeiros, B.; Pincus, R.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, K.; Lewinschal, A.; Bellouin, N.; Yang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies illustrated the potential of aerosols to change the large-scale atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, but it remains unclear to what extent the proposed aerosol-induced changes reflect robust model behavior and are affected by the climate system's internal variability. "Easy Aerosol" addresses this question by subjecting nine comprehensive climate models with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) to the same set of idealized "easy" aerosol perturbations. The aerosol perturbations are designed based on a global aerosol climatology and mimic the gravest mode of the anthropogenic aerosol. They both scatter and absorb shortwave radiation, but to focus on direct radiative effects aerosol-cloud interactions are omitted. Each model contributes seven simulations. A clean control case with no aerosol-radiative effects is compared to six perturbed simulations with differing aerosol loading, zonal aerosol distributions, and SSTs. To estimate the role of internal variability, one of the models contributes a 5-member ensemble for each simulation. When observed SSTs from years 1979-2005 are used, the aerosol leads to a local depression of precipitation at the Northern Hemisphere center of the aerosol and a northward shift of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This is consistent with the aerosol's shortwave atmospheric heating and the fact that SSTs are fixed. Moreover, the Northern hemisphere mid-latitude jet shifts poleward in the annual and zonal-mean. Due to large natura variability, however, these signals only emerge in ensemble runs or if the aerosol optical depth is increased by a factor of five compared to the observed magnitude of the present-day anthropogenic aerosol. When SSTs are adapted to include the cooling effect of the aerosol, the ITCZ and the Northern hemisphere jet shift southward in the annual and zonal-mean. The models exhibit very similar precipitation and zonal wind changes in response to the SST change, showing

  15. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticle ink via commercial hypodermic needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeongjun; Jang, Shin; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the needle shape on electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was investigated by comparing flat outlet needles and hypodermic needles. Line fabrication was performed to confirm the tendency of jetting stability and the printed line width with various driving voltage and stage speed by using Ag nanoparticle ink as a jetting solution on a hydrophobic surface. We verified that the hypodermic needle greatly improves the resolution in EHD printing. The ink slips down the inner wall of the hypodermic needle, and a very small meniscus is generated at the tip of the needle. Due to this phenomenon, high-resolution printing can be accomplished. The narrowest line that was fabricated using a hypodermic needle has a line width of 0.7 μm, and it is smaller than 1% of the needle inner diameter.

  16. Filling schemes of silver dots inkjet-printed on pixelated nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alan, Sheida; Jiang, Hao; Shahbazbegian, Haleh; Patel, Jasbir N; Kaminska, Bozena

    2017-03-01

    Recently, our group demonstrated an inkjet-based technique to enable high-throughput, versatile and full-colour printing of structural colours on generic pixelated nanostructures, termed as molded ink on nanostructured surfaces. The printed colours are controlled by the area of printed silver on the pixelated red, green and blue polymer nanostructure arrays. This paper investigates the behaviour of jetted silver ink droplets on nanostructured surfaces and the microscale dot patterns implemented during printing process, for achieving accurate and consistent colours in the printed images. The surface wettability and the schemes of filling silver dots inside the subpixels are crucial to the quality of printed images. Several related concepts and definitions are introduced, such as filling ratio, full dots per subpixel (DPSP), number of printable colours, colour leaking and dot merging. In our experiments, we first chemically modified the surface to control the wettability and dot size. From each type of modified surface, various filling schemes were experimented and the printed results were evaluated with comprehensive considerations on the number of printable colours and the negative effects of colour leaking and dot merging. Rational selection of the best filling scheme resulted in a 2-line filling scheme using 20 μm dot spacing and line spacing capable of printing 9261 different colours with 121 pixel per inch display resolution, on low-wettability surface. This study is of vital importance for scaling up the printing technique in industrial applications and provides meaningful insights for inkjet-printing on nanostructures.

  17. Filling schemes of silver dots inkjet-printed on pixelated nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alan, Sheida; Jiang, Hao; Shahbazbegian, Haleh; Patel, Jasbir N.; Kaminska, Bozena

    2017-03-01

    Recently, our group demonstrated an inkjet-based technique to enable high-throughput, versatile and full-colour printing of structural colours on generic pixelated nanostructures, termed as molded ink on nanostructured surfaces. The printed colours are controlled by the area of printed silver on the pixelated red, green and blue polymer nanostructure arrays. This paper investigates the behaviour of jetted silver ink droplets on nanostructured surfaces and the microscale dot patterns implemented during printing process, for achieving accurate and consistent colours in the printed images. The surface wettability and the schemes of filling silver dots inside the subpixels are crucial to the quality of printed images. Several related concepts and definitions are introduced, such as filling ratio, full dots per subpixel (DPSP), number of printable colours, colour leaking and dot merging. In our experiments, we first chemically modified the surface to control the wettability and dot size. From each type of modified surface, various filling schemes were experimented and the printed results were evaluated with comprehensive considerations on the number of printable colours and the negative effects of colour leaking and dot merging. Rational selection of the best filling scheme resulted in a 2-line filling scheme using 20 μm dot spacing and line spacing capable of printing 9261 different colours with 121 pixel per inch display resolution, on low-wettability surface. This study is of vital importance for scaling up the printing technique in industrial applications and provides meaningful insights for inkjet-printing on nanostructures.

  18. Sampling submicrometer particles suspended in near sonic and supersonic free jets. [from GTE exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martone, J. A.; Daley, P. S.; Boubel, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerosols containing solid, spherical stearic acid particles with a mean diameter of 0.8 micron and a geometric standard deviation of 1.28 were sampled with small bore front-facing aspirating probes in near-sonic and supersonic unheated free jets. The results are compared to compute the sampling error associated with a high-speed jet sample.

  19. Steady generation of aerosols with an improved constant output atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.; Katz, U.

    1981-01-01

    It is common practice to generate laboratory aerosols of soluble materials with pneumatic atomizers. In a typical device, a solution of the substance to be aerosolized is injected into a jet of air and the liquid is broken up into very small droplets. After forced evaporation, a dry aerosol of the solute is produced. A number of commercially available devices were tested, and despite differences in design, all the atomizers tested suffered from short- and/or long-term fluctuations of their output particle number concentrations. The mechanisms responsible for atomizer instabilities are discussed and methods for alleviating these problems are considered.

  20. PRELIMINARY TESTING OF NANOPARTICLE EFFECTIVENESS IN BINDER JETTING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Alta C; Elliott, Amy M; Basti, Mufeed M

    2016-01-01

    Binder jetting works by selectively depositing a binder with an inkjet print head into layers of powdered material. Compared with other metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes, binder jetting has significant potential for near-term adoption in manufacturing environments due to its reliability and throughput. The Achilles heel of binder jetting, however, is the inability to produce fully dense, single-alloy materials. The lack of density in printed binder jet parts is strictly dictated by the packing factor of the powder feedstock. Adding nanoparticles during printing will not only increase the part s packing factor but may also serve as a sintering aid. This study focuses on the effect of both the binder and nanoparticles on the final part density. As an unintended consequence of high nanoparticle loading, printed parts underwent a significant increase in porosity during the curing process. This unintended consequence is the apparent result of the nanoparticles blocking the exit of the solvent vapor during the curing step. Additionally, nanoparticle use for densification is validated with SEM imagery.

  1. Credit WCT. Original 4" x 5" black and white print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Original 4" x 5" black and white print housed in the JPL Archives, Pasadena, California. This view displays the west elevation of the mixer building and barricades. The slide from the second floor balcony (missing in 1995) provided rapid emergency evacuation for personnel in case of fire or other imminent danger. JPL negative 384-10506, 7 July 1964 - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Mixer, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Hydrochromic molecular switches for water-jet rewritable paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lan; Li, Minjie; Zhu, Shaoyin; Li, Hao; Xi, Guan; Li, Yong-Gang; Wang, Yi; Li, Quanshun; Liang, Shaojun; Zhong, Ke; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An

    2014-01-01

    The days of rewritable paper are coming, printers of the future will use water-jet paper. Although several kinds of rewritable paper have been reported, practical usage of them is rare. Herein, a new rewritable paper for ink-free printing is proposed and demonstrated successfully by using water as the sole trigger to switch hydrochromic dyes on solid media. Water-jet prints with various colours are achieved with a commercial desktop printer based on these hydrochromic rewritable papers. The prints can be erased and rewritten dozens of times with no significant loss in colour quality. This rewritable paper is promising in that it can serve an eco-friendly information display to meet the increasing global needs for environmental protection.

  3. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmans, Walter; Dehoff, Ryan

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  4. Printed hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Mäkinen, Jukka-Tapani; Keränen, Kimmo; Aikio, Janne; Alajoki, Teemu; Jaakola, Tuomo; Koponen, Matti; Keränen, Antti; Heikkinen, Mikko; Tuomikoski, Markus; Suhonen, Riikka; Hakalahti, Leena; Kopola, Pälvi; Hast, Jukka; Liedert, Ralf; Hiltunen, Jussi; Masuda, Noriyuki; Kemppainen, Antti; Rönkä, Kari; Korhonen, Raimo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents research activities carried out at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland in the field of hybrid integration of optics, electronics and mechanics. Main focus area in our research is the manufacturing of electronic modules and product structures with printed electronics, film-over-molding and polymer sheet lamination technologies and the goal is in the next generation of smart systems utilizing monolithic polymer packages. The combination of manufacturing technologies such as roll-to-roll -printing, injection molding and traditional component assembly is called Printed Hybrid Systems (PHS). Several demonstrator structures have been made, which show the potential of polymer packaging technology. One demonstrator example is a laminated structure with embedded LED chips. Element thickness is only 0.3mm and the flexible stack of foils can be bent in two directions after assembly process and was shaped curved using heat and pressure. The combination of printed flexible circuit boards and injection molding has also been demonstrated with several functional modules. The demonstrators illustrate the potential of origami electronics, which can be cut and folded to 3D shapes. It shows that several manufacturing process steps can be eliminated by Printed Hybrid Systems technology. The main benefits of this combination are small size, ruggedness and conformality. The devices are ideally suited for medical applications as the sensitive electronic components are well protected inside the plastic and the structures can be cleaned easily due to the fact that they have no joints or seams that can accumulate dirt or bacteria.

  5. BOK-Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The use of printed electronics technologies (PETs), 2D or 3D printing approaches either by conventional electronic fabrication or by rapid graphic printing of organic or nonorganic electronic devices on various small or large rigid or flexible substrates, is projected to grow exponentially in commercial industry. This has provided an opportunity to determine whether or not PETs could be applicable for low volume and high-reliability applications. This report presents a summary of literature surveyed and provides a body of knowledge (BOK) gathered on the current status of organic and printed electronics technologies. It reviews three key industry roadmaps- on this subject-OE-A, ITRS, and iNEMI-each with a different name identification for this emerging technology. This followed by a brief review of the status of the industry on standard development for this technology, including IEEE and IPC specifications. The report concludes with key technologies and applications and provides a technology hierarchy similar to those of conventional microelectronics for electronics packaging. Understanding key technology roadmaps, parameters, and applications is important when judicially selecting and narrowing the follow-up of new and emerging applicable technologies for evaluation, as well as the low risk insertion of organic, large area, and printed electronics.

  6. Fabrication of paper-based microfluidic sensors by printing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-04-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices is reported; it consists of selectively hydrophobizing paper using cellulose reactive hydrophobization agents. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic contrast of patterns so created has excellent ability to control capillary penetration of aqueous liquids in paper channels. Incorporating this idea with digital ink jet printing techniques, a new fabrication method of paper-based microfluidic devices is established. Ink jet printing can deliver biomolecules and indicator reagents with precision into the microfluidic patterns to form bio-chemical sensing zones within the device. This method thus allows the complete sensor, i.e. channel patterns and the detecting chemistries, to be fabricated only by two printing steps. This fabrication method can be scaled up and adapted to use high speed, high volume and low cost commercial printing technology. Sensors can be fabricated for specific tests, or they can be made as general devices to perform on-demand quantitative analytical tasks by incorporating the required detection chemistries for the required tasks.

  7. MANCHESTER MILLS, PRINT WORKS: BLUE DYE AND SOAPING; PRINTING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MANCHESTER MILLS, PRINT WORKS: BLUE DYE AND SOAPING; PRINTING AND BLEACHING BUILDINGS. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1905 VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. From the collection of Mr. George Durette, Photographer, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  8. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  9. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  10. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  11. Mechanism of electrohydrodynamic printing based on ac voltage without a nozzle electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vu Dat; Byun, Doyoung

    2009-04-01

    The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying technique has been applied to inkjet printing technology for fabrication of printed electronics. The conventional EHD inkjet device is based on dc voltage and requires two electrodes: a nozzle electrode and an extractor electrode. This study notes several drawbacks of the dc-based EHD printing device such as electrical breakdown and demonstrates stable jetting by using the extractor electrode alone without the nozzle electrode and ac voltage. The continuous ejection of droplets can be obtained only by ac voltage, showing consistent ejection at every peak of electrical signal. The suggested EHD inkjet device prevents electrical breakdown.

  12. Using Environmental Print to Enhance Emergent Literacy and Print Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Michelle M.; Hood, Michelle; Ford, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the ubiquitous and salient nature of environmental print, it has the potential to scaffold emergent literacy in young children. This randomised control study evaluated the effects of using environmental print compared to standard print (the same labels in manuscript form) in an 8-week intervention (30 min per week) to foster 3- to…

  13. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  14. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  15. For the Classroom: Print Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents an activity for students (ages 5-6 and 7-14) to identify external characteristics of marine life and plants through printing (using homemade stamp pads). Includes procedures and list of materials, and printing ideas. (JN)

  16. Fully printed and flexible ferroelectric capacitors based on a ferroelectric polymer for pressure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Tomohito; Sugano, Ryo; Tashiro, Tomoya; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Domingues Dos Santos, Fabrice; Miyabo, Atsushi; Tokito, Shizuo

    2016-10-01

    We report on the fabrication and demonstration of fully printed ferroelectric capacitors using poly(vinylidene fluoridetrifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)]. The printed ferroelectric capacitors were primarily fabricated by ink-jet printing on a thin plastic film substrate. The annealing process for the P(VDF-TrFE) layer was optimized from the viewpoints of surface morphology and crystallinity. A good ferroelectric polarization-electric field loop and piezoelectricity in the P(VDF-TrFE) were achieved for the printed ferroelectric capacitors. We have succeeded in the detection of a weak pressure of 150 mbar using the printed ferroelectric capacitor, which is an indication of a potential application to health-care biosensors. These results were realized by the optimization of the annealing temperature for the P(VDF-TrFE) layer.

  17. Single step high-speed printing of continuous silver lines by laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerto, D.; Biver, E.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Delaporte, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-speed ink printing process by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is of great interest for the printing community. To address the problems and the limitations of this process that have been previously identified, we have performed an experimental study on laser micro-printing of silver nanoparticle inks by LIFT and demonstrated for the first time the printing of continuous conductive lines in a single pass at velocities of 17 m/s using a 1 MHz repetition rate laser. We investigated the printing process by means of a time-resolved imaging technique to visualize the ejection dynamics of single and adjacent jets. The control of the donor film properties is of prime importance to achieve single step printing of continuous lines at high velocities. We use a 30 ps pulse duration laser with a wavelength of 343 nm and a repetition rate from 0.2 to 1 MHz. A galvanometric mirror head controls the distance between two consecutives jets by scanning the focused beam along an ink-coated donor substrate at different velocities. Droplets and lines of silver inks are laser-printed on glass and PET flexible substrates and we characterized their morphological quality by atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscope.

  18. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  19. Roll-printed organic thin-film transistor using patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jeongdai; Yu, Jong-Su; Lee, Taik-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kim, Kwang-Young

    2010-05-01

    The roll-printed gate, source, and drain electrodes of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were fabricated by gravure printing or gravure-offset printing using patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp with various channel lengths and low-resistance silver (Ag) pastes on flexible 150 x 150 mm2 plastic substrates. Bottom-contact roll-printed OTFTs used polyvinylphenol (PVP) as polymeric dielectric and bis(triisopropyl-silylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) as organic semiconductor; they were formed by spin coating or ink-jetting. Depending on the choice of roll-printing method, the printed OTFTs obtained had a field-effect mobility of between 0.08 and 0.1 cm2/Vs, an on/off current ratio of between 10(4) and 10(5), and a subthreshold slope of between 1.96 and 2.32 V/decade. The roll-printing using patterned PDMS stamp and soluble processes made it possible to fabricate a printed OTFT with a channel length of between 12 to 74 microm on a plastic substrate; this was not previously possible using traditional printing techniques. The proposed fabrication process was 20 steps shorted than conventional fabrication techniques.

  20. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  1. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  2. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  3. Bloomin' Color Celery Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Describes a second and third grade art activity in which students used celery cores to create pictures in the style of Georgia O'Keefe. Explains that the students learned about O'Keefe's artwork and describes how the students created their prints. (CMK)

  4. Legibility of Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Legibility refers to the physical appearance of printed materials: line lengths, type size, style of type face, space between lines and between letters, margins, and physical format are some of the factors that are involved. After the turn of the century, especially after 1925, research became fairly common in this area, but has been meager since…

  5. Serendipitous Stencil Prints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Printing, stamping, and rubbings are enjoyed by all ages, and the image-making capabilities of this media are endless and very spontaneous. In printmaking, images can be repeated, overlapped, inked in various colors, cut up, reassembled, and manipulated. Students find these methods to be engaging and serendipitous. This lesson, designed for eighth…

  6. Just press print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Patients requiring an organ transplant may one day no longer have to wait for a matching donor. As Stephen Ornes explains, researchers are making progress towards creating human organs with techniques such as 3D printing, using the patient's own cells for ink.

  7. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  8. "Printed-circuit" rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Rectifying antenna is less bulky structure for absorbing transmitted microwave power and converting it into electrical current. Printed-circuit approach, using microstrip technology and circularly polarized antenna, makes polarization orientation unimportant and allows much smaller arrays for given performance. Innovation is particularly useful with proposed electric vehicles powered by beam microwaves.

  9. Tin Can Textile Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Patricia; Sanford, Barbara

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of "canning"--applying textile pigment or dye to cloth by moving a pigment-filled can across the fabric to create a linear design. This printing process is described as low-cost, easy, and suitable for all age and artistic levels. (Author/SJL)

  10. Not by Print Alone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lare, Douglas; Cimino, Ellen

    1998-01-01

    Print public relations (calendars, newsletters, and annual reports) are not enough. Schools need effective two-way public relations programs that are high-priority, have adequate budgets and staff training, capitalize on new technologies, involve local education reporters, and feature board meetings and informal luncheons held throughout the…

  11. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  12. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  13. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  14. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  15. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  16. Recent advances in the management of obstructive airways disease. Auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sackner, M A; Kim, C S

    1985-08-01

    Aerosol delivered through metered-dose inhalers (MDI) offers a potentially convenient way to deliver bronchodilator agents and corticosteroids to the lungs of patients with asthma and COPD. Unfortunately, most patients are unable to coordinate satisfactorily their actuation with inhalation, a problem overcome by using auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems. Left to their own judgment, patients often inhale the aerosol with a high inspiratory flow rather than slowly to produce optimal aerosol deposition within the airways. This problem has been corrected by one of the auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems (InspirEase) through auditory, visual, and tactile feedback mechanisms. MDI devices release aerosol at a high jet velocity in large particle sizes, depositing most of the aerosol in the oropharynx which can lead to potential systemic absorption of adrenergic agonists with CNS and cardiovascular side effects, oral thrush, and suppression of adrenocortical activity. All the auxiliary MDI aerosol systems promote delivery of small aerosol particles and markedly diminish oropharyngeal impaction. Of all the systems, only InspirEase provides volume and flow feedback controls to ensure an optimal inhalation maneuver. Auxiliary MDI aerosol systems should always be used for aerosolized corticosteroid administration because they minimize oropharyngeal deposition and improve aerosol delivery efficiency.

  17. Accuracy of three-dimensional printing for manufacturing replica teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keun-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Chang, Na-Young; Chae, Jong-Moon; Kang, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a recent technological development that may play a significant role in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. It can be used to fabricate skull models or study models, as well as to make replica teeth in autotransplantation or tooth impaction cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fabrication of replica teeth made by two types of 3D printing technologies. Methods Fifty extracted molar teeth were selected as samples. They were scanned to generate high-resolution 3D surface model stereolithography files. These files were converted into physical models using two types of 3D printing technologies: Fused deposition modeling (FDM) and PolyJet technology. All replica teeth were scanned and 3D images generated. Computer software compared the replica teeth to the original teeth with linear measurements, volumetric measurements, and mean deviation measurements with best-fit alignment. Paired t-tests were used to statistically analyze the measurements. Results Most measurements of teeth formed using FDM tended to be slightly smaller, while those of the PolyJet replicas tended to be slightly larger, than those of the extracted teeth. Mean deviation measurements with best-fit alignment of FDM and PolyJet group were 0.047 mm and 0.038 mm, respectively. Although there were statistically significant differences, they were regarded as clinically insignificant. Conclusions This study confirms that FDM and PolyJet technologies are accurate enough to be usable in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26445716

  18. A hybrid electrohydrodynamic drop-on-demand printing system using a piezoelectric MEMS nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sang-Myun; Kim, Sangjin; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2012-04-01

    A unique hybrid jetting system based on electrohydrodynamic and piezoelectric forces has been designed to verify the control of the drop velocity and to obtain ultrafine droplets with a high jetting frequency. Piezoelectric nozzles have been fabricated using silicon on insulator wafers and Pyrex glass employing a MEMS process and an anodic bonding process. The plate-type electrode and moving stage were used for the printing process. The droplet ejection mechanisms from the nozzle using the hybrid jetting system were captured by a high-speed camera synchronized with a trigger signal. The deformation of the meniscus and the jetting delay time in regard to the high operational firing frequency were investigated. It was found that controlling the droplet velocity without a change in the droplet volume and obtaining a smaller dot (59 µm in diameter) in hybrid printing mode compared with inkjet printing mode (151 µm in diameter) were possible. These results show this system's promising applicability to the fabrication of micro patterning for a wide range of printed electronics applications.

  19. Inkjet printing of aqueous rivulets: Formation, deposition, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Vadim

    The past two decades have seen an explosion of research and development into nanotechnology, ranging from synthesis of novel materials that exhibit unique behavior to the assembly of fully functional devices that hold the potential to benefit all sectors of industry and society as a whole. One significant challenge for this emerging technology is the scaling of newly developed processes to the industrial level where manufacturing should be cheap, fast and with high throughput. One approach to this problem has been to develop processes of material deposition and device fabrication via solution-based additive manufacturing techniques such as printing. Specifically, it is envisioned that (in)organic functional nanomaterial that can be processed into solution form can be deposited in a precise manner (i.e., printed) onto sheets of flexible plastic/glass in a process similar to the printing of newspaper (formally, the process is dubbed Roll-to-Roll). This work is focused on experimentally studying and developing one type of solution-based material deposition technique---drop-on-demand ink-jet printing. This technique allows highly-repeatable deposition of small (pico-liter) droplets of functional ink in precise locations on a given target substrate. Although the technology has been in existence and in continuous use for many decades in the paper graphics industry, its application to nanotechnology-based fabrication processes on non-porous substrates presents many challenges stemming from the coupling of the wetting, material transport, evaporation and solid deposition phenomena that occur when printing patterns more complex than single droplets. The focus of this research has been to investigate these phenomena for the case of printed rivulets of water-based inks. A custom ink-jet apparatus has been assembled to allow direct optical observation of the flow and deposition that occur during printing. Experimental results show the importance of substrate surface energy and

  20. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  1. Biomimetic 4D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney Gladman, A.; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mahadevan, L.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  2. Biomimetic 4D printing.

    PubMed

    Gladman, A Sydney; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mahadevan, L; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  3. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  4. Fluorinated graphene suspension for inkjet printed technologies.

    PubMed

    Nebogatikova, N A; Antonova, I V; Kurkina, I I; Soots, R A; Vdovin, V I; Timofeev, V B; Smagulova, S A; Prinz, V Ya

    2016-05-20

    The possibility to control the size of the flakes of graphene suspension in the course of their fluorination in an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution was demonstrated. The effect of the suspension composition, the fluorination time, temperature and thermal stress on the fragmentation process was investigated. The corrugation of suspension flakes, which occurs at fluorination due to a difference in the constants of graphene and fluorographene lattices, leads to the appearance of nonuniform mechanical stresses. The fact that the flake size after fragmentation is determined by the size of corrugation allows the assumption that the driving force of fragmentation is this mechanical stress. This assumption is confirmed by the break of the corrugated layers from flakes under thermal stress. Moreover, fluorination treatment at elevated temperatures (∼70 °C) significantly accelerates the fragmentation process. Suspensions of fluorinated graphene with nanometer size flakes are of interest for the development of 2D ink-jet printing technologies and production of thermally and chemically stable dielectric films for nanoelectronics. The printed fluorinated graphene films on silicon and flexible substrates have been demonstrated and the charges in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been estimated as the ultra low values of (0.5-2) × 10(10) cm(-2).

  5. Fluorinated graphene suspension for inkjet printed technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebogatikova, N. A.; Antonova, I. V.; Kurkina, I. I.; Soots, R. A.; Vdovin, V. I.; Timofeev, V. B.; Smagulova, S. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to control the size of the flakes of graphene suspension in the course of their fluorination in an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution was demonstrated. The effect of the suspension composition, the fluorination time, temperature and thermal stress on the fragmentation process was investigated. The corrugation of suspension flakes, which occurs at fluorination due to a difference in the constants of graphene and fluorographene lattices, leads to the appearance of nonuniform mechanical stresses. The fact that the flake size after fragmentation is determined by the size of corrugation allows the assumption that the driving force of fragmentation is this mechanical stress. This assumption is confirmed by the break of the corrugated layers from flakes under thermal stress. Moreover, fluorination treatment at elevated temperatures (˜70 °C) significantly accelerates the fragmentation process. Suspensions of fluorinated graphene with nanometer size flakes are of interest for the development of 2D ink-jet printing technologies and production of thermally and chemically stable dielectric films for nanoelectronics. The printed fluorinated graphene films on silicon and flexible substrates have been demonstrated and the charges in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been estimated as the ultra low values of (0.5-2) × 1010 cm-2.

  6. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  7. Printed wiring assembly cleanliness

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    This work installed a product cleanliness test capability in a manufacturing environment. A previously purchased testing device was modified extensively and installed in a production department. The device, the testing process, and some soldering and cleaning variables were characterized to establish their relationship to the device output. The characterization provided information which will be required for cleanliness testing to be an adequate process control of printed wiring assembly soldering and cleaning processes.

  8. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  9. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  10. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  11. Photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R.

    2015-10-01

    Our ideas about the nature of photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets is evolving thanks to new data coming in from the Cassini spacecraft, ground-based and space-based telescopes, and theory and modeling. Aerosol formation begins at altitudes around 1000 km on Titan and around 800 km above the 1-bar pressure level in the polar thermospheres of Jupiter and Saturn where auroral energy is available to form ions and radicals. We have evidence that hydrocarbon chemistry is important in aerosol formation for all of these bodies and we believe that hydrazine on Jupiter and phosphine on Saturn may lead to aerosol production. Aeroso ls have a fractal aggregate structure on Titan and in the polar regions of Jupiter and Saturn. Their vertical and horizontal distributions reflect a balance between local production and horizontal and vertical transport governed by eddies and jets. They are important for radiative energy balance in ways that have only recently come to light.

  12. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  13. The Submerged Printing of Cells onto a Modified Surface Using a Continuous Flow Microspotter

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Sherry N.; Miles, Adam R.; Romanov, Valentin; Gale, Bruce K.; Eckman, Josh W.; Brooks, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    The printing of cells for microarray applications possesses significant challenges including the problem of maintaining physiologically relevant cell phenotype after printing, poor organization and distribution of desired cells, and the inability to deliver drugs and/or nutrients to targeted areas in the array. Our 3D microfluidic printing technology is uniquely capable of sealing and printing arrays of cells onto submerged surfaces in an automated and multiplexed manner. The design of the microfluidic cell array (MFCA) 3D fluidics enables the printhead tip to be lowered into a liquid-filled well or dish and compressed against a surface to form a seal. The soft silicone tip of the printhead behaves like a gasket and is able to form a reversible seal by applying pressure or backing away. Other cells printing technologies such as pin or ink-jet printers are unable to print in submerged applications. Submerged surface printing is essential to maintain phenotypes of cells and to monitor these cells on a surface without disturbing the material surface characteristics. By printing onto submerged surfaces, cell microarrays are produced that allow for drug screening and cytotoxicity assessment in a multitude of areas including cancer, diabetes, inflammation, infections, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24796939

  14. The submerged printing of cells onto a modified surface using a continuous flow microspotter.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Sherry N; Miles, Adam R; Romanov, Valentin; Gale, Bruce K; Eckman, Josh W; Brooks, Benjamin D

    2014-04-22

    The printing of cells for microarray applications possesses significant challenges including the problem of maintaining physiologically relevant cell phenotype after printing, poor organization and distribution of desired cells, and the inability to deliver drugs and/or nutrients to targeted areas in the array. Our 3D microfluidic printing technology is uniquely capable of sealing and printing arrays of cells onto submerged surfaces in an automated and multiplexed manner. The design of the microfluidic cell array (MFCA) 3D fluidics enables the printhead tip to be lowered into a liquid-filled well or dish and compressed against a surface to form a seal. The soft silicone tip of the printhead behaves like a gasket and is able to form a reversible seal by applying pressure or backing away. Other cells printing technologies such as pin or ink-jet printers are unable to print in submerged applications. Submerged surface printing is essential to maintain phenotypes of cells and to monitor these cells on a surface without disturbing the material surface characteristics. By printing onto submerged surfaces, cell microarrays are produced that allow for drug screening and cytotoxicity assessment in a multitude of areas including cancer, diabetes, inflammation, infections, and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Study on three-dimensional printing using electrohydrodynamic inkjet by analysis of mass flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Soo-Hong; Lee, Pil-Ho; Lee, Sang Won

    2014-11-01

    An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet can produce much smaller droplets than nozzle sizes even for highly viscous liquid. Micro scale patterns are produced by a direct patterning of the EHD inkjet printing technique to obtain lamination layers. A cone-jet mode shows good performance for line and surface printings. A prediction method for a flow rate was proposed by performing experiments and deriving an equation. The calculation was carried out by dividing the electric field and the fluid regions. Dielectric liquids were used as the working fluid, whose flow rate was measured at the applied voltage of 1.5 kV to 2.5 kV. The measured flow rate was affected by viscosity, surface tension, and density as fluid properties, and dielectric constant and electric conductivity as properties of electric fields for the voltage. Then, parameters of the printing were investigated by printed line width and thickness at various conditions. As a result, the applied static pressure had more effect on the line printing although the line width was affected by the stage velocity. The significant role of the parameters was confirmed to produce scaffolds using the three-dimensional EHD printing. This work supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. S-2011-0023457).

  16. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  17. A Hybrid Inkjet Printer Utilizing Electrohydrodynamic Jetting and Piezoelectric Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dat Nguyen, Vu; Byun, Doyoung

    2010-11-01

    This research demonstrates a hybrid electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet printing technique that offers better uniformity and stable operation in drop-on-demand (DOD) patterns compared to the conventional methods. This hybrid technique takes advantage of both electrohydrodynamic and piezoelectric methods where a piezoelectric actuator is used to supply a fixed volume of ink to the nozzle's exit for every jetting period, and the electrohydrodynamic technique is used to form ink droplets. Experimental results show that the pattern uniformity improves significantly when ink was supplied to the nozzle exit at a controlled rate using piezoelectric actuation. This hybrid technique can be applied to small scale nozzle to obtain high resolution printing.

  18. A Hybrid Inkjet Printer Utilizing Electrohydrodynamic Jetting and Piezoelectric Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyoung Byun,; Vu Dat Nguyen,; Prashanta Dutta,; Hoon Cheol Park,

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports a hybrid electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet printing technique that offers better uniformity and stable operation in drop-on-demand (DOD) patterns compared to the conventional methods. This hybrid technique takes advantage of both electrohydrodynamic and piezoelectric methods where a piezoelectric actuator is used to supply a fixed volume of ink to the nozzle’s exit for every jetting period, and the electrohydrodynamic technique is used to form ink droplets. Experimental results show that the print quality improves significantly when ink was supplied to the nozzle exit at a controlled rate using piezoelectric actuation.

  19. A Hybrid Inkjet Printer Utilizing Electrohydrodynamic Jetting and Piezoelectric Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Doyoung; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Dutta, Prashanta; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports a hybrid electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet printing technique that offers better uniformity and stable operation in drop-on-demand (DOD) patterns compared to the conventional methods. This hybrid technique takes advantage of both electrohydrodynamic and piezoelectric methods where a piezoelectric actuator is used to supply a fixed volume of ink to the nozzle's exit for every jetting period, and the electrohydrodynamic technique is used to form ink droplets. Experimental results show that the print quality improves significantly when ink was supplied to the nozzle exit at a controlled rate using piezoelectric actuation.

  20. Aerosol algorithm evaluation within aerosol-CCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael; Griesfeller, Jan

    Properties of aerosol retrievals from space are difficult. Even data from dedicated satellite sensors face contaminations which limit the accuracy of aerosol retrieval products. Issues are the identification of complete cloud-free scenes, the need to assume aerosol compositional features in an underdetermined solution space and the requirement to characterize the background at high accuracy. Usually the development of aerosol is a slow process, requiring continuous feedback from evaluations. To demonstrate maturity, these evaluations need to cover different regions and seasons and many different aerosol properties, because aerosol composition is quite diverse and highly variable in space and time, as atmospheric aerosol lifetimes are only a few days. Three years ago the ESA Climate Change Initiative started to support aerosol retrieval efforts in order to develop aerosol retrieval products for the climate community from underutilized ESA satellite sensors. The initial focus was on retrievals of AOD (a measure for the atmospheric column amount) and of Angstrom (a proxy for aerosol size) from the ATSR and MERIS sensors on ENVISAT. The goal was to offer retrieval products that are comparable or better in accuracy than commonly used NASA products of MODIS or MISR. Fortunately, accurate reference data of ground based sun-/sky-photometry networks exist. Thus, retrieval assessments could and were conducted independently by different evaluation groups. Here, results of these evaluations for the year 2008 are summarized. The capability of these newly developed retrievals is analyzed and quantified in scores. These scores allowed a ranking of competing efforts and also allow skill comparisons of these new retrievals against existing and commonly used retrievals.

  1. Recent trends in print portals and Web2Print applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    For quite some time now, the printing business has been under heavy pressure because of overcapacity, dropping prices and the delocalization of the production to low income countries. To survive in this competitive world, printers have to invest in tools that, on one hand, reduce the production costs and, on the other hand, create additional value for their customers (print buyers). The creation of customer portals on top of prepress production systems allowing print buyers to upload their content, approve the uploaded pages based on soft proofs (rendered by the underlying production system) and further follow-up the generation of the printed material, has been illustrative in this respect. These developments resulted in both automation for the printer and added value for the print buyer. Many traditional customer portals assume that the printed products have been identified before they are presented to the print buyer in the portal environment. The products are, in this case, typically entered by the printing organization in a so-called MISi system after the official purchase order has been received from the print buyer. Afterwards, the MIS system then submits the product to the customer portal. Some portals, however, also support the initiation of printed products by the print buyer directly. This workflow creates additional flexibility but also makes things much more complex. We here have to distinguish between special products that are defined ad-hoc by the print buyer and standardized products that are typically selected out of catalogs. Special products are most of the time defined once and the level of detail required in terms of production parameters is quite high. Systems that support such products typically have a built-in estimation module, or, at least, a direct connection to an MIS system that calculates the prices and adds a specific mark-up to calculate a quote. Often, the markup is added by an account manager on a customer by customer basis; in this

  2. Dynamics of Capillary-Driven Flow in 3D Printed Open Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Lade, Robert K; Hippchen, Erik J; Macosko, Christopher W; Francis, Lorraine F

    2017-03-28

    Microchannels have applications in microfluidic devices, patterns for micromolding, and even flexible electronic devices. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative manufacturing route for these microchannels due to the technology's relative speed and the design freedom it affords its users. However, the roughness of 3D printed surfaces can significantly influence flow dynamics inside of a microchannel. In this work, open microchannels are fabricated using four different 3D printing techniques: fused deposition modeling (FDM), stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering, and multi jet modeling. Microchannels printed with each technology are evaluated with respect to their surface roughness, morphology, and how conducive they are to spontaneous capillary filling. Based on this initial assessment, microchannels printed with FDM and SLA are chosen as models to study spontaneous, capillary-driven flow dynamics in 3D printed microchannels. Flow dynamics are investigated over short (∼10(-3) s), intermediate (∼1 s), and long (∼10(2) s) time scales. Surface roughness causes a start-stop motion down the channel due to contact line pinning, while the cross-sectional shape imparted onto the channels during the printing process is shown to reduce the expected filling velocity. A significant delay in the onset of Lucas-Washburn dynamics (a long-time equilibrium state where meniscus position advances proportionally to the square root of time) is also observed. Flow dynamics are assessed as a function of printing technology, print orientation, channel dimensions, and liquid properties. This study provides the first in-depth investigation of the effect of 3D printing on microchannel flow dynamics as well as a set of rules on how to account for these effects in practice. The extension of these effects to closed microchannels and microchannels fabricated with other 3D printing technologies is also discussed.

  3. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  4. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  5. Fountain-Jet Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    and 3 times higher than expected from free- jet results. Hill et al., (Reference 6) in work with foun- tain jets impacting fuselage models, detected ...delineate the origins of the turbulent anomalies associated with fountain jets by extending the previous studies. The results are presented herein...jet velocities were detected with a Thermal Systems Inc. Model 1050 dual-channel constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a Thermal Systems Inc

  6. Aerosol Formation In The Free Troposphere: Aircraft and Laboratory Measurements of Ionic and Gaseous Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.

    Aerosol formation seems to be very efficient in the upper troposphere (UT) as in- dicated by the frequent presence of numerous very small and therefore very young aerosol particles. Aersosol formation proceeds via nucleation of supersaturated low volatility trace gases (LVG) involving either a homogeneous (HONU) or an ion- induced (INU) mechanism. LVG experience rapid removal by condenstation on prefer- ably pre-existing aerosol particles and therefore LVG must be formed locally in the UT by photochemical conversion of precursor gases. A prominent example is gaseous sulfuric acid which is formed from SO2. This SO2 originates at least in the northern hemisphere mostly from fossil fuel combustion at ground-level and to some part origi- nates also from jet aircraft cruising in the UT. Other conceivable LVG's are low volatil- ity organic compounds. After formation by nucleation new particles may experience condensational growth involving LVG. Alternatively new particles may experience scavenging by attachment to pre-existing larger particles. The LVG-concentration has a strong influence on the growth-rate of new particles and thereby on the possibil- ity for growth to the size of a cloud condensation nucleus. Unfortunately present knowledge on free tropospheric LVG is rather poor. Here will be reported free tropo- spheric aircraft-based measurements of ionic and gaseous aerosol-precursors. These include both measurements in the "background" FT as well as measurements in ex- haust plumes of jet aircraft cruising in the UT. Furthermore accompanying new labo- ratory investigations of INU and measurements behind aircraft jet engines at ground- level will also be adressed.

  7. Multi-jets formation using laser forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, Emeric; Rapp, Ludovic; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia; Delaporte, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of multi-jets formation in liquid films has been investigated using the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. This technique allows the deposition of micrometer-sized droplets with a high spatial resolution from a donor substrate to a receiver substrate. The donor was a silver nanoparticles ink-coated substrate. The interaction of the laser pulse with the donor ink layer generates an expanding bubble in the liquid which propels a jet towards the receiver. Silver lines have already been printed by depositing overlapping droplets in a “low speed” process. In order to increase the throughput, it is necessary to decrease the time between the depositions of two droplets. By scanning the beam of a high repetition rate UV picosecond laser (343 nm; 30 ps; 500 kHz) with a galvanometric mirror, successive pulses are focused on the silver nanoparticles ink-coated donor substrate. The shape and dynamics of single jets and adjacent jets have been investigated by means of a time-resolved imaging technique. By varying the distance between the laser spots, different behaviours were observed and compared to the printed droplets. A spacing of 25 μm between laser spots was found to generate both stable jets and well-controlled, reproducible droplets at high speed.

  8. Easy Aerosol - Robust and non-robust circulation responses to aerosol radiative forcing in comprehensive atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn; Boucher, Olivier; Medeiros, Brian; Pincus, Robert; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Lewinschal, Anna; Bellouin, Nicolas; Yang, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This is consistent with the aerosol's shortwave heating of the atmosphere and the fact that SSTs are fixed. Moreover, the Northern hemisphere mid-latitude jet shows an annual-mean zonal-mean poleward shift. Due to large natural variability, however, these signals only emerge clearly in ensemble runs or if the aerosol optical depth is increased by a factor of five compared to the observed magnitude of the present-day anthropogenic aerosol. When SSTs are adapted to include the cooling effect of the aerosol, the ITCZ and the Northern hemisphere jet shift southward in the annual- and zonal-mean. The models exhibit very similar precipitation and zonal wind changes in response to the SST change, showing that SSTs are a key factor for the circulation response. Yet, model differences in the surface and top-of-atmosphere energy balances due to evaporation and cloud-radiative effects imply that the models would show much more different responses if they were coupled to an interactive ocean.

  9. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-01

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  10. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-17

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  11. Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1953 architectural drawings by Horowick & Lee, Architects, Jacksonville, Florida) EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Photography Laboratory, 2617 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  12. Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print (original sepia print is backward and in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1953 architectural drawings by Horowick & Lee, Architects, Jacksonville, Florida) FLOOR PLAN AND SCHEDULES - MacDill Air Force Base, Photography Laboratory, 2617 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  13. [Cholangiocarcinoma among printing workers].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shinji

    2014-02-01

    By June 2013, seventeen workers had suffered from intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma) in an offset proof-printing company in Osaka and nine of the workers had died. Ages at diagnosis were 25 to 45 years old. Known risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma were not found in the patients. All of the patients were exposed to 1,2-dichloropropane at high level for long-term and were diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma 7 to 20 years after the first exposure. Twelve of the patients were also exposed to dichloromethane. The Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recognized the cancer to be an occupational disease.

  14. Versioning of printed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2004-12-01

    During the definition of a printed product in an MIS system, a lot of attention is paid to the production process. The MIS systems typically gather all process-related parameters at such a level of detail that they can determine what the exact cost will be to make a specific product. This information can then be used to make a quote for the customer. Considerably less attention is paid to the content of the products since this does not have an immediate impact on the production costs (assuming that the number of inks or plates is known in advance). The content management is typically carried out either by the prepress systems themselves or by dedicated workflow servers uniting all people that contribute to the manufacturing of a printed product. Special care must be taken when considering versioned products. With versioned products we here mean distinct products that have a number of pages or page layers in common. Typical examples are comic books that have to be printed in different languages. In this case, the color plates can be shared over the different versions and the black plate will be different. Other examples are nation-wide magazines or newspapers that have an area with regional pages or advertising leaflets in different languages or currencies. When considering versioned products, the content will become an important cost factor. First of all, the content management (and associated proofing and approval cycles) becomes much more complex and, therefore, the risk that mistakes will be made increases considerably. Secondly, the real production costs are very much content-dependent because the content will determine whether plates can be shared across different versions or not and how many press runs will be needed. In this paper, we will present a way to manage different versions of a printed product. First, we will introduce a data model for version management. Next, we will show how the content of the different versions can be supplied by the customer

  15. Versioning of printed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2005-01-01

    During the definition of a printed product in an MIS system, a lot of attention is paid to the production process. The MIS systems typically gather all process-related parameters at such a level of detail that they can determine what the exact cost will be to make a specific product. This information can then be used to make a quote for the customer. Considerably less attention is paid to the content of the products since this does not have an immediate impact on the production costs (assuming that the number of inks or plates is known in advance). The content management is typically carried out either by the prepress systems themselves or by dedicated workflow servers uniting all people that contribute to the manufacturing of a printed product. Special care must be taken when considering versioned products. With versioned products we here mean distinct products that have a number of pages or page layers in common. Typical examples are comic books that have to be printed in different languages. In this case, the color plates can be shared over the different versions and the black plate will be different. Other examples are nation-wide magazines or newspapers that have an area with regional pages or advertising leaflets in different languages or currencies. When considering versioned products, the content will become an important cost factor. First of all, the content management (and associated proofing and approval cycles) becomes much more complex and, therefore, the risk that mistakes will be made increases considerably. Secondly, the real production costs are very much content-dependent because the content will determine whether plates can be shared across different versions or not and how many press runs will be needed. In this paper, we will present a way to manage different versions of a printed product. First, we will introduce a data model for version management. Next, we will show how the content of the different versions can be supplied by the customer

  16. Three Dimensional Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-30

    next. EPRI funded. Medical Applications; Therics , Inc. Princeton, NJ • Drug delivery devices. • Scaffolds for tissue engineering. • Direct printing...e r a t u r e ( C ) Conformal Cooling Condition T ime [se c] Tem p erature [degC] si mul ati on d ata experi men tal dat a 25 20 15 10 5 0 300 60...100 200 300 400 500 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Strain (%) S t r e s s ( M P a ) Infiltrated Skeleton Cast Ingot Inf before heat treat Inf before heat treat

  17. Chip-by-chip configurable interconnection using digital printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Mohammad; Winchester, Lee; Laurila, Mika-Matti; Mäntysalo, Matti; Ogier, Simon; Terés, Lluís; Carrabina, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    Printed electronics technologies add new fabrication concepts to the classical set of microelectronic processes. Among these, the use of digital printing techniques such as inkjet permits the deposition of materials on top of preexisting substrates without any mask. This allows individual personalization of electronic circuits. Different proposals have been made to make use of such a property: (1) wiring new metallic layers on top of circuits to build programmable logic array-like circuits, (2) programming OTP ROM like memories, and (3) building inkjet-configurable gate arrays. The capability of building an individual circuit with technological steps simpler than photolithographic ones opens a concept similar to the successful field programmable gate array. Although nowadays the process resolution is still low, it can quickly evolve to higher wiring densities and therefore permit a greater level of transistor integration. In this paper, we propose a new structure to realize the connections only by deposition of conductive dots oriented to optimize the area needed to implement the drop-on-demand (DoD) wiring at circuit level. One important feature of this structure is that it minimizes the amount of printed material required for the connection thereby reducing failures often seen with DoD printing techniques for conductive lines. These structures have been validated by two different DoD technologies: inkjet and superfine jet, and have been compared to mask-based photolithography technology with promising results.

  18. Direct printing of nanostructures by electrostatic autofocussing of ink nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Eghlidi, H.; Kress, S.; Sandoghdar, V.; Poulikakos, D.

    2012-06-01

    Nanotechnology, with its broad impact on societally relevant applications, relies heavily on the availability of accessible nanofabrication methods. Even though a host of such techniques exists, the flexible, inexpensive, on-demand and scalable fabrication of functional nanostructures remains largely elusive. Here we present a method involving nanoscale electrohydrodynamic ink-jet printing that may significantly contribute in this direction. A combination of nanoscopic placement precision, soft-landing fluid dynamics, rapid solvent vapourization, and subsequent self-assembly of the ink colloidal content leads to the formation of scaffolds with base diameters equal to that of a single ejected nanodroplet. The virtually material-independent growth of nanostructures into the third dimension is then governed by an autofocussing phenomenon caused by local electrostatic field enhancement, resulting in large aspect ratio. We demonstrate the capabilities of our electrohydrodynamic printing technique with several examples, including the fabrication of plasmonic nanoantennas with features sizes down to 50 nm.

  19. Direct printing of nanostructures by electrostatic autofocussing of ink nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Galliker, P; Schneider, J; Eghlidi, H; Kress, S; Sandoghdar, V; Poulikakos, D

    2012-06-12

    Nanotechnology, with its broad impact on societally relevant applications, relies heavily on the availability of accessible nanofabrication methods. Even though a host of such techniques exists, the flexible, inexpensive, on-demand and scalable fabrication of functional nanostructures remains largely elusive. Here we present a method involving nanoscale electrohydrodynamic ink-jet printing that may significantly contribute in this direction. A combination of nanoscopic placement precision, soft-landing fluid dynamics, rapid solvent vapourization, and subsequent self-assembly of the ink colloidal content leads to the formation of scaffolds with base diameters equal to that of a single ejected nanodroplet. The virtually material-independent growth of nanostructures into the third dimension is then governed by an autofocussing phenomenon caused by local electrostatic field enhancement, resulting in large aspect ratio. We demonstrate the capabilities of our electrohydrodynamic printing technique with several examples, including the fabrication of plasmonic nanoantennas with features sizes down to 50 nm.

  20. The Art of Small Job Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairhurst, Millicent

    1978-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the design and production of printed promotional materials for library programs, lectures, movies, exhibits, and community events. Areas covered are typography, printing, production, costs, copyfitting and layout, printing stock, and binding. (VT)

  1. Large bouncing jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, Karl; Weislogel, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the phenomena of large jet rebound (bounce), a mode of fluid transfer following oblique jet impacts on hydrophobic surfaces. We initially seek to describe the regimes of such jet bounce in tests conducted in the weightless environment of a drop tower. A parametric study reveals the dependence of the rebound mode on the relevant dimensionless groups such as Weber number We⊥ defined on the velocity component perpendicular to the surface. We show that significantly larger diameter jets behave similarly as much smaller jets demonstrated during previous terrestrial investigations when We⊥ 1 . For We⊥ > 1 , large jet impacts create fishbone-like structures. We also explore rebounds from nonplanar substrates. Improving our understanding of such jet rebound opens avenues for unique transport capabilities. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A.

  2. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  3. Observations of Aerosol Conditions Associated with Precipitation Events in the Remote Sierra Nevada Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Kingsmill, D.; Roberts, G. C.; Noblitt, S.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent investigations of atmospheric aerosols have suggested their importance in affecting clouds and precipitation patterns, especially in regions where anthropogenic contributions to aerosol loadings are large. Aerosols entrained into precipitating clouds have been shown to either enhance or suppress precipitation based on the characteristics of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) introduced. Due to the inherent chemical dependence of CCN activity, the chemical composition of aerosols introduced into precipitating clouds will determine their effect on precipitation. This presentation will utilize ground-based chemical and physical measurements of aerosols and precipitation from multiple winter seasons gathered at Sugar Pine Dam (Foresthill, CA) as part of the CalWater experiment. The coupled behavior of landfalling frontal systems, regional terrain-parallel flow along the windward slopes of the Sierra Nevada (i.e., the Sierra Barrier Jet), and observed aerosol conditions in the Sierra Nevada foothills will be demonstrated and related issues explored. Temporally correlated changes in aerosol chemical composition with approaching winter storms may provide key insights into the evolution of the Sierra Barrier Jet, a dynamic feature that can have a major influence on orographically-forced precipitation in this region, and could provide clues to the coupling of Central Valley pollution with winter-time orographic precipitation episodes (or lack thereof). Gaining an overall understanding of the frequency and magnitude of the entrainment of Central Valley pollutants on winter storm systems will ultimately provide an estimate of how much aerosols affect precipitation in California.

  4. Guide to Producing Print Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This is a simple how-to-do it manual intended to help projects that wish to produce print materials. It highlights the stages involved in producing print materials, giving an overview of the steps required and offering hints on different approaches to the various processes. The manual begins with the comprehensive layout (dummy) stage and proceeds…

  5. Splattering during turbulent liquid jet impingement on solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, S.K.; Lienhard, J.H. V . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In turbulent liquid jet impingement, a spray of droplets often breaks off of the liquid layer formed on the target. This splattering of liquid alters the efficiencies of jet impingement heat transfer processes and chemical containment safety devices, and leads to problems of aerosol formation in jet impingement cleaning processes. In this paper, the authors present a more complete study of splattering and improved correlations that extend and supersede the previous reports on this topic. The authors report experimental results on the amount of splattering for jets of water, isopropanol-water solutions, and soap-water mixtures. Jets were produced by straight tube nozzles of diameter 0.8--5.8 mm, with fully developed turbulent pipe-flow upstream of the nozzle exist. These experiments cover Weber numbers between 130--31,000, Reynolds numbers between 2,700--98,000, and nozzle-to-target separations of 0.2 [<=]l/d[<=]125. Splattering of up to 75 percent of the incoming jet liquid is observed. The results show that only the Weber number and l/d affect the fraction of jet liquid splattered. The presence of surfactants does not alter the splattering. A new correlation for the onset condition for splattering is given. In addition, the authors establish the range of applicability of the model of Lienhard et al. and the authors provide a more accurate set of coefficients for their correlation.

  6. Multi-nozzle electrohydrodynamic inkjet printing of silver colloidal solution for the fabrication of electrically functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Arshad; Rahman, Khalid; Hyun, Myung-Taek; Kim, Dong-Soo; Choi, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, multi-nozzle electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet printing of a colloidal solution containing silver nanoparticles in a fully controlled fashion is reported. For minimizing interaction, i.e. cross-talk, between neighboring jets, the distance between the nozzles was optimized numerically by investigating the magnitude of the electric field strength around the tip of each nozzle. A multi-nozzle EHD inkjet printing head consisting of three nozzles was fabricated and successfully tested by simultaneously printing electrically conductive lines of a colloidal solution containing silver nanoparticles onto a glass substrate. The printed results show electrical resistivity of 5.05×10-8 Ω m, which is almost three times larger than that of bulk silver. These conductive microtracks demonstrate the feasibility of the multi-nozzle EHD inkjet printing process for industrial fabrication of microelectronic devices.

  7. Electrohydrodynamic printing under applied pole-type nozzle configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Daoheng

    2013-01-01

    A pole-type nozzle has an inserted pole that jams a contraction flow into capillary in electrohydrodynamic deposition. The jammed solution improves Taylor cone formation by shortening the hysteresis time so that pole-type nozzle is suitable for high-resolution electrohydrodynamic printing. Experimental results demonstrate a governed frequency-dividing relationship with an integral ratio of applied voltage frequency to droplet deposition frequency. It is observed that low integral frequency ratio is in favor of low voltage amplitude and duty cycle, and high voltage frequency, since polymer solution jets in a small fluidic volume per droplet under low electric force and short pulse duration.

  8. Overview of Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate. I shall discuss these topics and application of the data to air quality monitoring.

  9. Piezoelectric-driven droplet impact printing with an interchangeable microfluidic cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoqing; Fan, Jinzhen; Li, Jiannan; Chu, Jiaru; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic impact printing has been recently introduced, utilizing its nature of simple device architecture, low cost, non-contamination, and scalable multiplexability and high throughput. In this paper, we have introduced an impact-based droplet printing platform utilizing a simple plug-and-play microfluidic cartridge driven by piezoelectric actuators. Such a customizable printing system allows for ultrafine control of droplet volume from picoliters (∼23 pl) to nanoliters (∼10 nl), a 500 fold variation. The high flexibility of droplet generation can be simply achieved by controlling the magnitude of actuation (e.g., driving voltage) and the waveform shape of actuation pulses, in addition to nozzle size restrictions. Detailed printing characterizations on these parameters have been conducted consecutively. A multiplexed impact printing system has been prototyped and demonstrated to provide the functions of single-droplet jetting and droplet multiplexing as well as concentration gradient generation. Moreover, a generic biological assay has also been tested and validated on this printing platform. Therefore, the microfluidic droplet printing system could be of potential value to establish multiplexed micro reactors for high-throughput life science applications. PMID:26392833

  10. Hyperspectral imaging in quality control of inkjet printed personalised dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hossein; Kolakovic, Ruzica; Genina, Natalja; Marmion, Mathieu; Salo, Harri; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Sandler, Niklas

    2015-04-10

    The aim of the study was to investigate applicability of near infra-red (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique in quality control of printed personalised dosage forms. Inkjet printing technology was utilized to fabricate escalating doses of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). A solution containing anhydrous theophylline as the model drug was developed as a printable formulation. Single units solid dosage forms (SDFs) were prepared by jetting the solution onto 1 cm × 1 cm areas on carrier substrate with multiple printing passes. It was found that the number of printing passes was in excellent correlation (R(2)=0.9994) with the amount of the dispensed drug (μg cm(-2)) based on the UV calibration plot. The API dose escalation was approximately 7.5 μg cm(-2) for each printing pass concluding that inkjet printing technology can optimally provide solutions to accurate deposition of active substances with a potential for personalized dosing. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out in order to visualize the trends in the hyperspectral data. Subsequently, a quantitative partial least squares (PLS) regression model was created. NIR hyperspectral imaging proved (R(2)=0.9767) to be a reliable, rapid and non-destructive method to optimize quality control of these planar printed dosage forms.

  11. Aerosol, radiation, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne, spaceborne, and ground-based measurements are used to study the radiative and climatic effects of aerosols. The data, which are modelled with a hierarchy of radiation and climate models, and their implications are summarized. Consideration is given to volcanic aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds, and the Arctic haze. It is shown that several types of aerosols (volcanic particles and the Arctic haze) cause significant alterations to the radiation budget of the regions where they are located.

  12. Fission-fragment attachment to aerosols and their transport through capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Alvarez, J.L.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of radioactive aerosols was studied using equipment, collectively called the Helium jet, that has been constructed to provide basic nuclear physics data on fission product nuclides. The transport of the fission products in the system depends on their attachment to aerosol particles. The system consists of 1) a tube furnace which generates aerosols by the sublimation or evaporation of source material, 2) a helium stream used to transport the aerosols, 3) a 25 m settling tube to eliminate the larger aerosols and smaller aerosols that would deposit in the capillary, 4) a Californium-252 self-fissioning source of fission product nuclides, and 5) a small capillary to carry the radioactive aerosols from the hot cell to the laboratory. Different source materials were aerosolized but NaCl is generally used because it yielded the highest transport efficiencies through the capillary. Particle size measurments were made with NaCl aerosols by using a cascade impactor, an optical light scattering device, and the capillary itself as a diffusion battery by performing radiation measurements and/or electrical conductivity measurements. Both radioactive and nonradioactive aerosols were measured in order to investigate the possibility of a preferential size range for fission product attachment. The measured size distributions were then used to calculate attachment coefficients and finally an attachment time.

  13. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  14. Anomalies in the South American Monsoon Induced by Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M. William; Kyu-Mong, Kim

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effects of aerosols on the water cycle of the South American monsoon using the NASA finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM). Global aerosol forcings are computed from radiative transfer functions derived from global distributions of five species of aerosols, i.e., dust, black carbon, organic carbon, sulphate and sea salt from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. Comparing fvGCM experiments without aerosol forcing, and with different combinations of aerosol forcing, we evaluate the impacts of aerosol direct heating on the onset, maintenance and evolution of the South American summer monsoon. We find that during the pre-monsoon season (September-October-November) Saharan dust contribute to heating of the atmosphere over the central and eastern equatorial Atlantic/Africa region through the elevated heat pump mechanism. The heating generates an anomalous Walker circulation with sinking motion, and low level northeasterlies over the Caribbean and northwestern South America. The low level flow is blocked by the Andes, and turn south and southeastward, increasing the low level jet (LLJ) along the eastern slope of the Andes. The increased LLJ transports more moisture from the Atlantic and the Amazon, enhancing the moisture convergence over subtropical land regions of South America. The moisture convergence was further accelerated by atmospheric heating by biomass burning over the Amazon. The net results of the dust and biomass heating are: a) an advance of the monsoon rainy season, b) an enhanced LLJ and c) a shifting the South America monsoon land precipitation equatorward, with increased rain over southern Brazil and reduced rain over the La Plata basin. ramifications of this elevated heating heat pump mechanism in aerosol monsoon water cycle on climate variability and change will be discussed. The ramifications of this "elevated heating heat pump" mechanism in aerosol monsoom water cycle on climate

  15. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  16. Printed Module Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Stockert, Talysa R.; Fields, Jeremy D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Mauger, Scott A.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2015-06-14

    Monolithic interconnects in photovoltaic modules connect adjacent cells in series, and are typically formed sequentially involving multiple deposition and scribing steps. Interconnect widths of 500 um every 10 mm result in 5% dead area, which does not contribute to power generation in an interconnected solar panel. This work expands on previous work that introduced an alternative interconnection method capable of producing interconnect widths less than 100 um. The interconnect is added to the module in a single step after deposition of the photovoltaic stack, eliminating the need for scribe alignment. This alternative method can be used for all types of thin film photovoltaic modules. Voltage addition with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells using a 2-scribe printed interconnect approach is demonstrated. Additionally, interconnect widths of 250 um are shown.

  17. Design of roll-to-roll printing equipment with multiple printing methods for multi-layer printing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Hwan; Jo, Jeongdai; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, a novel design concept for roll-to-roll printing equipment used for manufacturing printed electronic devices by multi-layer printing is presented. The roll-to-roll printing system mainly consists of printing units for patterning the circuits, tension control components such as feeders, dancers, load cells, register measurement and control units, and the drying units. It has three printing units which allow switching among the gravure, gravure-offset, and flexo printing methods by changing the web path and the placements of the cylinders. Therefore, depending on the application devices and the corresponding inks used, each printing unit can be easily adjusted to the required printing method. The appropriate printing method can be chosen depending on the desired printing properties such as thickness, roughness, and printing quality. To provide an example of the application of the designed printing equipment, we present the results of printing tests showing the variations in the printing properties of the ink for different printing methods.

  18. Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-29

    Researchers at the MDF have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.

  19. Infrared Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3D-Printed Object

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-29

    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.

  20. Contact dermatitis in printing tradesmen.

    PubMed

    Nethercott, J R; Nosal, R

    1986-05-01

    During a 2-year period in Toronto, Canada, 21 printing tradesmen with contact dermatitis were evaluated. 67% had allergic contact dermatitis; 29% due to ultraviolet-cured ink components. Irritant contact dermatitis accounted for 37% of the cases. The prognosis in printing tradesmen with contact dermatitis is guarded, except for those with allergic contact dermatitis due to UV-cured components, as the tradesmen who were sensitized to other contactants eventually left the trade. Offset lithography was associated with the problem in 18 of the 21 cases. A brief outline is given of the printing processes in common use.

  1. The jet in crossflowa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagozian, Ann R.

    2014-10-01

    The jet in crossflow, or transverse jet, is a flowfield that has relevance to a wide range of energy and propulsion systems. Over the years, our group's studies on this canonical flowfield have focused on the dynamics of the vorticity associated with equidensity and variable density jets in crossflow, including the stability characteristics of the jet's upstream shear layer, as a means of explaining jet response to altered types of excitation. The jet's upstream shear layer is demonstrated to exhibit convectively unstable behavior at high jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios, transitioning to absolutely unstable behavior at low momentum flux and/or density ratios, with attendant differences in shear layer vorticity evolution and rollup. These differences in stability characteristics are shown to have a significant effect on how one optimally employs external excitation to control jet penetration and spread, depending on the flow regime and specific engineering application. Yet recent unexpected observations on altered transverse jet structure under different flow conditions introduce a host of unanswered questions, primarily but not exclusively associated with the nature of molecular mixing, that make this canonical flowfield one that is of great interest for more extensive exploration.

  2. AirJet paper mover: an example of mesoscale MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Berlin, Andrew A.; Cheung, Patrick; Fromherz, Markus P.; Goldberg, David; Jackson, Warren B.; Preas, Bryan; Reich, James; Swartz, Lars E.

    2000-08-01

    The motion of human scale objects requires MEMS-like device arrays capable of providing reasonable forces ($GTR mN) over human scale distances (10-100 cm). In principle batch fabricated values controlling air jets can satisfy these actuation requirements. By extending printed circuit board technology to include electromechanical actuation, analogous to the extension of VLSI to MEMS, the requirement of low system cost can be achieved through batch fabrication and integration of the transduction elements with computational and communication elements. In this paper we show that modulated air jets arrayed with position sensors can support and accelerate flexible media without physical contact. Precise motion control with three degrees of freedom parallel to the array, using high flow, low pressure air jet arrays is enabled using electrostatic valves having opening and closing times of approximately equals 1 ms. We present results of an exemplary platform based on printed circuit board technologies, having an array of 576 electrostatic flap valvves (1152 for double-sided actuation) and associated oriented jets, and an integrated array of 32,000 optical sensors for high resolution detection of paper edge positions. Under closed loop control edge positioning has a standard deviation of approximately equals 25 microns. Fabrication and control of the system is described.

  3. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  4. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  5. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  6. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  7. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  8. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  9. Environmental Print: Real-World Early Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    What is environmental print? It is symbols all around. Environmental print is on signs, billboards, packages, junk mail, and everywhere. Young children easily recognize environmental print in their surroundings. Their everyday experiences with print are an important classroom tool to help children connect what they already know about written…

  10. Air-sea exchange from bubble-induced jetting: How viscous forces suppress droplet production from small bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Elena; Walls, Peter; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    When a bubble ruptures in the ocean, it frequently produces a jet that releases aerosols into the atmosphere. The number of jet drops ejected is important because droplets may contain sea salt and other cloud condensation nuclei. It is generally accepted that the smallest bubbles produce the largest number of jet drops. However, if the bubble is sufficiently small, viscosity prevents droplet production altogether. Here we investigate the number of jet drops produced by small bubbles. Using a combination of high-speed microscopy, similitude, and numerical simulations, we quantify the extent that viscous forces inhibit this droplet production. We acknowledge support from NSF under Grant No. 1351466.

  11. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  12. Lidar remote sensing of cloud formation caused by low-level jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jia; Felton, Melvin; Lei, Liqiao; McCormick, M. Patrick; Delgado, Ruben; St. Pé, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    In May 2014, the East Hampton Roads Aerosol Flux campaign was conducted at Hampton University to examine small-scale aerosol transport using aerosol, Raman, and Doppler lidars and rawindsonde launches. We present the results of analyses performed on these high-resolution planetary boundary layer and lower atmospheric measurements, with a focus on the low-level jets (LLJs) that form in this region during spring and summer. We present a detailed case study of a LLJ lasting from evening of 20 May to morning of 21 May using vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter, wind speed and direction, water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, and turbulence structure. We show with higher resolution than in previous studies that enhanced nighttime turbulence triggered by LLJs can cause the aerosol and water vapor content of the boundary layer to be transported vertically and form a well-mixed region containing the cloud condensation nuclei that are necessary for cloud formation.

  13. Direct fabrication of high-resolution three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds using electrohydrodynamic hot jet plotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chuang; Dong, Jingyan

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the direct three-dimensional (3D) fabrication of polymer scaffolds with sub-10 µm structures using electrohydrodynamic jet (EHD-jet) plotting of melted thermoplastic polymers. Traditional extrusion-based fabrication approaches of 3D periodic porous structures are very limited in their resolution, due to the excessive pressure requirement for extruding highly viscous thermoplastic polymers. EHD-jet printing has become a high-resolution alternative to other forms of nozzle deposition-based fabrication approaches by generating micro-scale liquid droplets or a fine jet through the application of a large electrical voltage between the nozzle and the substrate. In this study, we successfully apply EHD-jet plotting technology with melted biodegradable polymer (polycaprolactone, or PCL) for the fabrication of 2D patterns and 3D periodic porous scaffold structures in potential tissue engineering applications. Process conditions (e.g. electrical voltage, pressure, plotting speed) have been thoroughly investigated to achieve reliable jet printing of fine filaments. We have demonstrated for the first time that the EHD-jet plotting process is capable of the fabrication of 3D periodic structures with sub-10 µm resolution, which has great potential in advanced biomedical applications, such as cell alignment and guidance.

  14. Print a Bed Bug Card

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  15. Printing and Publishing Monitoring Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page covers monitoring information specific to the printing and publishing industry.

  16. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  17. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  18. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  19. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  20. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  1. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications.

  2. Occupational noise in printing companies.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Grujic, Selena D; Kiurski, Jelena; Krstic, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Kovacevic, Ilija

    2011-10-01

    The extent of noise in five printing companies in Novi Sad, Serbia, was determined using TES-1358A Sound Analyzer with RS-232 Interface. The data on equivalent A-level (dBA), as well as, maximum and minimum sound pressure levels were collected. It was found that folders and offset printing units are the predominant noise sources, with the average L (eq) levels of 87.66 and 82.7 dBA, respectively. Forty percent of the machines produced noise levels above the limiting threshold level of 85 dBA, allowed by law. The noise in all printing companies was dominated by higher frequency noise, and the maximum level mostly appeared at 4,000 Hz. For offset printing machines and folders, the means of L (eq) levels exceeded the permissible levels given by NR-80 curve at higher frequencies. There are no published studies of occupational noise and hearing impairment of workers exposed to hazardous noise in printing industry in Serbia. More extensive studies are needed to determine the exact impact of noise on the workers. Technical and organizational measures in order to control noise and prevent noise exposure, and general hearing conservation program to protect workers, should be introduced in printing industry.

  3. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  4. Jet lag modification.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emily; McGrane, Owen; Wedmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Athletes often are required to travel for sports participation, both for practice and competition. A number of those crossing multiple time zones will develop jet lag disorder with possible negative consequences on their performance. This review will discuss the etiology of jet lag disorder and the techniques that are available to shorten or minimize its effects. This includes both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

  5. Jet measurements in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Peter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    The reconstruction of jets generated in the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of TeV with the ATLAS detector is discussed. Beginning with a brief review of the calorimeter signal definitions relevant for jet finding, and the use of reconstructed charged particle tracks, the jet reconstruction strategy is described in some detail. Emphasis is put on the jet energy scale (JES) calibration strategy applied for first data, which is based on a short sequence of data driven and simulation based calibrations and corrections to restore the measured jet energy to particle level. The level of understanding of the signal patterns entering the JES corrections is shown for selected variables in comparisons to simulations. The present systematic uncertainties on the JES, which can be as low as 2% for central jets, are presented and analyzed with respect to the individual fractional contributions entering their determination. Some characteristic jet reconstruction performance and selected results from the first year of jet physics with ATLAS in a newly accessible kinematic domain are shown in conclusion.

  6. Multicolor lasing prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Yang, Shancheng; Wang, Yue; Gao, Yuan; He, Tingchao; Chen, Rui; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Handong

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates mass production of printable multi-color lasing microarrays based on uniform hemispherical microcavities on a distributed Bragg reflector using inkjet technique. By embedding two different organic dyes into these prints, optically pumped whispering gallery mode microlasers with lasing wavelengths in green and red spectral ranges are realized. The spectral linewidth of the lasing modes is found as narrow as 0.11 nm. Interestingly, dual-color lasing emission in the ranges of 515-535 nm and 585-605 nm is simultaneously achieved by using two different dyes with certain ratios. Spectroscopic measurements elucidate the energy transfer process from the green dye (donor) to the red one (acceptor) with an energy transfer efficiency up to 80% in which the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer dominates. As such, the acceptor lasing in the presence of donor exhibits a significantly lower (˜2.5-fold) threshold compared with that of the pure acceptor lasing with the same concentration.

  7. 75 FR 41524 - Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company, Corporate Offices, Cranston, RI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 6, 2009, applicable to workers of Cranston Print...

  8. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  9. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.

  10. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  11. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  12. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  13. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  14. Deposition and characterization of lines printed through laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Córdoba, C.; Patrascioiu, A.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2013-03-01

    The possibility of printing two-dimensional micropatterns of biomolecule solutions is of great interest in many fields of research in biomedicine, from cell-growth and development studies to the investigation of the mechanisms of communication between cells. Although laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been extensively used to print micrometric droplets of biological solutions, the fabrication of complex patterns depends on the feasibility of the technique to print micron-sized lines of aqueous solutions. In this study we investigate such a possibility through the analysis of the influence of droplet spacing of a water and glycerol solution on the morphology of the features printed by LIFT. We prove that it is indeed possible to print long and uniform continuous lines by controlling the overlap between adjacent droplets. We show how, depending on droplet spacing, several printed morphologies are generated, and we offer, in addition, a simple explanation of the observed behavior based on the jetting dynamics characteristic of the LIFT of liquids.

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  16. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  17. Optimal Jet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, D. Yu.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2003-09-01

    We describe a FORTRAN 77 implementation of the optimal jet definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We discuss details of the implementation, explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (OJF_014) Catalogue identifier: ADSB Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Any computer with the FORTRAN 77 compiler Tested with: g77/Linux on Intel, Alpha and Sparc; Sun f77/Solaris (thwgs.cern.ch); xlf/AIX (rsplus.cern.ch); MS Fortran PowerStation 4.0/Win98 Programming language used: FORTRAN 77 Memory required: ˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) Number of bytes in distributed program, including examples and test data: 251 463 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Hadronic jets, jet finding algorithms Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [ hep-ph/0301185] provide a brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called optimal jet definition ( OJD). The theory of OJD was developed by Tkachov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; 74 (1995) 2618; Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12 (1997) 5411; 17 (2002) 2783]. The desired jet configuration is obtained as the one that minimizes Ω R, a certain function of the input particles and jet

  18. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  19. WikiPrints: rendering enterprise Wiki content for printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkner, Kathrin

    2010-02-01

    Wikis have become a tool of choice for collaborative, informative communication. In contrast to the immense Wikipedia, that serves as a reference web site and typically covers only one topic per web page, enterprise wikis are often used as project management tools and contain several closely related pages authored by members of one project. In that scenario it is useful to print closely related content for review or teaching purposes. In this paper we propose a novel technique for rendering enterprise wiki content for printing called WikiPrints, that creates a linearized version of wiki content formatted as a mixture between web layout and conventional document layout suitable for printing. Compared to existing print options for wiki content, Wikiprints automatically selects content from different wiki pages given user preferences and usage scenarios. Meta data such as content authors or time of content editing are considered. A preview of the linearized content is shown to the user and an interface for making manual formatting changes provided.

  20. Autonomic Composite Hydrogels by Reactive Printing: Materials and Oscillatory Response (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    manufacturing tools, including inkjet printers , has vast poten- tial due to the ease of programing and creating arbitrary 2D and 3D structures. In the...of DMF, which can be applied with something as simple as a micro-dispenser or inkjet printer .2 Experimental 2.1 Materials N-Isopropyl acrylamide...Schematic diagram of the reactive printing procedure. Patterns can be programed by an ink jet printer , and complex patterns such as spots, lines, shape

  1. Time-Resolved imaging Studies of Laser-Induced Jet Formation in Non-Newtonian Liquid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkoz, Emre; Arnold, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Blister-actuated laser-induced forward transfer (BA-LIFT) is a nozzle-less printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. The lack of a nozzle allows for a wider range of inks since clogging is not a concern. In this work, a focused laser pulse is absorbed within a polymer layer coated with a thin liquid film. The pulse causes a rapidly expanding blister to be formed that induces a liquid jet. Various well-studied non-Newtonian solutions are tested to examine how the shear-thinning and shear-thickening characteristics affect jet formation. The time delay between pulses is varied along with the energy, and different regimes of transfer are identified. We explore how Ohnesorge number, Weber number and spot size affect the jet formation and evaluate parameters that lead to breakup of jets into droplets.

  2. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  3. Modeling Aerosol Particle Deposition on a Person Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    numerical simulations of aerosol particle deposition on the human form. Numerical simulation of a two-phase turbulent impinging jet flow is studied to...validation show that the standard EIM with turbulent tracking tends to over predict the deposition efficiency. Greatly improved results were achieved by

  4. An application of the focused liquid jet: needle free drug injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyama, Akihito; Katsuta, Chihiro; Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Endo, Nanami; Tanaka, Akane; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a focused liquid jet draws great attention since it can be applied to various applications (e. g. Ink jet printing, medical devices). In our research, in order to discuss its applicability for a needle-free drug injection system, we shoot a focused liquid jet to an animal skin with very high-speed. Previously, the penetration of this jet into a gelatin and an artificial skin has been performed in order to model of the jet penetration process. However, experiment for jet injection into the animal skin has not been conducted yet. In this presentation, we inject ink as the liquid jet into the skin of the hairless rat. We observe the top/back view and the cross-sectional view of the injected (ink-stained) skin. We capture the stained area of the skin in order to find characteristics of the jet penetration. We discuss the criteria for the jet penetration into the skin. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP26709007, JP16J08521.

  5. The effect of jet shape on jet injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Geehoon; Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the dispersion pattern of a needle-free jet injector are explored. The shape of the jets were compared using a high-speed video camera and jet injections of collimated and dispersed fluid jets with a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector were made into acrylamide gel and post-mortem porcine tissue. A custom-built high-speed X-ray imaging system was used in order to observe the dynamics of the dispersion mechanism for each injection in real time. We show that a collimated jet stream results in greater tissue penetration than a dispersed jet stream.

  6. Synthetic Fence Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Apps, Christopher

    2000-11-01

    "Synthetic Jets" have previously been produced where an oscillating flow with zero net mass flux acts on the edges of an orifice. The resulting flow is similar to a normal jet. We have proposed and verified that another type of jet called a "Synthetic Fence Jet" (SFJ or "fe-je") can also be created. We introduced a fence perpendicular to both a wall and an oscillating velocity field. Under certain conditions a jet was formed by vortices of alternating sign. The vortices were shed from the fence and they induced each other away from it. This phenomenon could be used as a method of flow control. The objective of this project was to use flow visualization to prove the existence of and characterize this jet. A test rig was used which incorporates smoke-wire flow visualization; independent oscillation level and frequency control; and computer- controlled data acquisition. It has been discovered that the jet direction can be vectored by altering the forcing waveform shape. To explain this a theory was developed that is based on the Biot-Savart law of vortex dynamics.

  7. Solar coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  8. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  9. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  10. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  11. Studies of the Los Angeles aerosol:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Cheng

    This work addresses two important but little studied aspects of the behavior of the atmospheric aerosol: (1)the contributions of the atmospheric aerosol to the surface microlayer (SMIC) of natural waters (a biochemically sensitive site) and (2)the morphological properties of atmospheric aerosols. The first part of the study involved a cooperative program for concurrent measurements of atmospheric aerosol, SMIC, and water column samples. Our group measured aerosol chemical characteristics (in terms of total concentrations and size distributions of various elements) at several locations on the west side of Los Angeles including above Santa Monica Bay. Scatter diagrams were made of SMIC concentrations for various elements vs. atmospheric aerosol concentrations of the same elements for similar time periods. The scatter diagrams identified a subset of elements in the SMIC that tended to increase with the atmospheric concentrations of the same elements. For these elements atmospheric deposition is probably a major source in the SMIC. Our scatter diagrams offer a novel approach to source resolution for the SMIC and potentially, a new method of determining dry deposition rates to natural waters. The second part of the research describes the first systematic study of the morphological properties of atmospheric aggregates in the ultrafine particle size range (dp <= 0.1 μm). These aggregates are emitted from diesel engines and other high temperature sources and have been linked to adverse effects on public health. Particles were collected from the atmospheric air on transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids fitted on the last two stages of a single- jet, eight-stage, low pressure impactor (LPI). Photomicrographs of the TEM grids were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (D f) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. Values of Df increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180 for the measurements made in

  12. Observation of cloud formation caused by low-level jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; McCormick, M. P.; Lei, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of analyses performed on high-resolution remotely-sensed and in situ atmospheric measurements of the boundary layer and lower atmosphere centered over the northeast coast of the Hampton Roads body of water in southeast Virginia. This region is adjacent to the confluence of the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean where often times, low-level jets (LLJs) are found in the boundary layer during summer months. An East Hampton Roads Aerosol Flux (EHRAF) campaign, was conducted from the campus of Hampton University (HU) to examine small-scale aerosol transport using aerosol, Raman, and Doppler lidars, as well as rawindsondes over a one-week period in May 2014 . LLJs were observed from evening of 20 May to the morning of 21 May, and were found to lead to cloud formation. In this paper, the cloud formation caused by LLJs is analyzed using data that includes high-resolution profiles of: aerosol backscatter, turbulence structure, temperature, wind speed and direction, and water vapor. It is found that enhanced nighttime turbulence triggered by LLJs causes the aerosol and water vapor content of boundary layer to be lifted up forming a well-mixed region. We show that this region contains the cloud condensation nuclei that are very important for the formation of clouds.

  13. Contact Printing of Arrayed Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Luikart, Alicia M.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel contact printing method utilizing a sacrificial layer of polyacrylic acid (PAA) was developed to selectively modify the upper surfaces of arrayed microstructures. The method was characterized by printing polystyrene onto SU-8 microstructures to create an improved substrate for a cell-based microarray platform. Experiments measuring cell growth SU-8 arrays modified with polystyrene and fibronectin demonstrated improved growth of NIH 3T3 (93% vs. 38%), HeLa (97% vs. 77%), and HT1080 (76% vs. 20%) cells relative to that for the previously used coating method. In addition, use of the PAA sacrificial layer permitted the printing of functionalized polystyrene, carboxylate polystyrene nanospheres, and silica nanospheres onto the arrays in a facile manner. Finally, a high concentration of extracellular matrix materials (ECM), such as collagen (5 mg/mL) and gelatin (0.1%), was contact printed onto the array structures using as little as 5 μL of the ECM reagent and without the formation of a continuous film bridge across the microstructures. Murine embryonic stem cells cultured on arrays printed with this gelatin-hydrogel remained in an undifferentiated state indicating an adequate surface gelatin layer to maintain these cells over time. PMID:20425106

  14. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  15. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  16. Jet Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sally Seidel

    2004-06-28

    Jets have been studied by the CDF Collaboration [1] as a means of searching for new particles and interactions, testing a variety of perturbative QCD predictions, and providing input for the global parton distribution function (PDF) fits. Unless otherwise indicated below, the jets were reconstructed using a cone algorithm [2] with cone radius R = 0.7 from data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run 2, 2001-2003, with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Central jets, in the pseudorapidity range relative to fixed detector coordinates 0.1 < |{eta}| < 0.7, are used.

  17. 3D Printing: Print the future of ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) printer is a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Recent technological advances in 3D printing have resulted in increased use of this technology in the medical field, where it is beginning to revolutionize medical and surgical possibilities. It is already providing medicine with powerful tools that facilitate education, surgical planning, and organ transplantation research. A good understanding of this technology will be beneficial to ophthalmologists. The potential applications of 3D printing in ophthalmology, both current and future, are explored in this article.

  18. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R.; De Brún, C.; Kempers, R.; Lupoi, R.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7oC. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux.

  20. Impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the Met Office global numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, J. P.; Walters, D. N.; Bellouin, N.; Milton, S. F.

    2014-05-01

    The inclusion of the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols in high-resolution global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being increasingly recognised as important for the improved accuracy of short-range weather forecasts. In this study the impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) are investigated. A hierarchy of aerosol representations are evaluated including three-dimensional monthly mean speciated aerosol climatologies, fully prognostic aerosols modelled using the CLASSIC aerosol scheme and finally, initialised aerosols using assimilated aerosol fields from the GEMS project. The prognostic aerosol schemes are better able to predict the temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol optical depth, which is particularly important in cases of large sporadic aerosol events such as large dust storms or forest fires. Including the direct effect of aerosols improves model biases in outgoing long-wave radiation over West Africa due to a better representation of dust. However, uncertainties in dust optical properties propagate to its direct effect and the subsequent model response. Inclusion of the indirect aerosol effects improves surface radiation biases at the North Slope of Alaska ARM site due to lower cloud amounts in high-latitude clean-air regions. This leads to improved temperature and height forecasts in this region. Impacts on the global mean model precipitation and large-scale circulation fields were found to be generally small in the short-range forecasts. However, the indirect aerosol effect leads to a strengthening of the low-level monsoon flow over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and an increase in precipitation over Southeast Asia. Regional impacts on the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) are also presented with the large dust loading in the aerosol climatology enhancing of the heat low over West Africa and weakening the AEJ. This study highlights the

  1. Impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the Met Office global NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, J. P.; Walters, D. N.; Bellouin, N.; Milton, S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Inclusion of the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols in high resolution global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being increasingly recognised as important for the improved accuracy of short-range weather forecasts. In this study the impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) are investigated. A hierarchy of aerosol representations are evaluated including three dimensional monthly mean speciated aerosol climatologies, fully prognostic aerosols modelled using the CLASSIC aerosol scheme and finally, initialised aerosols using assimilated aerosol fields from the GEMS project. The prognostic aerosol schemes are better able to predict the temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol optical depth, which is particularly important in cases of large sporadic aerosol events such as large dust storms or forest fires. Including the direct effect of aerosols improves model biases in outgoing longwave radiation over West Africa due to a better representation of dust. However, uncertainties in dust optical properties propogate to its direct effect and the subsequent model response. Inclusion of the indirect aerosol effects improves surface radiation biases at the North Slope of Alaska ARM site due to lower cloud amounts in high latitude clean air regions. This leads to improved temperature and height forecasts in this region. Impacts on the global mean model precipitation and large-scale circulation fields were found to be generally small in the short range forecasts. However, the indirect aerosol effect leads to a strengthening of the low level monsoon flow over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and an increase in precipitation over Southeast Asia. Regional impacts on the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) are also presented with the large dust loading in the aerosol climatology enhancing of the heat low over West Africa and weakening the AEJ. This study highlights the importance

  2. Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Aerosolized Conductive Flake Powders and Flake Suspensions having a Zero-Truncated Poisson Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle was used to disseminate all materials into a stirred 190 m 3 cylindrical aerosol chamber. After dispersion by the... nozzle and thorough chamber mixing with a low speed fan, spectral aerosol transmittance and concentration were simultaneously measured to obtain spectral...varying concentrations were prepared by stirring and sonicating the powders in ethanol. A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle , consisting of a jet of the

  3. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  4. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  5. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  6. 94. PRINT SHOP PORT LOOKING TO STARBOARD VISIBLE ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. PRINT SHOP - PORT LOOKING TO STARBOARD VISIBLE ARE ATF CHIEF 17 LITHOGRAPHIC PRINTING PRESS, 1250 MULTILITH PRINTING PRESS AND HOT TYPE PRINTING PRESS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  7. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  8. 3D holographic printer: fast printing approach.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexander V; Putilin, Andrey N; Kopenkin, Sergey S; Borodin, Yuriy P; Druzhin, Vladislav V; Dubynin, Sergey E; Dubinin, German B

    2014-02-10

    This article describes the general operation principles of devices for synthesized holographic images such as holographic printers. Special emphasis is placed on the printing speed. In addition, various methods to increase the printing process are described and compared.

  9. Philadelphia Printing and Publishing, 1876-1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Thomas M.

    1976-01-01

    Two Philadelphia printing histories, both reflecting the relationship of printing to publishing, are examined in this article: the manufacture by the publisher of his own product and the development and commercialization of the photomechanical halftone process. (Author)

  10. Relativistic Jets from Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; MacFadyen, A.

    2000-03-01

    Using a collapsar progenitor model of MacFadyen & Woosley, we have simulated the propagation of an axisymmetric jet through a collapsing rotating massive star with the GENESIS multidimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code. The jet forms as a consequence of an assumed (constant or variable) energy deposition in the range of 1050-1051 ergs s-1 within a 30 deg cone around the rotation axis. The jet flow is strongly beamed (approximately less than a few degrees), spatially inhomogeneous, and time dependent. The jet reaches the surface of the stellar progenitor (R*=2.98x1010 cm) intact. At breakout, the maximum Lorentz factor of the jet flow is 33. After breakout, the jet accelerates into the circumstellar medium, whose density is assumed to decrease exponentially and then become constant, ρext=10-5 g cm-3. Outside the star, the flow begins to expand laterally also (v~c), but the beam remains very well collimated. At a distance of 2.54 R*, where the simulation ends, the Lorentz factor has increased to 44.

  11. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  12. Axisymmetric wall jet development in confined jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-02-01

    The flow field surrounding an axisymmetric, confined, impinging jet was investigated with a focus on the early development of the triple-layered wall jet structure. Experiments were conducted using stereo particle image velocimetry at three different confinement gap heights (2, 4, and 8 jet diameters) across Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 9000. The rotating flow structures within the confinement region and their interaction with the surrounding flow were dependent on the confinement gap height and Reynolds number. The recirculation core shifted downstream as the Reynolds number increased. For the smallest confinement gap height investigated, the strong recirculation caused a disruption of the wall jet development. The radial position of the recirculation core observed at this small gap height was found to coincide with the location where the maximum wall jet velocity had decayed to 15% of the impinging jet exit velocity. After this point, the self-similarity hypothesis failed to predict the evolution of the wall jet further downstream. A reduction in confinement gap height increased the growth rates of the wall jet thickness but did not affect the decay rate of the wall jet maximum velocity. For jet Reynolds numbers above 2500, the decay rate of the maximum velocity in the developing region of the wall jet was approximately -1.1, which is close to previous results reported for the fully developed region of radial wall jets. A much higher decay rate of -1.5 was found for the wall jet formed by a laminar impinging jet at Re = 1000.

  13. In Print or Out of Print? The Continuing Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayden, Mimi

    1982-01-01

    Briefly describes the problems encountered by libraries in attempting to purchase out-of-stock books and discusses some of the reasons for changes in the way publishers handle backlist materials, including sales volume and its relation to increased printing costs. (JL)

  14. Corporate Web Sites in Traditional Print Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardun, Carol J.; Lamb, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Web presence in print advertisements to determine how marketers are creating bridges between traditional advertising and the Internet. Content analysis showed Web addresses in print ads; categories of advertisers most likely to link print ads with Web sites; and whether the Web site attempts to develop a database of potential…

  15. Image analysis of Renaissance copperplate prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2008-02-01

    From the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, prints were a common form of visual communication, analogous to photographs. Copperplate prints have many finely engraved black lines which were used to create the illusion of continuous tone. Line densities generally are 100-2000 lines per square centimeter and a print can contain more than a million total engraved lines 20-300 micrometers in width. Because hundreds to thousands of prints were made from a single copperplate over decades, variation among prints can have historical value. The largest variation is plate-related, which is the thinning of lines over successive editions as a result of plate polishing to remove time-accumulated corrosion. Thinning can be quantified with image analysis and used to date undated prints and books containing prints. Print-related variation, such as over-inking of the print, is a smaller but significant source. Image-related variation can introduce bias if images were differentially illuminated or not in focus, but improved imaging technology can limit this variation. The Print Index, the percentage of an area composed of lines, is proposed as a primary measure of variation. Statistical methods also are proposed for comparing and identifying prints in the context of a print database.

  16. All-Printed Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed G; Kramer, Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    A fully automated additive manufacturing process that produces all-printed flexible and stretchable electronics is demonstrated. The printing process combines soft silicone elastomer printing and liquid metal processing on a single high-precision 3D stage. The platform is capable of fabricating extremely complex conductive circuits, strain and pressure sensors, stretchable wires, and wearable circuits with high yield and repeatability.

  17. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  18. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols shift lake ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, Harry J.

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols over the Chinese Loess Plateau have diminished monsoon precipitation and concomitant soil erosion that plagues the region. Now, a reconstruction documents the differences between historical warming events and the present, highlighting the paradoxical implications of decreasing atmospheric aerosols.

  19. Generation of aerosolized drugs.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R K; Niven, R W

    1994-01-01

    The expanding use of inhalation therapy has placed demands on current aerosol generation systems that are difficult to meet with current inhalers. The desire to deliver novel drug entities such as proteins and peptides, as well as complex formulations including liposomes and microspheres, requires delivery systems of improved efficiency that will target the lung in a reproducible manner. These efforts have also been spurred by the phase out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and this has included a directed search for alternative propellants. Consequently, a variety of new aerosol devices and methods of generating aerosols are being studied. This includes the use of freon replacement propellants, dry powder generation systems, aqueous unit spray systems and microprocessor controlled technologies. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages depending upon each principle of action and set of design variables. In addition, specific drugs may be better suited for one type of inhaler device vs. another. The extent to which aerosol generation systems achieve their goals is discussed together with a summary of selected papers presented at the recent International Congress of Aerosols in Medicine.

  20. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  1. Conservation of Drawings and Prints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Antoinette

    1972-01-01

    Some of the basic techniques of preserving and restoring prints and drawings are outlined. Examination, dry cleaning, stain removal, mending, backing removal, and lining are discussed, as well as aspects of the complexity of bleaching, types and nature of some stains and discolorations, and materials of poor quality used by many framers. (Author)

  2. Printing. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seivert, Chester

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 13 terminal objectives for an intermediate printing course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course with specialized classroom, shop, and practical experiences designed to enable the student to develop proficiency…

  3. Flexible substrate for printed wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakura, M.; Yabe, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, A.

    1982-01-01

    A very flexible substrate for printed wiring is disclosed which is composed of a blend of phenoxy resin-polyisocyanate-brominated epoxy resin in which the equivalent ration of the functional groups is hydroxyl grouped: isocyanate group: epoxy group = 1:0.2 to 2:0.5 to 3. The product has outstanding solder resistance and is applied to metal without using adhesives.

  4. Printing. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This document contains a vocational program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for secondary and postsecondary printing programs. The guide contains the following sections: occupational description; program content (curriculum framework and student performance standards); program implementation (student admission criteria,…

  5. The Power of the Print

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The print has a long-standing tradition of carrying a political message. This can be seen in the works of artists from the German Expressionists, like Kathe Kollwitz and Emil Nolde, to Mexican printmakers like Jose Posada and Leopoldo Mendez. Whether it was during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the War in Iraq, or the 2008 presidential election,…

  6. All-printed paper memory.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kao, Zhen-Kai; Huang, Teng-Han; Liao, Ying-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal–insulator–metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems.

  7. Printing. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seivert, Chester

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 17 terminal objectives for a secondary level basic printing course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hours daily) course with specialized classroom and shop experiences designed to enable the student to develop basic…

  8. Latin American Folk Art Prints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navah, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Latin American customs and colors play an important role as second graders are introduced to multicultural experiences through food, music, dance, art, and craft. In this article, the author describes a printing project inspired by Guatemalan weavings and amate bark paintings. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  9. Qualification of security printing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Aronoff, Jason S.; Arnabat, Jordi

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the statistical and hardware processes involved in qualifying two related printing features for their deployment in product (e.g. document and package) security. The first is a multi-colored tiling feature that can also be combined with microtext to provide additional forms of security protection. The color information is authenticated automatically with a variety of handheld, desktop and production scanners. The microtext is authenticated either following magnification or manually by a field inspector. The second security feature can also be tile-based. It involves the use of two inks that provide the same visual color, but differ in their transparency to infrared (IR) wavelengths. One of the inks is effectively transparent to IR wavelengths, allowing emitted IR light to pass through. The other ink is effectively opaque to IR wavelengths. These inks allow the printing of a seemingly uniform, or spot, color over a (truly) uniform IR emitting ink layer. The combination converts a uniform covert ink and a spot color to a variable data region capable of encoding identification sequences with high density. Also, it allows the extension of variable data printing for security to ostensibly static printed regions, affording greater security protection while meeting branding and marketing specifications.

  10. Conservation of Photographic Print Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Alice

    1981-01-01

    Provides specific information on varying photographic materials and processes to aid archivists and curators in preserving photograph collections. Preservation problems related to major types of silver prints on paper (salt, albumen, collodion, gelatin) and to the silver image (oxidation, silver sulfide) are covered. Twenty references are cited.…

  11. Printing Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 10 occupations in the printing series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for…

  12. Organic materials for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, M.; Nilsson, D.; Robinson, N. D.

    2007-01-01

    Organic materials can offer a low-cost alternative for printed electronics and flexible displays. However, research in these systems must exploit the differences - via molecular-level control of functionality - compared with inorganic electronics if they are to become commercially viable.

  13. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  14. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  15. 3D printing PLGA: a quantitative examination of the effects of polymer composition and printing parameters on print resolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Holzberg, Timothy R; Lim, Casey G; Gao, Feng; Gargava, Ankit; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-04-12

    In the past few decades, 3D printing has played a significant role in fabricating scaffolds with consistent, complex structure that meet patient-specific needs in future clinical applications. Although many studies have contributed to this emerging field of additive manufacturing, which includes material development and computer-aided scaffold design, current quantitative analyses do not correlate material properties, printing parameters, and printing outcomes to a great extent. A model that correlates these properties has tremendous potential to standardize 3D printing for tissue engineering and biomaterial science. In this study, we printed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) utilizing a direct melt extrusion technique without additional ingredients. We investigated PLGA with various lactic acid:glycolic acid (LA:GA) molecular weight ratios and end caps to demonstrate the dependence of the extrusion process on the polymer composition. Micro-computed tomography was then used to evaluate printed scaffolds containing different LA:GA ratios, composed of different fiber patterns, and processed under different printing conditions. We built a statistical model to reveal the correlation and predominant factors that determine printing precision. Our model showed a strong linear relationship between the actual and predicted precision under different combinations of printing conditions and material compositions. This quantitative examination establishes a significant foreground to 3D print biomaterials following a systematic fabrication procedure. Additionally, our proposed statistical models can be applied to couple specific biomaterials and 3D printing applications for patient implants with particular requirements.

  16. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micro-pores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards.

  17. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  18. Aerosol Filter Loading Data for a Simulated Jet Engine Test Cell Aerosol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    media. M SECTION II TEST PROGRAM I. TESTING PROCEDURE Sheets of the filter media were obtained from Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation. Ten centimeter...loading cycle. 2. TEST FILTERS The four following glass fiber filter medias were obtained from Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation (OCF) and tested both...shown in Table 22. Filters were washed from the back side. 5. ONCLUSIONS Four glass fiber filters, specified in the contract, were obtained from Owens

  19. Chemical aerosol Raman detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Di Cecca, S.; Amin, M.; Perkins, B. G.; Clark, M. L.; Jeys, T. H.; Sickenberger, D. W.; D'Amico, F. M.; Emmons, E. D.; Christesen, S. D.; Kreis, R. J.; Kilper, G. K.

    2017-03-01

    A sensitive chemical aerosol Raman detector (CARD) has been developed for the trace detection and identification of chemical particles in the ambient atmosphere. CARD includes an improved aerosol concentrator with a concentration factor of about 40 and a CCD camera for improved detection sensitivity. Aerosolized isovanillin, which is relatively safe, has been used to characterize the performance of the CARD. The limit of detection (SNR = 10) for isovanillin in 15 s has been determined to be 1.6 pg/cm3, which corresponds to 6.3 × 109 molecules/cm3 or 0.26 ppb. While less sensitive, CARD can also detect gases. This paper provides a more detailed description of the CARD hardware and detection algorithm than has previously been published.

  20. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  1. 3D-printing spatially varying BRDFs.

    PubMed

    Rouiller, Olivier; Bickel, Bernd; Kautz, Jan; Matusik, Wojciech; Alexa, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A new method fabricates custom surface reflectance and spatially varying bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (svBRDFs). Researchers optimize a microgeometry for a range of normal distribution functions and simulate the resulting surface's effective reflectance. Using the simulation's results, they reproduce an input svBRDF's appearance by distributing the microgeometry on the printed material's surface. This method lets people print svBRDFs on planar samples with current 3D printing technology, even with a limited set of printing materials. It extends naturally to printing svBRDFs on arbitrary shapes.

  2. The M87 Jet. "Rosetta Stone" of AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the M87 jet based on multi-frequency VLBI observations and MHD jet theories. Millimeter VLBI cores are considered as innermost jet emissions. The jet structure up to ~ 105 rs is described as a parabolic streamline, indicating the lateral expansion under a confinement by the stratified ISM. Thus, the jet collimation maintains in five orders of magnitude in the distance starting from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), less than 10 rs. We here examine the jet parabolic structure in order to identify the property of a bulk acceleration; observed sub-to-superluminal motions indicate an MHD acceleration from non-relativistic to relativistic regimes. We propose that the M87 jet consists of Poynting-flux dominated flows, powered by nonlinear torsional Alfvén waves. Future sub-mm VLBI observations play an important role in resolving the origin of the M87 jets.

  3. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  4. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  5. Jet propulsion without inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-08-01

    A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e., jetting) surfaces are considered and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number, which corresponds to the potential flow created by a source dipole at the sphere center. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increases as the body becomes more oblate and limits to approximately 162% in the case of a flat plate swimming along its axis of symmetry. Our results are discussed in the light of slime extrusion mechanisms occurring in many cyanobacteria.

  6. Jet engine testing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zweifel, T.L.

    1987-03-24

    An apparatus is described for testing jet engines mounted on an aircraft, the jet engines of the type having a high speed rotor and a low speed rotor, comprising: representative signal means for providing first representative signals representative of rotation rates of the low speed rotor in the jet engines and second representative signals representative of rotation rates of the high speed rotor in the jet engines; equivalent signal means coupled to receive the second representative signals for deriving equivalent signals representative of low speed rotor rotation rates of normally operating jet engines having high speed rotor rotation rates represented by the second representative signals; first difference signal means coupled to receive the first representative signals and the equivalent signals for providing first difference signals representative of differences between the first representative signals and the equivalent signals; means for providing threshold signals; first detector means coupled to the threshold signal means and the first difference signal means for comparing the threshold signals and the first difference signals to provide first detected signals representative of values of the first difference signals relative to the threshold signals; and engine failure indicator means coupled to receive the detected signals for determination of engine failures.

  7. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  9. Highly stable aerosol generator

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, Henry S.; Clark, Mark L.

    1981-01-01

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

  10. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  11. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  12. Customizing digital printing for fine art practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna E.; Thirkell, Paul; Hoskins, Steve; Wang, Hong Qiang; Laidler, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The presentation will demonstrate how through alternative methods of digital print production the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is developing methodologies for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods. Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Examples of artist's work, and examples from the Perpetual Portfolio are included - an artist in residence scheme for selected artists wanting to work at the Centre and to make a large-format digital print. Colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing. Research is also underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet ink range, and to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks.

  13. Customizing digital printing for fine art practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna E.; Thirkell, Paul; Hoskins, Steve; Wang, Hong Qiang; Laidler, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The presentation will demonstrate how through alternative methods of digital print production the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is developing methodologies for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods. Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Examples of artist's work, and examples from the Perpetual Portfolio are included - an artist in residence scheme for selected artists wanting to work at the Centre and to make a large-format digital print. Colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing. Research is also underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet ink range, and to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks.

  14. Pool scrubbing under jet injection regime: An enhancement of the SPARC90 code

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, L. E.; Berna, C.; Escriva, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    The SPARC90 code was developed to calculate the aerosol pool trapping during vent discharge processes, at low gas velocities. However, there are accident sequences, like SGTR core meltdown sequences, at which particle laden gases reach the aqueous ponds at very high velocities and new particle removal mechanisms become effective right at the inlet. As a result of the shearing off of roll wave water crests, water droplets are entrained in the gas core and sweep out aerosol particles, mainly by inertial impaction and interception. This paper summarizes the update of the SPARC90 code based on state-of-the-art equations for jet hydrodynamics and aerosol removal. Equations for variables like droplets population, size and velocity have been implemented. Based on the anticipated conditions in case of an SGTR severe accident sequence, comparisons of estimates from this new version (SPAR90-Jet) and the original one are set in terms of decontamination factor. Even though further work is still ahead, this work highlights how substantial particle retention at the pool inlet can reach under jet regime and how different aerosol removal mechanisms are with respect to the globule injection regime. (authors)

  15. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  16. Effects of sulfate aerosol forcing on East Asian summer monsoon for 1985-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjoong J.; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1. One control and two sensitivity model experiments were conducted in order to diagnose the separate roles played by sea surface temperature (SST) variations and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcing changes in East Asia. We find that the SST variation has been a major driver for the observed weakening of the EASM, whereas the effect of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing has been opposite and has slightly intensified the EASM over the recent decades. The reinforcement of the EASM results from radiative cooling by the sulfate aerosol forcing, which decelerates the jet stream around the jet's exit region. Subsequently, the secondary circulation induced by such a change in the jet stream leads to the increase in precipitation around 18-23°N. This result indicates that the increase in anthropogenic emissions over East Asia may play a role in compensating for the weakening of the EASM caused by the SST forcing.

  17. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  18. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  19. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  20. Control of Asymmetric Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    with 5hciir Irycr frequencies arnd miodfy th-e preferied mode. Perforte~d steel plateCs "-leed with tempcratuze-resistatr: mnsulativ- mineral wool reduce...Insulation of the Jet facility was initially ... ovid. d 6y ibuiglass, then mineral wool and at the present there is none for health concerns. The...imerior of the jet’s anechoic chamber was also insulated with mineral wool to foitify acoustic damping, however this too has been removed due to portions