Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol maldi technique

  1. MALDI, AP/MALDI and ESI techniques for the MS detection of amyloid [beta]-peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mineo, Placido; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Amyloid [beta]-peptides (A[beta]s) are involved in several neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and considerable experimental evidences have emerged indicating that different proteases play a major role in regulating the accumulation of A[beta]s in the brain. Particularly, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been shown to degrade A[beta]s at different cleavage sites, but the experimental results reported in the literature and obtained by mass spectrometry methods are somehow fragmentary. The detection of A[beta]s is often complicated by solubility issues, oxidation artifacts and spontaneous aggregation/cleavage and, in order to rationalize the different reported results, we analyzed A[beta]s solutions by three different MS approaches: matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion trap and electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap. Differences in the obtained results are discussed and ESI is chosen as the most suitable MS method for A[beta]s detection. Finally, cleavage sites produced by interaction of A[beta]s with IDE are identified, two of which had never been reported in the literature.

  2. New Insights for Diagnosis of Pineapple Fusariosis by MALDI-TOF MS Technique.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cledir; Ventura, José Aires; Lima, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    Fusarium is one of the most economically important fungal genus, since it includes many pathogenic species which cause a wide range of plant diseases. Morphological or molecular biology identification of Fusarium species is a limiting step in the fast diagnosis and treatment of plant disease caused by these fungi. Mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)-based fingerprinting approach was applied to the fungal growth monitoring and direct detection of strain Fusarium guttiforme E-480 inoculated in both pineapple cultivars Pérola and Imperial side shoots, that are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to this fungal strain. MALDI-TOF MS technique was capable to detect fungal molecular mass peaks in the susceptible pineapple stem side shoot tissue. It is assumed that these molecular masses are mainly constituted by ribosomal proteins. MALDI-TOF-based fingerprinting approach has herein been demonstrated to be sensitive and accurate for the direct detection of F. guttiforme E-480 molecular masses on both susceptible and resistant pineapple side stem free of any pre-treatment. According to the results obtained, the changing on molecular mass peaks of infected susceptible pineapple tissue together with the possibility of fungal molecular masses analysis into this pineapple tissue can be a good indication for an early diagnosis by MALDI-TOF MS of pineapple fusariosis. PMID:27117163

  3. New Insights for Diagnosis of Pineapple Fusariosis by MALDI-TOF MS Technique.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cledir; Ventura, José Aires; Lima, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    Fusarium is one of the most economically important fungal genus, since it includes many pathogenic species which cause a wide range of plant diseases. Morphological or molecular biology identification of Fusarium species is a limiting step in the fast diagnosis and treatment of plant disease caused by these fungi. Mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)-based fingerprinting approach was applied to the fungal growth monitoring and direct detection of strain Fusarium guttiforme E-480 inoculated in both pineapple cultivars Pérola and Imperial side shoots, that are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to this fungal strain. MALDI-TOF MS technique was capable to detect fungal molecular mass peaks in the susceptible pineapple stem side shoot tissue. It is assumed that these molecular masses are mainly constituted by ribosomal proteins. MALDI-TOF-based fingerprinting approach has herein been demonstrated to be sensitive and accurate for the direct detection of F. guttiforme E-480 molecular masses on both susceptible and resistant pineapple side stem free of any pre-treatment. According to the results obtained, the changing on molecular mass peaks of infected susceptible pineapple tissue together with the possibility of fungal molecular masses analysis into this pineapple tissue can be a good indication for an early diagnosis by MALDI-TOF MS of pineapple fusariosis.

  4. Analytical techniques for ambient sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Kumar, R.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    Work done to further develop the infrared spectroscopic analytical method for the analysis of atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as some exploratory work on a new procedure for determining proton acidity in aerosol samples is described. Earlier work had led to the successful use of infrared (ir) spectrophotometry for the analysis of nitrate, ammonium, and neutral and acidic sulfates in aerosol samples collected by an impactor on a Mylar-film substrate. In this work, a filter-extraction method was developed to prepare filter-collected aerosol samples for ir analysis. A study was made comparing the ir analytical results on filter-collected samples with impactor-collected samples. Also, the infrared analytical technique was compared in field studies with light-scattering techniques for aerosol analysis. A highly sensitive instrument for aerosol analysis using attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy was designed, built, and tested. This instrument provides a measurement sensitivity much greater (by a factor of 6 for SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) than that obtainable using the KBr-pellet method. This instrument collect size- and time-resolved samples and is potentially capable of providing automated, near real-time aerosol analysis. Exploratory work on a novel approach to the determination of proton acidity in filter- or impactor-collected aerosol samples is also described. In this technique, the acidic sample is reacted with an access of a tagged, vapor-phase base. The unreacted base is flushed off and the amount of the tag retained by the sample is a direct measure of the proton acidity of the sample. The base was tagged with Ge, which can be conveniently determined by the x-ray fluorescence technique.

  5. Aerosol pattern correlation techniques of wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of lidar image correlation techniques of remote wind measurement. It also examines the potential use of satellite borne lidar global wind measurements using this approach. Lidar systems can easily detect spatial variations in the volume scattering cross section of naturally occurring aerosols. Lidar derived RHI, PPI and range-time displays of aerosol backscatter have been extensively employed in the study of atmospheric structure. Descriptions of this type of data can be obtained in many references including Kunkel et al. (1977), Kunkel et al. (1980), Boers et al. (1984), Uthe et al. (1980), Melfi et al. (1985) and Browell et al. (1983). It is likely that the first space-borne lidars for atmospheric studies will observe aerosol backscatter to measure parameters such as boundary layer depth and cloud height. This paper examines the potential application of these relatively simple aerosol backscatter lidars to global wind measurements.

  6. Aerosol particle analysis by Raman scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.; Tang, I.N.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy is a very versatile tool for chemical characterization of micron-sized particles. Such particles are abundant in nature, and in numerous energy-related processes. In order to elucidate the formation mechanisms and understand the subsequent chemical transformation under a variety of reaction conditions, it is imperative to develop analytical measurement techniques for in situ monitoring of these suspended particles. In this report, we outline our recent work on spontaneous Raman, resonance Raman and non-linear Raman scattering as a novel technique for chemical analysis of aerosol particles as well as supersaturated solution droplets.

  7. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-06-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details.

  8. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, G; de Puit, M; Bleay, S; Bradshaw, R; Francese, S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect's lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  9. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  10. Application the mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF technique for detection of Babesia canis canis infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Banach, Tomasz; Bartnicki, Michał; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Łyp, Paweł; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to use rapid mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics analyses for diagnosis of Babesia canis canis infections in dogs. The study was conducted on two groups of dogs--healthy dogs and dogs infected with B. canis canis which demonstrated symptoms of babesiosis. The matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS technique revealed the presence of a protein fraction of 51-52 kDa in the blood serum of all the animals infected with the protozoa, which was not found in the serum of healthy dogs. The proteins are suspected to be disease markers, whereas the MALDI-TOF technique itself has high specificity and sensitivity and can be applied in analytical laboratories in the diagnosis of canine babesiosis.

  11. New insights from MALDI-ToF MS, NMR, and GC-MS: mass spectrometry techniques applied to palynology.

    PubMed

    Moore, S E M; Hemsley, A R; French, A N; Dudley, E; Newton, R P

    2006-08-01

    The present study for the first time describes the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) to palynology. With an accessible mass range of up to about 350,000 Da at subpicomolar range, this technique is ideal for the characterisation of bio-macromolecules, such as sporopollenin, found in fossil and extant pollen and spore walls, which often can only be isolated in very small quantities. At this stage, the limited solubility of sporopollenin allows for the identification of sections of this biopolymer, but with the optimisation of MALDI-ToF matrices, further structure elucidation will become possible. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy data obtained from a number of experiments revealed that some previously reported data were misinterpreted. These results add support to the hypothesis that common plasticizers were wrongly described as sporopollenin compounds.

  12. Experimental Technique for Studying Aerosols of Lyophilized Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher S.; Derr, John S.; Flurie, Eugene G.; Roderick, Roger C.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented for studying aerosols generated from lyophilized bacteria by using Escherichia coli B, Bacillus subtilis var. niger, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pasteurella tularensis. An aerosol generator capable of creating fine particle aerosols of small quantities (10 mg) of lyophilized powder under controlled conditions of exposure to the atmosphere is described. The physical properties of the aerosols are investigated as to the distribution of number of aerosol particles with particle size as well as to the distribution of number of bacteria with particle size. Biologically unstable vegetative cells were quantitated physically by using 14C and Europium chelate stain as tracers, whereas the stable heat-shocked B. subtilis spores were assayed biologically. The physical persistence of the lyophilized B. subtilis aerosol is investigated as a function of size of spore-containing particles. The experimental result that physical persistence of the aerosol in a closed aerosol chamber increases as particle size is decreased is satisfactorily explained on the bases of electrostatic, gravitational, inertial, and diffusion forces operating to remove particles from the particular aerosol system. The net effect of these various forces is to provide, after a short time interval in the system (about 2 min), an aerosol of fine particles with enhanced physical stability. The dependence of physical stability of the aerosol on the species of organism and the nature of the suspending medium for lyophilization is indicated. Also, limitations and general applicability of both the technique and results are discussed. PMID:4992657

  13. Aerosol analysis techniques and results from micro pulse lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Reagan, John A.; Powell, Donna

    1998-01-01

    The effect of clouds and aerosol on the atmospheric energy balance is a key global change problem. Full knowledge of aerosol distributions is difficult to obtain by passive sensing alone. Aerosol and cloud retrievals in several important areas can be significantly improved with active remote sensing by lidar. Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is an aerosol and cloud profilometer that provides a detailed picture of the vertical structure of boundary layer and elevated dust or smoke plume aerosols. MPL is a compact, fully eyesafe, ground-based, zenith pointing instrument capable of full-time, long-term unattended operation at 523 nm. In October of 1993, MPL began taking full-time measurements for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and has since expanded to ARM sites in the Tropical West Pacific (TWP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA). Other MPL's are moving out to some of the 60 world-wide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites which are already equipped with automatic sun-sky scanning spectral radiometers providing total column optical depth measurements. Twelve additional MPL's have been purchased by NASA to add to the aerosol and cloud database of the EOS ground validation network. The original MPL vertical resolution was 300 meters but the newer versions have a vertical resolution of 30 meters. These expanding data sets offer a significant new resource for atmospheric radiation analysis. Under the direction of Jim Spinhirne, the MPL analysis team at NASA/GSFC has developed instrument correction and backscatter analysis techniques for ARM to detect cloud boundaries and analyze vertical aerosol structures. A summary of MPL applications is found in Hlavka (1997). With the aid of independent total column optical depth instruments such as the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at the ARM sites or sun photometers at the AERONET sites, the MPL data can be calibrated, and time-resolved vertical profiles of

  14. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): Demonstrating New Techniques for Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Selmer, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar that provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CATS payload has been operating since early February 2015 from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS was designed to operate for six months, and up to three years, providing a combination of operational science, in-space technology demonstration, and technology risk reduction for future Earth Science missions. One of the primary project goals of CATS is to demonstrate technology in support of future space-based lidar mission development. The CATS instrument has been demonstrating the high repetition rate laser and photon counting detection approach to lidar observations, in contrast to the low repetition rate, high energy technique employed by CALIPSO. Due to this technique, cloud and aerosol profile data exhibit high spatial and temporal resolution, which was never before possible from a space-based platform. Another important science goal of the CATS-FO project is accurate determination of aerosol type on a global scale. CATS provided the first space-based depolarization measurements at multiple wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm), and first measurements at 1064 nm from space. The ratio of the depolarization measurements at these two wavelengths enables significant improvement in aerosol typing. The CATS retrievals at 1064 nm also provide improvements to detecting aerosols above clouds. The CATS layer identification algorithm is a threshold-based layer detection method that uses the 1064 nm attenuated scattering ratio and also includes a routine to identify clouds embedded within aerosol layers. This technique allows CATS to detect the full extent of the aerosol layers above the cloud, and differentiate these two layers so that the optical properties can be more accurately determined.

  15. Tissue MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Beine, Birte; Diehl, Hanna C; Meyer, Helmut E; Henkel, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique to visualize molecular features of tissues based on mass detection. This chapter focuses on MALDI MSI of peptides and provides detailed operational instructions for sample preparation of cryoconserved and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Besides sample preparation we provide protocols for the MALDI measurement, tissue staining, and data analysis. On-tissue digestion and matrix application are described for two different commercially available and commonly used spraying devices: the SunCollect (SunChrom) and the ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonik GmbH).

  16. Potential of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid detection technique in plant pathology: identification of plant-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faheem; Babalola, Olubukola O; Tak, Hamid I

    2012-09-01

    Plant diseases caused by plant pathogens substantially reduce crop production every year, resulting in massive economic losses throughout the world. Accurate detection and identification of plant pathogens is fundamental to plant pathogen diagnostics and, thus, plant disease management. Diagnostics and disease-management strategies require techniques to enable simultaneous detection and quantification of a wide range of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. Over the past decade, rapid development of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) techniques for characterization of microorganisms has enabled substantially improved detection and identification of microorganisms. In the biological sciences, MALDI-TOF MS is used to analyze specific peptides or proteins directly desorbed from intact bacteria, fungal spores, nematodes, and other microorganisms. The ability to record biomarker ions, in a broad m/z range, which are unique to and representative of individual microorganisms, forms the basis of taxonomic identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have initiated new research, i.e. analysis of more complex microbial communities. Such studies are just beginning but have great potential for elucidation not only of the interactions between microorganisms and their host plants but also those among different microbial taxa living in association with plants. There has been a recent effort by the mass spectrometry community to make data from large scale mass spectrometry experiments publicly available in the form of a centralized repository. Such a resource could enable the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a universal technique for detection of plant pathogens and non-pathogens. The effects of experimental conditions are sufficiently understood, reproducible spectra can be obtained from computational database search, and microorganisms can be rapidly characterized by genus, species

  17. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of optically levitated aerosol: a technique to quantitatively map the viscosity of suspended aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, C; Hosny, N A; Tong, H; Seville, P C; Gallimore, P J; Davidson, N M; Athanasiadis, A; Botchway, S W; Ward, A D; Kalberer, M; Kuimova, M K; Pope, F D

    2016-08-21

    We describe a technique to measure the viscosity of stably levitated single micron-sized aerosol particles. Particle levitation allows the aerosol phase to be probed in the absence of potentially artefact-causing surfaces. To achieve this feat, we combined two laser based techniques: optical trapping for aerosol particle levitation, using a counter-propagating laser beam configuration, and fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of molecular rotors for the measurement of viscosity within the particle. Unlike other techniques used to measure aerosol particle viscosity, this allows for the non-destructive probing of viscosity of aerosol particles without interference from surfaces. The well-described viscosity of sucrose aerosol, under a range of relative humidity conditions, is used to validate the technique. Furthermore we investigate a pharmaceutically-relevant mixture of sodium chloride and salbutamol sulphate under humidities representative of in vivo drug inhalation. Finally, we provide a methodology for incorporating molecular rotors into already levitated particles, thereby making the FLIM/optical trapping technique applicable to real world aerosol systems, such as atmospheric aerosols and those generated by pharmaceutical inhalers. PMID:27430158

  19. Graphical techniques for interpreting the composition of individual aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Rahn, Kenneth A.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    A graphical technique that uses X- Y and ternary plots is presented for interpreting elemental data for individual aerosol particles. By revealing the multiple functional relationships between the elements, it offers more insight into the groups of particles and the transitions between them than traditional techniques such as factor analysis and cluster analysis alone are able to. For a sample of dust storm aerosol from Beijing in March 2002, X-Y plots revealed areas, lines, and "dots" that represented clays, smooth transitions to asymptotes of pure single-component minerals, and pure minor minerals or special particles, respectively. Ternary plots further revealed ratios of elements and potential minerals. Careful use of cluster analysis revealed subgroups of particles that were not separated by clear borders. The dust storm had three major components, clay/quartz (Al 2O 3, SiO 2, etc.), basic calcium (CaO, CaCO 3), and salts (sulfate, phosphate, chloride). Some sulfates, including CaSO 4 and (NH 4) xH 2-xSO 4, were mixed with the quartz and clay. A five-step sequence that combines graphics, basic statistics, cluster analysis, and SEM photography seems to extract the maximum information from suites of single particles.

  20. The investigation of advanced remote sensing techniques for the measurement of aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques and inversion methods for the measurement of characteristics of aerosol and gaseous species in the atmosphere were investigated. Of particular interest were the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, such as their size distribution, number concentration, and complex refractive index, and the vertical distribution of these properties on a local as well as global scale. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring of tropospheric aerosols were developed as well as satellite monitoring of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Computer programs were developed for solving multiple scattering and radiative transfer problems, as well as inversion/retrieval problems. A necessary aspect of these efforts was to develop models of aerosol properties.

  1. Multigrid MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (mMALDI MSI).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Annett; Hölzer, Stefan; Knop, Katrin; Schubert, Ulrich S; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is an important technique for the spatially resolved molecular analysis of tissue sections. The selection of matrices influences the resulting mass spectra to a high degree. For extensive and simultaneous analysis, the application of different matrices to one tissue sample is desirable. To date, only a single matrix could be applied to a tissue section per experiment. However, repetitive removal of the matrix makes this approach time-consuming and damaging to tissue samples. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a multigrid MALDI MSI technique (mMALDI MSI) that relies on automated inkjet printing to place differing matrices onto predefined dot grids. We used a cooled printhead to prevent cavitation of low viscosity solvents in the printhead nozzle. Improved spatial resolution of the dot grids was achieved by using a triple-pulse procedure that reduced droplet volume. The matrices can either be applied directly to the thaw-mounted tissue sample or by precoating the slide followed by mounting of the tissue sample. During the MALDI imaging process, we were able to precisely target different matrix point grids with the laser to simultaneously produce distinct mass spectra. Unlike the standard method, the prespotting approach optimizes the spectra quality, avoids analyte delocalization, and enables subsequent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the pre-spotted multigrid MALDI MSI workflow. PMID:27039200

  2. CURRENT AND EMERGING TECHNIQUES FOR CHARACTERIZING TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter generally includes dust, smoke, soot, or aerosol particles. Environmental research addresses the origin, size, chemical composition, and the formation mechanics of aerosols. In the troposphere, fine aerosols (e.g. with diameters < 2.5 um) remain suspended until...

  3. Specific MALDI-MSI: Tag-Mass.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jonathan; Ayed, Mohamed El; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    MALDI imaging as a molecular mass spectrometry imaging technique (MSI) can provide accurate information about molecular composition on a surface. The last decade of MSI development has brought the technology to clinical and biomedical applications as a complementary technique of MRI and other molecular imaging. Then, this IMS technique is used for endogenous and exogenous molecule detection in pharmaceutical and biomedical fields. However, some limitations still exist due to physical and chemical aspects, and sensitivity of certain compounds is very low. Thus, we developed a multiplex technique for fast detection of different compound natures. The multiplex MALDI imaging technique uses a photocleavable group that can be detect easily by MALDI instrument. These techniques of targeted imaging using Tag-Mass molecules allow the multiplex detection of compounds like antibodies or oligonucleotides. Here, we describe how we used this technique to detect huge proteins and mRNA by MALDI imaging in rat brain and in a model for regeneration; the leech. PMID:20680601

  4. Observationally-constrained estimates of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over East Asia via data assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Not only aerosol's direct effect on climate by scattering and absorbing the incident solar radiation, but also they indirectly perturbs the radiation budget by influencing microphysics and dynamics of clouds. Aerosols also have a significant adverse impact on human health. With an importance of aerosols in climate, considerable research efforts have been made to quantify the amount of aerosols in the form of the aerosol optical depth (AOD). AOD is provided with ground-based aerosol networks such as the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), and is derived from satellite measurements. However, these observational datasets have a limited areal and temporal coverage. To compensate for the data gaps, there have been several studies to provide AOD without data gaps by assimilating observational data and model outputs. In this study, AODs over East Asia simulated with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) observation are interpolated via different data assimilation (DA) techniques such as Cressman's method, Optimal Interpolation (OI), and Kriging for the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March - May 2012). Here, the interpolated results using the three DA techniques are validated intensively by comparing with AERONET AODs to examine the optimal DA method providing the most reliable AODs over East Asia.

  5. Measuring 35S of Aerosol Sulfate: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Dominguez, G.; Bluen, B.; Corbin, A.; Abramian, A.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    On a global and regional level, the cycling of sulfur in the environment has consequences for air quality, human health, and may contribute to global climate change. Due to its multiple oxidation states, the sulfur cycle is very complex and poorly understood. Stable isotopes are currently used to understand reaction pathways as well as sources and sinks of sulfurous compounds in the environment. Sulfur also has one short lived (τ1/2 ~87 d) radioactive isotope (35S) which is continuously made in the atmosphere by the cosmic ray spallation of argon, is then quickly oxidized to 35SO2 and enters the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The short-lived radioactive nature of this isotope of sulfur provides us with potentially powerful tracer for understanding the time scales at which sulfur is oxidized, deposited, and transported in the atmosphere and the deposition of atmospheric sulfate into rivers and water catchments. However, despite its potential, the use of 35S as a tracer of aerosol chemistry has not been fully exploited, Here we present details of instrumental set up for measuring 35S in aerosol sulfate and some preliminary results of measurements of 35S abundances in aerosols from Riverside (inland) and La Jolla (coastal) CA and discuss the sensitivity and limitations of the measurements in providing insights into day/night aerosol chemistry (Riverside) as well as the uptake of SO2 pollution in coastal environments by sea-salt aerosols. Also, we present preliminary results from measurement of sulfate in river water in Ecuador before and after precipitation events.

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques In Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo omega (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), determined aerosol omega by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured radiative fluxes; retrievals of omega from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for omega at midvisable wavelengths approx. 550 nm, with omega(sub midvis) greater than or equal to 0.85 and less than or equal to 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of omega could usually be approximated by lognormals in omega(sub max) - omega, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of omega(sub midvis) 0.90 +/- 0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., thermal offsets, unknown gas absorption) The other techniques gave larger values for omega(sub midvis) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of omega(sub midvis) = 0.95 +/- 0.04. Current uncertainties in omega are large in terms of climate effects More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of

  7. Apportionment of urban aerosol sources in Chongqing (China) using synergistic on-line techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yang, Fumo

    2016-04-01

    The sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during wintertime at a background urban location in Chongqing (southwestern China) have been determined. Aerosol chemical composition analyses were performed using multiple on-line techniques, such as single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) for single particle chemical composition, on-line elemental carbon-organic carbon analyzer (on-line OC-EC), on-line X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for elements, and in-situ Gas and Aerosol Compositions monitor (IGAC) for water-soluble ions in PM2.5. All the datasets from these techniques have been adjusted to a 1-h time resolution for receptor model input. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been used for resolving aerosol sources. At least six sources, including domestic coal burning, biomass burning, dust, traffic, industrial and secondary/aged factors have been resolved and interpreted. The synergistic on-line techniques were helpful for identifying aerosol sources more clearly than when only employing the results from the individual techniques. This results are useful for better understanding of aerosol sources and atmospheric processes.

  8. Apportionment of urban aerosol sources in Cork (Ireland) by synergistic measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Hellebust, Stig; Healy, Robert M; O'Connor, Ian P; Kourtchev, Ivan; Sodeau, John R; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin D; Wenger, John C

    2014-09-15

    The sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during wintertime at a background urban location in Cork city (Ireland) have been determined. Aerosol chemical analyses were performed by multiple techniques including on-line high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS), on-line single particle aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TSI ATOFMS), on-line elemental carbon-organic carbon analysis (Sunset_EC-OC), and off-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis of filter samples collected at 6-h resolution. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been carried out to better elucidate aerosol sources not clearly identified when analyzing results from individual aerosol techniques on their own. Two datasets have been considered: on-line measurements averaged over 2-h periods, and both on-line and off-line measurements averaged over 6-h periods. Five aerosol sources were identified by PMF in both datasets, with excellent agreement between the two solutions: (1) regional domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Regional," 24-27%; (2) local urban domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Urban," 22-23%; (3) road vehicle emissions--"Traffic," 15-20%; (4) secondary aerosols from regional anthropogenic sources--"SA_Regional" 9-13%; and (5) secondary aged/processed aerosols related to urban anthropogenic sources--"SA_Urban," 21-26%. The results indicate that, despite regulations for restricting the use of smoky fuels, solid fuel burning is the major source (46-50%) of PM2.5 in wintertime in Cork, and also likely other areas of Ireland. Whilst wood combustion is strongly associated with OC and EC, it was found that peat and coal combustion is linked mainly with OC and the aerosol from these latter sources appears to be more volatile than that produced by wood combustion. Ship emissions from the nearby port were found to be mixed with the SA_Regional factor. The PMF analysis allowed us to link the AMS cooking organic

  9. Aerosol retrieval from SNPP/VIIRS: Analysis of technique and data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Istvan

    2013-04-01

    The aerosol environmental data records (EDR) derived from the measurements of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are the aerosol optical thickness (AOT), aerosol particle size parameter (APSP, characterized in terms of the Angstrom Exponent, AE), and suspended matter (SM). These EDRs go through various evaluations to assess their level of maturity. This presentation provides an analysis of the VIIRS aerosol retrieval technique in comparison with the MODIS technique and of the work and results the SNPP/JPSS Calibration/Validation Team has performed for these maturity levels up to date. The VIIRS AOT products have been compared with aerosol products derived from MODIS observations onboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite (Aqua), and with AERONET products and observations. All comparisons have been applied to a uniform time sample. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the VIIRS aerosol EDRs have showed that VIIRS AOT over ocean is comparable to those from MODIS and AERONET. Over land, the VIIRS AOT was initially biased high; this bias has subsequently been reduced significantly by updating the pre-launch values of the spectral surface ratios used in the AOT retrieval.

  10. Direct identification of microorganisms from positive blood cultures using the lysis-filtration technique and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Farina, Claudio; Arena, Fabio; Casprini, Patrizia; Cichero, Paola; Clementi, Massimo; Cosentino, Marina; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Giani, Tommaso; Luzzaro, Francesco; Mattei, Romano; Mauri, Carola; Nardone, Maria; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Serna Ortega, Paula Andrea; Vailati, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Microbial identification from blood cultures is essential to institute optimal antibiotic therapy and improve survival possibilities. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully applied to identify bacteria and yeasts from positive blood cultures broths. The aim of this multicentre study was to evaluate the reliability of the lysis-filtration technique associated with MALDI-TOF MS to directly identify microorganisms from 765 positive blood cultures collected in six Italian hospitals. Overall, 675/765 (78.1%) blood isolates were correctly identified at the species level, with significant differences between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria (92.6%, and 69.8%, respectively). Some difficulties arise in identifying Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, yeasts and anaerobes. The lysis-filtration protocol is a suitable procedure in terms of performance in identifying microorganisms, but it is quite expensive and technically time-consuming since the time of filtration is not regular for all the samples. The application of the MALDI-TOF MS technique to the direct microbial identification from positive blood cultures is a very promising approach, even if more experience must be gained to minimize errors and costs. PMID:25938749

  11. Direct identification of microorganisms from positive blood cultures using the lysis-filtration technique and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Farina, Claudio; Arena, Fabio; Casprini, Patrizia; Cichero, Paola; Clementi, Massimo; Cosentino, Marina; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Giani, Tommaso; Luzzaro, Francesco; Mattei, Romano; Mauri, Carola; Nardone, Maria; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Serna Ortega, Paula Andrea; Vailati, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Microbial identification from blood cultures is essential to institute optimal antibiotic therapy and improve survival possibilities. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully applied to identify bacteria and yeasts from positive blood cultures broths. The aim of this multicentre study was to evaluate the reliability of the lysis-filtration technique associated with MALDI-TOF MS to directly identify microorganisms from 765 positive blood cultures collected in six Italian hospitals. Overall, 675/765 (78.1%) blood isolates were correctly identified at the species level, with significant differences between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria (92.6%, and 69.8%, respectively). Some difficulties arise in identifying Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, yeasts and anaerobes. The lysis-filtration protocol is a suitable procedure in terms of performance in identifying microorganisms, but it is quite expensive and technically time-consuming since the time of filtration is not regular for all the samples. The application of the MALDI-TOF MS technique to the direct microbial identification from positive blood cultures is a very promising approach, even if more experience must be gained to minimize errors and costs.

  12. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived By Diverse Techniques in Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo w (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, TARFOX and ACE-2, determined aerosol w by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured fluxes; retrievals of w from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for w at midvisible wavelengths, with 0.85 less than wmidvis less than 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of w could usually be approximated by lognormals in wmax-w, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of wmidvis of 0.90+/-0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and possible artifacts (e.g., unknown gas absorption). The other techniques gave larger values for wmidvis for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of wmidvis = 0.95+/-0.04, Current uncertainties in vv are large in terms of climate effects. More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of humidification effects on w.

  13. A New Raman DIAL Technique for Measuring Stratospheric Ozone in the Presence of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Mcgee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael; Heaps, William S.; Ferrare, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new lidar scheme to measure stratospheric ozone in the presence of heavy volcanic aerosol loading. The eruptions of the Philippine volcano Pinatubo during June 1991 ejected large amounts of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to altitudes of at least 30 km. The resulting aerosols have severely affected the measurements of stratospheric ozone when using traditional Rayleigh differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique, in which the scattering mechanism is almost entirely Rayleigh and which assumes a small amount or no aerosols. In order to extract an ozone profile in the regions below about 30 km where the Rayleigh lidar returns are contaminated by aerosol scattering from Mt. Pinatubo cloud, we have used a Raman lidar technique, where the scattering mechanism depends solely on molecular nitrogen. In this scheme there is no aerosol scattering component to the backscattered lidar return. Using this technique in conjunction with the Rayleigh DIAL measurement, the GSFC stratospheric ozone lidar has measured ozone profiles between 15 and 50 km during the recently held UARS correlative measurement campaign (February-March 1992) at JPL's Table Mountain Facility in California.

  14. In-depth discrimination of aerosol types using multiple clustering techniques over four locations in Indo-Gangetic plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Humera; Alam, Khan; Bibi, Samina

    2016-11-01

    Discrimination of aerosol types is essential over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) because several aerosol types originate from different sources having different atmospheric impacts. In this paper, we analyzed a seasonal discrimination of aerosol types by multiple clustering techniques using AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) datasets for the period 2007-2013 over Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur and Kanpur. We discriminated the aerosols into three major types; dust, biomass burning and urban/industrial. The discrimination was carried out by analyzing different aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE), Abortion Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Real Refractive Index (RRI) and their interrelationship to investigate the dominant aerosol types and to examine the variation in their seasonal distribution. The results revealed that during summer and pre-monsoon, dust aerosols were dominant while during winter and post-monsoon prevailing aerosols were biomass burning and urban industrial, and the mixed type of aerosols were present in all seasons. These types of aerosol discriminated from AERONET were in good agreement with CALIPSO (the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) measurement.

  15. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable. PMID:27418427

  16. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable.

  17. Optical characterization of the MALDI plume

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The development of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) by Karas, Hillenkamp et al. has brought an entire new class of large-molecule applications within the reach of mass spectrometry. However, the ionization efficiency and therefore the sensitivity of the technique could be improved if details of the ionization mechanism were understood more thoroughly. The environment in the MALDI plume may influence the ionization of the analyte, in analogy to the effect of pH on biomolecules in solution. Optical probing techniques, such as laser-induced fluorescence, allow some characteristics of the plume environment to be studied directly. This paper describes measurement of wavelength-dispersed fluorescence produced in MALDI experiments in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS).

  18. 3M™ Molecular detection system versus MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and molecular techniques for the identification of Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella spp. &Listeria spp.

    PubMed

    Loff, Marché; Mare, Louise; de Kwaadsteniet, Michele; Khan, Wesaal

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare standard selective plating, conventional PCR (16S rRNA and species specific primers), MALDI-TOF MS and the 3M™ Molecular Detection System for the routine detection of the pathogens Listeria, Salmonella and Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in wastewater and river water samples. MALDI-TOF MS was able to positively identify 20/21 (95%) of the E. coli isolates obtained at genus and species level, while 16S rRNA sequencing only correctly identified 6/21 (28%) as E. coli strains. None of the presumptive positive Listeria spp. and Salmonella spp. isolates obtained by culturing on selective media were positively identified by MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA analysis. The species-specific E. coli 0157:H7 PCR described in this present study, was not able to detect any E. coli 0157:H7 strains in the wastewater and river water samples analysed. However, E. coli strains, Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were detected using species specific PCR. Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria spp. and Salmonella spp. were also sporadically detected throughout the sampling period in the wastewater and river water samples analysed by the 3M™ Molecular Detection System. MALDI-TOF MS, which is a simple, accurate and cost-effective detection method, efficiently identified the culturable organisms, while in the current study both species specific PCR (Listeria spp. and Salmonella spp.) and 3M™ Molecular Detection System could be utilised for the direct routine analysis of pathogens in water sources.

  19. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  20. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  1. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  2. A novel technique for estimating aerosol optical thickness trends using meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, Moses E.; Akinyemi, M. L.; Akin-Ojo, O.

    2016-02-01

    Estimating aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over regions can be tasking if satellite data set over such region is very scanty. Therefore a technique whose application captures real-time events is most appropriate for adequate monitoring of risk indicators. A new technique i.e. arithmetic translation of pictorial model (ATOPM) was developed. The ATOPM deals with the use mathematical expression to compute other meteorological parameters obtained from satellite or ground data set. Six locations within 335 × 230 Km2 area of a selected portion of Nigeria were chosen and analyzed -using the meteorological data set (1999-2012) and MATLAB. The research affirms the use of some parameters (e.g. minimum temperature, cloud cover, relative humidity and rainfall) to estimate the aerosol optical thickness. The objective of the paper was satisfied via the use of other meteorological parameters to estimate AOT when the satellite data set over an area is scanty.

  3. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique of estimating aerosol radiative forcing from high resolution spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. We look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurement is made and along with an Radtiative transfer (RT) model, radiative forcing is estimated. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and a 3nm resolution during around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.01 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux due to change in individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves matching different combinations of aerosol species in OPAC model and RT model as long as the combination which gives the minimum root mean squared deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model, aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. Also an alternate method to estimate the spectral SSA is discussed. Here, the RT model, the observed spectral flux and spectral AOD is used. Spectral AOD is input to RT model and SSA is varied till the minimum root mean squared difference between observed and simulated spectral flux from RT model is obtained. The methods discussed are limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive

  4. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique for estimating aerosol radiative forcing from spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. In this study we look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurements along with an RT model is used to estimate radiative forcing. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and 3nm resolution for around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.1 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. All the measurements were made in the campus of Indian Institute of Science which is in the heart of Bangalore city. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux to change in the mass concentration of individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds -OPAC classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the region of influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves an iterative process where the mixture of aerosol species are changed in OPAC model and RT model is run as long as the mixture which mimics the measured spectral flux within 2-3% deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. The new method is limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive an optically equivalent aerosol mixture reduces when diffuse component of flux increases. Our analysis also showed that direct component of spectral flux is

  5. Microscopy and Spectroscopy Techniques to Guide Parameters for Modeling Mineral Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veghte, D. P.; Moore, J. E.; Jensen, L.; Freedman, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol particles are the second largest emission by mass into the atmosphere and contribute to the largest uncertainty in radiative forcing. Due to the variation in size, composition, and shape, caused by physical and chemical processing, uncertainty exists as to whether mineral dust causes a net warming or cooling effect. We have used Cavity Ring-Down Aerosol Extinction Spectroscopy (CRD-AES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to measure extinction cross sections and morphologies of size-selected, non-absorbing and absorbing mineral dust aerosol particles. We have found that microscopy is essential for characterizing the polydispersity of the size selection of non-spherical particles. Through the combined use of CRD-AES, microscopy, and computation (Mie theory and Discreet Dipole Approximation), we have determined the effect of shape on the optical properties of additional species including clay minerals, quartz, and hematite in the sub-micron regime. Our results have shown that calcite can be treated as polydisperse spheres while quartz and hematite need additional modeling parameters to account for their irregularity. Size selection of clay minerals cannot be performed due to their irregular shape, but microscopy techniques can be used to better quantify the particle aspect ratio. Our results demonstrate a new method that can be used to extend cavity ring-down spectroscopy for the measurement of the optical properties of non-spherical particles. This characterization will lead to better aerosol extinction parameters for modeling aerosol optical properties in climate models and satellite retrieval algorithms.

  6. New developments in MALDI imaging for pathology proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Wisztorski, Maxence; Lemaire, Remi; Stauber, Jonathan; Menguelet, Sonia Ait; Croix, Dominique; Mathé, Olivia Jardin; Day, Robert; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    With new emerging mass spectrometry technologies, it can now be demonstrated that direct tissue analysis is feasible using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) sources. A major advantage of direct MALDI analysis is to avoid time-consuming extraction, purification or separation steps, which have the potential for producing artifacts. Direct MALDI analysis of tissue sections enables the acquisition of cellular expression profiles while maintaining the cellular and molecular integrity. With automation and the ability to reconstruct complex spectral data using imaging software, it is now possible to produce multiplex imaging maps of selected bio-molecules within tissue sections. Thus, direct MALDI spectral data obtained from tissue sections can be converted into imaging maps, a method now known as MALDI-imaging. MALDI-imaging combines the power of mass spectrometry, namely exquisite sensitivity and unequivocal structural information, within an intact and unaltered morphological context. Critical improvements to increase image resolution are presented in this manuscript e.g., solvent treatment, new solid ionic matrices, gold sputtering, nickel support or laser focalization. One of the most important developments is the ability to carry out either direct MALDI analysis or MALDI imaging on paraffin tissue sections, thus opening the path to an archival "gold-mine" of existing pathology samples to proteomic analysis. These developments provide new avenues for biomarker hunting and diagnostic follow-up in the clinical setting. Further developments in MALDI-imaging of specific targets provide an added dimension, as validated disease-marker-gene RNA transcripts can be analyzed along with their translation by targeting their specific protein products or metabolites. Disease/health states will thus be closely molecularly monitored at protein and nucleic acids levels, with a single technique. Taken together, MALDI imaging will become a key tool for pathology

  7. A survey of light-scattering techniques used in the remote monitoring of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deirmendjian, D.

    1980-01-01

    A critical survey of the literature on the use of light-scattering mechanisms in the remote monitoring of atmospheric aerosols, their geographical and spatial distribution, and temporal variations was undertaken to aid in the choice of future operational systems, both ground based and air or space borne. An evaluation, mainly qualitative and subjective, of various techniques and systems is carried out. No single system is found to be adequate for operational purposes. A combination of earth surface and space-borne systems based mainly on passive techniques involving solar radiation with active (lidar) systems to provide auxiliary or backup information is tentatively recommended.

  8. Application of the TDMA Technique Toward the Size and Charge Distribution Measurement of Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simones, Matthew Paul

    The knowledge of charge distributions among aerosol particles has been an important topic for many years because of the strong electrostatic interactions which can greatly influence aerosol transport and evolution. Theoretical models have been developed although experimental verification has been limited because of the difficulty in measuring charged aerosols. Recently a method utilizing a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) has been shown to be applicable toward measuring both the size and charge distributions of nanosized combustion aerosols. The goal of this work is on further exploration of this method toward the measurement of non-combustion aerosols and in particular those associated with very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). The complete bipolar charge and size distributions of spark generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium aerosol have been measured with a TDMA apparatus assembled and calibrated during this study. In addition, an electrostatic precipitator has been designed and constructed for measuring the size distributions of neutrally charged particles associated with these aerosols. The results show charge asymmetry in all measured aerosols with higher concentrations of positively charged particles than negative at the same charge level. These results differ from equilibrium charge distributions of both Boltzmann and Fuchs showing that charge equilibrium may not always be an appropriate assumption. The TDMA technique should find applications in characterizing VHTR aerosols and rate processes such as coagulation, deposition, and resuspension which will be important for both reactor design, and accident modeling and simulation.

  9. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  10. Mapping of soot particles in a weakly sooting diffusion flame by aerosol techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hepp, H.; Siegmann, K.

    1998-10-01

    The evolution of detailed particle size distributions has been measured along the centerline of an axisymmetric diffusion flame of CH{sub 4} + Ar burning in air at 1 atm. Soot particles with mean diameters of 3--18 nm were observed. Changes in the size distribution exhibited zones where either nucleation, coagulation, or destruction of soot particles dominated. These highly sensitive measurements were made by microprobe sampling with an immediate dilution of 1:400, to quench the aerosol, and by subsequent application of aerosol measurement techniques. In parallel, the yield of photoemitted electrons from size-selected particles was determined. The yield shows a characteristic dependence on location in the flame, indicating changes of the particle`s surface. Multiphoton, time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to investigate the correlation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the flame and enhanced photoemission yield from the soot particles.

  11. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  12. Comparison of the accuracy of aerosol refractive index measurements from single particle and ensemble techniques.

    PubMed

    Mason, Bernard J; King, Simon-John; Miles, Rachael E H; Manfred, Katherine M; Rickards, Andrew M J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2012-08-23

    The ability of two techniques, aerosol cavity ring down spectroscopy (A-CRDS) and optical tweezers, to retrieve the refractive index of atmospherically relevant aerosol was compared through analysis of supersaturated sodium nitrate at a range of relative humidities. Accumulation mode particles in the diameter range 300-600 nm were probed using A-CRDS, with optical tweezer measurements performed on coarse mode particles several micrometers in diameter. A correction for doubly charged particles was applied in the A-CRDS measurements. Both techniques were found to retrieve refractive indices in good agreement with previously published results from Tang and Munkelwitz, with a precision of ±0.0012 for the optical tweezers and ±0.02 for the A-CRDS technique. The coarse mode optical tweezer measurements agreed most closely with refractive index predictions made using a mass-weighted linear mixing rule. The uncertainty in the refractive index retrieved by the A-CRDS technique prevented discrimination between predictions using both mass-weighted and volume-weighted linear mixing rules. No efflorescence or kinetic limitations on water transport between the particle and the gas phase were observed at relative humidities down to 14%. The magnitude of the uncertainty in refractive index retrieved using the A-CRDS technique reflects the challenges in determining particle optical properties in the accumulation mode, where the extinction efficiency varies steeply with particle size.

  13. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data: Part III. Using Combined PCA to Compare Spatiotemporal Variability of MODIS, MISR and OMI Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  14. Application of spectral analysis techniques in the intercomparison of aerosol data: Part III. Using combined PCA to compare spatiotemporal variability of MODIS, MISR, and OMI aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-04-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  15. Raman-lidar technique for tropospheric and stratospheric sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wandinger, U.

    1995-01-01

    Tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and clouds are known to influence the earth`s radiation budget as well as chemical processes of the atmosphere. Thus, remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric particles has important applications in weather and climate research, pollution monitoring, and atmospheric chemistry. During the last few years Raman lidars have become very important tools in this field of research. The development of powerful light sources such as Nd:YAG and excimer lasers, of interference filters with narrow bandwidth and high transmission, and of low-noise photomultiplier tubes and counting systems has improved the Raman-lidar technique during the past decade significantly. The technique is based on the detection of two signals resulting from elastic backscattering by air molecules and particles and inelastic (Raman) backscattering by a gas of known number density, i.e., nitrogen or oxygen. The technique has been successfully applied to cirrus-cloud studies. In this presentation, the capability of the Raman-lidar technique for tropospheric and stratospheric profiling of aerosol and cloud properties will be discussed on the basis of measurement examples.

  16. High T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by plasma aerosol mist deposition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. W.; Vuong, K. D.; Leone, A.; Shen, C. Q.; Williams, J.; Coy, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report new results on high T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by a plasma aerosol mist deposition technique, in atmospheric environment. Materials fabricated are YBaCuO, BiPbSrCaCuO, BaCaCuO precursor films for TlBaCaCuO, and other buffers such as YSZ. Depending on processing conditions, sizes of crystallites and/or particles are between dozens of nano-meters and several micrometers. Superconductive properties and other material characteristics can also be tailored.

  17. New real-time technique to measure the size distribution of water-insoluble aerosols.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Roby; Bergin, Michael H; Carrico, Christian M; Grant, Don

    2005-07-01

    To date, there has been much research into the size distribution of ambient atmospheric aerosols, particularly either the total aerosol population or water-soluble ionic species such as sulfate or nitrate. Meanwhile, there have been virtually no size-resolved measurements of water-insoluble aerosols (WIA). This has been due to a lack of practical measurement technology rather than a reflection of the importance of WIA to climate and health. Particle solubility influences the planetary radiation balance both directly and indirectly: solubility influences both the amount of hygroscopic growth (and thus light scattering) that occurs as a function of relative humidity and the ability of particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (and thus the lifetime and albedo of clouds). Also, recent information suggests that WIA may be harmful to human health. To address these concerns, a new real-time technique has been developed to measure the size-resolved concentration of WIA. This technique involves the entrainment of particles into a liquid stream and measurement of the WIA size distribution using a liquid optical particle counter. The time resolution of this instrumentation is approximately 4 min (depending on flow rate) and is capable of sizing and counting insoluble particles with diameters of 0.25-2.0 microm at atmospheric concentrations as low as 0.1 cm(-3). Laboratory characterization using polystyrene latex spheres shows agreement within +/-5% of the liquid stream and air stream particle concentrations when adjusted for flow rate. The instrumentation was field-tested at a rural site on the edge of the metro-Atlanta urban area. During this test, the WIA concentration averaged 5% of the total particle concentration between 0.25 and 2.0 microm but reached as high as 35%.

  18. Application of modified Twomey techniques to invert lidar angular scatter and solar extinction data for determining aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    Polarization properties of the angularly scattered laser light from a volume of air are used to determine the size distribution of the aerosol particles within the volume by the use of appropriate inversion techniques. Similar techniques are employed to determine a mean size distribution of the particulates within a vertical column through the atmosphere from determinations of the aerosol optical depth as a function of wavelength. In both of these examples, a modification of an inversion technique originally described by Twomey has been employed. Details of this method are presented as well as results from actual measurements employing bistatic lidar and solar radiometer.

  19. Pseudorandom Noise Code-Based Technique for Cloud and Aerosol Discrimination Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Flood, Michael A.; Harrison, Fenton Wallace

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is working on a continuous wave (CW) laser based remote sensing scheme for the detection of CO2 and O2 from space based platforms suitable for ACTIVE SENSING OF CO2 EMISSIONS OVER NIGHTS, DAYS, AND SEASONS (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS is a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). A unique, multi-frequency, intensity modulated CW (IMCW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) operating at 1.57 micron for CO2 sensing has been developed. Effective aerosol and cloud discrimination techniques are being investigated in order to determine concentration values with accuracies less than 0.3%. In this paper, we discuss the demonstration of a PN code based technique for cloud and aerosol discrimination applications. The possibility of using maximum length (ML)-sequences for range and absorption measurements is investigated. A simple model for accomplishing this objective is formulated, Proof-of-concept experiments carried out using SONAR based LIDAR simulator that was built using simple audio hardware provided promising results for extension into optical wavelengths. Keywords: ASCENDS, CO2 sensing, O2 sensing, PN codes, CW lidar

  20. Development of a New Technique for the Efficient Delivery of Aerosolized Medications to Infants on Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Tian, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficiency of a new technique for delivering aerosols to intubated infants that employs a new Y-connector, access port administration of a dry powder, and excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation particles that change size in the airways. Methods A previously developed CFD model combined with algebraic correlations were used to predict delivery system and lung deposition of typical nebulized droplets (MMAD = 4.9 μm) and EEG dry powder aerosols. The delivery system consisted of a Y-connector [commercial (CM); streamlined (SL); or streamlined with access port (SL-port)] attached to a 4-mm diameter endotracheal tube leading to the airways of a 6-month-old infant. Results Compared to the CM device and nebulized aerosol, the EEG approach with an initial 0.9 μm aerosol combined with the SL and SL-port geometries reduced device depositional losses by factors of 3-fold and >10-fold, respectively. With EEG powder aerosols, the SL geometry provided the maximum tracheobronchial deposition fraction (55.7%), whereas the SL-port geometry provided the maximum alveolar (67.6%) and total lung (95.7%) deposition fractions, respectively. Conclusions Provided the aerosol can be administered in the first portion of the inspiration cycle, the proposed new method can significantly improve the deposition of pharmaceutical aerosols in the lungs of intubated infants. PMID:25103332

  1. An advanced technique for speciation of organic nitrogen in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, S.; Robinson, J.; Hays, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    threshold as water-soluble free AA, with an average concentration of 22 ± 9 ng m-3 (N=13). Following microwave-assisted gas phase hydrolysis, the total AA concentration in the forest environment increased significantly (70 ± 35 ng m-3) and additional compounds (methionine, isoleucine) were detected above the reporting threshold. The ability to quantify AA in aerosol samples without derivatization reduces time consuming preparation procedures while providing the advancement of selective mass determination that eliminates potential interferences associated with traditional fluorescence detection. This step forward in precise mass determination with the use of internal standardization, improves the confidence of compound identification. With the increasing focus on WSOC (including ON) characterization in the atmospheric science community, native detection by LC-MS (Q-TOF) will play a central role in determining the most direct approach to quantify an increasing fraction of the co-extracted polar organic compounds. Method application for further characterization of atmospheric ON will be discussed. Reference: Samy, S., Robinson, J., and M.D. Hays. "An Advanced LC-MS (Q-TOF) Technique for the Detection of Amino Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols", Analytical Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/s00216-011-5238-2

  2. Vertical distribution of aerosol extinction cross section and inference of aerosol imaginary index in the troposphere by lidar technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reports on vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter in the troposphere which were obtained from multi zenith angle lidar measurements. It is reported that a direct slant path solution was found to be not possible due to horizontal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere. Attention is given to the use of a regression analysis with respect to zenith angle for a layer integration of the angle dependent lidar equation in order to determine the optical thickness and aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio for defined atmospheric layers and the subsequent evaluation of cross-section profiles.

  3. Characterization of inhalation aerosols: a critical evaluation of cascade impactor analysis and laser diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    Cascade impactor analysis is the standard technique for in vitro characterization of aerosol clouds generated by medical aerosol generators. One important reason for using this inertial separation principle is that drug fractions are classified into aerodynamic size ranges that are relevant to the deposition in the respiratory tract. Measurement of these fractions with chemical detection methods enables establishment of the particle size distribution of the drug in the presence of excipients. However, the technique is laborious and time consuming and most of the devices used for inhaler evaluation lack sufficient possibilities for automation. In addition to that, impactors often have to be operated under conditions for which they were not designed and calibrated. Particularly, flow rates through impactors are increased to values at which the flow through the nozzles is highly turbulent. This has an uncontrolled influence on the collection efficiencies and cut-off curves of these nozzles. Moreover, the cut-off value varies with the flow rate through an impactor nozzle. On the other hand, the high air flow resistances of most impactors are rather restricting to the attainable (fixed) inspiratory flow curves through these devices. Especially for breath actuated dry powder inhalers, higher flow rates and flow increase rates may be desirable than can be achieved in combination with a particular type of impactor. In this paper, the applicability of laser diffraction technology is evaluated as a very fast and highly reliable alternative for cascade impactor analysis. With this technique, aerodynamic diameters cannot be measured, but for comparative evaluation and development, comprising most in vitro applications, this is not necessary. Laser diffraction has excellent possibilities for automated recording of data and testing conditions, and the size classes are independent of the flow rate. Practical limitations can be overcome by using a special inhaler adapter which

  4. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  5. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  6. Investigations of Some Liquid Matrixes for Analyte Quantification by MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Lee, Seong Hoon; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-06-01

    Sample inhomogeneity is one of the obstacles preventing the generation of reproducible mass spectra by MALDI and to their use for the purpose of analyte quantification. As a potential solution to this problem, we investigated MALDI with some liquid matrixes prepared by nonstoichiometric mixing of acids and bases. Out of 27 combinations of acids and bases, liquid matrixes could be produced from seven. When the overall spectral features were considered, two liquid matrixes using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid as the acid and 3-aminoquinoline and N,N-diethylaniline as bases were the best choices. In our previous study of MALDI with solid matrixes, we found that three requirements had to be met for the generation of reproducible spectra and for analyte quantification: (1) controlling the temperature by fixing the total ion count, (2) plotting the analyte-to-matrix ion ratio versus the analyte concentration as the calibration curve, and (3) keeping the matrix suppression below a critical value. We found that the same requirements had to be met in MALDI with liquid matrixes as well. In particular, although the liquid matrixes tested here were homogeneous, they failed to display spot-to-spot spectral reproducibility unless the first requirement above was met. We also found that analyte-derived ions could not be produced efficiently by MALDI with the above liquid matrixes unless the analyte was sufficiently basic. In this sense, MALDI processes with solid and liquid matrixes should be regarded as complementary techniques rather than as competing ones.

  7. A novel rocket-based in-situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Achtert, P.; Ivchenko, N.; Magnusson, P.; Kuremyr, T.; Shepenkov, V.; Tibert, G.

    2012-11-01

    A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 85 and 17 km is described. Collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Each collection sample is exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy gives size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  8. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  9. Orbiting lidar simulations. I - Aerosol and cloud measurements by an independent-wavelength technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Livingston, J. M.; Grams, G. W.; Patterson, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud measurements have been simulated for a Space Shuttle lidar. Expected errors - in signal, transmission, density, and calibration - are calculated algebraically and checked by simulating measurements and retrievals using random-number generators. By day, vertical structure is retrieved for tenuous clouds, Saharan aerosols, and boundary layer aerosols (at 0.53 and 1.06 micron) as well as strong volcanic stratospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron). By night, all these constituents are retrieved plus upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols (at 1.06 micron), mesospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron), and noctilucent clouds (at 1.06 and 0.53 micron). The vertical resolution was 0.1-0.5 km in the troposphere, 0.5-2.0 km above, except 0.25-1.0 km in the mesospheric cloud and aerosol layers; horizontal resolution was 100-2000 km.

  10. Deconvolution and Quantification of Primary and Oxygenated Organic Aerosols: Technique Development and Applications to the Pittsburgh AMS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Alfarra, R.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Worsnop, D.; Canagaratna, M.

    2004-12-01

    A new technique has been developed to deconvolve and quantify the mass concentrations of primary and oxygenated organic aerosol (POA and OOA) using highly time-resolved organic mass spectral data obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). OOA may comprise secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as well as oxidized POA. This technique involves a series of multivariate linear regressions that use mass-to-charge ratios (m/z's) 57 (mostly C4H9+) and 44 (mostly CO2+), the identified AMS mass spectral tracers for POA and OOA, respectively, as the initial principal components followed by an iterative algorithm to evaluate and "purify" POA and OOA mass spectral tracers. We have applied this technique to the AMS organic aerosol data acquired at the EPA Pittsburgh Supersite during September 2002 and have observed excellent agreement between the reconstructed organic concentrations (= POA + OOA) and the measured values (r2 = 0.997, slope = 0.998). The reconstructed organic data matrix (size = 3199 time steps x 300 m/z's) explains 99% of the variance in the measured time series. The extracted mass spectrum of POA shows high similarity to those of diesel exhaust sampled during a chase study, lab-measured lubricating oil, and freshly emitted traffic aerosols measured in urban environments. The spectrum of OOA closely resembles those of aged organic aerosols sampled in remote areas and also shows similarity with the spectrum of fulvic acid-a humic-like substance that is ubiquitous in the environment and has previously been used as an analogue to represent polyacid compounds found in highly processed and oxidized atmospheric organic aerosols. Organic aerosols in Pittsburgh during Sept. 2002 are mainly oxygenated, on average consisting of ~ 70% OOA (likely mainly secondary in nature). Pronounced diurnal variations in the POA/OOA contributions to organic mass have been observed, with the contribution of POA peaking in the morning rush hours while that of OOA is largest in

  11. Application of the VH-TDMA technique to coastal ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Ristovski, Z.; Morawska, L.

    2004-08-01

    A newly developed VH-TDMA has been used for the first time to measure the volatile fractions and post volatilization hygroscopic growth factors of ambient aerosols in the coastal marine and urban environments. The results are compared with comparable data for laboratory generated aerosols of known composition. Measurements conducted on coastal Aitken mode particles showed volatilization behavior similar to laboratory generated aerosols composed of methane sulfonic acid and ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted on 60 nm particles during nucleation events contained a greater fraction of material with similar volatility to ammonium sulfate than was found at other times. These particles were hygroscopic but less so than pure ammonium sulfate. Measurements conducted in the Brisbane central business district during sea breeze conditions show similar behavior to the coastal aerosol, but with additional low volatility species. This aerosol may originate from urban sources or from marine particles acquiring additional secondary aerosol species during transport.

  12. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.K.; Lewis, T.M.; Beeson, M.D.; Russell, D.H. )

    1994-05-15

    We report the application of aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The aerosol MALDI experiment uses aerosol liquid introduction in conjunction with pulsed UV laser ionization to form ions from large biomolecules in solution. Mass analysis is achieved in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the LC/MALDI-MS experiment, the matrix solution is combined with the column effluent in a mixing tee, LC/MALDI-MS is demonstrated for the separation of bradykinin, gramicidin S, and myoglobin. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  14. Orbiting lidar simulations. 1: Aerosol and cloud measurements by an independent-wavelength technique.

    PubMed

    Russell, P B; Morley, B M; Livingston, J M; Grams, G W; Patterson, E M

    1982-05-01

    Aerosol and cloud measurements are simulated for a space shuttle lidar. Expected errors (in signal, transmission, density, and calibration) are calculated algebraically and checked by simulating measurements and retrievals using random number generators. Vertical resolution is 0.1-0.5 km in the troposphere, 0.5-2.0 km above, except 0.25-1.0 km in mesospheric cloud and aerosol layers. Horizontal resolution is 100-2000 km. By day vertical structure is retrieved for tenuous clouds, Saharan aerosols, and boundary layer aerosols (at 0.53 and 1.06 microm) as well as strong volcanic stratospheric aerosols (at 0.53 microm). Quantitative backscatter is retrieved provided that particulate optical depth does not exceed approximately 0.3. By night all these constituents are retrieved plus upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols (at 1.06 microm), mesospheric aerosols (at 0.53 microm), and noctilucent clouds (at 1.06 and 0.53 microm). Molecular density is a leading source of error in measuring nonvolcanic stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols.

  15. Ethyl Esterification for MALDI-MS Analysis of Protein Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Reiding, Karli R; Lonardi, Emanuela; Hipgrave Ederveen, Agnes L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl esterification is a technique for the chemical modification of sialylated glycans, leading to enhanced stability when performing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry (MS), as well as allowing the efficient detection of both sialylated and non-sialylated glycans in positive ion mode. In addition, the method shows specific reaction products for α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids, leading to an MS distinguishable mass difference. Here, we describe the ethyl esterification protocol for 96 glycan samples, including enzymatic N-glycan release, the aforementioned ethyl esterification, glycan enrichment, MALDI target preparation, and the MS(/MS) measurement. PMID:26700047

  16. [Applications of MALDI-TOF technology in clinical microbiology].

    PubMed

    Suarez, S; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2015-02-01

    Until now, the identification of micro-organisms has been based on the cultural and biochemical characteristics of bacterial and fungal species. Recently, Mass Spectrometry type Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed in clinical microbiology laboratories. This new technology allows identification of micro-organisms directly from colonies of bacteria and fungi within few minutes. In addition, it can be used to identify germs directly from positive blood culture bottles or directly from urine samples. Other ways are being explored to expand the use of MALDI-TOF in clinical microbiology laboratories. Indeed, some studies propose to detect bacterial antibiotic resistance while others compare strains within species for faster strain typing. The main objective of this review is to update data from the recent literature for different applications of MALDI-TOF technique in microbiological diagnostic routine.

  17. MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry applications in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Fournier, Pierre Edouard; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2010-11-01

    MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry (MS) has been successfully adapted for the routine identification of microorganisms in clinical microbiology laboratories in the past 10 years. This revolutionary technique allows for easier and faster diagnosis of human pathogens than conventional phenotypic and molecular identification methods, with unquestionable reliability and cost-effectiveness. This article will review the application of MALDI-TOF-MS tools in routine clinical diagnosis, including the identification of bacteria at the species, subspecies, strain and lineage levels, and the identification of bacterial toxins and antibiotic-resistance type. We will also discuss the application of MALDI-TOF-MS tools in the identification of Archaea, eukaryotes and viruses. Pathogenic identification from colony-cultured, blood-cultured, urine and environmental samples is also reviewed.

  18. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  19. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric aerosols--recent developments and applications. Part II: On-line mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Prather, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Many of the significant advances in our understanding of atmospheric particles can be attributed to the application of mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry provides high sensitivity with fast response time to probe chemically complex particles. This review focuses on recent developments and applications in the field of mass spectrometry of atmospheric aerosols. In Part II of this two-part review, we concentrate on real-time mass spectrometry techniques, which provide high time resolution for insight into brief events and diurnal changes while eliminating the potential artifacts acquired during long-term filter sampling. In particular, real-time mass spectrometry has been shown recently to provide the ability to probe the chemical composition of ambient individual particles <30 nm in diameter to further our understanding of how particles are formed through nucleation in the atmosphere. Further, transportable real-time mass spectrometry techniques are now used frequently on ground-, ship-, and aircraft-based studies around the globe to further our understanding of the spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols. In addition, coupling aerosol mass spectrometry techniques with other measurements in series has allowed the in situ determination of chemically resolved particle effective density, refractive index, volatility, and cloud activation properties.

  20. A new Technique for Studying Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Marine Stratocumulus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, V. P.; Albrecht, B.; Kollias, P.; Jonsson, H.; Breed, D.

    2006-12-01

    A cloud seeding experiment conducted off-shore of Monterey, California in June 2006 was designed to establish the feasibility of perturbing aerosol concentrations and composition artificially as a method for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus. Perturbations in aerosols were made using hygroscopic (Magnesium/Potassium Perchlorate) flares (manufactured by Ice Crystal Engineering (ICE)) burned within a cloud deck. Responses to the resulting aerosol perturbations were observed using in-situ aerosol, cloud, and drizzle probes and a 95 GHz FMCW radar operating from the CIRPAS Twin Otter research aircraft. This method is demonstrated using results from 28 June 2006, when ICE flares were burned creating two seeded lines in a 300 m thick cloud with a mean cloud droplet concentration of 200 cm{-3}. In-cloud plume intersects (total of 16) were made during a 35 min period with the Twin-Otter. Each plume crossing was identified by a strong aerosol concentration increase in the 0.1-3 μm range. During this time, direct observations of the evolution of cloud and drizzle were made in conjunction with background cloud conditions. Results from cloud evolution characterization, the merits of this approach and potential for future applications will be discussed.

  1. Estimation of aerosol type from airborne hyperspectral data: a new technique designed for industrial plume characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Marion, R.; Foucher, P.-Y.; Briottet, X.

    2012-11-01

    The determination of the aerosol type in a plume from remotely sensed data without any a priori knowledge is a challenging task. If several methods have already been developed to characterize the aerosols from multi or hyperspectral data, they are not suited for industrial particles, which have specific physical and optical properties, changing quickly and in a complex way with the distance from the source emission. From radiative transfer equations, we have developed an algorithm, based on a Look-Up Table approach, enabling the determination of the type of this kind of particles from hyperspectral data. It consists in the selection of pixels pairs, located at the transitions between two kinds of grounds (or between an illuminated and a shadow area), then in the comparison between normalized estimated Aerosol Optical Thicknesses (AOTs) and pre-calculated AOTs. The application of this algorithm to simulated data leads to encouraging results: the selection of only six pixels pairs allows the algorithm to differentiate aerosols emitted by a metallurgical plant from biomass burning particles, urban aerosols and particles from an oil depot explosion, regardless the size and the aerosol concentration. The algorithm performances are better for a relatively high AOT but the single scattering approximation does not enable the characterization of thick plumes (AOT above 2.0). However, the choice of transitions (type of grounds) does not seem to significantly affect the results.

  2. MULTI-TECHNIQUE APPROACH TO MEASURE SIZE AND TIME RESOLVED ATMOSPHERIC AND RADIONUCLIDE AEROSOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Shutthanandan, V; Xie, YuLong; Disselkamp, Robert S; Laulainen, Nels S; Smith, Edward A; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2008-12-01

    Accurate quantifications of aerosol components are crucial to predict global atmospheric transport models. Recently developed International Monitoring System (IMS) network represents an opportunity to enhance comprehensive systematic aerosol observations on a global scale because it provides a global infrastructure. As such, a local pilot study utilizing several state-of-the-art instruments has been conducted at the peak of Rattlesnake Mountain, Washington, USA, during three month periods (June-August) in 2003 to explore this opportunity. In this study, routine aerosol samples were collected using a 3-stage Cascade Impactor Beam Analyzer (0.07 to 2.5 µm) with time resolution about 6 hours on long Teflon strips while radionuclide aerosols were collected using Radionuclide aerosol sampler/analyzer (RASA) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The elemental composition and hydrogen concentration were measured using proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), respectively. In addition, short and long-lived radionuclides that exist in nature were measured with same time resolution (6 hours) using RASA. In this method, high-resolution gamma-ray spectra were analyzed for radionuclide concentration. Combination of trace radioactive and non-radioactive element analysis in aerosols makes this investigation unique.

  3. Analysis of size-fractionated coal combustion aerosols by PIXE and other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Røyset, O.; Vadset, M.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Lind, T. M.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to study the chemical composition of size-fractionated in-stack fly-ash particles emitted during coal combustion. The samples were collected before the electrostatic precipitator at a gas temperature of 120°C during the combustion of Venezuelan coal in a 81 MW capacity circulating fluidized bed boiler. The sampling device consisted of a Berner low pressure impactor, which was operated with a cyclone precutter. The Nuclepore polycarbonate foils, which were used as collection surfaces in the low pressure impactor, were analyzed by the three techniques and the results of common elements were critically compared. The PIXE results were systematically lower than the INAA data and the percentage difference appeared to be stage-dependent, but virtually independent upon the element. The discrepancies are most likely due to bounce-off effects, particle reentrainment and other sampling artifacts, which may make that a fraction of the aerosol particles is deposited on the impaction foils outside the section analyzed by PIXE. However, by resorting to a "mixed internal standard" approach, accurate PIXE data are obtained. Also in the comparison between the ICP-MS and the INAA data significant discrepancies were observed. These are most likely due to incomplete dissolution of the particulate material and in particular of the alumino-silicate fly-ash matrix, during the acid digestion sample preparation step for ICP-MS. It is suggested that a comparison between ICP-MS data of acid digested samples and INAA can advantageously be used to provide speciation information on the various elements. Selected examples of size distributions are presented and briefly discussed.

  4. The Time Series Technique for Aerosol Retrievals over Land from MODIS: Algorithm MAIAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols interact with sun light by scattering and absorbing radiation. By changing irradiance of the Earth surface, modifying cloud fractional cover and microphysical properties and a number of other mechanisms, they affect the energy balance, hydrological cycle, and planetary climate [IPCC, 2007]. In many world regions there is a growing impact of aerosols on air quality and human health. The Earth Observing System [NASA, 1999] initiated high quality global Earth observations and operational aerosol retrievals over land. With the wide swath (2300 km) of MODIS instrument, the MODIS Dark Target algorithm [Kaufman et al., 1997; Remer et al., 2005; Levy et al., 2007] currently complemented with the Deep Blue method [Hsu et al., 2004] provides daily global view of planetary atmospheric aerosol. The MISR algorithm [Martonchik et al., 1998; Diner et al., 2005] makes high quality aerosol retrievals in 300 km swaths covering the globe in 8 days. With MODIS aerosol program being very successful, there are still several unresolved issues in the retrieval algorithms. The current processing is pixel-based and relies on a single-orbit data. Such an approach produces a single measurement for every pixel characterized by two main unknowns, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface reflectance (SR). This lack of information constitutes a fundamental problem of the remote sensing which cannot be resolved without a priori information. For example, MODIS Dark Target algorithm makes spectral assumptions about surface reflectance, whereas the Deep Blue method uses ancillary global database of surface reflectance composed from minimal monthly measurements with Rayleigh correction. Both algorithms use Lambertian surface model. The surface-related assumptions in the aerosol retrievals may affect subsequent atmospheric correction in unintended way. For example, the Dark Target algorithm uses an empirical relationship to predict SR in the Blue (B3) and Red (B1) bands from the

  5. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  6. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  7. Techniques of Validation of Aerosol and Water Vapor Retrievals From MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Chu, Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Slutsker, Ilya; Holben, Brent N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are extremely important for global climate studies and modeling in the quest to characterize the global radiation budget and forcing. The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, and spatial distribution and dynamics of aerosols are still very poorly known. Aerosol column optical thickness and other parameters as well as column precipitable water vapor amount are some of the main atmospheric parameters retrieved from the MODIS instrument on board the Terra satellite. To ensure the reliability of these parameters, we have embarked on a very massive validation effort. This involves cross correlation between the retrievals from the satellite data and those obtained from sunphotometer measurements at a large number of ground stations spread throughout the globe. Notable among these ground stations is a large network of over 100 stations coordinated under the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project. Whereas MODIS retrieves the aerosol parameters throughout the globe once or twice a day during the daytime, the ground measurements cover only discrete locations of the earth, though the retrievals are done several times a day. We have devised a method to. match the MODIS and ground retrievals through spatial statistics for the MODIS data and temporal statistics for the ground data. This has produced good comparisons and has enabled the validation of MODIS aerosol and water vapor retrievals at over 100 discrete locations in various parts of the earth both over the land and over the ocean. Currently, the validation statistical data is produced routinely by the MODIS aerosol group and is even available not only for validation but also for use by the science community for short and long term studies at various parts of the earth. One important advantage is that the system can be expanded to incorporate more locations where ground measurements and other studies may be conducted at any time during the lifetime of MODIS.

  8. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: statistical data analysis and current computational challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry, also called MALDI-imaging, is a label-free bioanalytical technique used for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of a sample. Usually, MALDI-imaging is exploited for analysis of a specially prepared tissue section thaw mounted onto glass slide. A tremendous development of the MALDI-imaging technique has been observed during the last decade. Currently, it is one of the most promising innovative measurement techniques in biochemistry and a powerful and versatile tool for spatially-resolved chemical analysis of diverse sample types ranging from biological and plant tissues to bio and polymer thin films. In this paper, we outline computational methods for analyzing MALDI-imaging data with the emphasis on multivariate statistical methods, discuss their pros and cons, and give recommendations on their application. The methods of unsupervised data mining as well as supervised classification methods for biomarker discovery are elucidated. We also present a high-throughput computational pipeline for interpretation of MALDI-imaging data using spatial segmentation. Finally, we discuss current challenges associated with the statistical analysis of MALDI-imaging data. PMID:23176142

  9. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Kollias, Pavlos; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Breed, Daniel W.

    2007-07-01

    Giant hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes was observed using an instrumented aircraft making 16 transects of the plumes. The cloud drop size distribution width increased in the plumes due to an increased number of small cloud drops (3-5 μm) on the earlier transects and a 5-fold increase in the number of large drops (20-40 μm) relative to the background cloud 30 minutes later. The cloud effective diameter increased from about 11 μm in the background to 13 μm in the plumes. Although the giant nuclei were only a small fraction of the total aerosols produced by the flares, they dominated the cloud response. The merit of the seeding approach for controlled observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus was demonstrated.

  10. Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew S; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2013-09-01

    A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

  11. Studies of seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties with use of remote techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2014-05-01

    According to the IPCC report, atmospheric aerosols due to their properties -extinction of Sun and Earth radiation and participation in processes of creation of clouds, are among basic "unknowns" in climate studies. Aerosols have large effect on the radiation balance of the Earth which has a significant impact on climate changes. They are also a key issue in the case of remote sensing measurements. The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols depend not only on their type but also on physical parameters such as pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction. The wide range of properties in which atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's climate is the reason of high unrelenting interest of scientists from different disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology. Numerous studies have dealt with aerosol optical properties, e.g. Dubovik et al. (2002), but only in a few have regarded the influence of meteorological parameters on the optical properties of aerosols in the Baltic Sea area. Studies of aerosol properties over the Baltic were conducted already in the last forty years, e.g. Zielinski T. et. al. (1999) or Zielinski T. & A. Zielinski (2002). The experiments carried out at that time involved only one measuring instrument -e.g. LIDAR (range of 1 km) measurements and they were conducted only in selected areas of the Polish coastal zone. Moreover in those publications authors did not use measurements performed on board of research vessel (R/V Oceania), which belongs to Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Science (IO PAN) or data received from satellite measurements. In 2011 Zdun and Rozwadowska performed an analysis of all data derived from the AERONET station on the Gotland Island. The data were divided into seasons and supplemented by meteorological factors. However, so far no comprehensive study has been carried out for the entire Baltic Sea area. This was the reason to conduct further research of SEasonal Variations of Aerosol optical depth over the Baltic

  12. APPLICATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research project to develop tools and methodologies to measure aerosol chemical and particle dispersion through space. These tools can be used to devise pollution prevention strategies that could reduce occupant chemical exposures and guide manufactu...

  13. [Rapid identification of microorganisms using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Masaharu; Nomura, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In a clinical diagnostic microbiology laboratory, the current method of identifying bacterial isolates is based mainly on phenotypic characteristics, such as the growth pattern on different media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions. These techniques collectively allow high-level accuracy in identifying most bacterial isolates, but they are costly and time-consuming. In our clinical microbiology laboratory, we prospectively assessed the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify bacterial strains that were routinely isolated from clinical samples. Bacterial colonies obtained from a total of 468 strains of 92 bacterial species isolated at the Department of Clinical Laboratory at Chiba University were directly placed on target MALDI plates, followed by the addition of CHCA matrix solution. The plates were then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement, and the microorganisms were identified by pattern matching by the libraries in the BioTyper 2.0 software. The identification rates at species and genus levels were 91.7% (429/468) and 97.0% (454/468), respectively. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, simple, and high-throughput proteomic technique for the identification of a variety of bacterial species. Since colony to colony differences and the effects of culture duration on the results are minimal, it can be implemented in a conventional laboratory setting. Although for some pathogens, the preanalytic processes should be refined and current database should be improved to obtain more accurate results, the MALDI-TOF MS-based method generally performs as well as the conventional methods and is a promising technology in clinical laboratories.

  14. Characterization of Microorganisms by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Catherine E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-10-02

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for characterization and analysis of microorganisms, specifically bacteria, is described here as a rapid screening tool. The objective of this technique is not comprehensive protein analysis of a microorganism but rather a rapid screening of the organism and the accessible protein pattern for characterization and distinction. This method is based on the ionization of the readily accessible and easily ionizable portion of the protein profile of an organism that is often characteristic of different bacterial species. The utility of this screening approach is yet to reach its full potential but could be applied to food safety, disease outbreak monitoring in hospitals, culture stock integrity and verification, microbial forensics or homeland security applications.

  15. Online Measurements of Water-Soluble Iron in Ambient Aerosols: A new Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, N.; Oakes, M.; Weber, R. J.; Majestic, B. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Snyder, D. C.; Schauer, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    Water-soluble iron, i.e. Fe(II) (hereafter, WS-Fe), is a redox active metal that can act as a catalyst in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In atmospheric aerosol particles, WS-Fe may significantly impact human health and the atmospheric oxidative capacity. Further, WS-Fe acts as a critical nutrient for marine organisms and has been hypothesized to limit phytoplankton productivity in high nitrate, low-chlorophyll ocean regions. In order to assess the role of aerosol WS-Fe on human health, atmospheric chemistry and ocean biogeochemistry, it is necessary to understand its major sources, transport, transformation processes and sinks. Filter-based measurements with several (6-24) hours integration time are predominately used to quantify WS-Fe in aerosols but provide limited insight into acute exposures that could be higher than daily averages, or sources having high temporal variability. Generally, mineral dust and its processing with acidic pollutants, is considered the dominant source of WS-Fe, however, recent studies have reported combustion emissions are also a possible source. A time-resolved data set may help in identifying WS-Fe sources, atmospheric transformations and possible sinks. We have developed a new system for online quantitative analyses of WS-Fe present in ambient aerosols with a 12-minute integration time. It mainly consists of Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS), a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and a portable UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The complete system is automated so that first the liquid sample (water-extract of ambient aerosols from PILS) is mixed with ferrozine (complexing reagent) by pumping them simultaneously (10:1) through a serpentine reactor and a 100 turn mixing coil using a peristaltic pump. After holding the mixed solution in the mixing coil for three minutes, the sample is pumped through the LWCC and held there for two minutes to acquire the absorbance of the solution at 562 nm (for Fe

  16. Application of the tracer-aerosol gradient interpretive technique to sulfur attribution for the big bend regional aerosol and visibility observational study.

    PubMed

    Green, Mark; Kuhns, Hampden; Pitchford, Marc; Dietz, Russell; Ashbaugh, Lowell; Watson, Tom

    2003-05-01

    A simple data analysis method called the Tracer-Aerosol Gradient Interpretive Technique (TAGIT) is used to attribute particulate S and SO2 at Big Bend National Park in Texas and nearby areas to local and regional sources. Particulate S at Big Bend is of concern because of its effects on atmospheric visibility. The analysis used particulate S, SO2, and perfluorocarbon tracer data from six 6-hr sampling sites in and near Big Bend National Park. The data were collected in support of the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study; the field portion was conducted from July through October 1999. Perfluorocarbon tracer was released continuously from a tower at Eagle Pass, TX, approximately 25 km northeast of two large coal-fired power plants (Carbon I and II) in Coahuila, Mexico, and approximately 270 km east-southeast of Big Bend National Park. The perfluorocarbon tracer did not properly represent the location of the emissions from the Carbon power plants for individual 6-hr sampling periods and attributed only 3% of the particulate S and 27% of the SO2 at the 6-hr sites in and near Big Bend to sources represented by the tracer. An alternative approach using SO2 to tag "local" sources such as the Carbon plants attributed 10% of the particulate S and 75% of the SO2 at the 6-hr sites to local sources. Based on these two approaches, most of the regional (65-86%) and a small fraction (19-31%) of the local SO2 was converted to particulate S. The analysis implies that substantial reductions in particulate S at Big Bend National Park cannot be achieved by only reducing emissions from the Carbon power plants; reduction of emissions from many sources over a regional area would be necessary.

  17. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  18. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  19. Use of the MALDI BioTyper system with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for rapid identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Masaharu; Sato, Kenichi; Segawa, Syunsuke; Ishii, Chisato; Miyabe, Akiko; Murata, Syota; Saito, Tomoko; Nomura, Fumio

    2011-06-01

    In a clinical diagnosis microbiology laboratory, the current method of identifying bacterial isolates is based mainly on phenotypic characteristics, for example growth pattern on different media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions. These techniques collectively enable great accuracy in identifying most bacterial isolates, but are costly and time-consuming. In our clinical microbiology laboratory, we prospectively assessed the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify bacterial strains that were routinely isolated from clinical samples. Bacterial colonies obtained from a total of 468 strains of 92 bacterial species isolated at the Department of Clinical Laboratory at Chiba University were directly placed on target MALDI plates followed by addition of CHCA matrix solution. The plates were then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement and the microorganisms were identified by pattern matching with the libraries in the BioTyper 2.0 software. Identification success at the species and genus levels was 91.7% (429/468) and 97.0% (454/468), respectively. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, simple, and high-throughput proteomic technique for identification of a variety of bacterial species. Because colony-to-colony differences and effects of culture duration on the results are minimal, it can be implemented in a conventional laboratory setting. Although for some pathogens, preanalytical processes should be refined, and the current database should be improved to obtain more accurate results, the MALDI-TOF MS based method performs, in general, as well as conventional methods and is a promising technology in clinical laboratories.

  20. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  1. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 μm thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.

  2. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 μm thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.

  3. The long-range transport of aerosols from northern China to Hong Kong - a multi-technique study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, M.; Zheng, M.; Wang, F.; Chim, K. S.; Kot, S. C.

    The results of the inorganic and organic analyses of aerosol samples collected on the east and west sides of Hong Kong during a dust episode (9-10 May 1996) are reported. The origin of the dust was traced to Northern China. The dust reached Hong Kong by way of the East China Sea. The characteristics of the inorganic elements and organic compounds were quite different from the non-episodic samples collected on 1-2 April 1996, EPD (Environmental Protection Department, Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong, China) results for April-May 1994, and our early studies (Zheng et al., 1997. Atmospheric Environment 31(2), 227-237.). Results from X-ray spectrometry showed pronounced increase in the relative abundance of Al, Fe, Ca, S and Cl in the dust samples compared to the non-episodic samples. The high abundance of Cl in the dust samples suggested the aerosols experienced long-range transport by way of the sea. ICP-MS analysis revealed higher concentrations of Fe, Ca, S and Pb in the episodic samples relative to the values measured during April-May 1994 by EPD. The high Ca content in the soil samples is a characteristic of northern Chinese crustal material (Liu et al., 1985). Hong Kong aerosols are characterized by high octadecenoic acid concentration due to heavy urbanization and Chinese-style stir-fry cooking. A much lower C 18:1/C 18:0 ratio was found in the episodic samples, however, suggesting the aerosols were transported from a long distance. The high ratio of ⩾C 20/aerosol samples collected during the episode corresponded well with those of the eolian dust samples over the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Back trajectories and low altitude (<3 km) mesoscale flow modeling

  4. MALDI Matrix Research for Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Matrices are necessary materials for ionizing analytes in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The choice of a matrix appropriate for each analyte controls the analyses. Thus, in some cases, development or improvement of matrices can become a tool for solving problems. This paper reviews MALDI matrix research that the author has conducted in the recent decade. It describes glycopeptide, carbohydrate, or phosphopeptide analyses using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium (TMG) salts of p-coumaric acid (CA) (G3CA), 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ)/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) (3-AQ/CHCA) or 3-AQ/CA and gengeral peptide, peptide containing disulfide bonds or hydrophobic peptide analyses using butylamine salt of CHCA (CHCAB), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN), octyl 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (alkylated dihydroxybenzoate, ADHB), or 1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)octan-1-one (alkylated trihydroxyacetophenone, ATHAP). PMID:26819908

  5. New Examination of the Raman Lidar Technique for Water Vapor and Aerosols. Paper 1; Evaluating the Temperature Dependent Lidar Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    The intent of this paper and its companion is to compile together the essential information required for the analysis of Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol data acquired using a single laser wavelength. In this first paper several details concerning the evaluation of the lidar equation when measuring Raman scattering are considered. These details include the influence of the temperature dependence of both pure rotational and vibrational-rotational Raman scattering on the lidar profile. These are evaluated for the first time using a new form of the lidar equation. The results indicate that, for the range of temperatures encountered in the troposphere, the magnitude of the temperature dependent effect can reach 10% or more for narrowband Raman water vapor measurements. Also the calculation of atmospheric transmission is examined carefully including the effects of depolarization. Different formulations of Rayleigh cross section determination commonly used in the lidar field are compared revealing differences up to 5% among the formulations. The influence of multiple scattering on the measurement of aerosol extinction using the Raman lidar technique is considered as are several photon pulse-pileup correction techniques.

  6. Light absorption by airborne aerosols: comparison of integrating plate and spectrophone techniques.

    PubMed

    Szkarlat, A C; Japar, S M

    1981-04-01

    An excellent correlation between the integrating plate (IP) and the photoacoustic methods for measuring aerosol light absorption has been found for airborne graphitic carbon in diesel vehicle exhaust. However, the regression coefficient depends on the orientation of the Teflon membrane filter during the IP analysis. With the collected particulates between the filter and the integrating plate, the IP response is 1.85 times that for the filter reversed. In either case the response ratio of the IP method to the photoacoustic method is >1.0, i.e., 2.43 vs 1.30. The IP calibration is also probably dependent on the nature of the filter medium. PMID:20309278

  7. The application of MALDI TOF MS in biopharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2011-09-30

    The development and quality assessment of modern biopharmaceuticals, particularly protein and peptide drugs, requires an array of analytical techniques to assess the integrity of the bioactive molecule during formulation and administration. Mass spectrometry is one of these methods and is particularly suitable for determining chemical modifications of protein and peptide drugs. The emphasis of this review is the identification of covalent interactions between protein and peptide bioactives with polymeric pharmaceutical formulations using mass spectrometry with the main focus on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled tandem time-of-flight (TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The basics of MALDI TOF MS and collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based ion fragmentation will be explained and applications for qualitative characterization of protein and peptide drugs and their interactions with pharmaceutical polymers will be discussed using three case studies.

  8. [Applications of MALDI-TOF-MS in clinical microbiology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, Etienne; Nassif, Xavier

    2011-10-01

    For twenty years, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a particularly powerful tool for analysis and characterization of proteins in research. It is only recently that this technology, especially MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight) has entered the field of routine microbiology. This method has proven to be reliable and safe for the identification of bacteria, yeasts, filamentous fungi and dermatophytes. MALDI-TOF-MS is a rapid, precise and cost-effective method for identification, compared to conventional phenotypic techniques or molecular biology. Its ability to analyse whole microorganisms with few sample preparation has greatly reduced the time to identification (1-2 min). Furthermore, this technology can be used to identify bacteria directly from clinical samples as blood culture bottles or urines. Future applications will be developed in order to provide direct information concerning virulence or resistance protein markers.

  9. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data. Part II: Using Maximum Covariance Analysis to Effectively Compare Spatiotemporal Variability of Satellite and AERONET Measured Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiomater (MISR) provide regular aerosol observations with global coverage. It is essential to examine the coherency between space- and ground-measured aerosol parameters in representing aerosol spatial and temporal variability, especially in the climate forcing and model validation context. In this paper, we introduce Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA), also known as Singular Value Decomposition analysis as an effective way to compare correlated aerosol spatial and temporal patterns between satellite measurements and AERONET data. This technique not only successfully extracts the variability of major aerosol regimes but also allows the simultaneous examination of the aerosol variability both spatially and temporally. More importantly, it well accommodates the sparsely distributed AERONET data, for which other spectral decomposition methods, such as Principal Component Analysis, do not yield satisfactory results. The comparison shows overall good agreement between MODIS/MISR and AERONET AOD variability. The correlations between the first three modes of MCA results for both MODIS/AERONET and MISR/ AERONET are above 0.8 for the full data set and above 0.75 for the AOD anomaly data. The correlations between MODIS and MISR modes are also quite high (greater than 0.9). We also examine the extent of spatial agreement between satellite and AERONET AOD data at the selected stations. Some sites with disagreements in the MCA results, such as Kanpur, also have low spatial coherency. This should be associated partly with high AOD spatial variability and partly with uncertainties in satellite retrievals due to the seasonally varying aerosol types and surface properties.

  10. Adjunct therapies during mechanical ventilation: airway clearance techniques, therapeutic aerosols, and gases.

    PubMed

    Kallet, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients in respiratory failure often require adjunct therapies to address special needs such as inhaled drug delivery to alleviate airway obstruction, treat pulmonary infection, or stabilize gas exchange, or therapies that enhance pulmonary hygiene. These therapies generally are supportive in nature rather than curative. Currently, most lack high-level evidence supporting their routine use. This overview describes the rationale and examines the evidence supporting adjunctive therapies during mechanical ventilation. Both mechanistic and clinical research suggests that intrapulmonary percussive ventilation may enhance pulmonary secretion mobilization and might reverse atelectasis. However, its impact on outcomes such ICU stay is uncertain. The most crucial issue is whether aerosolized antibiotics should be used to treat ventilator-associated pneumonia, particularly when caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. There is encouraging evidence from several studies supporting its use, at least in individual cases of pneumonia non-responsive to systemic antibiotic therapy. Inhaled pulmonary vasodilators provide at least short-term improvement in oxygenation and may be useful in stabilizing pulmonary gas exchange in complex management situations. Small uncontrolled studies suggest aerosolized heparin with N-acetylcysteine might break down pulmonary casts and relieve airway obstruction in patients with severe inhalation injury. Similar low-level evidence suggests that heliox is effective in reducing airway pressure and improving ventilation in various forms of lower airway obstruction. These therapies generally are supportive and may facilitate patient management. However, because they have not been shown to improve patient outcomes, it behooves clinicians to use these therapies parsimoniously and to monitor their effectiveness carefully. PMID:23709200

  11. Analysis of Biomolecules by Atmospheric Pressure Visible-Wavelength MALDI-Ion Trap-MS in Transmission Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Raymond E.; Findsen, Eric W.; Isailovic, Dragan

    2013-10-01

    We report the development of a new AP visible-wavelength MALDI-ion trap-MS instrument with significantly improved performance over our previously reported system ( Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 315, 66-73 (2012)). A Nd:YAG pulsed laser emitting light at 532 nm was used to desorb and ionize oligosaccharides and peptides in transmission geometry through a glass slide. Limits of detection (LODs) achieved in MS mode correspond to picomole quantities of oligosaccharides and femtomole quantities of peptides. Tandem MS (MS/MS) experiments enabled identification of enzymatically digested proteins and oligosaccharides by comparison of MS/MS spectra with data found in protein and glycan databases. Moreover, the softness of ionization, LODs, and fragmentation spectra of biomolecules by AP visible-wavelength MALDI-MS were compared to those obtained by AP UV MALDI-MS using a Nd:YAG laser emitting light at 355 nm. AP visible-wavelength MALDI appears to be a softer ionization technique then AP UV MALDI for the analysis of sulfated peptides, while visible-wavelength MALDI-MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS spectra of other biomolecules analyzed were mostly similar to those obtained by AP UV MALDI-MS. Therefore, the methodology presented will be useful for MS and MSn analyses of biomolecules at atmospheric pressure. Additionally, the AP visible-wavelength MALDI developed can be readily used for soft ionization of analytes on various mass spectrometers.

  12. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Achtert, P.; Ivchenko, N.; Magnusson, P.; Kuremyr, T.; Shepenkov, V.; Tibert, G.

    2013-03-01

    A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  13. Protein Chips Compatible with MALDI Mass Spectrometry Prepared by Ambient Ion Landing.

    PubMed

    Pompach, Petr; Benada, Oldřich; Rosůlek, Michal; Darebná, Petra; Hausner, Jiří; Růžička, Viktor; Volný, Michael; Novák, Petr

    2016-09-01

    We present a technology that allows the preparation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-compatible protein chips by ambient ion landing of proteins and successive utilization of the resulting protein chips for the development of bioanalytical assays. These assays are based on the interaction between the immobilized protein and the sampled analyte directly on the protein chip and subsequent in situ analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry. The electrosprayed proteins are immobilized on dry metal and metal oxide surfaces, which are nonreactive under normal conditions. The ion landing of electrosprayed protein molecules is performed under atmospheric pressure by an automated ion landing apparatus that can manufacture protein chips with a predefined array of sample positions or any other geometry of choice. The protein chips prepared by this technique are fully compatible with MALDI ionization because the metal-based substrates are conductive and durable enough to be used directly as MALDI plates. Compared to other materials, the nonreactive surfaces show minimal nonspecific interactions with chemical species in the investigated sample and are thus an ideal substrate for selective protein chips. Three types of protein chips were used in this report to demonstrate the bioanalytical applications of ambient ion landing. The protein chips with immobilized proteolytic enzymes showed the usefulness for fast in situ peptide MALDI sequencing; the lectin-based protein chips showed the ability to enrich glycopeptides from complex mixtures with subsequent MALDI analysis, and the protein chips with immobilized antibodies were used for a novel immunoMALDI workflow that allowed the enrichment of antigens from the serum followed by highly specific MALDI detection. PMID:27478994

  14. MALDI for Europa Planetary Science and Exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, T. J.; Agresti, D. G.; Clemett, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    TOF MS for Europa landed science can identify small molecules of the cryosphere and complex biomolecules upwelling from a subsurface water ocean. A matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization (MALDI) testbed for cryo-ice mixtures is being developed.

  15. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data: 1. an EOF Approach to the Spatial-Temporal Variability of Aerosol Optical Depth Using Multiple Remote Sensing Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Many remote sensing techniques and passive sensors have been developed to measure global aerosol properties. While instantaneous comparisons between pixel-level data often reveal quantitative differences, here we use Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, also known as Principal Component Analysis, to demonstrate that satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) data sets exhibit essentially the same spatial and temporal variability and are thus suitable for large-scale studies. Analysis results show that the first four EOF modes of AOD account for the bulk of the variance and agree well across the four data sets used in this study (i.e., Aqua MODIS, Terra MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS). Only SeaWiFS data over land have slightly different EOF patterns. Globally, the first two EOF modes show annual cycles and are mainly related to Sahara dust in the northern hemisphere and biomass burning in the southern hemisphere, respectively. After removing the mean seasonal cycle from the data, major aerosol sources, including biomass burning in South America and dust in West Africa, are revealed in the dominant modes due to the different interannual variability of aerosol emissions. The enhancement of biomass burning associated with El Niño over Indonesia and central South America is also captured with the EOF technique.

  16. Microorganism Identification Based On MALDI-TOF-MS Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elssner, Thomas; Kostrzewa, Markus; Maier, Thomas; Kruppa, Gary

    Advances in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry have enabled the ­development of a rapid, accurate and specific method for the identification of bacteria directly from colonies picked from culture plates, which we have named the MALDI Biotyper. The picked colonies are placed on a target plate, a drop of matrix solution is added, and a pattern of protein molecular weights and intensities, "the protein fingerprint" of the bacteria, is produced by the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. The obtained protein mass fingerprint representing a molecular signature of the microorganism is then matched against a database containing a library of previously measured protein mass fingerprints, and scores for the match to every library entry are produced. An ID is obtained if a score is returned over a pre-set threshold. The sensitivity of the techniques is such that only approximately 104 bacterial cells are needed, meaning that an overnight culture is sufficient, and the results are obtained in minutes after culture. The improvement in time to result over biochemical methods, and the capability to perform a non-targeted identification of bacteria and spores, potentially makes this method suitable for use in the detect-to-treat timeframe in a bioterrorism event. In the case of white-powder samples, the infectious spore is present in sufficient quantity in the powder so that the MALDI Biotyper result can be obtained directly from the white powder, without the need for culture. While spores produce very different patterns from the vegetative colonies of the corresponding bacteria, this problem is overcome by simply including protein fingerprints of the spores in the library. Results on spores can be returned within minutes, making the method suitable for use in the "detect-to-protect" timeframe.

  17. Potential Pitfalls in MALDI-TOF MS Analysis of Abiotically Synthesized RNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcar, Bradley T.; Cassidy, Lauren M.; Moriarty, Elizabeth M.; Joshi, Prakash C.; Coari, Kristin M.; McGown, Linda B.

    2013-06-01

    Demonstration of the abiotic polymerization of ribonucleotides under conditions consistent with conditions that may have existed on the prebiotic Earth is an important goal in "RNA world" research. Recent reports of abiotic RNA polymerization with and without catalysis rely on techniques such as HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and MALDI-TOF MS to analyze the reaction products. It is essential to understand the limitations of these techniques in order to accurately interpret the results of these analyses. In particular, techniques that rely on mass for peak identification may not be able to distinguish between a single, linear RNA oligomer and stable aggregates of smaller linear and/or cyclic RNA molecules. In the case of MALDI-TOF MS, additional complications may arise from formation of salt adducts and MALDI matrix complexes. This is especially true for abiotic RNA polymerization reactions because the concentration of longer RNA chains can be quite low and RNA, as a polyelectrolyte, is highly susceptible to adduct formation and aggregation. Here we focus on MALDI-TOF MS analysis of abiotic polymerization products of imidazole-activated AMP in the presence and absence of montmorillonite clay as a catalyst. A low molecular weight oligonucleotide standard designed for use in MALDI-TOF MS and a 3'-5' polyadenosine monophosphate reference standard were also run for comparison and calibration. Clay-catalyzed reaction products of activated GMP and UMP were also examined. The results illustrate the ambiguities associated with assignment of m/z values in MALDI mass spectra and the need for accurate calibration of mass spectra and careful sample preparation to minimize the formation of adducts and other complications arising from the MALDI process.

  18. Long term fine aerosol analysis by XRF and PIXE techniques in the city of Rijeka, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivošević, Tatjana; Orlić, Ivica; Radović, Iva Bogdanović

    2015-11-01

    The results of a long term, multi elemental XRF and PIXE analysis of fine aerosol pollution in the city of Rijeka, Croatia, are reported for the first time. The samples were collected during a seven months period (6th Aug 2013-28th Feb 2014) on thin stretched Teflon filters and analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) at the Laboratory for Elemental Micro-Analysis (LEMA), University of Rijeka and by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) using 1.6 MeV protons at the Laboratory for Ion Beam Interactions (LIBI), Ruđer Bošković Institute, Zagreb. The newly developed micro-XRF system at LEMA provided results for 19 elements in the range from Si to Pb. The PIXE at the LIBI provided information for the same elements as well for the light elements such as Na, Mg and Al. Black carbon was determined with the Laser Integrated Plate Method (LIPM). The results were statistically evaluated by means of the positive matrix factorization (PMF). The seven major pollution sources were identified together with their relative contributions, these are: secondary sulfates, road traffic, smoke, road dust, sea spray, ship emissions and soil dust.

  19. Amino acid analysis by means of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry or MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gogichaeva, Natalia V; Alterman, Michail A

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe two different amino acid analysis protocols based on the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). First protocol describes a MALDI TOF MS-based method for a routine simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of free amino acids and protein hydrolysates (Alterman et al. Anal Biochem 335: 184-191, 2004). Linear responses between the amino acid concentration and the peak intensity ratio of corresponding amino acid to internal standard were observed for all amino acids analyzed in the range of concentrations from 20 to 300 μM. Limit of quantitation varied from 0.03 μM for arginine to 3.7 μM for histidine and homocysteine. This method has one inherent limitation: the analysis of isomeric and isobaric amino acids. To solve this problem, a second protocol based on the use of MALDI TOF/TOF MS/MS for qualitative analysis of amino and organic acids was developed. This technique is capable of distinguishing isobaric and isomeric compounds (Gogichayeva et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 18: 279-284, 2007). Both methods do not require amino acid derivatization or chromatographic separation, and the data acquisition time is decreased to several seconds for a single sample. PMID:22125142

  20. A Geostatistical Data Fusion Technique for Merging Remote Sensing and Ground-Based Observations of Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Michalak, Anna M.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Paradise, Susan R.; Braverman, Amy J.; Miller, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Particles in the atmosphere reflect incoming sunlight, tending to cool the Earth below. Some particles, such as soot, also absorb sunlight, which tens to warm the ambient atmosphere. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a measure of the amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere, and is a key input to computer models that simulate and predict Earth's changing climate. The global AOD products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), both of which fly on the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, provide complementary views of the particles in the atmosphere. Whereas MODIS offers global coverage about four times as frequent as MISR, the multi-angle data makes it possible to separate the surface and atmospheric contributions to the observed top-of-atmosphere radiances, and also to more effectively discriminate particle type. Surface-based AERONET sun photometers retrieve AOD with smaller uncertainties than the satellite instruments, but only at a few fixed locations. So there are clear reasons to combine these data sets in a way that takes advantage of their respective strengths. This paper represents an effort at combining MISR, MODIS and AERONET AOD products over the continental US, using a common spatial statistical technique called kriging. The technique uses the correlation between the satellite data and the "ground-truth" sun photometer observations to assign uncertainty to the satellite data on a region-by-region basis. The larger fraction of the sun photometer variance that is duplicated by the satellite data, the higher the confidence assigned to the satellite data in that region. In the Western and Central US, MISR AOD correlation with AERONET are significantly higher than those with MODIS, likely due to bright surfaces in these regions, which pose greater challenges for the single-view MODIS retrievals. In the east, MODIS correlations are higher, due to more frequent sampling

  1. e-MALDI: An Electrowetting-Enhanced Drop Drying Method for MALDI Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kudina, Olena; Eral, Burak; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    The performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is frequently compromised by the heterogeneous distribution of matrix and analyte deposits on the target plate arising during the conventional drop-drying sample preparation procedure. It was recently shown that this so-called coffee stain effect can be suppressed by exciting evaporating complex fluids throughout the drying process using AC-electrowetting. Here, we demonstrate that electrowetting-assisted drying of solutions of common MALDI matrix materials and a variety of common low molecular weight pharmaceutical molecules indeed leads to substantially smaller and more homogeneous sample spots on special electrowetting-functionalized e-MALDI target plates. The improved spot quality enables 2-30× enhanced MALDI-MS signals along with substantial reductions of the typical lateral variations of the MALDI-MS. The latter largely eliminates the time-consuming need to search for "sweet spots". PMID:27026060

  2. [New Progress of MALDI-TOF-IMS in the Study of Proteomics].

    PubMed

    Ren, Guan-heng; Weng, Rong-hua; Shi, Yan; Huang, Ping; Li, Zheng-dong; Shao, Yu; Deng, Kai-fei; Liu, Ning-guo; Chen, Yi-jiu

    2016-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-IMS) has been a classical technique for studying proteomics in present and a tool for analyzing the distribution of proteins and small molecules within biological tissue sections. MALDI-TOF-IMS can analyze multiple unknown compounds in biological tissue sections simultaneously through a single measurement which can obtain molecule imaging of the tissue while maintaining the integrity of cellular and molecules in tissue. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry technique develops relatively quickly in all biomedical domain. This paper based on the relevant data and reviews the present developing level of MALDI-TOF-IMS, the principle of imaging mass spectrometry, methology and the prospect in forensic pathology. PMID:27501686

  3. MALDI MS sample preparation by using paraffin wax film: systematic study and application for peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Chen, Ruibing; Ma, Mingming; Li, Lingjun

    2008-01-15

    Recently developed sample preparation techniques employing hydrophobic sample support have improved the detection sensitivity and mass spectral quality of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). These methods concentrate the samples on target by minimizing the sample area via the solvent repellent effect of the target surface. In the current study, we employed the use of paraffin wax film (Parafilm M) for improved MALDI MS analysis of low-abundance peptide mixtures, including neuronal tissue releasate and protein tryptic digests. This thin film was found to strongly repel polar solvents including water, methanol, and acetonitrile, which enabled the application of a wide range of sample preparation protocols that involved the use of various organic solvents. A "nanoliter-volume deposition" technique employing a capillary column has been used to produce tiny ( approximately 400 microm) matrix spots of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid on the film. By systematically optimizing the sample volume, solvent composition, and film treatment, the Parafilm M substrate in combination with the nanoliter-volume matrix deposition method allowed dilute sample to be concentrated on the film for MALDI MS analysis. Peptide mixtures with nanomolar concentrations have been detected by MALDI time-of-flight and MALDI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers. Overall, the use of Parafilm M enabled improved sensitivity and spectral quality for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures.

  4. An advanced LC-MS (Q-TOF) technique for the detection of amino acids in atmospheric aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodology for detection of native (underivitized) amino acids in atmospheric aerosols has been developed. This article describes the use of LC-MS (Q-TOF) and microwave-assisted gas phase hydrolysis for detection of free and combined amino acids in aerosols collected in a Southe...

  5. [Studies of bacterial typing with MALDI-TOF].

    PubMed

    Culebras, Esther; Alvarez-Buylla, Adela; Jose Artacho Reinoso, M; Antonio Lepe, Jose

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry has emerged as a potential tool for microbial characterization and identification in many microbiology departments. The technology is rapid, sensitive, and relatively inexpensive in terms of both the labour and costs involved. This review provides an overview on its utility for strain typing and epidemiological studies and explains the methodological approaches that can be used both for the performance of the technique and for the analysis of results. Finally, the review summarizes studies on the characterization of distinct bacterial species.

  6. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  7. An offline constrained data assimilation technique for aerosols: Improving GCM simulations over South Asia using observations from two satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraskar, Ankit; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra; Cherian, Ribu

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol properties simulated by general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit large uncertainties due to biases in model processes and inaccuracies in aerosol emission inputs. In this work, we propose an offline, constrained optimization based procedure to improve these simulations by assimilating them with observational data. The proposed approach explicitly incorporates the non-negativity constraint on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a key metric to quantify aerosol distributions. The resulting optimization problem is quadratic programming in nature and can be easily solved by available optimization routines. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by performing offline assimilation of GCM simulated aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over South Asia (40-120 E, 5-40 N), with satellite AOD measurements from two sensors, namely Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Uncertainty in observational data used in the assimilation is computed by developing different error bands around regional AOD observations, based on their quality assurance flags. The assimilation, evaluated on monthly and daily scales, compares well with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as determined by goodness of fit statistics. Assimilation increased both model predicted atmospheric absorption and clear sky radiative forcing by factors consistent with recent estimates in literature. Thus, the constrained assimilation algorithm helps in systematically reducing uncertainties in aerosol simulations.

  8. Application of MALDI-TOF MS for requalification of a Candida clinical isolates culture collection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Neves, Rejane P.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial culture collections underpin biotechnology applications and are important resources for clinical microbiology by supplying reference strains and/or performing microbial identifications as a service. Proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS have been used for Candida spp. identification in clinical laboratories and demonstrated to be a fast and reliable technique for the routine identification of pathogenic yeasts. The main aim of this study was to apply MALDI-TOF MS combined with classical phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify Candida clinical isolates preserved from 1 up to 52 years in a Brazilian culture collection and assess its value for the identification of yeasts preserved in this type of collections. Forty Candida spp. clinical isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical analyses. Identifications were also performed by the new proteomic approach based on MALDI-TOF MS. Results demonstrated 15% discordance when compared with morphological and biochemical analyses. Discordant isolates were analysed by ITS sequencing, which confirmed the MALDI-TOF MS identifications and these strains were renamed in the culture collection catalogue. In conclusion, proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS represents a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinical Candida species preserved in culture collections and may present clear benefits when compared with the performance of existing daily routine methods applied at health centres and hospitals. PMID:25242936

  9. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  10. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and total column ozone from Ultraviolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements based on an optimal estimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) retrieval technique was used to retreive aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and an asymmetry factor ( g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths, along with total column ozone (TOC), from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March through November in 2009. The OE technique specifies appropriate error covariance matrices and optimizes a forward model (Tropospheric ultraviolet radiative transfer model, TUV), and thus provides a supplemental method for use across the network of the Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) for the retrieval of aerosol properties and TOC with reasonable accuracy in the UV spectral range under various atmospheric conditions. In order to assess the accuracy of the OE technique, we compared the AOD retreivals from this method with those from Beer's Law and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product. We also examine the OE retrieved TOC in comparison with the TOC from the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the estimated AOD from the OE method agree well with those derived from Beer's law and the collocated AERONETAOD product, showing high values of correlation coefficients, generally 0.98 and 0.99, and large slopes, ranging from 0.95 to 1.0, as well as small offsets, less than 0.02 especially at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC retrievals also indicates the promising accuracy of the OE method in that the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). Validation of the OE retrievals on these selected dates suggested that the OE technique has its merits and can serve as a supplemental tool in further analyzing UVMRP data.

  11. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging for the simultaneous location of resveratrol, pterostilbene and viniferins on grapevine leaves.

    PubMed

    Becker, Loïc; Carré, Vincent; Poutaraud, Anne; Merdinoglu, Didier; Chaimbault, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the in-situ response to a stress, grapevine leaves have been subjected to mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) experiments. The Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) approach using different matrices has been evaluated. Among all the tested matrices, the 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was found to be the most efficient matrix allowing a broader range of detected stilbene phytoalexins. Resveratrol, but also more toxic compounds against fungi such as pterostilbene and viniferins, were identified and mapped. Their spatial distributions on grapevine leaves irradiated by UV show their specific colocation around the veins. Moreover, MALDI MSI reveals that resveratrol (and piceids) and viniferins are not specifically located on the same area when leaves are infected by Plasmopara viticola. Results obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging demonstrate that this technique would be essential to improve the level of knowledge concerning the role of the stilbene phytoalexins involved in a stress event.

  12. Application of MALDI-TOF MS for the Identification of Food Borne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Melanie; Huber, Ingrid; Konrad, Regina; Busch, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the routine identification of clinical isolates. MALDI-TOF MS based identification of bacteria has been shown to be more rapid, accurate and cost-efficient than conventional phenotypic techniques or molecular methods. Rapid and reliable identification of food-associated bacteria is also of crucial importance for food processing and product quality. This review is concerned with the applicability of MALDI-TOF MS for routine identification of foodborne bacteria taking the specific requirements of food microbiological laboratories and the food industry into account. The current state of knowledge including recent findings and new approaches are discussed. PMID:24358065

  13. [Evaluation of mass spectrometry: MALDI-TOF MS for fast and reliable yeast identification].

    PubMed

    Relloso, María S; Nievas, Jimena; Fares Taie, Santiago; Farquharson, Victoria; Mujica, María T; Romano, Vanesa; Zarate, Mariela S; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique known as MALDI-TOF MS is a tool used for the identification of clinical pathogens by generating a protein spectrum that is unique for a given species. In this study we assessed the identification of clinical yeast isolates by MALDI-TOF MS in a university hospital from Argentina and compared two procedures for protein extraction: a rapid method and a procedure based on the manufacturer's recommendations. A short protein extraction procedure was applied in 100 isolates and the rate of correct identification at genus and species level was 98.0%. In addition, we analyzed 201 isolates, previously identified by conventional methods, using the methodology recommended by the manufacturer and there was 95.38% coincidence in the identification at species level. MALDI TOF MS showed to be a fast, simple and reliable tool for yeast identification.

  14. MALDI-TOF MS in clinical parasitology: applications, constraints and prospects.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Neelja; Kumar, Manish; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being used for rapid and reproducible identification of bacteria, viruses and fungi in clinical microbiological laboratories. However, some studies have also reported the use of MALDI-TOF MS for identification of parasites, like Leishmania, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Entamoeba, ticks and fleas. The present review collates all the information available on the use of this technique for parasites, in an effort to assess its applicability and the constraints for identification/diagnosis of parasites and diseases caused by them. Though MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of parasites is currently done by reference laboratories only, in future, this promising technology might surely replace/augment molecular methods in clinical parasitology laboratories. PMID:27387025

  15. MALDI-TOF MS in clinical parasitology: applications, constraints and prospects.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Neelja; Kumar, Manish; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being used for rapid and reproducible identification of bacteria, viruses and fungi in clinical microbiological laboratories. However, some studies have also reported the use of MALDI-TOF MS for identification of parasites, like Leishmania, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Entamoeba, ticks and fleas. The present review collates all the information available on the use of this technique for parasites, in an effort to assess its applicability and the constraints for identification/diagnosis of parasites and diseases caused by them. Though MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of parasites is currently done by reference laboratories only, in future, this promising technology might surely replace/augment molecular methods in clinical parasitology laboratories.

  16. Considerations for quantification of lipids in nerve tissue using MALDI mass spectrometric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Yost, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    MALDI mass spectrometric imaging is a technique that provides the ability to identify and characterize endogenous and exogenous compounds spatially within tissue with relatively little sample preparation. While it is a proven methodology for qualitative analysis, little has been reported for its utility in quantitative measurements. In the current work, inherent challenges in MALDI quantification are addressed. Signal response is monitored over successive analyses of a single tissue section to minimize error due to variability in the laser, matrix application, and sample inhomogeneity. Methods for the application of an internal standard to tissue sections are evaluated and used to quantify endogenous lipids in nerve tissue. A precision of 5% or less standard error was achieved, illustrating that MALDI imaging offers a reliable means of in situ quantification for microgram-sized samples and requires minimal sample preparation. PMID:21953974

  17. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  18. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  19. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  20. MALDI Imaging of Lipids after Matrix Sublimation/Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert C.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Barkley, Robert M.; Zemski Berry, Karin A.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques have been developed to record mass spectra of biomolecules including lipids as they naturally exist within tissues and thereby permit the generation of images displaying the distribution of specific lipids in tissues, organs, and intact animals. These techniques are based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) that requires matrix application onto the tissue surface prior to analysis. One technique of application that has recently shown significant advantages for lipid analysis is sublimation of matrix followed by vapor deposition directly onto the tissue. Explanations for enhanced sensitivity realized by sublimation/deposition related to sample temperature after a laser pulse and matrix crystal size are presented. Specific examples of sublimation/deposition in lipid imaging of various organs including brain, ocular tissue, and kidney are presented. PMID:21571091

  1. MALDI-TOF and MALDI-FTICR imaging mass spectrometry of methamphetamine incorporated into hair.

    PubMed

    Miki, Akihiro; Katagi, Munehiro; Kamata, Tooru; Zaitsu, Kei; Tatsuno, Michiaki; Nakanishi, Toyofumi; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Takubo, Takayuki; Suzuki, Koichi

    2011-04-01

    A new approach is described for imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of methamphetamine (MA) incorporated into human hair using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF) and MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR). A longitudinal section of a lengthwise manually-cut single human hair shaft from a chronic MA user was directly analyzed by MALDI-TOF-IMS after deposited with α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix. A barcode-like image, which was most probably generated with repeated intakes of MA, was for the first time obtained by monitoring MA-specific product ion in the selected reaction monitoring mode. Laser beam scan lengthwise-cut hair shafts gave only poor mass spectra of MA, probably due to the loss of MA and/or the thermal denaturation of hair. The identity of MA detected in hair was further confirmed by MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry. A combination with ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry by FTICR provided indisputable identification of MA. The MALDI-FTICR-IMS of another hair shaft from the same MA user also provided a barcode-like image by monitoring the protonated molecule of MA with ultra-high resolution. The two barcode-like images exhibited a close resemblance. Thus, MALDI-IMS can offer a new perspective: 'imaging hair analyses for drugs'.

  2. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  3. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  4. [Rapid Identification of Infectious Microorganisms in Clinical Samples by MALDI-TOF MS Analysis].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-laser desorption ionization time-of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a powerful tool for the detection of target molecules in body fluids. Recently, the MALDI-TOF MS technique was applied for the rapid detection of protein profiles in cultured strains, and has rapid, simple, and universal advantages over the conventional technique. MALDI mass patterns were compared with the unique ribosomal 16S protein profiles of standard microorganism strains in a commercial database. Although this present MS technique has already been adopted as a routine method for the identification of general bacteria in the clinical laboratory field, there are still many problems to overcome regarding current challenges, necessitating the identification of more valuable species of microorganism. As the first step, we have begun the standardization of sample preparation to identify species causing infectious diseases by MALDI-TOF MS. In this special issue, we summarize the challenges in the modified preparation of clinical samples, such as blood, urine, and sputum, in our laboratory to rapidly diagnose severe infectious disease, and describe the current trends in clinical microbiology.

  5. [Rapid Identification of Infectious Microorganisms in Clinical Samples by MALDI-TOF MS Analysis].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-laser desorption ionization time-of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a powerful tool for the detection of target molecules in body fluids. Recently, the MALDI-TOF MS technique was applied for the rapid detection of protein profiles in cultured strains, and has rapid, simple, and universal advantages over the conventional technique. MALDI mass patterns were compared with the unique ribosomal 16S protein profiles of standard microorganism strains in a commercial database. Although this present MS technique has already been adopted as a routine method for the identification of general bacteria in the clinical laboratory field, there are still many problems to overcome regarding current challenges, necessitating the identification of more valuable species of microorganism. As the first step, we have begun the standardization of sample preparation to identify species causing infectious diseases by MALDI-TOF MS. In this special issue, we summarize the challenges in the modified preparation of clinical samples, such as blood, urine, and sputum, in our laboratory to rapidly diagnose severe infectious disease, and describe the current trends in clinical microbiology. PMID:26536780

  6. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  7. Effect of hygroscopic growth on the aerosol light-scattering coefficient: A review of measurements, techniques and error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Zieger, P.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is important for an accurate description of direct aerosol radiative forcing. This factor is defined as the ratio between the scattering coefficient at enhanced relative humidity, RH, to a reference (dry) scattering coefficient. Here, we review the different experimental designs used to measure the scattering coefficient at dry and humidified conditions as well as the procedures followed to analyze the measurements. Several empirical parameterizations for the relationship between f(RH) and RH have been proposed in the literature. These parameterizations have been reviewed and tested using experimental data representative of different hygroscopic growth behavior and a new parameterization is presented. The potential sources of error in f(RH) are discussed. A Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the overall measurement uncertainty, which is found to be around 20-40% for moderately hygroscopic aerosols. The main factors contributing to this uncertainty are the uncertainty in RH measurement, the dry reference state and the nephelometer uncertainty. A literature survey of nephelometry-based f(RH) measurements is presented as a function of aerosol type. In general, the highest f(RH) values were measured in clean marine environments, with pollution having a major influence on f(RH). Dust aerosol tended to have the lowest reported hygroscopicity of any of the aerosol types studied. Major open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are outlined.

  8. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles

  9. DNA sequence analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, F; Nordhoff, E; Larsen, L K; Kristiansen, K; Roepstorff, P; Hillenkamp, F

    1998-01-01

    Conventional DNA sequencing is based on gel electrophoretic separation of the sequencing products. Gel casting and electrophoresis are the time limiting steps, and the gel separation is occasionally imperfect due to aberrant mobility of certain fragments, leading to erroneous sequence determination. Furthermore, illegitimately terminated products frequently cannot be distinguished from correctly terminated ones, a phenomenon that also obscures data interpretation. In the present work the use of MALDI mass spectrometry for sequencing of DNA amplified from clinical samples is implemented. The unambiguous and fast identification of deletions and substitutions in DNA amplified from heterozygous carriers realistically suggest MALDI mass spectrometry as a future alternative to conventional sequencing procedures for high throughput screening for mutations. Unique features of the method are demonstrated by sequencing a DNA fragment that could not be sequenced conventionally because of gel electrophoretic band compression and the presence of multiple non-specific termination products. Taking advantage of the accurate mass information provided by MALDI mass spectrometry, the sequence was deduced, and the nature of the non-specific termination could be determined. The method described here increases the fidelity in DNA sequencing, is fast, compatible with standard DNA sequencing procedures, and amenable to automation. PMID:9592136

  10. An aerosol data assimilation technique using GCM predictions and satellite observations of seasonal AOD over south Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Bhushan, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Cherian, R.; Quaas, J.; Carmichael, G.; Kulkarni, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol properties and climate effects simulated in climate chemistry models often exhibit large uncertainties, owing to bias in model processes like chemistry or transport, simplified representation of sub-grid processes and uncertainties in aerosol emission estimates. An approach to reduce this uncertainty involves assimilation of observational datasets, typically from satellite detection, with model predictions. Estimation of uncertainty in observations then becomes a central concern in data assimilation procedures. In this work, predictions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) obtained from simulation of a general circulation model ECHAM 5.5 extended by an aerosol module HAM (Hamburg Aerosol Module) were assimilated using daily mean AOD from satellite observations available from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), over south Asia. Towards this end, an algorithm was developed for interpolation of the observations (available at higher resolutions) to a larger model grid, using data quality weights and propagation of uncertainties. An optimal interpolation algorithm was then implemented to assimilate the observed values with the model predicted values of AOD over the domain of interest. The free parameters in the assimilation algorithm pertaining to observational uncertainty were tuned using values obtained from the error analysis of satellite (MODIS) data with ground station (AERONET) measurements at Kanpur during 2001-2010. The assimilation was performed on a monthly scale for a complete year of 2006. The ability of the assimilation algorithm to correct model AOD was evaluated using sunphotometer AOD measurements at different sites in the domain. Assimilation corrected the underpredicted model AODs significantly to bring them close to AERONET measurements. Root mean square error (RMSE) for assimilated AODs was 0.107 compared to 0.337 for model AODs indicating reduction in uncertainty. For further validation, daily assimilation was performed and the

  11. Comparison of vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and atmospheric pressure MALDI (AP-MALDI) tandem mass spectrometry of 2-dimensional separated and trypsin-digested glomerular proteins for database search derived identification.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Corina; Krieger, Sigurd; Raptakis, Emmanuel; Allmaier, Günter

    2006-08-01

    Mass spectrometric based sequencing of enzymatic generated peptides is widely used to obtain specific sequence tags allowing the unambiguous identification of proteins. In the present study, two types of desorption/ionization techniques combined with different modes of ion dissociation, namely vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (vMALDI) high energy collision induced dissociation (CID) and post-source decay (PSD) as well as atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI low energy CID, were applied for the fragmentation of singly protonated peptide ions, which were derived from two-dimensional separated, silver-stained and trypsin-digested hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic glomerular proteins. Thereby, defined properties of the individual fragmentation pattern generated by the specified modes could be observed. Furthermore, the compatibility of the varying PSD and CID (MS/MS) data with database search derived identification using two public accessible search algorithms has been evaluated. The peptide sequence tag information obtained by PSD and high energy CID enabled in the majority of cases an unambiguous identification. In contrast, part of the data obtained by low energy CID were not assignable using similar search parameters and therefore no clear results were obtainable. The knowledge of the properties of available MALDI-based fragmentation techniques presents an important factor for data interpretation using public accessible search algorithms and moreover for the identification of two-dimensional gel separated proteins.

  12. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Based Microbial Identifications: Challenges and Scopes for Microbial Ecologists

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, Praveen; Prakash, Om; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) based biotyping is an emerging technique for high-throughput and rapid microbial identification. Due to its relatively higher accuracy, comprehensive database of clinically important microorganisms and low-cost compared to other microbial identification methods, MALDI-TOF MS has started replacing existing practices prevalent in clinical diagnosis. However, applicability of MALDI-TOF MS in the area of microbial ecology research is still limited mainly due to the lack of data on non-clinical microorganisms. Intense research activities on cultivation of microbial diversity by conventional as well as by innovative and high-throughput methods has substantially increased the number of microbial species known today. This important area of research is in urgent need of rapid and reliable method(s) for characterization and de-replication of microorganisms from various ecosystems. MALDI-TOF MS based characterization, in our opinion, appears to be the most suitable technique for such studies. Reliability of MALDI-TOF MS based identification method depends mainly on accuracy and width of reference databases, which need continuous expansion and improvement. In this review, we propose a common strategy to generate MALDI-TOF MS spectral database and advocated its sharing, and also discuss the role of MALDI-TOF MS based high-throughput microbial identification in microbial ecology studies.

  13. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Based Microbial Identifications: Challenges and Scopes for Microbial Ecologists.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Praveen; Prakash, Om; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) based biotyping is an emerging technique for high-throughput and rapid microbial identification. Due to its relatively higher accuracy, comprehensive database of clinically important microorganisms and low-cost compared to other microbial identification methods, MALDI-TOF MS has started replacing existing practices prevalent in clinical diagnosis. However, applicability of MALDI-TOF MS in the area of microbial ecology research is still limited mainly due to the lack of data on non-clinical microorganisms. Intense research activities on cultivation of microbial diversity by conventional as well as by innovative and high-throughput methods has substantially increased the number of microbial species known today. This important area of research is in urgent need of rapid and reliable method(s) for characterization and de-replication of microorganisms from various ecosystems. MALDI-TOF MS based characterization, in our opinion, appears to be the most suitable technique for such studies. Reliability of MALDI-TOF MS based identification method depends mainly on accuracy and width of reference databases, which need continuous expansion and improvement. In this review, we propose a common strategy to generate MALDI-TOF MS spectral database and advocated its sharing, and also discuss the role of MALDI-TOF MS based high-throughput microbial identification in microbial ecology studies. PMID:27625644

  14. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Based Microbial Identifications: Challenges and Scopes for Microbial Ecologists

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, Praveen; Prakash, Om; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) based biotyping is an emerging technique for high-throughput and rapid microbial identification. Due to its relatively higher accuracy, comprehensive database of clinically important microorganisms and low-cost compared to other microbial identification methods, MALDI-TOF MS has started replacing existing practices prevalent in clinical diagnosis. However, applicability of MALDI-TOF MS in the area of microbial ecology research is still limited mainly due to the lack of data on non-clinical microorganisms. Intense research activities on cultivation of microbial diversity by conventional as well as by innovative and high-throughput methods has substantially increased the number of microbial species known today. This important area of research is in urgent need of rapid and reliable method(s) for characterization and de-replication of microorganisms from various ecosystems. MALDI-TOF MS based characterization, in our opinion, appears to be the most suitable technique for such studies. Reliability of MALDI-TOF MS based identification method depends mainly on accuracy and width of reference databases, which need continuous expansion and improvement. In this review, we propose a common strategy to generate MALDI-TOF MS spectral database and advocated its sharing, and also discuss the role of MALDI-TOF MS based high-throughput microbial identification in microbial ecology studies. PMID:27625644

  15. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Combined maximum covariance analysis to bridge the gap between multi-sensor satellite retrievals and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques has greatly advanced our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols. Various satellite sensors and the associated retrieval algorithms all add to the information of global aerosol variability, while well-designed surface networks provide time series of highly accurate measurements at specific locations. In studying the variability of aerosol properties, aerosol climate effects, and constraining aerosol fields in climate models, it is essential to make the best use of all of the available information. In the previous three parts of this series, we demonstrated the usefulness of several spectral decomposition techniques in the analysis and comparison of temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth using satellite and ground-based measurements. Specifically, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) successfully captures and isolates seasonal and interannual variability from different aerosol source regions, Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) provides a means to verify the variability in one satellite dataset against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, and Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) realized parallel comparison among multi-satellite, multi-sensor datasets. As the final part of the study, this paper introduces a novel technique that integrates both multi-sensor datasets and ground observations, and thus effectively bridges the gap between these two types of measurements. The Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) decomposes the cross covariance matrix between the combined multi-sensor satellite data field and AERONET station data. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol source regions and events represented by different satellite datasets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of

  16. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based SNP genotyping.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Wolfgang; Wurmbach, Jan-Henner; Thiele, Herbert; Kostrzewa, Markus

    2002-07-01

    In recent years a growing demand for simple and robust SNP genotyping platforms has arisen from the widespread use of SNPs in industrial and public research. The resulting knowledge about genotype/phenotype correlations is of special interest for the identification of potential new drug targets and in the field of pharmacogenomics. However, full exploitation of the available genomic information requires vast numbers of SNP analyses, as large cohorts of patients have to be screened for a large number of markers. Only very few of the current SNP genotyping techniques can cope with the resulting demands concerning sample throughput, automation, accuracy and cost-effectiveness. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry has the potential to develop into a 'Gold Standard' for high-throughput SNP genotyping - if it has not already done so. This review will focus on the latest developments of this technology.

  17. MALDI-TOF to compare polysaccharide profiles from commercial health supplements of different mushroom species.

    PubMed

    López-García, Marta; García, María Sonia Dopico; Vilariño, José Manuel López; Rodríguez, María Victoria González

    2016-05-15

    In this work MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy was investigated to characterise the β-glucan profiles of several commercial health supplements, without any derivatisation or purification pre-treatment. The effect of two solvents (water and dimethyl sulfoxide) and two MALDI matrices (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone) was first evaluated on dextran standards. MALDI-TOF was found as a useful and quick technique to obtain structural information of diverse food supplements based on mushroom extracts. The MALDI polysaccharide profiles of 5 supplements from different mushroom species were qualitatively similar showing [Glucan+Na](+) cations with a peak-to-peak mass difference of 16 Da consistent with the repeating unit of the β-(1→3)-glucan. The profiles strongly depended on the sample solvent used, with m/z values around 5000-8000 for water and 2000 for dimethyl sulfoxide; differences between samples were revealed in the molecular weight of the aqueous preparation, with the highest values for Maitake and Cordyceps species. PMID:26776013

  18. MALDI-TOF to compare polysaccharide profiles from commercial health supplements of different mushroom species.

    PubMed

    López-García, Marta; García, María Sonia Dopico; Vilariño, José Manuel López; Rodríguez, María Victoria González

    2016-05-15

    In this work MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy was investigated to characterise the β-glucan profiles of several commercial health supplements, without any derivatisation or purification pre-treatment. The effect of two solvents (water and dimethyl sulfoxide) and two MALDI matrices (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone) was first evaluated on dextran standards. MALDI-TOF was found as a useful and quick technique to obtain structural information of diverse food supplements based on mushroom extracts. The MALDI polysaccharide profiles of 5 supplements from different mushroom species were qualitatively similar showing [Glucan+Na](+) cations with a peak-to-peak mass difference of 16 Da consistent with the repeating unit of the β-(1→3)-glucan. The profiles strongly depended on the sample solvent used, with m/z values around 5000-8000 for water and 2000 for dimethyl sulfoxide; differences between samples were revealed in the molecular weight of the aqueous preparation, with the highest values for Maitake and Cordyceps species.

  19. How Well Do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, Richard; Flynn, Connor M.; Elleman, Robert; Covert, David; Strawa, A.; Welton, E J.; Turner, David D.; Jonsson, Haf; Redemann, Jens; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M. B.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Barnard, James C.

    2006-02-01

    The recent U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instruments: airborne Sun photometer, airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measurements to be biased low (2 - 4 Mm 1 equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared) when compared to airborne sunphotometer extinction. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar ?ep(?) are biased high. Bias differences are 0.004 Km-1 (13%) and 0.007 Km-1 (24%) for the two elastic back-scatter lidars (MPLARM and MPLNET, ? = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km-1 (54%) for the Raman lidar (? = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of extinction tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne sunphotometer extinction. On the other hand, extinction derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. We conclude that the error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state-of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths

  20. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M.; Michalsky, J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Barnard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated

  1. Quantitative MALDI tandem mass spectrometric imaging of cocaine from brain tissue with a deuterated internal standard.

    PubMed

    Pirman, David A; Reich, Richard F; Kiss, András; Heeren, Ron M A; Yost, Richard A

    2013-01-15

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is an analytical technique used to determine the distribution of individual analytes within a given sample. A wide array of analytes and samples can be investigated by MSI, including drug distribution in rats, lipid analysis from brain tissue, protein differentiation in tumors, and plant metabolite distributions. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is a soft ionization technique capable of desorbing and ionizing a large range of compounds, and it is the most common ionization source used in MSI. MALDI mass spectrometry (MS) is generally considered to be a qualitative analytical technique because of significant ion-signal variability. Consequently, MSI is also thought to be a qualitative technique because of the quantitative limitations of MALDI coupled with the homogeneity of tissue sections inherent in an MSI experiment. Thus, conclusions based on MS images are often limited by the inability to correlate ion signal increases with actual concentration increases. Here, we report a quantitative MSI method for the analysis of cocaine (COC) from brain tissue using a deuterated internal standard (COC-d(3)) combined with wide-isolation MS/MS for analysis of the tissue extracts with scan-by-scan COC-to-COC-d(3) normalization. This resulted in significant improvements in signal reproducibility and calibration curve linearity. Quantitative results from the MSI experiments were compared with quantitative results from liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS results from brain tissue extracts. Two different quantitative MSI techniques (standard addition and external calibration) produced quantitative results comparable to LC-MS/MS data. Tissue extracts were also analyzed by MALDI wide-isolation MS/MS, and quantitative results were nearly identical to those from LC-MS/MS. These results clearly demonstrate the necessity for an internal standard for quantitative MSI experiments. PMID:23214490

  2. Rapid identification and source-tracking of Listeria monocytogenes using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Snehal; Gulati, Vandana; Fox, Edward M; Karpe, Avinash; Beale, David J; Sevior, Danielle; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the sometimes fatal disease listeriosis. Public health concerns and stringent regulations associated with the presence of this pathogen in food and food processing environments underline the need for rapid and reliable detection and subtyping techniques. In the current study, the application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a single identification and source-tracking tool for a collection of L. monocytogenes isolates, obtained predominantly from dairy sources within Australia, was explored. The isolates were cultured on different growth media and analysed using MALDI-TOF MS at two incubation times (24 and 48 h). Whilst reliable genus-level identification was achieved from most media, identification at the species level was found to be dependent on culture conditions. Successful speciation was highest for isolates cultured on the chromogenic Agar Listeria Ottaviani Agosti agar (ALOA, 91% of isolates) and non-selective horse blood agar (HBA, 89%) for 24h. Chemometric statistical analysis of the MALDI-TOF MS data enabled source-tracking of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from four different dairy sources. Strain-level discrimination was also observed to be influenced by culture conditions. In addition, t-test/analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify potential biomarker peaks that differentiated the isolates according to their source of isolation. Source-tracking using MALDI-TOF MS was compared and correlated with the gold standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. The discriminatory index and the congruence between both techniques were compared using the Simpsons Diversity Index and adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS based source-tracking (using data obtained by culturing the isolates on HBA) and PFGE demonstrated good congruence with a Wallace coefficient of 0.71 and

  3. Characterization of natural wax esters by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Cvacka, Josef

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to the analysis of wax esters (WEs) was investigated. A series of metal salts of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was synthesized and tested as possible matrices. Alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) and transition metal (Cu, Ag) salts were studied. The matrix properties were evaluated, including solubility in organic solvents, threshold laser power that should be applied for successful desorption/ionization of WEs, the nature of the matrix ions and the mass range occupied by them, and the complexity of the isotope clusters for individual metals. Lithium salt of dihydroxybenzoic acid (LiDHB) performed the best and matrices with purified lithium isotopes ((6)LiDHB or (7)LiDHB) were recommended for WEs. Three sample preparation procedures were compared: (1) mixing the sample and matrix in a glass vial and deposition of the mixture on a MALDI plate (Mix), (2) deposition of sample followed by deposition of matrix (Sa/Ma), and (3) deposition of matrix followed by deposition of sample (Ma/Sa). Morphology of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The best sample preparation technique was Ma/Sa with the optimum sample to matrix molar ratio 1 : 100. Detection limit was in the low picomolar range. The relative response of WEs decreased with their molecular weight, and minor differences between signals of saturated and monounsaturated WEs were observed. MALDI spectra of WEs showed molecular adducts with lithium [M + Li](+). Fragments observed in postsource decay (PSD) spectra were related to the acidic part of WEs [RCOOH + Li](+) and they were used for structure assignment. MALDI with LiDHB was used for several samples of natural origin, including insect and plant WEs. A good agreement with GC/MS data was achieved. Moreover, MALDI allowed higher WEs to be analyzed, up to 64 carbon atoms in Ginkgo biloba leaves extract. PMID:18821728

  4. New developments in profiling and imaging of proteins from tissue sections by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chaurand, Pierre; Norris, Jeremy L; Cornett, D Shannon; Mobley, James A; Caprioli, Richard M

    2006-11-01

    Molecular imaging of tissue by MALDI mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for visualizing the spatial distribution of constituent analytes with high molecular specificity. Although the technique is relatively young, it has already contributed to the understanding of many diverse areas of human health. In recent years, a great many advances in the practice of imaging mass spectrometry have taken place, making the technique more sensitive, robust, and ultimately useful. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the more recent technological advances that have improved the efficiency of imaging mass spectrometry for clinical applications. Advances in the way MALDI mass spectrometry is integrated with histology, improved methods for automation, and better tools for data analysis are outlined in this review. Refined top-down strategies for the identification and validation of candidate biomarkers found in tissue sections are discussed. A clinical example highlighting the application of these methods to a cohort of clinical samples is described.

  5. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry applied to identifying species of insect-pathogenic fungi from the Metarhizium anisopliae complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be a powerful tool for taxonomic resolution of microorganisms. In this proof-of-concept study, we assessed the effectiveness of this technique to track the current gene sequence-based phylogenet...

  6. Identification and differentiation of food-related bacteria: A comparison of FTIR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Mareike; Breitenwieser, Franziska; Konrad, Regina; Huber, Ingrid; Busch, Ulrich; Scherer, Siegfried

    2014-08-01

    The food industry requires easy, accurate, and cost-effective techniques for microbial identification to ensure safe products and identify microbial contaminations. In this work, FTIR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were assessed for their suitability and applicability for routine microbial diagnostics of food-related microorganisms by analyzing their robustness according to changes in incubation time and medium, identification accuracy and their ability to differentiate isolates down to the strain level. Changes in the protocol lead to a significantly impaired performance of FTIR spectroscopy, whereas they had only little effects on MALDI-TOF MS. Identification accuracy was tested using 174 food-related bacteria (93 species) from an in-house strain collection and 40 fresh isolates from routine food analyses. For MALDI-TOF MS, weaknesses in the identification of bacilli and pseudomonads were observed; FTIR spectroscopy had most difficulties in identifying pseudomonads and enterobacteria. In general, MALDI-TOF MS obtained better results (52-85% correct at species level), since the analysis of mainly ribosomal proteins is more robust and seems to be more reliable. FTIR spectroscopy suffers from the fact that it generates a whole-cell fingerprint and intraspecies diversity may lead to overlapping species borders which complicates identification. In the present study values between 56% and 67% correct species identification were obtained. On the opposite, this high sensitivity offers the opportunity of typing below the species level which was not possible using MALDI-TOF MS. Using fresh isolates from routine diagnostics, both techniques performed well with 88% (MALDI-TOF) and 75% (FTIR) correct identifications at species level, respectively. PMID:24878140

  7. Enhancing plasma peptide MALDI-TOF-MS profiling by mesoporous silica assisted crystallization.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Rosa; Casadonte, Francesca; Pasqua, Luigi; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Urbani, Andrea; Savino, Rocco

    2010-02-15

    Promising profiling techniques based on new material/solid phase extraction for capturing "molecular signatures" from body fluids are being coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS. Sample preparation significantly influences spectrum quality in this ionization method. Mesoporous silica beads (MSB), by the means of nano-sized porous channels with high surface area, enable harvesting of peptides from plasma and serum excluding large size proteins. We have investigated the morphology of a sample slurry, developed as a new tool for plasma peptides enrichment based on mesoporous materials. Our study highlights a correlation between crystals morphology and enhanced performances in MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. This is the first report which correlates the increase in signal intensity with crystal formation in samples preparations which make use of various kinds of slurries for the analysis of samples clinically relevant like human plasma.

  8. Application of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Virology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a diagnostic tool of microbial identification and characterization based on the detection of the mass of molecules. In the majority of clinical laboratories, this technology is currently being used mainly for bacterial diagnosis, but several approaches in the field of virology have been investigated. The introduction of this technology in clinical virology will improve the diagnosis of infections produced by viruses but also the discovery of mutations and variants of these microorganisms as well as the detection of antiviral resistance. This review is focused on the main current applications of MALDI-TOF MS techniques in clinical virology showing the state of the art with respect to this exciting new technology. PMID:24222805

  9. New identification of proanthocyanidins in cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum L.) using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Martín, María Luisa; Fuguet, Elisabet; Quero, Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2012-01-01

    The inner bark of Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum L.) is commonly used as a spice and has also been widely employed in the treatment and prevention of disease. The positive health effects associated with the consumption of cinnamon could in part be due to its phenolic composition; proanthocyanidins (PA) are the major polyphenolic component in commercial cinnamon. We present a thorough study of the PA profile of cinnamon obtained using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. In addition to the advantages of MALDI-TOF as a sensitive technique for the analysis of high-molecular-weight compounds, the tandem arrangement allows the identification of the compounds through their fragmentation patterns from MS/MS experiments. This is the first time that this technique has been used to analyze polymeric PA. The results show that cinnamon PA are more complex than was previously thought. We show here for the first time that they contain (epi)gallocatechin and (epi)catechingallate units. As gallates (galloyl moieties) and the pyrogallol group in gallocatechins have been related to the biological activity of grape and tea polyphenols, the presence of these substructures may explain some of the properties of cinnamon extracts. MALDI-TOF/TOF reveals that cinnamon bark PA include combinations of (epi)catechin, (epi)catechingallate, (epi)gallocatechin, and (epi)afzelechin, which results in a highly heterogeneous mixture of procyanidins, prodelphinidins, and propelargonidins.

  10. Optimization and Comparison of Multiple MALDI Matrix Application Methods for Small Molecule Mass Spectrometric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The matrix application technique is critical to the success of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) experiment. This work presents a systematic study aiming to evaluate three different matrix application techniques for MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) of endogenous metabolites from legume plant, Medicago truncatula, root nodules. Airbrush, automatic sprayer, and sublimation matrix application methods were optimized individually for detection of metabolites in the positive ionization mode exploiting the two most widely used MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Analytical reproducibility and analyte diffusion were examined and compared side-by-side for each method. When using DHB, the optimized method developed for the automatic matrix sprayer system resulted in approximately double the number of metabolites detected when compared to sublimation and airbrush. The automatic sprayer method also showed more reproducible results and less analyte diffusion than the airbrush method. Sublimation matrix deposition yielded high spatial resolution and reproducibility but fewer analytes in the higher m/z range (500–1000 m/z). When the samples were placed in a humidity chamber after sublimation, there was enhanced detection of higher mass metabolites but increased analyte diffusion in the lower mass range. When using CHCA, the optimized automatic sprayer method and humidified sublimation method resulted in double the number of metabolites detected compared to standard airbrush method. PMID:25331774

  11. Tiny-TOF-MALDI mass spectrometry for particulate drug and explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, Wayne A.; Benson, Richard C.; Ecelberger, Scott A.; Phillips, Terry E.; Cornish, Timothy J.; Cotter, Robert J.

    1995-09-01

    The MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization) technique, widely used to desorb and ionize large biomolecules, is applied here to small molecules having low vapor pressure, such as drugs and explosives. Furthermore, we report the coupling of the MALDI technique with a small, highly portable tiny-TOF (fime-of-flight) mass spectrometer developed in our laboratories. This mass spectrometer is a low voltage coaxial reflectron design with a short flight tube that is specifically designed for low molecular weight substances. The reflectron is designed to operate in two different modes that provide an expremely powerful pseudo-tandem mass spectrometry capability that is crucial for field applications. Using this system we have measured mass spectral signatures for cocaine, heroine, and the explosive RDX in the sub- nanogram range. Also reported here are continued developements on advanced MALDI sampling technologies, sensitivity, and mass resolution enhancements of the tiny-TOF, further decreases in system size and weight, and concepts for field operational systems.

  12. Fast detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis in Salmo salar serum through MALDI-TOF-MS profiling.

    PubMed

    Olate, Verónica R; Nachtigall, Fabiane M; Santos, Leonardo S; Soto, Alex; Araya, Macarena; Oyanedel, Sandra; Díaz, Verónica; Marchant, Vanessa; Rios-Momberg, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a pathogenic bacteria known as the aetiological agent of the salmonid rickettsial syndrome and causes a high mortality in farmed salmonid fishes. Detection of P. salmonis in farmed fishes is based mainly on molecular biology and immunohistochemistry techniques. These techniques are in most of the cases expensive and time consuming. In the search of new alternatives to detect the presence of P. salmonis in salmonid fishes, this work proposed the use of MALDI-TOF-MS to compare serum protein profiles from Salmo salar fish, including experimentally infected and non-infected fishes using principal component analysis (PCA). Samples were obtained from a controlled bioassay where S. salar was challenged with P. salmonis in a cohabitation model and classified according to the presence or absence of the bacteria by real time PCR analysis. MALDI spectra of the fish serum samples showed differences in its serum protein composition. These differences were corroborated with PCA analysis. The results demonstrated that the use of both MALDI-TOF-MS and PCA represents a useful tool to discriminate the fish status through the analysis of salmonid serum samples. PMID:26956387

  13. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  14. Precision of heavy-light peptide ratios measured by maldi-tof mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N Leigh; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W; Kruppa, Gary; Paape, Rainer; Suckau, Detlef

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated the precision of peptide quantitation by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) using six pairs of proteotypic peptides (light) and same-sequence stable isotope labeled synthetic internal standards (heavy). These were combined in two types of dilution curves spanning 100-fold and 2000-fold ratios. Coefficients of variation (CV; standard deviation divided by mean value) were examined across replicate MALDI spots using a reflector acquisition method requiring 100 000 counts for the most intense peak in each summed spectrum. The CV of light/heavy peptide centroid peak area ratios determined on four replicate spots per sample, averaged across 11 points of a 100-fold dilution curve and over all six peptides, was 2.2% (ranging from 1.5 to 3.7% among peptides) at 55 fmol total (light + heavy) of each peptide applied per spot, and 2.5% at 11 fmol applied. The average CV of measurements at near-equivalence (light = heavy, the center of the dilution curve) for the six peptides was 1.0%, about 17-fold lower CV than that observed when five peptides were ratioed to a sixth peptide (i.e., a different-sequence internal standard). Response curves across the 100-fold range were not completely linear but could be closely modeled by a power law fit giving R(2) values >0.998 for all peptides. The MALDI-TOF MS method was used to determine the endogenous level of a proteotypic peptide (EDQYHYLLDR) of human protein C inhibitor (PCI) in a plasma digest after enrichment by capture on a high affinity antipeptide antibody, a technique called stable isotope standards and capture by anti-peptide antibodies (SISCAPA). The level of PCI was determined to be 770 ng/mL with a replicate measurement CV of 1.5% and a >14 000-fold target enrichment via SISCAPA-MALDI-TOF. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF technology can provide precise quantitation of high-to-medium abundance peptide biomarkers over a 100-fold dynamic range when ratioed to same-sequence labeled internal standards

  15. Developing integrated TOF-SIMS/MALDI IMS system in studying biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ligang

    Using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) techniques (including TOF-SIMS and MALDI IMS) to study biological systems is a relatively new concept and quickly gained popularity in recent years. Imaging mass spectrometry is a discovery technology that utilizes a focused ion beam or laser beam to desorb ions from sample surface. By detecting the desorbed ions, the chemical distributions and biological changes of a sample surface can be analyzed. These techniques offer a new analytical imaging approach to investigate biological processes at the cellular and tissue level. In this research, a novel integrated TOF-SIMS/MALDI IMS system as well as IMS based biological-sample-preparation techniques and data-reduction methods are developed. We then demonstrate the power of these techniques in studying different biological systems, including monosaccharides isomers, human breast cancer cell lines, mouse embryo tissues and mouse kidney sections. Using TOF-SIMS and statistical analysis methods, seven monosaccharide isomers are fully differentiated by analyzing their characteristic spectral pattern. In addition, a deep understanding of the fragmentation pathway of these isomers under ion bombardment is gained. In an application of TOF-SIMS to the differentiation of three human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231, we show that principal component analysis (PCA) data reduction of TOF-SIMS spectra can differentiate cellular compartments (cytosol, nuclear and particulate) within the cell types, as well as homogenates from among the three cell lines. In a tissue-specific application, we extend the analytical capabilities of TOF-SIMS and PCA by imaging and differentiating Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) mouse embryo tissues. We demonstrate reproducible differentiation of six tissue types based on the remaining small molecules after paraffin-embedding and the fragments of the cellular proteins. In a unique study of fresh frozen mouse kidney tissues, both TOF

  16. Pulse Stripping Analysis: A Technique for Determination of Some Metals in Aerosols and Other Limited Size Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parry, Edward P.; Hern, Don H.

    1971-01-01

    A technique for determining lead with a detection limit down to a nanogram on limited size samples is described. The technique is an electrochemical one and involves pre-concentration of the metal species in a mercury drop. Although the emphasis in this paper is on the determination of lead, many metal ion species which are reducible to the metal at an electrode are equally determinable. A technique called pulse polarography is proposed to determine the metals in the drop and this technique is discussed and is compared with other techniques. Other approaches for determination of lead are also compared. Some data are also reported for the lead content of Ventura County particulates. The characterization of lead species by solubility parameters is discussed.

  17. Deriving simple empirical relationships between aerodynamic and optical aerosol measurements and their application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different measurement techniques for aerosol characterization and quantification either directly or indirectly measure different aerosol properties (i.e. count, mass, speciation, etc.). Comparisons and combinations of multiple measurement techniques sampling the same aerosol can provide insight into...

  18. Direct identification of trypanosomatids by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (DIT MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Avila, C C; Almeida, F G; Palmisano, G

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and rapid determination of trypanosomatids is essential in epidemiological surveillance and therapeutic studies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been shown to be a useful and powerful technique to identify bacteria, fungi, metazoa and human intact cells with applications in clinical settings. Here, we developed and optimized a MALDI-TOF MS method to profile trypanosomatids. trypanosomatid cells were deposited on a MALDI target plate followed by addition of matrix solution. The plate was then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement to create reference mass spectra library and unknown samples were identified by pattern matching using the BioTyper software tool. Several m/z peaks reproducibly and uniquely identified trypanosomatids species showing the potentials of direct identification of trypanosomatids by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, this method discriminated different life stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, epimastigote and bloodstream trypomastigote and Trypanosoma brucei, procyclic and bloodstream. T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) were also discriminated in three clades. However, it was not possible to achieve enough resolution and software-assisted identification at the strain level. Overall, this study shows the importance of MALDI-TOF MS for the direct identification of trypanosomatids and opens new avenues for mass spectrometry-based detection of parasites in biofluids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27659938

  19. [Rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Dolores Rojo, María; Navarro Marí, José María; Bou, Germán

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry has become established as a first-line diagnostic tool in the identification of microorganisms, including those producing human infections. Rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance is one of the future applications of this technique with the greatest likelihood of success. This review describes the most important studies published in this field and discusses potential future challenges and the clinical application of this technique in the next few years. PMID:27389291

  20. MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry: current frontiers and perspectives in pathology research and practice.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2015-04-01

    MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry has entered the field of tissue-based research by providing unique advantages for analyzing tissue specimen in an unprecedented detail. A broad spectrum of analytes ranging from proteins, peptides, protein modification over small molecules, drugs and their metabolites as well as pharmaceutical components, endogenous cell metabolites, lipids, and other analytes are made accessible by this in situ technique in tissue. Some of them were even not accessible in tissues within the histological context before. Thereby, the great advantage of MALDI Imaging is the correlation of molecular information with traditional histology by keeping the spatial localization information of the analytes after mass spectrometric measurement. This method is label-free and allows multiplex analysis of hundreds to thousands of molecules in the very same tissue section simultaneously. Imaging mass spectrometry brings a new quality of molecular data and links the expert discipline of pathology and deep molecular mass spectrometric analysis to tissue-based research. This review will focus on state-of-the-art of MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry, its recent applications by analyzing tissue specimen and the contributions in understanding the biology of disease as well as its perspectives for pathology research and practice.

  1. Size Characterization of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticles by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, Jason K.; Grass, Michael E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Marsh, Anderson L.

    2009-08-15

    In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been utilized to characterize colloidal platinum nanoparticles synthesized in the 1-4 nm size range. The nanoparticles were prepared via a solution-based method in which the size could be controlled by varying reaction conditions, such as the alcohol used as the reductant. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone), or PVP, (MW = 29,000 g/mol) was employed as a capping agent to stabilize the synthesized nanoparticles in solution. A model for determining the size of the metallic nanoparticle core from MALDI-TOF mass spectra has been developed and verified through correlation with particle sizes from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In this model it was assumed that 1.85 nm nanoparticles are capped by one PVP chain, which was verified through experiments performed with capped and uncapped nanoparticles. Larger nanoparticles are capped by either two (2.60 and 2.94 nm) or three (3.69 nm) PVP chains. These findings clearly indicate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a technique for fully characterizing nanoscale materials in order to elucidate structure-property relationships.

  2. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of black yeasts of the genus Exophiala.

    PubMed

    Özhak-Baysan, Betil; Öğünç, Dilara; Döğen, Aylin; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of Exophiala species. The analysis included a total of 110 Exophiala isolates, including 15 CBS strains representing 4 species, Exophiala dermatitidis (61), E. phaeomuriformis (36), E. crusticola (9), and E. heteromorpha (4), that had been previously identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. We also compared the relative efficacies of Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) and Columbia agar (CA) for use in MALDI-TOF MS. Remarkably, we obtained a log-score value ≥2.0 by using either SGA or CA for all 15 CBS strains, indicating species-level identification. The remaining 95 Exophiala strains were identified to the genus or species levels, with identification rates of 96.8% and 90.5%, using SGA or CA, respectively. Most of the E. dermatitidis (100% and 92.9%), E. phaeomuriformis (80.6% and 83.9%), E. crusticola (50% and 100%), and E. heteromorpha (100% and 100%) isolates were correctly identified using SGA or CA, respectively. Furthermore, 58.9% and 26.3% of the strains had log-score values of ≥2.0 by using SGA and CA, respectively. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and reliable technique with high rates of correct taxonomic identification. PMID:25851261

  3. Direct screening of herbal blends for new synthetic cannabinoids by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Rossella; Chiarini, Anna; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Seri, Catia; Rimondo, Claudia; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Armato, Ubaldo; Tagliaro, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, a number of herbal blends containing different synthetic compounds mimicking the pharmacological activity of cannabinoids and displaying a high toxicological potential have appeared in the market. Their availability is mainly based on the so-called "e-commerce", being sold as legal alternatives to cannabis and cannabis derivatives. Although highly selective, sensitive, accurate, and quantitative methods based on GC-MS and LC-MS are available, they lack simplicity, rapidity, versatility and throughput, which are required for product monitoring. In this context, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) offers a simple and rapid operation with high throughput. Thus, the aim of the present work was to develop a MALDI-TOF MS method for the rapid qualitative direct analysis of herbal blend preparations for synthetic cannabinoids to be used as front screening of confiscated clandestine preparations. The sample preparation was limited to herbal blend leaves finely grinding in a mortar and loading onto the MALDI plate followed by addition of 2 µl of the matrix/surfactant mixture [α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)]. After drying, the sample plate was introduced into the ion source for analysis. MALDI-TOF conditions were as follows: mass spectra were analyzed in the range m/z 150-550 by averaging the data from 50 laser shots and using an accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The described method was successfully applied to the screening of 31 commercial herbal blends, previously analyzed by GC-MS. Among the samples analyzed, 21 contained synthetic cannabinoids (namely JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-250, JWH-210, JWH-019, and AM-694). All the results were in agreement with GC-MS, which was used as the reference technique. PMID:22282100

  4. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piergianni, Maddalena; Buttrini, Mirko; Montecchini, Sara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Gorrini, Chiara; Rossi, Sabina; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Detection of Entamoeba histolytica and its differentiation from Entamoeba dispar is an important goal of the clinical parasitology laboratory. The aim of this study was the identification and differentiation of E. histolytica and E. dispar by MALDI-TOF MS, in order to evaluate the application of this technique in routine diagnostic practice. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to 3 amebic reference strains and to 14 strains isolated from feces that had been differentiated by molecular methods in our laboratory. Protein extracts from cultures of these strains (axenic cultures for the 3 reference strains and monoxenic cultures for the 14 field isolates) were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the spectra obtained were analyzed by statistical software. Five peaks discriminating between E. histolytica and E. dispar reference strains were found by protein profile analysis: 2 peaks (8,246 and 8,303 Da) specific for E. histolytica and 3 (4,714; 5,541; 8,207 Da) for E. dispar. All clinical isolates except one showed the discriminating peaks expected for the appropriate species. For 2 fecal samples from which 2 strains (1 E. histolytica and 1 E. dispar) out of the 14 included in this study were isolated, the same discriminating peaks found in the corresponding isolated amebic strains were detected after only 12h (E. histolytica) and 24h (E. dispar) of incubation of the fecal samples in Robinson's medium without serum. Our study shows that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to discriminate between E. histolytica and E. dispar using in vitro xenic cultures and it also could have potential for the detection of these species in clinical samples.

  5. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  6. Detection and quantification of bacterial spoilage in milk and pork meat using MALDI-TOF-MS and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Xu, Yun; Goodacre, Royston

    2012-07-17

    Microbiological safety is one of the cornerstones of quality control in the food industry. Identification and quantification of spoilage bacteria in pasteurized milk and meat in the food industry currently relies on accurate and sensitive yet time-consuming techniques which give retrospective values for microbial contamination. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), a proven technique in the field of protein and peptide identification and quantification, may be a valuable alternative approach for the rapid assessment of microbial spoilage. In this work we therefore developed MALDI-TOF-MS as a novel analytical approach for the assessment of food that when combined with chemometrics allows for the detection and quantification of milk and pork meat spoilage bacteria. To develop this approach, natural spoilage of pasteurized milk and raw pork meat samples incubated at 15 °C and at room temperature, respectively, was conducted. Samples were collected for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis (which took 4 min per sample) at regular time intervals throughout the spoilage process, with concurrent calculation and documentation of reference total viable counts using traditional microbiological methods (these took 2 days). Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal component discriminant function analysis, canonical correlation analysis, partial least-squares (PLS) regression, and kernel PLS (KPLS) were used to analyze the data. The results from MALDI-TOF-MS combined with PLS or KPLS gave excellent bacterial quantification results for both milk and meat spoilage, and typical root mean squared errors for prediction in test spectra were between 0.53 and 0.79 log unit. Overall these novel findings strongly indicate that MALDI-TOF-MS when combined with chemometric approaches would be a useful adjunct for routine use in the milk and meat industry as a fast and accurate viable bacterial detection and quantification method.

  7. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    registration techniques. Different strategies for automatic serial image registration applied to MS datasets are outlined in detail. The third image modality is histology driven, i.e. a digital scan of the histological stained slices in high-resolution. After fusion of reconstructed scan images and MRI the slice-related coordinates of the mass spectra can be propagated into 3D-space. After image registration of scan images and histological stained images, the anatomical information from histology is fused with the mass spectra from MALDI-MSI. As a result of the described pipeline we have a set of 3 dimensional images representing the same anatomies, i.e. the reconstructed slice scans, the spectral images as well as corresponding clustering results, and the acquired MRI. Great emphasis is put on the fact that the co-registered MRI providing anatomical details improves the interpretation of 3D MALDI images. The ability to relate mass spectrometry derived molecular information with in vivo and in vitro imaging has potentially important implications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23467008

  8. Laser-Assisted Analysis of Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Giffin, C. E.; Norris, D. D.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed instrument makes rapid mass-spectrometric analyses of individual particles in aerosols. Each particle vaporized and ionized by intense laser pulse, which creates ions of minimum complexity. Ability to analyze single aerosol particles continuously makes technique suitable for detection of toxic aerosol particles on real-time basis and for identification of their sources.

  9. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    that emission of soot particles may be localized to fossil fuel combustion, whereas wood/biomass burning emission of black carbon is due to transportation from farther distances. Regression analysis between eBCff and CO (r = 0.44) indicated a similar source as vehicular emissions. The very high loading of PM2.5 along with eBC over Delhi suggests that urgent action is needed to mitigate the emissions of carbonaceous aerosol in the northern part of India. PMID:25217282

  10. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    that emission of soot particles may be localized to fossil fuel combustion, whereas wood/biomass burning emission of black carbon is due to transportation from farther distances. Regression analysis between eBCff and CO (r = 0.44) indicated a similar source as vehicular emissions. The very high loading of PM2.5 along with eBC over Delhi suggests that urgent action is needed to mitigate the emissions of carbonaceous aerosol in the northern part of India.

  11. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1993-11-01

    In support of the initial phase of the Instrument Development Program (IDP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, the authors have researched the means by which multiple remote sensing techniques could be best applied to characterizing the cloudy atmosphere. This research has directly supported the short-term goal of aiding in the selection of the most appropriate instrumentation for ARM Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, but also has more long-term consequences for the application of remote sensing for measuring cloud properties of crucial concern to general circulation and climate models. To accomplish the goals they have (1) developed a mobile, state-of-the-art, scanning polarization diversity lidar (PDL) to test a variety of techniques for cloud remote sensing, including simultaneous dual-wavelength and dual-polarization, and high-speed variable field-of-view operations; (2) successfully participated in field projects using the PDL along with other remote sensors and instrumented aircraft to obtain detailed datasets for the testing of instrument techniques; (3) in collaboration with researchers at the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, used numerical cloud modeling and empirical studies to develop and refine remote sensing approaches for cloud property retrieval.

  12. MALDI-MS/MS with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility for the Structural Analysis of N-Linked Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Bonomelli, Camille; Scrivens, James H.

    2012-11-01

    The preference for singly charged ion formation by MALDI makes it a better choice than electrospray ionization for profiling mixtures of N-glycans. For structural analysis, fragmentation of negative ions often yields more informative spectra than fragmentation of positive ones but such ions are more difficult to produce from neutral glycans under MALDI conditions. This work investigates conditions for the formation of both positive and negative ions by MALDI from N-linked glycans released from glycoproteins and their subsequent MS/MS and ion mobility behaviour. 2,4,6-Trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) doped with ammonium nitrate was found to give optimal ion yields in negative ion mode. Ammonium chloride or phosphate also yielded prominent adducts but anionic carbohydrates such as sulfated N-glycans tended to ionize preferentially. Carbohydrates adducted with all three adducts (phosphate, chloride, and nitrate) produced good negative ion CID spectra but those adducted with iodide and sulfate did not yield fragment ions although they gave stronger signals. Fragmentation paralleled that seen following electrospray ionization providing superior spectra than could be obtained by PSD on MALDI-TOF instruments or with ion traps. In addition, ion mobility drift times of the adducted glycans and the ability of this technique to separate isomers also mirrored those obtained following ESI sample introduction. Ion mobility also allowed profiles to be obtained from samples whose MALDI spectra showed no evidence of such ions allowing the technique to be used in conditions where sample amounts were limiting. The method was applied to N-glycans released from the recombinant human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein, gp120.

  13. Protein unlocking procedures of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues: application to MALDI-TOF imaging MS investigations.

    PubMed

    Ronci, Maurizio; Bonanno, Elena; Colantoni, Alfredo; Pieroni, Luisa; Di Ilio, Carmine; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are a powerful tool for examining the clinical course of diseases. These specimens represent an incredible mine of valuable clinical and biological information for proteomic investigation. MALDI-TOF imaging MS (MALDI-IMS) is a protein profiling technique which enables the direct sampling of histological section; however, the quality of molecular data are strongly influenced by the tissue preparation condition. In fact, in previous years most of the studies employing such a technological platform have been conducted using cryo-preserved tissues. We have developed an in vitro approach using "tissue surrogate" samples in order to explore different protein unlocking procedures which might enable a suitable recovery of polypeptides for MS analysis. The developed protocols have been compared both by MALDI-TOF MS and nLC-MS(E) analysis either on surrogate samples or on FFPE specimen from human breast cancer. The collected evidence has been applied for the preparation of FFPE tissue sections following MALDI-IMS analysis. Our results outline the possibility to obtain valuable peptide mass spectra profiles form FFPE preparations by applying a combined two steps procedure of heat induced antigen retrieval (HIAR) in presence of EDTA and on target trypsin hydrolysis. A multivariate statistical evaluation is presented and discussed according to molecular spatial distributions and tissue morphology.

  14. MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry: a step forward in the anatomopathological characterization of stenotic aortic valve tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Iloro, Ibon; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Azkargorta, Mikel; Sastre-Oliva, Tamara; Escobes, Iraide; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F.; Sanchez, Pedro L.; Urreta, Harkaitz; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Pinto, Angel; Padial, Luis R.; Akerström, Finn; Elortza, Felix; Barderas, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common form of valve disease. Once symptoms develop, there is an inexorable deterioration with a poor prognosis; currently there are no therapies capable of modifying disease progression, and aortic valve replacement is the only available treatment. Our goal is to study the progression of calcification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) and get new insights at molecular level that could help in the understanding of this disease. In this work, we analyzed consecutive slices from aortic valve tissue by MALDI-IMS, to establish the spatial distribution of proteins and peptides directly from the surface of the histological sections. The analysis showed different structures corresponding to regions observed in conventional histology, including large calcification areas and zones rich in collagen and elastic fibers. Peptide extraction from the tissue, followed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis, provided the identification of collagen VI α-3 and NDRG2 proteins which correlated with the masses obtained by MALDI-IMS and were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These results highlighted the molecular mechanism implied in AS using MALDI-IMS, a novel technique never used before in this pathology. In addition, we can define specific regions proving a complementary resolution of the molecular histology. PMID:27256770

  15. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS: a new tool to assess the multifaceted activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Richard; Daumas, Aurélie; Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis; Textoris, Julien

    2012-10-22

    Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS is routinely used to identify bacterial species in clinical samples. This technique has also proven to allow identification of intact mammalian cells, including macrophages. Here, we wondered whether this approach enabled the assessment human macrophages plasticity. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF spectra of macrophages stimulated with IFN-γ and IL-4, two inducers of M1 and M2 macrophage polarisation, consisted of peaks ranging from 2 to 12 kDa. The spectra of unstimulated and stimulated macrophages were clearly different. The fingerprints induced by the M1 agonists, IFN-γ, TNF, LPS and LPS+IFN-γ, and the M2 agonists, IL-4, TGF-β1 and IL-10, were specific and readily identifiable. Thus, whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS was able to characterise M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes. In addition, the fingerprints induced by extracellular (group B Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus) or intracellular (BCG, Orientia tsutsugamushi, Coxiella burnetii) bacteria were bacterium-specific. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS fingerprints therefore revealed the multifaceted activation of human macrophages. This approach opened a new avenue of studies to assess the immune response in the clinical setting, by monitoring the various activation patterns of immune cells in pathological conditions.

  16. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry compatible inactivation method for highly pathogenic microbial cells and spores.

    PubMed

    Lasch, Peter; Nattermann, Herbert; Erhard, Marcel; Stämmler, Maren; Grunow, Roland; Bannert, Norbert; Appel, Bernd; Naumann, Dieter

    2008-03-15

    Identification of microorganisms, specifically of vegetative cells and spores, by intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) is an emerging new technology. The technique provides specific biomarker profiles which can be employed for bacterial identification at the genus, species, or even at the subspecies level holding the potential to serve as a rapid and sensitive identification technique in clinical or food microbiology and also for sensitive detection of biosafety level (BSL) 3 microorganisms. However, the development of ICMS as an identification technique for BSL-3 level microorganisms is hampered by the fact that no MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) compatible inactivation procedure for microorganisms, and particularly for bacterial endospores, has been evaluated so far. In this report we describe a new methodology for effective inactivation of microorganisms which is compatible with the analysis of microbial protein patterns by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The main challenge of this work was to define the conditions that ensure microbial inactivation and permit at the same time comprehensive analysis of microbial protein patterns. Among several physical, chemical, and mechanical inactivation procedures, inactivation by trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) proved to be the best method in terms of bactericidal capacity and information content of the mass spectra. Treatment of vegetative cells by 80% TFA alone for 30 min assured complete inactivation of microbial cells under all conditions tested. For spore inactivation, the "TFA inactivation protocol" was developed which is a combination of TFA treatment with basic laboratory routines such as centrifugation and filtering. This MALDI-TOF/ICMS compatible sample preparation protocol is simple and rapid (30 min) and assures reliable inactivation of vegetative cells and spores of highly pathogenic (BSL-3) microorganisms.

  17. Graphical aerosol classification method using aerosol relative optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A simple graphical method is presented to classify aerosol types based on a combination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol relative optical thickness (AROT). Six aerosol types, including maritime (MA), desert dust (DD), continental (CO), sub-continental (SC), urban industry (UI) and biomass burning (BB), are discriminated in a two dimensional space of AOT440 and AROT1020/440. Numerical calculations are performed using MIE theory based on a multi log-normal particle size distribution, and the AROT ranges for each aerosol type are determined. More than 5 years of daily observations from 8 representative aerosol sites are applied to the method to confirm spatial applicability. Finally, 3 individual cases are analyzed according to their specific aerosol status. The outcomes indicate that the new graphical method coordinates well with regional characteristics and is also able to distinguish aerosol variations in individual situations. This technique demonstrates a novel way to estimate different aerosol types and provide information on radiative forcing calculations and satellite data corrections.

  18. Multifunctional nanoparticles composite for MALDI-MS: Cd2+-doped carbon nanotubes with CdS nanoparticles as the matrix, preconcentrating and accelerating probes of microwave enzymatic digestion of peptides and proteins for direct MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2010-12-01

    For the first time, we utilized multifunctional nanoparticles composite (NPs composite) for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS) analysis of peptides and proteins. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes doped with Cd(2+) ions and modified with cadmium sulfide NPs were synthesized by a chemical reduction method at room temperature. The multifunctional NPs composite applied for the analysis of peptides and microwave-digested proteins in the atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion-trap and MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) was successfully demonstrated. The maximum detection sensitivity for peptides in MALDI-MS was achieved by the adsorption of negatively charged peptides onto the surfaces of NP composite through electrostatic interactions. The optimal conditions of peptide mixtures were obtained at 20 min of incubation time using 1 mg of NPs composite when the pH of the sample solution was kept higher than the pI values of peptides. The potentiality of the NP composite in the preconcentration of peptides was compared with that of the individual NP by calculating the preconcentration factors (PF) and found that the NPs composite showed a 4-6 times of PF than the other NPs. In addition, the NPs composite was also applied as heat-absorbing materials for efficient microwave tryptic digestion of cytochrome c and lysozyme from milk protein in MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. We believe that the use of NPs composite technique would be an efficient and powerful preconcentrating tool for MALDI-MS for the study of proteome research. PMID:21053343

  19. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of annonaceous acetogenins in Annona muricata products for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Champy, Pierre; Guérineau, Vincent; Laprévote, Olivier

    2009-12-15

    Annonaceous acetogenins are proposed as environmental neurotoxicants consumed through medicinal and alimentary habits and responsible for atypical parkinsonian syndromes observed in tropical areas. Potential sources of exposure still have to be determined, as, to date, only a few batches of products for human consumption were searched for these compounds. To assess the presence of acetogenins, we propose a fast, sensitive and accurate method of screening, using MALDI-TOF MS, with minimal sample preparation. Development of the technique is discussed. Its application to leaves of herbal tea, pulp and bottled nectar of Annona muricata is presented.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Polymer Additives with MALDI-TOF MS Using an Internal Standard Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzinger, Clemens; Gabriel, Stefan; Beißmann, Susanne; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is used for the qualitative analysis of seven different polymer additives directly from the polymer without tedious sample pretreatment. Additionally, by using a solid sample preparation technique, which avoids the concentration gradient problems known to occur with dried droplets and by adding tetraphenylporphyrine as an internal standard to the matrix, it is possible to perform quantitative analysis of additives directly from the polymer sample. Calibration curves for Tinuvin 770, Tinuvin 622, Irganox 1024, Irganox 1010, Irgafos 168, and Chimassorb 944 are presented, showing coefficients of determination between 0.911 and 0.990.

  1. Quantitative analysis of polymer additives with MALDI-TOF MS using an internal standard approach.

    PubMed

    Schwarzinger, Clemens; Gabriel, Stefan; Beißmann, Susanne; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is used for the qualitative analysis of seven different polymer additives directly from the polymer without tedious sample pretreatment. Additionally, by using a solid sample preparation technique, which avoids the concentration gradient problems known to occur with dried droplets and by adding tetraphenylporphyrine as an internal standard to the matrix, it is possible to perform quantitative analysis of additives directly from the polymer sample. Calibration curves for Tinuvin 770, Tinuvin 622, Irganox 1024, Irganox 1010, Irgafos 168, and Chimassorb 944 are presented, showing coefficients of determination between 0.911 and 0.990.

  2. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  3. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  4. Acoustic Sample Deposition MALDI-MS (ASD-MALDI-MS): A Novel Process Flow for Quality Control Screening of Compound Libraries.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jefferson; Wood, Elizabeth; Peters, Grace S; Drexler, Dieter M

    2016-02-01

    In the early stages of drug discovery, high-throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries against pharmaceutical targets is a common method to identify potential lead molecules. For these HTS campaigns to be efficient and successful, continuous quality control of the compound collection is necessary and crucial. However, the large number of compound samples and the limited sample amount pose unique challenges. Presented here is a proof-of-concept study for a novel process flow for the quality control screening of small-molecule compound libraries that consumes only minimal amounts of samples and affords compound-specific molecular data. This process employs an acoustic sample deposition (ASD) technique for the offline sample preparation by depositing nanoliter volumes in an array format onto microscope glass slides followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS) analysis. An initial study of a 384-compound array employing the ASD-MALDI-MS workflow resulted in a 75% first-pass positive identification rate with an analysis time of <1 s per sample. PMID:26203056

  5. Large protein analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry using amoxicillin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazim; Guo, Zhongxian; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria or their protein and peptide entity enrichment using biomolecules-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, and analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is a promising technique to analyze microorganisms. High and low molecular weight proteins like penicillin-binding proteins are responsible for final step synthesis of peptidoglycan biosynthesis; those are the target of lactam antibiotics. In this paper, we synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (mag-NPs) and further modified them with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and then the β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin was covalently linked to their surface. β-Lactam group attributes as penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) in bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were used as model bacteria for enrichment based on the β-lactam affinity of magnetic nanoparticles, and then the bacteria were easily separated by an external magnet. Several high molecular weight penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) were detected by MALDI MS containing 10(4) and 10(3) colony-forming unit (cfu) per milileter (mL) of S. aureus and E. coli, respectively. In the case of E. coli, higher molecular weight PBPs were observed at 20 to 55 kDa in MALDI mass spectra. However, S. aureus bacteria resulted with femAB operon-based proteins, with molecular weight of 49570.4 Da, by MALDI MS after using amoxicillin functionalized-mag-NPs. The current approach provides an effective bacteria detection and preconcentration method that has high potential in the near future for fast and sensitive diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria infection. Graphical Abstract Schematic for large proteins analysis by MALDI TOF MS (a) mag-NPs and bacterial interaction (b) Penicillin binding proteins trapping by Amox-mag-NPs. PMID:27565791

  6. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  7. Comprehensive imaging of porcine adrenal gland lipids by MALDI-FTMS using quercetin as a matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Borchers, Christoph H

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal glands synthesize and release functional zone-specific steroid and catecholamine hormones to regulate mammalian stress responses. Lipids such as sphingolipids have been shown to control the steroid hormone biosynthesis in adrenal glands, indicating their important roles in endocrine organs. Molecular imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a well-established analytical technique for determining both the spatial location and the relative abundances of various lipids on tissue. To better understand the overall roles of different lipid classes that play in the mammalian adrenal glands, it is necessary to comprehensively determine the spatial distributions of various lipids in the different functional zones of adrenal glands. However, the potential of this technique has not been fully reached, considering there are thousands of lipid species in a cell or tissue. To achieve this, we used quercetin as a MALDI matrix for negative ion detection of endogenous lipids on tissue sections of porcine adrenal glands by MALDI-Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS. As a result of these experiments, 409 endogenous compounds were detected in the negative ion mode. Combining both the positive and negative ion detection led to successful determination of the spatial distribution patterns of 555 unique endogenous compounds that were identified as 544 lipid entities and 11 nonlipid metabolites. Many classes of these lipids showed distinct distribution patterns in different functional zones of the adrenal gland. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the largest group of lipid entities that have been analyzed in a single MS imaging study so far, and comprehensive profiles of the spatial distributions of lipids in porcine adrenal glands are shown here for the first time.

  8. Multiplex detection of protein toxins using MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry: application in unambiguous toxin detection from bioaerosol.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Bhoj; Kamboj, Dev Vrat

    2012-12-01

    Protein toxins, such as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shiga toxin (STX), and plant toxin ricin, are involved in a number of diseases and are considered as potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. From a bioterrorism and warfare perspective, these agents are likely to cause maximum damage to a civilian or military population through an inhalational route of exposure and aerosol is considered the envisaged mode of delivery. Unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol is of paramount importance, both for bringing mitigation protocols into operation and for implementation of effective medical countermeasures, in case a "biological cloud" is seen over a population. A multiplex, unambiguous, and qualitative detection of protein toxins is reported here using tandem mass spectrometry with MALDI-TOF-TOF. The methodology involving simple sample processing steps was demonstrated to identify toxins (ETX, Clostridium perfringes phospholipase C, and SEB) from blind spiked samples. The novel directed search approach using a list of unique peptides was used to identify toxins from a complex protein mixture. The bioinformatic analysis of seven protein toxins for elucidation of unique peptides with conservation status across all known sequences provides a high confidence for detecting toxins originating from any geographical location and source organism. Use of tandem MS data with peptide sequence information increases the specificity of the method. A prototype for generation of aerosol using a nebulizer and collection using a cyclone collector was used to provide a proof of concept for unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol using precursor directed tandem mass spectrometry combined with protein database searching. ETX prototoxin could be detected from aerosol at 0.2 ppb concentration in aerosol.

  9. Intact lipid imaging of mouse brain samples: MALDI, nanoparticle-laser desorption ionization, and 40 keV argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Phan, Nhu T N; Fletcher, John S; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the capability of nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (NP-LDI MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS, and gas cluster ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB SIMS) to provide maximum information available in lipid analysis and imaging of mouse brain tissue. The use of Au nanoparticles deposited as a matrix for NP-LDI MS is compared to MALDI and SIMS analysis of mouse brain tissue and allows selective detection and imaging of groups of lipid molecular ion species localizing in the white matter differently from those observed using conventional MALDI with improved imaging potential. We demonstrate that high-energy (40 keV) GCIB SIMS can act as a semi-soft ionization method to extend the useful mass range of SIMS imaging to analyze and image intact lipids in biological samples, closing the gap between conventional SIMS and MALDI techniques. The GCIB SIMS allowed the detection of more intact lipid compounds in the mouse brain compared to MALDI with regular organic matrices. The 40 keV GCIB SIMS also produced peaks observed in the NP-LDI analysis, and these peaks were strongly enhanced in intensity by exposure of the sample to trifluororacetic acid (TFA) vapor prior to analysis. These MS techniques for imaging of different types of lipids create a potential overlap and cross point that can enhance the information for imaging lipids in biological tissue sections. Graphical abstract Schematic of mass spectral imaging of a mouse brain tissue using GCIB-SIMS and MALDI techniques. PMID:27549796

  10. Intact lipid imaging of mouse brain samples: MALDI, nanoparticle-laser desorption ionization, and 40 keV argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Phan, Nhu T N; Fletcher, John S; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the capability of nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (NP-LDI MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS, and gas cluster ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB SIMS) to provide maximum information available in lipid analysis and imaging of mouse brain tissue. The use of Au nanoparticles deposited as a matrix for NP-LDI MS is compared to MALDI and SIMS analysis of mouse brain tissue and allows selective detection and imaging of groups of lipid molecular ion species localizing in the white matter differently from those observed using conventional MALDI with improved imaging potential. We demonstrate that high-energy (40 keV) GCIB SIMS can act as a semi-soft ionization method to extend the useful mass range of SIMS imaging to analyze and image intact lipids in biological samples, closing the gap between conventional SIMS and MALDI techniques. The GCIB SIMS allowed the detection of more intact lipid compounds in the mouse brain compared to MALDI with regular organic matrices. The 40 keV GCIB SIMS also produced peaks observed in the NP-LDI analysis, and these peaks were strongly enhanced in intensity by exposure of the sample to trifluororacetic acid (TFA) vapor prior to analysis. These MS techniques for imaging of different types of lipids create a potential overlap and cross point that can enhance the information for imaging lipids in biological tissue sections. Graphical abstract Schematic of mass spectral imaging of a mouse brain tissue using GCIB-SIMS and MALDI techniques.

  11. Feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) networking in university hospitals in Brussels.

    PubMed

    Martiny, D; Cremagnani, P; Gaillard, A; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Mascart, G; Ebraert, A; Attalibi, S; Dediste, A; Vandenberg, O

    2014-05-01

    The mutualisation of analytical platforms might be used to address rising healthcare costs. Our study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of networking a unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system for common use in several university hospitals in Brussels, Belgium. During a one-month period, 1,055 successive bacterial isolates from the Brugmann University Hospital were identified on-site using conventional techniques; these same isolates were also identified using a MALDI-TOF MS system at the Porte de Hal Laboratory by sending target plates and identification projects via transportation and the INFECTIO_MALDI software (Infopartner, Nancy, France), respectively. The occurrence of transmission problems (<2 %) and human errors (<1 %) suggested that the system was sufficiently robust to be implemented in a network. With a median time-to-identification of 5 h and 11 min (78 min, min-max: 154-547), MALDI-TOF MS networking always provided a faster identification result than conventional techniques, except when chromogenic culture media and oxidase tests were used (p < 0.0001). However, the limited clinical benefits of the chromogenic culture media do not support their extra cost. Our financial analysis also suggested that MALDI-TOF MS networking could lead to substantial annual cost savings. MALDI-TOF MS networking presents many advantages, and few conventional techniques (optochin and oxidase tests) are required to ensure the same quality in patient care from the distant laboratory. Nevertheless, such networking should not be considered unless there is a reorganisation of workflow, efficient communication between teams, qualified technologists and a reliable IT department and helpdesk to manage potential connectivity problems.

  12. Independent assessment of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) sample preparation quality: A novel statistical approach for quality scoring.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Pieter C; Kok, Sander J; Weusten, Jos J A M; Honing, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    Preparation of samples according to an optimized method is crucial for accurate determination of polymer sample characteristics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) analysis. Sample preparation conditions such as matrix choice, cationization agent, deposition technique or even the deposition volume should be chosen to suit the sample of interest. Many sample preparation protocols have been developed and employed, yet finding the optimal sample preparation protocol remains a challenge. Because an objective comparison between the results of diverse protocols is not possible, "gut-feeling" or "good enough" is often decisive in the search for an optimum. This implies that sub-optimal protocols are used, leading to a loss of mass spectral information quality. To address this problem a novel analytical strategy based on MALDI imaging and statistical data processing was developed in which eight parameters were formulated to objectively quantify the quality of sample deposition and optimal MALDI matrix composition and finally sum up to an overall quality score of the sample deposition. These parameters can be established in a fully automated way using commercially available mass spectrometry imaging instruments without any hardware adjustments. With the newly developed analytical strategy the highest quality MALDI spots were selected, resulting in more reproducible and more valuable spectra for PEG in a variety of matrices. Moreover, our method enables an objective comparison of sample preparation protocols for any analyte and opens up new fields of investigation by presenting MALDI performance data in a clear and concise way.

  13. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from the Photooxidation of Complex Hydrocarbon Mixtures: Composition, effect of SO2, and Relevance to Ambient Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Gao, S.; Knipping, E.; Edgerton, E.; Shahgoli, M.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Edney, E.; Kleindiesnt, T.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J.; Jaoui, M.

    2005-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from single hydrocarbon precursors is commonly studied in smog chamber experiments to obtain SOA yield and organic composition data. However, very few complex air mixture experiments have been conducted to simulate possible conditions in ambient atmospheres. A six-phase experiment involving various combinations of alpha-pinene, toluene, isoprene, and SO2 were irradiated in the EPA's dynamic smog chamber at the National Exposure Research Laboratory in Raleigh, NC. Glass fiber filters and impactor plates were collected for each phase of the experiment to identify and quantify the nature of the SOA composition. The following suite of analytical techniques analyzed the resultant polar organic compounds and the high molecular weight species: liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ESI-ion trap mass spectrometry, matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI)-time of flight mass spectrometry, and high-resolution mass spectrometry. When SO2 is present in the chamber, increases in the gravimetric aerosol mass concentration and in the abundance of polar organic compounds are observed, likely suggesting an acid catalysis effect stemming from the conversion of SO2 to H2SO4 that condenses onto aerosol formed. The addition of isoprene to a alpha-pinene/toluene mixture is found to lower the amount of aerosol produced and is also found to lower the abundance of organic compounds identified by the various analytical techniques. Lastly, many of the polar organic compounds identified and quantified here are also seen in the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network during the summer of 2004. In particular, a sulfur and nitrogen containing organic species (MW = 295 gmol) is found to be the most abundant polar organic species identified in this field study (~28 % on average of the total identified organic mass). This species is also detected in the chamber

  14. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Effects of analyte concentration and matrix-to-analyte ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, M.D.; Murray, K.K.; Russell, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    We have recently developed an aerosol-liquid introduction interface for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. In this study, we examine the effect of matrix-to-analyte ratio and analyte concentration on analyte ion yield. These studies were performed using bradykinin, gramicidin S, bovine insulin, and myoglobin as analytes and {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and 4-nitroaniline as matrices. The optimum matrix-to-analyte molar ratio for aerosol MALDI was determined to be 10-100:1, which is lower than that typically used for conventional surface MALDI (100-10 000:1). The ion yield was found to be a nonlinear function of analyte concentration. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed. 43 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  16. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  17. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Neuronal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides the ability to detect and identify a broad range of analytes and their spatial distributions from a variety of sample types, including tissue sections. Here we describe an approach for probing neuropeptides from sparse cell cultures using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MSI—at single cell spatial resolution—in both MS and tandem MS modes. Cultures of Aplysia californica neurons are grown on an array of glass beads embedded in a stretchable layer of Parafilm M. As the membrane is stretched, the beads/neurons are separated physically and the separated beads/neurons analyzed via MALDI TOF MS. Compared with direct MS imaging of samples, the stretching procedure enhances analyte extraction and incorporation into the MALDI matrix, with negligible analyte spread between separated beads. MALDI tandem MSI using the stretched imaging approach yields localization maps of both parent and fragment ions from Aplysia pedal peptide, thereby confirming peptide identification. This methodology represents a flexible platform for MSI investigation of a variety of cell cultures, including functioning neuronal networks.

  18. MALDI-ToF Analysis of Model Copolymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, David; Arnould, Mark

    2008-03-01

    MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry was used to determine the composition of a low MW styrene (S) / n-butyl acrylate (nBA) copolymer. Bernoullian chain statistics were used to predict the copolymer distribution and confirm that MALDI-ToF detects the correct composition. The copolymer was blended with a low MW polystyrene homopolymer having the same end group as the copolymer at several levels to determine if MALDI-ToF could be used to calculate the amount of homopolymer by subtracting homopolymer peak areas. It is found that, while MALDI-ToF can be used to monitor the amount of homopolymer blended into the copolymer, the observed increase is always greater than the actual amount added, e.g. up to 13% error. This could be due to the fact that the homopolymer ionizes more efficiently than the low MW copolymer. A model to improve the accuracy of the calculated amount of homopolymer in the blend is discussed.

  19. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well. PMID:23992420

  20. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Boyd, A R; Burke, G A; Duffy, H; Holmberg, M; O' Kane, C; Meenan, B J; Kingshott, P

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry (Surface-MALDI-MS) as a technique for the direct detection of foetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins adsorbed to hybrid calcium phosphate/titanium dioxide surfaces produced by a novel radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method incorporating in situ annealing between 500°C and 700°C during deposition. XRD and XPS analysis indicated that the coatings produced at 700°C were hybrid in nature, with the presence of Ca-P and titanium dioxide clearly observed in the outer surface layer. In addition to this, the Ca/P ratio was seen to increase with increasing annealing temperature, with values of between 2.0 and 2.26 obtained for the 700°C samples. After exposure to FBS solution, surface-MALDI-MS indicated that there were significant differences in the protein patterns as shown by unique peaks detected at masses below 23.1 kDa for the different surfaces. These adsorbates were assigned to a combination of growth factors and lipoproteins present in serum. From the data obtained here it is evident that surface-MALDI-MS has significant utility as a tool for studying the dynamic nature of protein adsorption onto the surfaces of bioceramic coatings, which most likely plays a significant role in subsequent bioactivity of the materials.

  1. Characterization of immunoglobulins through analysis of N-glycopeptides by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Emy; Buist, Marjorie; Roy, Rini; Gomes de Oliveira, Andrey Giovanni; Bodnar, Edward; Salama, Apolline; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Perreault, Hélène

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this report is to emphasize the role, usefulness and power of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the analysis of glycoforms of antibodies (Abs) through their proteolytic glycopeptides. Abs are complex biomolecules in which glycans hold determinant properties and thus need to be thoroughly characterized following Ab production by recombinant methods or Ab collection from human/animal serum or tissue. In spite of the great robustness of MALDI-TOF MS in terms of tolerance to impurities, the analysis of Abs and Ab components using this technique requires extensive sample preparation involving all or some of chromatography, solid phase extraction, enzymatic modification, and chemical derivatization. This report focuses on a monoclonal Ab produced in cell culture, as well as on a polyclonal human immunoglobulin (Ig) G obtained commercially and a polyclonal porcine IgG obtained from serum. A method is first provided to separate Ab protein chain components (light chains, heavy chains) by gel electrophoresis, which is useful for instance for protein-A eluates of Igs either from cell culture or biological samples. This allows for in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein gel band(s) of choice for further MS characterization. Also discussed is the more conventional in-solution overnight digestion method used here with each of two proteolytic enzymes, i.e. trypsin and chymotrypsin. The overnight method is in turn compared with a much faster approach, that of digesting Abs with trypsin or chymotrypsin through the action of microwave heating. For method comparison, glycopeptides are fractionated from digestion mixtures using mostly C-18 cartridges for simplicity, although this enrichment procedure is also compared with other published procedures. The advantages of MALDI tandem mass spectrometry are highlighted for glycopeptide analysis, and lastly an esterification method applied to glycopeptides is

  2. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  3. Histology-directed MALDI mass spectrometry for the diagnostic pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hark Kyun; Kim, In-Hoo

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of targeted agents, it has become clinically important to distinguish histologic types of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) using biopsy samples. We investigated whether direct tissue matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis on lipid may classify histology of NSCLCs. Twentyone pairs of frozen, resected NSCLCs were analyzed using histology-directed, MALDI MS. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid were manually deposited on areas of each tissue section enriched in epithelial cells to identify lipid profiles, and mass spectra were acquired using a MALDI-time of flight instrument. Squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas, two major histologic types of NSCLC, were found to have different lipid profiles. Discriminatory lipids correctly classified the histology of 80.4% of independent NSCLC surgical tissue samples (41 out of 51) in validation set, suggesting that lipid profiles can classify NSCLCs according to the histologic type. We also found that protein and lipid MALDI MS profiles can classify 30 breast cancers according to the intrinsic subtypes. Immunohistochemistry-defined, luminal, HER2+, and triple-negative tumors demonstrated different protein and lipid profiles, as evidenced by cross validation P values < 0.01. Discriminatory proteins and lipids classified tumors according to the intrinsic subtype with median prediction accuracies of 80.0-81.3% in 100 random test sets. Potential advantages of this label-free approach may include small tissue requirement, relatively rapid procedure, and low reagent cost. Day-today variation of this technology is also acceptable, with the Pearson correlation of 0.95. Taken together, these results suggest the possible clinical utility of histology-directed, lipid and protein MALDI MS.

  4. Identification of fungal microorganisms by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chalupová, Jana; Raus, Martin; Sedlářová, Michaela; Sebela, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a reliable tool for fast identification and classification of microorganisms. In this regard, it represents a strong challenge to microscopic and molecular biology methods. Nowadays, commercial MALDI systems are accessible for biological research work as well as for diagnostic applications in clinical medicine, biotechnology and industry. They are employed namely in bacterial biotyping but numerous experimental strategies have also been developed for the analysis of fungi, which is the topic of the present review. Members of many fungal genera such as Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium or Trichoderma and also various yeasts from clinical samples (e.g. Candida albicans) have been successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS. However, there is no versatile method for fungi currently available even though the use of only a limited number of matrix compounds has been reported. Either intact cell/spore MALDI-TOF MS is chosen or an extraction of surface proteins is performed and then the resulting extract is measured. Biotrophic fungal phytopathogens can be identified via a direct acquisition of MALDI-TOF mass spectra e.g. from infected plant organs contaminated by fungal spores. Mass spectrometric peptide/protein profiles of fungi display peaks in the m/z region of 1000-20000, where a unique set of biomarker ions may appear facilitating a differentiation of samples at the level of genus, species or strain. This is done with the help of a processing software and spectral database of reference strains, which should preferably be constructed under the same standardized experimental conditions.

  5. Immunoaffinity sample purification and MALDI-TOF MS analysis of alpha-Solanine and alpha-chaconine in serum.

    PubMed

    Driedger, D R; Sporns, P

    2001-02-01

    A sample purification technique was developed for the detection of potato glycoalkaloids (GAs) in blood serum by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). GAs were extracted from spiked serum (5 mL) using a C(18) solid-phase extraction cartridge. The GAs were then selectively captured on antibody-coated agarose beads. The agarose beads were washed with water and the GAs eluted with 25 microL of methanol. MALDI-TOF MS was used to detect the GAs in the methanol eluent. Immunoaffinity sample purification of the GAs effectively reduced the signal suppression observed during the analysis of unpurified samples. alpha-Chaconine and alpha-solanine were detected in serum spiked with 1 ng/mL of each GA.

  6. Identification of reducing and nonreducing neutral carbohydrates by laser-enhanced in-source decay (LEISD) MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Li, Zong-Jun; Wan, Debin; Lian, Wenhui; Liu, Shuying

    2013-05-01

    In this work, laser-enhanced in-source decay (LEISD) technique of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS) was used to distinguish reducing and nonreducing carbohydrates. Interestingly, easier cleavage of (1 → 2)-linked glycosidic bonds for nonreducing carbohydrates containing D-fructofuranosyl units was observed in MALDI-FT-ICR-MS, which was in agreement with the result of theoretical calculation by the software package Gaussian 09. Importantly, no cross-ring cleavage of fructofuranosyl residues was detected in the LEISD spectra of nonreducing carbohydrates. LEISD method therefore offers an attractive alternative for fast and efficient differentiation of reducing and nonreducing carbohydrates, and the positions of nonreducing monosaccharide residues in a carbohydrate chain could be easily speculated.

  7. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  8. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26419771

  9. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  10. Applications of MALDI-TOF MS to large-scale human mtDNA population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Cerný, Viktor; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA variation in populations is commonly carried out in many fields of biomedical research. We propose the analysis of mitochondrial DNA coding region SNP (mtSNP) variation to a high level of phylogenetic resolution based on MALDI-TOF MS. The African phylogeny has been chosen to test the applicability of the technique but any other part of the worldwide phylogeny (or any other mtSNP panel) could be equally suitable for MALDI-TOF MS genotyping. SNP selection thus aimed to fully cover all the mtSNPs defining major and minor branches of the known African tree, including, macro-haplogroup L, and haplogroups M1, and U6. A total of 230 mtSNPs were finally selected. We used tests samples collected from two different African locations, namely, Mozambique and Chad Basin. Different internal genotyping controls and other indirect approaches (e.g. phylogenetic checking coupled with automatic sequencing) were used in order to evaluate the reproducibility of the technique, which resulted to be 100% using samples previously subjected to whole genome amplification. The advantages of the MALDI-TOF MS are also discussed in comparison with other popular methods such as minisequencing, highlighting its high-throughput nature, which is particularly suitable for case-control medical studies, forensic databasing or population and anthropological studies. PMID:19862743

  11. Differentiation of linear and cyclic polymer architectures by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS2).

    PubMed

    Yol, Aleer M; Dabney, David E; Wang, Shih-Fan; Laurent, Boyd A; Foster, Mark D; Quirk, Roderic P; Grayson, Scott M; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2013-01-01

    [M + Ag](+) ions from cyclic and linear polystyrenes and polybutadienes, formed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), give rise to significantly different fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)) experiments. In both cases, fragmentation starts with homolytic cleavage at the weakest bond, usually a C-C bond, to generate two radicals. From linear structures, the separated radicals depolymerize extensively by monomer losses and backbiting rearrangements, leading to low-mass radical ions and much less abundant medium- and high-mass closed-shell fragments that contain one of the original end groups, along with internal fragments. With cyclic structures, depolymerization is less efficient, as it can readily be terminated by intramolecular H-atom transfer between the still interconnected radical sites (disproportionation). These differences in fragmentation reactivity result in substantially different fragment ion distributions in the MS(2) spectra. Simple inspection of the relative intensities of low- versus high-mass fragments permits conclusive determination of the macromolecular architecture, while full spectral interpretation reveals the individual end groups of linear polymers or the identity of the linker used to form the cyclic polymer. PMID:23192702

  12. Differentiation of Linear and Cyclic Polymer Architectures by MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yol, Aleer M.; Dabney, David E.; Wang, Shih-Fan; Laurent, Boyd A.; Foster, Mark D.; Quirk, Roderic P.; Grayson, Scott M.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2013-01-01

    [M + Ag]+ ions from cyclic and linear polystyrenes and polybutadienes, formed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), give rise to significantly different fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) experiments. In both cases, fragmentation starts with homolytic cleavage at the weakest bond, usually a C-C bond, to generate two radicals. From linear structures, the separated radicals depolymerize extensively by monomer losses and backbiting rearrangements, leading to low-mass radical ions and much less abundant medium- and high-mass closed-shell fragments that contain one of the original end groups, along with internal fragments. With cyclic structures, depolymerization is less efficient, as it can readily be terminated by intramolecular H-atom transfer between the still interconnected radical sites (disproportionation). These differences in fragmentation reactivity result in substantially different fragment ion distributions in the MS2 spectra. Simple inspection of the relative intensities of low- versus high-mass fragments permits conclusive determination of the macromolecular architecture, while full spectral interpretation reveals the individual end groups of linear polymers or the identity of the linker used to form the cyclic polymer.

  13. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  14. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for rapid identification of clinical fungal isolates based on ribosomal protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Anup K; Mirdha, Bijay R; Xess, Immaculata; Paul, Saikat; Samantaray, Jyotish C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Khalil, Shehla; Rastogi, Neha; Dabas, Yubhisha

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the identification of clinical fungal isolates (yeast and molds) by protein profiling using Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). A total of 125 clinical fungal culture isolates (yeast and filamentous fungi) were collected. The test set included 88 yeast isolates (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida kefyr, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida rugosa, Candida tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans) and 37 isolates of molds (Alternaria spp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella spp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum nanum, Rhizomucor spp. and Trichophyton spp.). The correlation between MALDI TOF MS and conventional identification for all these 125 fungal isolates included in the study was 87.2% at the species level and 90.4% at the genus level. MALDI TOF MS results revealed that the correlation in yeast (n=88) identification was 100% both at the genus and species levels whereas, the correlation in mold (n=37) identification was more heterogeneous i.e. 10.81% isolates had correct identification up to the genus level, 56.7% isolates had correct identification both at the genus and species levels, whereas 32.42% isolates were deemed Not Reliable Identification (NRI). But, with the modification in sample preparation protocol for molds, there was a significant improvement in identification. 86.4% isolates had correct identification till the genus and species levels whereas, only 2.7% isolates had Not Reliable Identification. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS could be a possible alternative to conventional techniques both for the identification and differentiation of clinical fungal isolates. However, the main limitation of this technique is that MS identification could be more precise only if the reference spectrum of the fungal species is available in the

  15. Reducing time to identification of positive blood cultures with MALDI-TOF MS analysis after a 5-h subculture.

    PubMed

    Verroken, A; Defourny, L; Lechgar, L; Magnette, A; Delmée, M; Glupczynski, Y

    2015-02-01

    Speeding up the turn-around time of positive blood culture identifications is essential in order to optimize the treatment of septic patients. Several sample preparation techniques have been developed allowing direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification of positive blood cultures. Yet, the hands-on time restrains their routine workflow. In this study, we evaluated an approach whereby MALDI-TOF MS identification without any additional steps was carried out on short subcultured colonies from positive blood bottles with the objective of allowing results reporting on the day of positivity detection. Over a 7-month period in 2012, positive blood cultures detected by 9 am with an automated system were inoculated onto a Columbia blood agar and processed after a 5-h incubation on a MALDI-TOF MicroFlex platform (Bruker Daltonik GmbH). Single-spotted colonies were covered with 1 μl formic acid and 1 μl matrix solution. The results were compared to the validated identification techniques. A total of 925 positive blood culture bottles (representing 470 bacteremic episodes) were included. Concordant identification was obtained in 727 (81.1 %) of the 896 monomicrobial blood cultures, with failure being mostly observed with anaerobes and yeasts. In 17 episodes of polymicrobic bacteremia, the identification of one of the two isolates was achieved in 24/29 (82.7 %) positive cultures. Routine implementation of MALDI-TOF MS identification on young positive blood subcultures provides correct results to the clinician in more than 80 % of the bacteremic episodes and allows access to identification results on the day of blood culture positivity detection, potentially accelerating the implementation of targeted clinical treatments.

  16. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter surveys the analytical techniques used to determine the concentrations of aerosol mass and its chemical components. The techniques surveyed include mass, major ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), organic carbon, elemental carbon, and trace elements. As reported in...

  17. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  18. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modeling in order, ultimately, to identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Furthermore, a holistic view of results across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidized gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i.e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be

  19. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  20. Aerosol-Based Cell Therapy for Treatment of Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kardia, Egi; Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol-based cell delivery technique via intratracheal is an effective route for delivering transplant cells directly into the lungs. An aerosol device known as the MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer is invented to transform liquid into an aerosol form, which then can be applied via intratracheal administration for drug delivery. The device produces a uniform and concentrated distribution of aerosolized liquid. Using the capability of MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer to transform liquid into aerosol form, our group has designed a novel method of cell delivery using an aerosol-based technique. We have successfully delivered skin-derived fibroblast cells and airway epithelial cells into the airway of a rabbit with minimum risk of cell loss and have uniformly distributed the cells into the airway. This chapter illustrates the application of aerosol device to deliver any type of cells for future treatment of lung diseases. PMID:27062596

  1. Shortcomings of the Commercial MALDI-TOF MS Database and Use of MLSA as an Arbiter in the Identification of Nocardia Species.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Gema; de Dios Caballero, Juan; Garrido, Noelia; Valdezate, Sylvia; Cantón, Rafael; Sáez-Nieto, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are difficult to identify, a consequence of the ever increasing number of species known and their homogeneous genetic characteristics. 16S rRNA analysis has been the gold standard for identifying these organisms, but proteomic techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) and housekeeping gene analysis, have also been explored. One hundred high (n = 25), intermediate (n = 20), and low (n = 55) prevalence (for Spain) Nocardia strains belonging to 30 species were identified via 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The manufacturer-provided database MALDI Biotyper library v4.0 (5.627 entries, Bruker Daltonik) was employed. In the high prevalence group (Nocardia farcinica, N. abscessus, N. cyriacigeorgica and N. nova), the 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS methods provided the same identification for 76% of the strains examined. For the intermediate prevalence group (N. brasiliensis, N. carnea, N. otitidiscaviarum and N. transvalensis complex), this figure fell to 45%. In the low-prevalence group (22 species), these two methods were concordant only in six strains at the species level. Tetra-gene multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) involving the concatemer gyrB-16S rRNA-hsp65-secA1 was used to arbitrate between discrepant identifications (n = 67). Overall, the MLSA confirmed the results provided at species level by 16S rRNA analysis in 34.3% of discrepancies, and those provided by MALDI-TOF MS in 13.4%. MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate for the identification of Nocardia species, but only if its reference spectrum database improves, especially with respect to unusual, recently described species and species included in the described Nocardia complexes.

  2. Shortcomings of the Commercial MALDI-TOF MS Database and Use of MLSA as an Arbiter in the Identification of Nocardia Species

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Gema; de Dios Caballero, Juan; Garrido, Noelia; Valdezate, Sylvia; Cantón, Rafael; Sáez-Nieto, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are difficult to identify, a consequence of the ever increasing number of species known and their homogeneous genetic characteristics. 16S rRNA analysis has been the gold standard for identifying these organisms, but proteomic techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) and housekeeping gene analysis, have also been explored. One hundred high (n = 25), intermediate (n = 20), and low (n = 55) prevalence (for Spain) Nocardia strains belonging to 30 species were identified via 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The manufacturer-provided database MALDI Biotyper library v4.0 (5.627 entries, Bruker Daltonik) was employed. In the high prevalence group (Nocardia farcinica, N. abscessus, N. cyriacigeorgica and N. nova), the 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF MS methods provided the same identification for 76% of the strains examined. For the intermediate prevalence group (N. brasiliensis, N. carnea, N. otitidiscaviarum and N. transvalensis complex), this figure fell to 45%. In the low-prevalence group (22 species), these two methods were concordant only in six strains at the species level. Tetra-gene multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) involving the concatemer gyrB-16S rRNA-hsp65-secA1 was used to arbitrate between discrepant identifications (n = 67). Overall, the MLSA confirmed the results provided at species level by 16S rRNA analysis in 34.3% of discrepancies, and those provided by MALDI-TOF MS in 13.4%. MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate for the identification of Nocardia species, but only if its reference spectrum database improves, especially with respect to unusual, recently described species and species included in the described Nocardia complexes. PMID:27148228

  3. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Visualizing In Situ Metabolism of Endogenous Metabolites and Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of bioactive small molecules is indispensable for elucidating their biological or pharmaceutical roles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables determination of the distribution of ionizable molecules present in tissue sections of whole-body or single heterogeneous organ samples by direct ionization and detection. This emerging technique is now widely used for in situ label-free molecular imaging of endogenous or exogenous small molecules. MSI allows the simultaneous visualization of many types of molecules including a parent molecule and its metabolites. Thus, MSI has received much attention as a potential tool for pathological analysis, understanding pharmaceutical mechanisms, and biomarker discovery. On the other hand, several issues regarding the technical limitations of MSI are as of yet still unresolved. In this review, we describe the capabilities of the latest matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI technology for visualizing in situ metabolism of endogenous metabolites or dietary phytochemicals (food factors), and also discuss the technical problems and new challenges, including MALDI matrix selection and metabolite identification, that need to be addressed for effective and widespread application of MSI in the diverse fields of biological, biomedical, and nutraceutical (food functionality) research. PMID:24957029

  4. Characterising phase variations in MALDI-TOF data and correcting them by peak alignment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Simon M; Haney, Richard P; Campa, Michael J; Fitzgerald, Michael C; Patz, Edward F

    2007-01-01

    The use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a means of analyzing the proteome has been evaluated extensively in recent years. One of the limitations of this technique that has impeded the development of robust data analysis algorithms is the variability in the location of protein ion signals along the x-axis. We studied technical variations of MALDI-TOF measurements in the context of proteomics profiling. By acquiring a benchmark data set with five replicates, we estimated 76% to 85% of the total variance is due to phase variation. We devised a lobster plot, so named because of the resemblance to a lobster claw, to help detect the phase variation in replicates. We also investigated a peak alignment algorithm to remove the phase variation. This operation is analogous to the normalization step in microarray data analysis. Only after this critical step can features of biological interest be clearly revealed. With the help of principal component analysis, we demonstrated that after peak alignment, the differences among replicates are reduced. We compared this approach to peak alignment with a model-based calibration approach in which there was known information about peaks in common among all spectra. Finally, we examined the potential value at each point in an analysis pipeline of having a set of methods available that includes parametric, semiparametric and nonparametric methods; among such methods are those that benefit from the use of prior information. PMID:19305630

  5. Quantitation of Alpha-Glucosidase Activity Using Fluorinated Carbohydrate Array and MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyojik; Chan, Allen L; LaVallo, Vincent; Cheng, Quan

    2016-02-01

    Quantitation of alpha-glucosidase (α-GD) activity is of significance to diagnosis of many diseases including Pompe disease and type II diabetes. We report here a new method to determine α-GD activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with carbohydrate microarray and affinity surface chemistry. Carbohydrate probes are synthesized for capture of the enzymatic reaction products and the adducts are loaded onto a fluorinated gold surface to generate an array, which is followed by characterization by MALDI-TOF-MS. The ratio of intensities is used to determine the level of activity of several enzymes. In addition, half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of acarbose and epigallocatechin gallate are also determined using this approach, and the results agree well with the reported values. This method is advantageous as compared to conventional colorimetric techniques that typically suffer matrix interference problems from samples. The use of the polyfluorinated surface has effectively suppressed the interference. PMID:26760440

  6. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  7. MALDI TOF imaging mass spectrometry in clinical pathology: a valuable tool for cancer diagnostics (review).

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Jörg; Kriegsmann, Mark; Casadonte, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an evolving technique in cancer diagnostics and combines the advantages of mass spectrometry (proteomics), detection of numerous molecules, and spatial resolution in histological tissue sections and cytological preparations. This method allows the detection of proteins, peptides, lipids, carbohydrates or glycoconjugates and small molecules.Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue can also be investigated by IMS, thus, this method seems to be an ideal tool for cancer diagnostics and biomarker discovery. It may add information to the identification of tumor margins and tumor heterogeneity. The technique allows tumor typing, especially identification of the tumor of origin in metastatic tissue, as well as grading and may provide prognostic information. IMS is a valuable method for the identification of biomarkers and can complement histology, immunohistology and molecular pathology in various fields of histopathological diagnostics, especially with regard to identification and grading of tumors.

  8. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging of Fabry disease biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, David; Roy, Sandrine; Germain, Dominique P.; Chaminade, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Laprevote, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism, in which a partial or total deficiency of [alpha]-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme, results in the progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids (globotriaosylceramide and digalactosylceramide) in most fluids and tissues of the body. Few information is available about the composition and distribution in tissues of the accumulated glycosphingolipids species. Mass spectrometry imaging is an innovative technique, which can provide pieces of information about the distribution of numerous biological compounds, such as lipids, directly on the tissue sections. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging approaches were used to study the localization of lipids (cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate, vitamin E, glycosphingolipids ...) on skin and kidney sections of patients affected by the Fabry disease. Numerous information on pathophysiology were enlightened by both techniques.

  9. [Screening and identification of forensic molecular markers of injury using MALDI-TOF-MS imaging mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Guo; Chen, Yi-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    There are many deficiencies in forensic traumatic molecular markers detected by the techniques of traditional immunohistology and molecular biology, because these markers are isolated and obscure of the mechanism of interaction. The imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is more suitable for the forensic molecular markers using function of screening, analysis and graphical representation. In this paper, the techniques and the latest research in screening and identification of typical molecular markers by IMS based on matrix-assisted laser adsorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) are reviewed. And its application values in forensic injury are discussed.

  10. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  11. Ionic liquid matrix-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for enhanced MALDI-MS analysis of phospholipids in soybean.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Tapadia, Kavita

    2015-09-15

    Ionic liquid matrix (ILM) is found to be a very versatile substance for analysis of broad range of organic molecules in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) due to good solubility for a variety of analytes, formation of homogenous crystals and high vacuum stability of the matrix. In the present work, an ILM, cyno-4-hydroxycinnamic acid-butylamine (CHCAB) was employed in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) as sample probe and matrix for extraction and ionization of phospholipids from food samples (soybean) prior to MALDI-MS analysis. With the employed technique, 8-125 fold improvement in signal intensity and limit of detection were achieved for the analysis of phospholipids. The best extraction efficiency of phospholipids in ILM-DLLME was obtained with 5min extraction time in presence 30mg/mL CHCAB and 1.2% NaCl using chloroform as an extracting solvent and methanol as a dispersing solvent. Further, the developed ILM-DLLME procedure has been successfully applied for the analysis of phospholipids in soybean samples in MALDI-MS. PMID:26276066

  12. Fractional Factorial Design of MALDI-TOF-MS Sample Preparations for the Optimized Detection of Phospholipids and Acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    AlMasoud, Najla; Correa, Elon; Trivedi, Drupad K; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-06-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has successfully been used for the analysis of high molecular weight compounds, such as proteins and nucleic acids. By contrast, analysis of low molecular weight compounds with this technique has been less successful due to interference from matrix peaks which have a similar mass to the target analyte(s). Recently, a variety of modified matrices and matrix additives have been used to overcome these limitations. An increased interest in lipid analysis arose from the feasibility of correlating these components with many diseases, e.g. atherosclerosis and metabolic dysfunctions. Lipids have a wide range of chemical properties making their analysis difficult with traditional methods. MALDI-TOF-MS shows excellent potential for sensitive and rapid analysis of lipids, and therefore this study focuses on computational-analytical optimization of the analysis of five lipids (4 phospholipids and 1 acylglycerol) in complex mixtures using MALDI-TOF-MS with fractional factorial design (FFD) and Pareto optimality. Five different experimental factors were investigated using FFD which reduced the number of experiments performed by identifying 720 key experiments from a total of 8064 possible analyses. Factors investigated included the following: matrices, matrix preparations, matrix additives, additive concentrations, and deposition methods. This led to a significant reduction in time and cost of sample analysis with near optimal conditions. We discovered that the key factors used to produce high quality spectra were the matrix and use of appropriate matrix additives. PMID:27228355

  13. MALDI-TOF MS and chemometric based identification of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex species.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Clara; Botelho, João; Silva, Liliana; Grosso, Filipa; Nemec, Alexandr; Lopes, João; Peixe, Luísa

    2014-07-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is becoming the technique of choice for rapid bacterial identification at species level in routine diagnostics. However, some drawbacks concerning the identification of closely related species such as those belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (Acb) complex lead to high rates of misidentifications. In this work we successfully developed an approach that combines MALDI-TOF MS and chemometric tools to discriminate the six Acb complex species (A. baumannii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, Acinetobacter pittii, A. calcoaceticus, genomic species "Close to 13TU" and genomic species "Between 1 and 3"). Mass spectra of 83 taxonomically well characterized clinical strains, reflecting the breadth of currently known phenetic diversity within the Acb complex, were achieved from intact cells and cell extracts and analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA). This combined approach lead to 100% of correct species identification using mass spectra obtained from intact cells. Moreover, it was possible to discriminate two Acb complex species (genomic species "Close to 13TU" and genomic species "Between 1 and 3") not included in the MALDI Biotyper database.

  14. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric identification of dyes and pigments.

    PubMed

    Soltzberg, L J; Hagar, Amanda; Kridaratikorn, Supicha; Mattson, Anne; Newman, Richard

    2007-11-01

    We have used MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to characterize a selection of dyes from the Schweppe dye collection and pigments from the Tate Gallery collection. MALDI-TOF mass spectra of such samples are easily obtained and, through observation of both positive and negative ion spectra, provide a convenient, versatile method for dye characterization and identification. Such pairs of positive and negative ion spectra immediately distinguish between acidic and basic dyes and provide the characteristic mass of either the molecular ion or a simply related fragment ion. This approach is especially useful in situations where very small amounts of analyte are available, as in museum research and forensic analysis. In the case of textile dyes, we have carried out identification on material from single fibers and, with insoluble pigments, have begun to identify components of historically important pastel sticks from submicrogram samples.

  15. Determination of cocaine, cocaine metabolites and cannabinoids in single hairs by MALDI Fourier transform mass spectrometry--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, Frank; Arrey, Tabiwang; Strupat, Kerstin

    2013-05-01

    In a preliminary test, four single hairs of a drug abuser were analyzed for the presence of drugs by MALDI Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS). Washed hair strains were directly fixed on a sample plate using pressure stable, double-sided adhesive tape; α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix was manually spotted onto the hair strains. FTMS full scans were obtained moving from the hair root region towards the hair tip. Cocaine (accurate m/z ratio 304.15433) was identified mostly from the root of the hair and then later again towards the hair tip. This was confirmed by analysis of a second hair. Additionally cocaine metabolites with m/z ratio 290.13868 (benzoylecgonine), and m/z 318.16998 (cocaethylene) were detected for plausibility control. Using the MALDI technique, time-related information was obtained concerning the behavioural pattern of the consumer with high resolution compared to conventional procedures. However, in two hairs of the same individual which were analyzed under the same conditions, negative results were achieved. These preliminary results confirm the applicability of MALDI-MS for the determination of drugs and pharmaceuticals in hair samples being useful in forensic toxicology. The high chronological resolution allows an enhanced interpretation concerning the periods of drug administration. However, the negative results with two negative hairs have also demonstrated that hair analysis of single hairs can lead to misinterpretation. Different growth rates have to be considered, and particularly the phenomenon of different growth phases (anagen, catagen, telogen) require attention. PMID:23386550

  16. MALDI linear TOF mass spectrometry of PEGylated (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Birgit K; Siekmann, Jürgen; Belgacem, Omar; Wenzel, Ryan J; Turecek, Peter L; Allmaier, Günter

    2010-06-01

    PEGylation of proteins is a fast growing field in biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences owing to its ability to prolong the serum half-life time of recombinant proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) has been shown to be a powerful tool in the analysis of several PEGylated small proteins. Here we present data obtained with a standard secondary electron multiplier (SEM) and a high mass (HM) detector combined with a MALDI linear TOF MS system for the detection of PEGylated (glyco)proteins in the range of 60-600 kDa. Examples of MALDI TOF MS of small (interferon alpha2a), middle (human serum albumin (HSA)) and high molecular mass proteins (coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF), both heavily glycosylated proteins) are presented. The particular challenge for the analysis was the heterogeneity of the (glyco)proteins in the high molecular weight range in combination with additional PEGylation, which even introduced more heterogeneity and was more challenging for interpretation. Nevertheless, the performance of MALDI linear TOF MS with both detector systems in terms molecular weight and heterogeneity determination depending on the m/z range was superior to the other methods. Although the SEM was able to obtain information about protein PEGylation in the mass range up to 100 kDa (e.g. PEGylated HSA), the HM system was crucial for detection of HM ions (e.g. PEGylated recombinant vWF), which was impossible with the standard SEM.

  17. [Aerosol therapy].

    PubMed

    Wildhaber, J H

    1998-08-15

    Aerosol therapy plays a major role in the diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. The aim of inhalation therapy is to deposit a reproducible and adequate dose of a specific drug to the airways, in order to achieve a high, local, clinical effect while avoiding serious systemic side effects. To achieve this goal, it is therefore important to have an efficient inhalation device to deliver different medications. However, the currently available therapeutic inhalation devices (nebuliser, pressurised metered-dose inhaler and dry powder inhaler) are not very efficient in aerosol delivery and have several disadvantages. Inhalation devices can be assessed by in vitro studies, filter studies and radiolabelled deposition studies. Several radiolabelled deposition studies have shown that nebulisers and pressurised metered-dose inhalers are not very efficient in aerosol delivery. In children, before 1997, only 0.5% to 15% of the total nebulised or actuated dose from a nebuliser or pressurised metered-dose inhaler actually reached the lungs. These numbers were somewhat improved in adults, 30% of the total nebulised or actuated dose reaching the airways. Aerosol therapy with dry powder inhalers was the most efficient before 1997, 30% of the total dose being deposited in the lungs of adults and children. In 1997, new developments in pressurised metered-dose inhalers much improved their efficiency in aerosol delivery. Lung deposition can be increased by up to 60% with use of a non-electrostatic holding chamber and/or a pressurised metered-dose inhaler with a hydrofluoroalkane propellant possessing superior aerosol characteristics. Several studies comparing the clinical efficiency of different inhalation devices have shown that the choice of an optimal inhalation device is crucial. In addition to the aerosol characteristics, ventilation parameters and airway morphology have an important bearing on deposition patterns. These parameters may be greatly influenced by the

  18. Visualization of Time-Dependent Distribution of Rifampicin in Rat Brain Using MALDI MSI and Quantitative LCMS/MS.

    PubMed

    Shobo, Adeola; Bratkowska, Dominika; Baijnath, Sooraj; Naiker, Suhashni; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Maguire, Glenn Eamond Mitchell; Kruger, Hendrik Gert; Govender, Thavendran

    2015-06-01

    Rifampicin (RIF) is a major component for short-course chemotherapy against tuberculosis, since it is active against rapidly metabolizing as well as dormant bacteria. According to the Lipinski rules, RIF should not enter the blood-brain barrier. Visualization of tissue drug distribution is of major importance in pharmacological studies; thus, far imaging of RIF in the brain has been limited to positron emission tomography. We propose using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging techniques as a suitable alternative for the visualization and localization of drug tissue distribution. Using the liquid chromatography mass spectrometric (LCMS) technique, we were able to quantify the concentrations of RIF in the uninfected rat brain; we paired this with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to show the time-dependent manner in which RIF is able to enter the brain. Our results show that even at the minute concentrations measured with LCMS/MS we were able visualize the drug and show its exact distribution in the rat brain. Other available methods require nuclear labeling and the detection of gamma rays produced by labeled compounds to visualize the compound and its localization; MALDI MSI is a more recently developed technique, which can provide detailed information on drug distribution in tissues when compared to other imaging techniques. This study shows that without any requirement for complex preprocessing we are able to produce images with a relatively improved resolution and localization than those acquired using more complex imaging methods, showing MALDI MSI to be an invaluable tool in drug distribution studies.

  19. Biological aerosol trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSha, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    In recent history, manmade and natural events have shown us the every-present need for systems to monitor the troposphere for contaminates. These contaminants may take either a chemical or biological form, which determines the methods we use to monitor them. Monitoring the troposphere for biological contaminants is of particular interest to my organization. Whether manmade or natural, contaminants of a biological origin share similar constituents; typically the aromatic amino acids tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. All of these proteinaceous compounds autofluorescence when exposed to UV radiation and this established the basis of the laser-induced fluorescence technique we use to detect biological contaminants. This technique can be employed in either point or remote detection schemes and is a valuable tool for discriminating proteinaceous form non-proteinaceous aerosols. For this particular presentation I am going to describe a breadboard point sensor we designed and fabricated to detect proteinaceous aerosols. Previous point sensor designs relied on convoluted flow paths to concentrate the aerosols into a solution. Other systems required precise beam alignment to evenly distribute the energy irradiating the detector elements. Our objective was to build a simple system where beam alignment is not critical, and the flow is straight and laminar. The breadboard system was developed over a nine- month period and its performance assessed at a recent test at Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah. In addition, we have performed chamber experiments in an attempt to establish a baseline for the systems. The results of these efforts are presented here.

  20. Tracing the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus on laboratory ants using physical preconcentration coupled ZnO nanoparticle assisted MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Judy; Wu, Hui-Fen; Lee, Chia-Hsun; Manikandan, Muthu

    2012-01-21

    Ants and humans coexist closely and for the most part happily. We consider ants to be harmless, small beings--we have no problem picking them out of our tea cups or sugar jars, throwing them away and continuing to consume the food. This paper is an eye-opener that these ants are not as harmless as they may seem. In particular, our relationship with those present in bacteria-rich environments (e.g. a microbiological lab) need to be reconsidered. From an analytical point of view we have applied the physical preconcentration coupled ZnO NPs assisted MALDI-MS (PP-MALDI-MS) as a novel and sensitive technique for detecting bacteria on the surface of a species of ant present in our laboratory. The preconcentration methods consist of simple techniques comprising of vortex combined with centrifugation or ultrasonication resulting in increasing sample concentration up to the MALDI-MS detection limit. ZnO NPs were used to further enhance the bacterial signals for culture free rapid analysis using MALDI-MS. The importance of a vortex-combined centrifugation approach, using a large number of samples (large number of ants) and decreasing the suspension volume and addition of sample to ZnO NPs (3.5g L(-1)) were found to be crucial prerequisites for increasing MALDI-MS detection of bacteria on ants. We were able to identify the pathogenic clinically important Staphylococcus aureus on the surface of the ants. The bacterial identification was validated using ClinPro 2.1.

  1. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets.

  2. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging: A cutting-edge tool for fundamental and clinical histopathology.

    PubMed

    Longuespée, Rémi; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Mark; Pottier, Charles; Picard de Muller, Gaël; Delvenne, Philippe; Kriegsmann, Jörg; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological diagnoses have been done in the last century based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. These methods were complemented by histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and molecular techniques. Mass spectrometry (MS) methods allow the thorough examination of various biocompounds in extracts and tissue sections. Today, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging links classical histology and molecular analyses. Direct mapping is a major advantage of the combination of molecular profiling and imaging. MSI can be considered as a cutting edge approach for molecular detection of proteins, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, and small molecules in tissues. This review covers the detection of various biomolecules in histopathological sections by MSI. Proteomic methods will be introduced into clinical histopathology within the next few years.

  3. Improved MALDI-TOF Imaging Yields Increased Protein Signals at High Molecular Mass *

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, Barbara D.; Tsaprailis, George; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrum images are created from an array of mass spectra collected over a tissue surface. We have increased the mass range of proteins that can be detected in tissue sections from kidneys of different rodent species, by a modification of the sandwich technique which involves co-crystallizing matrix with analyte. A tissue section is placed upon a drop of sinapinic acid matrix dissolved in 90% ethanol and 0.5% Triton X-100. Once the matrix has dried, a seed layer of sinapinic crystals is added as a dispersion in xylene. Additional layers of sinapinic acid are added as solutions in 90% ethanol followed by 50% acetonitrile. Numerous peaks with signal to noise ratio of four or greater are observed between 25 kDa to 50 kDa. This represents approximately 10 times as many peaks as are detected using traditional matrix spotting and spraying. PMID:18926723

  4. Comparison of the Bruker MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry system and conventional phenotypic methods for identification of Gram-positive rods.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Claudia; Almuzara, Marisa; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Ramírez, María Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry (MS) method has emerged as a promising and a reliable tool for bacteria identification. In this study we compared Bruker MALDI-TOF MS and conventional phenotypic methods to identify a collection of 333 Gram-positive clinical isolates comprising 22 genera and 60 species. 16S rRNA sequencing was the reference molecular technique, and rpoB gene sequecing was used as a secondary gene target when 16Sr RNA did not allow species identification of Corynebacterium spp. We also investigate if score cut-offs values of ≥ 1,5 and ≥ 1,7 were accurate for genus and species-level identification using the Bruker system. Identification at species level was obtained for 92,49% of Gram-positive rods by MALDI-TOF MS compared to 85,89% by phenotypic method. Our data validates the score ≥ 1,5 for genus level and ≥ 1,7 for species-level identification in a large and diverse collection of Gram-positive rods. The present study has proved the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS as an identification method in Gram-positive rods compared to currently used methods in routine laboratories.

  5. Comparison of the Bruker MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry System and Conventional Phenotypic Methods for Identification of Gram-Positive Rods

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Claudia; Almuzara, Marisa; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Ramírez, María Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry (MS) method has emerged as a promising and a reliable tool for bacteria identification. In this study we compared Bruker MALDI-TOF MS and conventional phenotypic methods to identify a collection of 333 Gram-positive clinical isolates comprising 22 genera and 60 species. 16S rRNA sequencing was the reference molecular technique, and rpoB gene sequecing was used as a secondary gene target when 16Sr RNA did not allow species identification of Corynebacterium spp. We also investigate if score cut-offs values of ≥1,5 and ≥1,7 were accurate for genus and species-level identification using the Bruker system. Identification at species level was obtained for 92,49% of Gram-positive rods by MALDI-TOF MS compared to 85,89% by phenotypic method. Our data validates the score ≥1,5 for genus level and ≥1,7 for species-level identification in a large and diverse collection of Gram-positive rods. The present study has proved the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS as an identification method in Gram-positive rods compared to currently used methods in routine laboratories. PMID:25184254

  6. Identification and classification of seafood-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria: 16S rRNA sequencing versus MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Karola; Fernández-No, Inmaculada C; Pazos, Manuel; Gallardo, José M; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Cañas, Benito; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2013-03-01

    The present study aims to compare two molecular technologies, 16S rRNA sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS, for bacterial species identification in seafood. With this aim, 70 reference strains from culture collections, including important seafood-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species, and 50 strains isolated from commercial seafood products, were analysed by both techniques. Genomic analysis only identified the species of 50% of the isolated strains, proving to be particularly poor at identifying members of the Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera. In contrast, MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting identified 76% of the strains at the species level. The mass spectral data were submitted to the SpectraBank database (http://www.spectrabank.org), making this information available to other researchers. Furthermore, cluster analysis of the peak mass lists was carried out with the web application SPECLUST and the calculated groupings were consistent with results determined by a phylogenetic approach that is based on the 16S rRNA sequences. However, the MALDI-TOF MS analysis demonstrated more discriminating potential that allowed for better classification, especially for the Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera. This is of importance with respect to the varying pathogenic and spoilage character at the intragenus and intraspecies level. In this sense, MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated to be a competent bacterial typing tool that extends phenotypic and genotypic approaches, allowing a more ample classification of bacterial strains.

  7. Combination detergent/MALDI matrix: functional cleavable detergents for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jeremy L; Porter, Ned A; Caprioli, Richard M

    2005-08-01

    This study reports the synthesis of the first functional cleavable detergent designed specifically for applications in mass spectrometry. Upon cleavage, two inert compounds and the MALDI matrix are formed, eliminating sources of potential interference originating from traditional cleavable detergents. Analysis of peptides demonstrates that MALDI matrix generated in situ results in MALDI spectra equivalent to those prepared using established protocols. Analysis of the membrane protein diacylglycerol kinase was accomplished using the combination detergent/MALDI matrix. Applications of the functional cleavable detergents to the profiling of whole cell lysates results in increased signal-to-noise ratios of many ions and the detection of additional proteins previously not observed.

  8. Intact spore MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis of Puccinia pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Beinhauer, Jana; Raus, Martin; Hanzalová, Alena; Horčička, Pavel; Šebela, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the identification of pathogens causing rust diseases of crops using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of intact cells or spores (IC/IS). All optimizations were performed with Puccinia triticina, the causal agent of wheat leaf rust. Experiments included selection of washing solvents for spores, finding of an optimal concentration of spores in suspension and the most suitable matrix system as well as an evaluation of different sample preparation techniques. The best results were obtained when the spores were washed with acetonitrile/0.1% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid, 7:3, v/v. A mixture of ferulic and sinapinic acids (5:15mgml(-1)) dissolved in acetonitrile/2.5% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid, 7:3, v/v, was found optimal for the deposition of samples (50μg spores per μl) by two-layer volume technique. The optimized protocol was subsequently applied to other Puccinia species (Puccinia graminis, Puccinia striiformis and Puccinia coronata). Together with the use of the software BIOSPEAN, not only different species but also various pathotypes of the same species, which differ in their virulence, could be discriminated. There were 108 and 29 proteins identified from P. striiformis and P. graminis spores, respectively, after an acidic extraction in the matrix solvent mimicking the sample preparation for MALDI. Besides the presence of ribosomal proteins, histones, regulatory proteins and enzymes, also extracellular proteins participating in the pathogenesis were found. Finally, for both species, several proteins were assigned to signals in typical mass spectrometric profiles and suggested as diagnostic markers. PMID:27267623

  9. MALDI-TOF MS versus VITEK 2 ANC card for identification of anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Gu, Bing; Xia, Wenying; Fan, Kun; Mei, Yaning; Huang, Peijun; Pan, Shiyang

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an accurate, rapid and inexpensive technique that has initiated a revolution in the clinical microbiology laboratory for identification of pathogens. The Vitek 2 anaerobe and Corynebacterium (ANC) identification card is a newly developed method for identification of corynebacteria and anaerobic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ANC card and MALDI-TOF MS techniques for identification of clinical anaerobic isolates. Methods Five reference strains and a total of 50 anaerobic bacteria clinical isolates comprising ten different genera and 14 species were identified and analyzed by the ANC card together with Vitek 2 identification system and Vitek MS together with version 2.0 database respectively. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used as reference method for accuracy in the identification. Results Vitek 2 ANC card and Vitek MS provided comparable results at species level for the five reference strains. Of 50 clinical strains, the Vitek MS provided identification for 46 strains (92%) to the species level, 47 (94%) to genus level, one (2%) low discrimination, two (4%) no identification and one (2%) misidentification. The Vitek 2 ANC card provided identification for 43 strains (86%) correct to the species level, 47 (94%) correct to the genus level, three (6%) low discrimination, three (6%) no identification and one (2%) misidentification. Conclusions Both Vitek MS and Vitek 2 ANC card can be used for accurate routine clinical anaerobe identification. Comparing to the Vitek 2 ANC card, Vitek MS is easier, faster and more economic for each test. The databases currently available for both systems should be updated and further developed to enhance performance. PMID:24822113

  10. Identification of peptides using gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction coupled with AP-MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Wu, Hui-Fen; Zhou, Zi-Cong

    2005-11-15

    A novel technique, gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) for the identification of peptides has been described. The SDME of peptides from aqueous solution was achieved using gold nanoparticles prepared in toluene as the acceptor phase. A simple phenomenon of isoelectric point (pI) of the peptides has been utilized successfully to extract the peptides into a single drop of nanogold in toluene. After extraction, a single-drop nano gold solution was directly spotted onto the target plate with an equal volume of matrix, proportional, variant-cyanohydroxy cinnamic acid ( proportional, variant-CHCA) and analyzed in AP-MALDI-MS. The parameters, such as solvent selection, extraction time, agitation rate, and pH effect, were optimized for the SDME technique. Using this technique, in aqueous solution, the lowest concentration detected for Met- and Leu-enkephalin peptides was 0.2 and 0.17 microM, respectively. In addition, the application of this technique to obtain the signal for the selected peptides in a mass spectrum in the presence of matrix interferences such as 1% Triton X-100 and 6.5 M urea has been showed. The application was extended to identify the peptides spiked into urine.

  11. Passive Remote Sensing of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties got a resurgence in the 1970s when John Reagan and Ben Herman initiated a program to develop and implement a surface-based sunphotometer system to monitor spectral aerosol optical thickness at the University of Arizona. In this presentation I will review the state of the technology used to monitor aerosol optical and microphysical properties, including the determination of spectral aerosol optical thickness and total ozone content. This work continued with John Reagan developed a surface-based spectral flux radiometer to implement Ben Herman's idea to determine the imaginary part of the complex refractive index of aerosols using the recently developed diffuse-direct technique. Progress made both in surface-based instrumentation, inversion theory for analyzing such data, and in satellite observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties will be reviewed to highlight the state of knowledge after 30 years of expanded capability and introduction of novel new capabilities, both from the ground and from spacecraft.

  12. Graphene nanosheet mediated MALDI-MS (GN-MALDI-MS) for rapid, in situ detection of intact incipient biofilm on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo Sgum; Gopal, Judy; Hua, Pei-Yang; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-09-01

    Detection is the first step to efficient treatment, therefore early detection of biofilm gains paramount importance for the initiation of mitigation protocols. A systematic study was conducted to detect the biofilm formation (1h to 2month period) on aluminium, titanium surfaces and their corresponding oxide film surfaces. The limit of detection (LOD) in case of traditional MALDI-MS was limited to a 6h old biofilm. Whereas, in case of the Graphene nanosheet mediated MALDI-MS (GN-MALDI-MS) approach, early detection of the biofilm was demonstrated to be 1h on titanium surfaces and 3h for Al surfaces. PMID:27207065

  13. Viridans Group Streptococci Clinical Isolates: MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry versus Gene Sequence-Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Dedej, Etleva; Vailati, Francesca; Farina, Claudio; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) species-level identification is fundamental for patients management. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization—time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used for VGS identification but discrimination within the Mitis group resulted difficult. In this study, VGS identifications with two MALDI-TOF instruments, the Biotyper (Bruker) and the VITEK MS (bioMérieux) have been compared to those derived from tuf, soda and rpoB genes sequencing. VGS isolates were clustered and a dendrogram constructed using the Biotyper 3.0 software (Bruker). RpoB gene sequencing resulted the most sensitive and specific molecular method for S. pneumonia identification and was used as reference method. The sensitivity and the specificity of the VITEK MS in S. pneumonia identification were 100%, while the Biotyper resulted less specific (92.4%). In non pneumococcal VGS strains, the group-level correlation between rpoB and the Biotyper was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 61% after database upgrading (than 37% before upgrading). The group-level correlation between rpoB and the VITEK MS was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 36% and increases at 69% if isolates identified as S. mitis/S. oralis are included. The less accurate performance of the VITEK MS in VGS identification within the Mitis group was due to the inability to discriminate between S. mitis and S. oralis. Conversely, the Biotyper, after the release of the upgraded database, was able to discriminate between the two species. In the dendrogram, VGS strains from the same group were grouped into the same cluster and had a good correspondence with the gene-based clustering reported by other authors, thus confirming the validity of the upgraded version of the database. Data from this study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF technique can represent a rapid and cost saving method for VGS identification even within the Mitis group but improvements of spectra database are

  14. Multiplex MALDI-TOF MS detection of mitochondrial variants in Brazilian patients with hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Matilde da Silva-Costa, Sueli; Balieiro, Juliane Cristina; Fernandes, Marcela Scabello Amaral; Alves, Rogério Marins; Guerra, Andrea Trevas Maciel; Marcondes, Ana Maria; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by bilateral vision loss. More than 95% of LHON cases are associated with one of the three main mtDNA mutations: G11778A, T14484C, and G3460A. The other 5% of cases are due to other rare mutations related to the disease. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and spectrum of LHON mtDNA mutations, including the haplogroup, in a cohort of Brazilian patients with optic neuropathy and to evaluate the usefulness of iPLEX Gold/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technology in detecting LHON mutations. Methods We analyzed a total of 101 patients; 67 had a clinical diagnosis of LHON and 34 had optic neuropathy of unknown etiology. Direct sequencing and iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS were used to screen for the most common pathogenic point mutations in LHON, together with the rare mutations G3733A, C4171A, T10663C, G14459A, C14482G, A14495G, C14568T, and C14482A. Results We identified mutations in 36 patients, of whom 83.3% carried the G11778A mutation and 16.7% carried the T14484C mutation. In individuals with mutations, the haplogroups found were L1/L2, L3, C, R, U, D, and H. Rare mutations were not detected in any of the patients analyzed. Conclusions The frequencies of the main LHON mutations were similar to those previously reported for Latin America. A different frequency was found only for the A3460G mutation. The most frequent haplogroups identified were of African origin. The iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS technology proved to be highly accurate and efficient for screening mutations and identifying the haplogroups related to LHON. The MassArray platform, combined with other techniques, enabled definitive diagnosis of LHON in 36% (36/101) of the cases studied. PMID:27582625

  15. Development of simple and rapid elution methods for proteins from various affinity beads for their direct MALDI-TOF downstream application.

    PubMed

    Mlynarcik, Patrik; Bencurova, Elena; Madar, Marian; Mucha, Rastislav; Pulzova, Lucia; Hresko, Stanislav; Bhide, Mangesh

    2012-07-19

    Commercially available desalting techniques, necessary for downstream MALDI-TOF analysis of proteins, are often costly or time consuming for large-scale analysis. Here, we present techniques to elute proteins from various affinity resins, free from salt and ready for MALDI mass spectrometry. We showed that 0.1% TFA in 50% acetonitrile or 40% ethanol can be used as salt-free eluents for His-tagged proteins from variety of polyhistidine-affinity resins, while washing of resin beads twice with double-distilled water prior to the elution effectively desalted and recovered wide-range-molecular size proteins than commercially available desalting devices. Modified desalting and elution techniques were also applied for Flag- and Myc-tag affinity resins. The technique was further applied in co-precipitation assay, where the maximum recovery of wide-range molecular size proteins is crucial. Further, results showed that simple washing of the beads with double distilled water followed by elution with acetonitrile effectively desalted and recovered 150 kDa factor H protein of the sheep and its binding partner ~30 kDa BbCRASP-1 in co-precipitation assay. In summary, simple modifications in the desalting and elution strategy save time, labor and cost of the protein preparation for MALDI mass spectrometry; and large-scale protein purifications or co-precipitations can be performed with ease. PMID:22433248

  16. Rapid Detection of K1 Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yonglu; Li, Jiaping; Gu, Danxia; Fang, Ying; Chan, Edward W.; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) are genetic variants of K. pneumoniae which can cause life-threatening community-acquired infection in healthy individuals. Currently, methods for efficient differentiation between classic K. pneumoniae (cKP) and hvKP strains are not available, often causing delay in diagnosis and treatment of hvKP infections. To address this issue, we devised a Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) approach for rapid identification of K1 hvKP strains. Four standard algorithms, genetic algorithm (GA), support vector machine (SVM), supervised neural network (SNN), and quick classifier (QC), were tested for their power to differentiate between K1 and non-K1 strains, among which SVM was the most reliable algorithm. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curves of the interest peaks generated by the SVM model was found to confer highly accurate detection sensitivity and specificity, consistently producing distinguishable profiles for K1 hvKP and non-K1 strains. Of the 43 K. pneumoniae modeling strains tested by this approach, all were correctly identified as K1 hvKP and non-K1 capsule type. Of the 20 non-K1 and 17 K1 hvKP validation isolates, the accuracy of K1 hvKP and non-K1 identification was 94.1 and 90.0%, respectively, according to the SVM model. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS approach can be applied alongside the conventional genotyping techniques to provide rapid and accurate diagnosis, and hence prompt treatment of infections caused by hvKP. PMID:26733976

  17. Photochemistry of Model Organic Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Nizkorodov, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Up to 90 percent of urban aerosol particles have been shown to contain organic molecules. Reactions of these particles with atmospheric oxidants and/or sunlight result in large changes in their composition, toxicity, and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei. For this reason, chemistry of model organic aerosol particles initiated by oxidation and direct photolysis is of great interest to atmospheric, climate, and health scientists. Most studies in this area have focused on identifying the products of oxidation of the organic aerosols, while the products of direct photolysis of the resulting molecules remaining in the aerosol particle have been left mostly unexplored. We have explored direct photolytic processes occurring in selected organic aerosol systems using infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy to identify small gas phase products of photolysis, and mass-spectrometric and photometric techniques to study the condensed phase products. The first model system was secondary organic aerosol formed from the oxidation of several monoterpenes by ozone in the presence and absence of NOx, under different humidities. The second system modeled after oxidatively aged primary organic aerosol particles was a thin film of either alkanes or saturated fatty acids oxidized in several different ways, with the oxidation initiated by ozone, chlorine atom, or OH. In every case, the general conclusion was that the photochemical processing of model organic aerosols is significant. Such direct photolysis processes are believed to age organic aerosol particles on time scales that are short compared to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes.

  18. MALDI-TOF MS of Trichoderma: A model system for the identification of microfungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This investigation aimed to assess whether MALDI-TOF MS analysis of proteomics could be applied to the study of Trichoderma, a fungal genus selected because it includes many species and is phylogenetically well defined. We also investigated whether MALDI-TOF MS analysis of proteomics would reveal ap...

  19. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4 -/- knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  20. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism’s surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4−/− knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers. PMID:24819461

  1. High resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of retinal tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K; Caprioli, Richard M; Schey, Kevin L

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4(-/-) knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  2. Solvent-free MALDI-MS: developmental improvements in the reliability and the potential of MALDI in the analysis of synthetic polymers and giant organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, S; Keune, S; Räder, H J; Müllen, K

    2006-05-01

    A dry sample preparation strategy was previously established as a new method for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), so-called solvent-free MALDI-MS. In this contribution, we examine systems that have been shown problematic with conventional solvent-based MALDI approaches. Problems frequently encountered are solubility, miscibility, and segregation effects during crystallization as a result of unfavorable analyte and matrix polarities. In all cases studied, solvent-free MALDI-MS simplified the measurement and improved the analysis. Solvent-free MALDI-MS enables more reliable results in well-known problematic systems such as polydimethylsiloxane with its segregation effects. However, even in highly compatible analyte/matrix systems such as polystyrene and dithranol, there were undesirable suppression effects when employing THF as solvent. Generally, the solvent-free method allows for more homogeneous analyte/matrix mixtures as well as higher shot-to-shot and sample-to-sample reproducibility. As a result, less laser power has to be applied, which yields milder MALDI conditions, reduced background signals, and provides better resolution of the analyte signals. Solvent-free MALDI-MS proved valuable for the characterization of nanosized material, e.g., fullereno-based structures, which indicated having an increased fragmentation-susceptibility. New analyte/matrix combinations (e.g., polyvinylpyrrolidone/dithranol) are accessible independent of solubility and compatibility in common solvents. An improved quantitation potential is recognized (e.g., insoluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon against soluble dendrite precursor). The rapid and easy measurement of industrial products demonstrates the solvent-free method capable for improved throughput analysis of a variety of compounds (e.g., poly(butylmethacrylate) diol) in routine industrial analysis. Hence, this new MALDI method leads to qualitative and quantitative improvements, making

  3. Comparison of CID spectra of singly charged polypeptide antibiotic precursor ions obtained by positive-ion vacuum MALDI IT/RTOF and TOF/RTOF, AP-MALDI-IT and ESI-IT mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Zehl, Martin; Belgacem, Omar; Raptakis, Emmanuel; Mistrik, Robert; Allmaier, Günter

    2006-04-01

    Various classes of polypeptide antibiotics, including blocked linear peptides (gramicidin D), side-chain-cyclized peptides (bacitracin, viomycin, capreomycin), side-chain-cyclized depsipeptides (virginiamycin S), real cyclic peptides (tyrocidin, gramcidin S) and side-chain-cyclized lipopeptides (polymyxin B and E, amfomycin), were investigated by low-energy collision induced dissociation (LE-CID) as well as high-energy CID (HE-CID). Ion trap (IT) based instruments with different desorption/ionization techniques such as electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (AP-MALDI) and vacuum MALDI (vMALDI) as well as a vMALDI-time-of-flight (TOF)/curved field-reflectron instrument fitted with a gas collision cell were used. For optimum comparability of data from different IT instruments, the CID conditions were standardized and only singly charged precursor ions were considered. Additionally, HE-CID data obtained from the TOF-based instrument were acquired and compared with LE-CID data from ITs. Major differences between trap-based and TOF-based CID data are that the latter data set lacks abundant additional loss of small neutrals (e.g. ammonia, water) but contains product ions down to the immonium-ion-type region, thereby allowing the detection of even single amino-acid (even unusual amino acids) substitutions. For several polypeptide antibiotics, mass spectrometric as well as tandem mass spectrometric data are shown and discussed for the first time, and some yet undescribed minor components are also reported. De novo sequencing of unusually linked minor components of (e.g. cyclic) polypeptides is practically impossible without knowledge of the exact structure and fragmentation behavior of the major components. Finally, the described standardized CID condition constitutes a basic prerequisite for creating a searchable, annotated MS(n)-database of bioactive compounds. The applied desorption/ionization techniques showed no

  4. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  5. Apportionment of Primary and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California During the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside (SOAR-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient sampling was conducted in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside to characterize the composition and sources of organic aerosol using a variety of state-of-the-art instrumentation and source apportionment techniques.

  6. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  7. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry applied to virus identification

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Adriana; Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Buttrini, Mirko; Gorrini, Chiara; Motta, Federica; Germini, Diego; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Virus detection and/or identification traditionally rely on methods based on cell culture, electron microscopy and antigen or nucleic acid detection. These techniques are good, but often expensive and/or time-consuming; furthermore, they not always lead to virus identification at the species and/or type level. In this study, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was tested as an innovative tool to identify human polioviruses and to identify specific viral protein biomarkers in infected cells. The results revealed MALDI-TOF MS to be an effective and inexpensive tool for the identification of the three poliovirus serotypes. The method was firstly applied to Sabin reference strains, and then to isolates from different clinical samples, highlighting its value as a time-saving, sensitive and specific technique when compared to the gold standard neutralization assay and casting new light on its possible application to virus detection and/or identification. PMID:25354905

  8. Paint spray tests for respirators: aerosol characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ackley, M W

    1980-05-01

    Liquid paint is sprayed from an atomizing nozzle to form an aerosol for testing paint spray respirators. The generated aerosol conditions are dependent upon liguid properties, spray-nozzle flow conditions and droplet evaporation. A technique was developed for controlling the aerosol concentrations reliably. Particle-size distributions of lacquer and enamel have been measured. The lacquer distribution was found to be multi-modal. Aerosol concentration dradients arise when the nozzle is not properly positioned. Filter loading resistance is significantly affected by these concentration variations. With regard to selection of standard aerosol test be improved by modifying the current NIOSH criteria to include a description of the particle-size distribution, a more precise definition of the paint and paint thinner chemical compositions, and a narrower concentration range. PMID:6932174

  9. Uranyl-water-containing complexes: solid-state UV-MALDI mass spectrometric and IR spectroscopic approach for selective quantitation.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Since primary environmental concept for long storage of nuclear waste involved assessment of water in uranium complexes depending on migration processes, the paper emphasized solid-state matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) and IR spectroscopic determination of UO2(NO3)2·6H2O; UO2(NO3)2·3H2O, α-, β-, and γ-UO3 modifications; UO3·xH2O (x = 1 or 2); UO3·H2O, described chemically as UO2(OH)2, β- and γ-UO2(OH)2 modifications; and UO4·2H2O, respectively. Advantages and limitation of vibrational spectroscopic approach are discussed, comparing optical spectroscopic data and crystallographic ones. Structural similarities occurred in α-γ modifications of UO3, and UO2(OH)2 compositions are analyzed. Selective speciation achieved by solid-state mass spectrometry is discussed both in terms of its analytical contribution for environmental quality assurance and assessment of radionuclides, and fundamental methodological interest related the mechanistic complex water exchange of UO3·H2O forms in the gas phase. In addition to high selectivity and precision, UV-MALDI-MS, employing an Orbitrap analyzer, was a method that provided fast steps that limited sample pretreatment techniques for direct analysis including imaging. Therefore, random and systematic errors altering metrology and originating from the sample pretreatment stages in the widely implemented analytical protocols for environmental sampling determination of actinides are significantly reduced involving the UV-MALDI-Orbitrap-MS method. The method of quantum chemistry is utilized as well to predict reliably the thermodynamics and nature of U-O bonds in uranium species in gas and condensed phases. PMID:23942998

  10. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  11. Aerosolized Surfactants, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F

    2015-06-01

    Drug delivery by aerosol may have several advantages over other modes, particularly if the lung is the target organ. Aerosol delivery may allow achievement of higher concentrations while minimizing systemic effects and offers convenience, rapid onset of action, and avoidance of the needles and sterile technique necessary with intravenous drug administration. Aerosol delivery may change the pharmacokinetics of many drugs, however, and an awareness of the caveats of aerosolized drug delivery is mandatory to ensure both safety and adequate drug delivery. This paper discusses the administration of surfactants, anti-inflammatory agents, and analgesics by the aerosol route.

  12. Polar Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Phase Functions: Calibration and Field Measurements in Hawaii and the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    A custom polar nephelometer was built to make open air aerosol phase function measurements. The system is calibrated using filtered air as well as known aerosols. Measurements of aerosol phase functions were made in Hawaii and the United Arab Emirates. Using Mie and Pollack and Cuzzi code, aerosol size distributions are inverted. Time permiting these results will be compared with aerosol size distribution measurements obtained by other techniques.

  13. Development of a dual-internal-reference technique to improve accuracy when determining bacterial 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio with application to Escherichia coli liquid and aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Krumins, Valdis; Fennell, Donna E; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate enumeration of rRNA content in microbial cells, e.g. by using the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio, is critical to properly understand its relationship to microbial activities. However, few studies have considered possible methodological artifacts that may contribute to the variability of rRNA analysis results. In this study, a technique utilizing genomic DNA and 16S rRNA from an exogenous species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) as dual internal references was developed to improve accuracy when determining the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of a target organism, Escherichia coli. This technique was able to adequately control the variability in sample processing and analysis procedures due to nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) losses, inefficient reverse transcription of RNA, and inefficient PCR amplification. The measured 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased by 2-3 fold when E. coli 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA quantities were normalized to the sample-specific fractional recoveries of reference (P. fluorescens) 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA, respectively. In addition, the intra-sample variation of this ratio, represented by coefficients of variation from replicate samples, decreased significantly after normalization. This technique was applied to investigate the temporal variation of 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli during its non-steady-state growth in a complex liquid medium, and to E. coli aerosols when exposed to particle-free air after their collection on a filter. The 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased significantly during its early exponential phase of growth; when E. coli aerosols were exposed to extended filtration stress after sample collection, the ratio also increased. In contrast, no significant temporal trend in E. coli 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio was observed when the determined ratios were not normalized based on the recoveries of dual references. The developed technique could be widely applied in studies of relationship between

  14. Development of a dual-internal-reference technique to improve accuracy when determining bacterial 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio with application to Escherichia coli liquid and aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Krumins, Valdis; Fennell, Donna E; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate enumeration of rRNA content in microbial cells, e.g. by using the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio, is critical to properly understand its relationship to microbial activities. However, few studies have considered possible methodological artifacts that may contribute to the variability of rRNA analysis results. In this study, a technique utilizing genomic DNA and 16S rRNA from an exogenous species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) as dual internal references was developed to improve accuracy when determining the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of a target organism, Escherichia coli. This technique was able to adequately control the variability in sample processing and analysis procedures due to nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) losses, inefficient reverse transcription of RNA, and inefficient PCR amplification. The measured 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased by 2-3 fold when E. coli 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA quantities were normalized to the sample-specific fractional recoveries of reference (P. fluorescens) 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA, respectively. In addition, the intra-sample variation of this ratio, represented by coefficients of variation from replicate samples, decreased significantly after normalization. This technique was applied to investigate the temporal variation of 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli during its non-steady-state growth in a complex liquid medium, and to E. coli aerosols when exposed to particle-free air after their collection on a filter. The 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased significantly during its early exponential phase of growth; when E. coli aerosols were exposed to extended filtration stress after sample collection, the ratio also increased. In contrast, no significant temporal trend in E. coli 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio was observed when the determined ratios were not normalized based on the recoveries of dual references. The developed technique could be widely applied in studies of relationship between

  15. Screening of nerve agent degradation products by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Shu, You-Ren; Su, An-Kai; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for the rapid screening of degradation products derived from nerve agents by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Five standard products were selected as model compounds, including isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (i-BuMPA), and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CHMPA), which are degradation products of Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), VX, Russian VX (RVX), and GF, respectively. For comparison, CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and DCCA (7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) were used as the MALDI-matrix when the third harmonic generation (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a hydrogen Raman laser (multifrequency laser) were used, respectively. The method permitted the five nerve agent degradation products to be screened rapidly and successfully, suggesting that it has the potential for use as a routine monitoring tool. PMID:16808484

  16. Investigating quantitation of phosphorylation using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Laurie; Engel-Hall, Aaron; Drew, Kevin; Steinhardt, George; Helseth, Donald L.; Jabon, David; McMurry, Timothy; Angulo, David S.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in methods and instrumentation for analysis of phosphopeptides using mass spectrometry, it is still difficult to quantify the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate due to physiochemical differences between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides. Here we report experiments to investigate those differences using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for a set of synthetic peptides by creating calibration curves of known input ratios of peptides/phosphopeptides and analyzing their resulting signal intensity ratios. These calibration curves reveal subtleties in sequence-dependent differences for relative desorption/ionization efficiencies that cannot be seen from single-point calibrations. We found that the behaviors were reproducible with a variability of 5–10% for observed phosphopeptide signal. Although these data allow us to begin addressing the issues related to modeling these properties and predicting relative signal strengths for other peptide sequences, it is clear this behavior is highly complex and needs to be further explored. PMID:18064576

  17. Screening of nerve agent degradation products by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Shu, You-Ren; Su, An-Kai; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for the rapid screening of degradation products derived from nerve agents by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Five standard products were selected as model compounds, including isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (i-BuMPA), and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CHMPA), which are degradation products of Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), VX, Russian VX (RVX), and GF, respectively. For comparison, CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and DCCA (7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) were used as the MALDI-matrix when the third harmonic generation (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a hydrogen Raman laser (multifrequency laser) were used, respectively. The method permitted the five nerve agent degradation products to be screened rapidly and successfully, suggesting that it has the potential for use as a routine monitoring tool.

  18. Peptidome Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid by LC-MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj; Gobom, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We report on the analysis of endogenous peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by mass spectrometry. A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from CSF. Analysis of the extracts by offline LC-MALDI MS resulted in the detection of 3,000–4,000 peptide-like features. Out of these, 730 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The majority of these peptides have not been previously reported in CSF. The identified peptides were found to originate from 104 proteins, of which several have been reported to be involved in different disorders of the central nervous system. These results support the notion that CSF peptidomics may be viable complement to proteomics in the search of biomarkers of CNS disorders. PMID:22880031

  19. Identification of metal-binding to proteins in seed samples using RF-HPLC-UV, GFAAS and MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Rigueira, Leila M B; Lana, Diogo A P D; Dos Santos, Daniel M; Pimenta, Adriano M; Augusti, Rodinei; Costa, Leticia M

    2016-11-15

    An extraction procedure using Tris-HCl buffer solution was employed in order to extract water-soluble proteins from seed samples of oat, wheat and soybean. Initially, the total protein concentration was determined by the Bradford method in each solution, after the extraction procedure. The soybean sample showed a higher concentration of total protein compared to the others. The protein extracts obtained were separated by reverse-phase chromatography (RP-HPLC-UV). The protein fractions were collected and analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF-MS) for determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn and identification of proteins, respectively. The combination of techniques such as RP-HPLC-UV, GFAAS and MALDI-TOF-MS allowed the identification of several proteins bound to metals present in the seed samples.

  20. Identification of metal-binding to proteins in seed samples using RF-HPLC-UV, GFAAS and MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Rigueira, Leila M B; Lana, Diogo A P D; Dos Santos, Daniel M; Pimenta, Adriano M; Augusti, Rodinei; Costa, Leticia M

    2016-11-15

    An extraction procedure using Tris-HCl buffer solution was employed in order to extract water-soluble proteins from seed samples of oat, wheat and soybean. Initially, the total protein concentration was determined by the Bradford method in each solution, after the extraction procedure. The soybean sample showed a higher concentration of total protein compared to the others. The protein extracts obtained were separated by reverse-phase chromatography (RP-HPLC-UV). The protein fractions were collected and analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF-MS) for determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn and identification of proteins, respectively. The combination of techniques such as RP-HPLC-UV, GFAAS and MALDI-TOF-MS allowed the identification of several proteins bound to metals present in the seed samples. PMID:27283712

  1. Identification of Dermatophyte Species after Implementation of the In-House MALDI-TOF MS Database

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Adriana; Motta, Federica; Montecchini, Sara; Gorrini, Chiara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Piergianni, Maddalena; Buttrini, Mirko; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Despite that matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful tool in the clinical microbiology setting, few studies have till now focused on MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of dermatophytes. In this study, we analyze dermatophytes strains isolated from clinical samples by MALDI-TOF MS to supplement the reference database available in our laboratory. Twenty four dermatophytes (13 reference strains and 11 field isolated strains), identified by both conventional and molecular standard procedures, were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, and the spectra obtained were used to supplement the available database, limited to a few species. To verify the robustness of the implemented database, 64 clinical isolates other than those used for the implementation were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The implementation allowed the identification of the species not included in the original database, reinforced the identification of the species already present and correctly identified those within the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex previously classified as Trichophyton. tonsurans by MALDI-TOF MS. The dendrogram obtained by analyzing the proteic profiles of the different species of dermatophytes reflected their taxonomy, showing moreover, in some cases, a different clusterization between the spectra already present in the database and those newly added. In this study, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a useful tool suitable for the identification of dermatophytes for diagnostic purpose. PMID:25216335

  2. AERONET data investigation of the aerosol mixtures over Iasi area, One-year time scale overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, Mihai Marius; Timofte, Adrian; Unga, Florin; Albina, Bogdan; Gurlui, Silviu

    2015-03-01

    In order to analyze the troposphere dynamics under particular conditions in North-East region of Romania, various types of aerosols chemical compositions have been studied using complementary techniques. Thus, the seasonal trends of aerosols and its external influences have been studied using aerosol optical properties retrieved from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Complementary studies were taken into account by using several meteorological factors, computational models and meteorological data. Moreover, this paper presents optical properties analysis of different types of aerosols and the seasonal variability of them in one year of measurements. The major categories of aerosol types are evidenced, such as urban/industrial aerosol, biomass burning and mineral dust.

  3. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  4. MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate pattern recognition analysis for the rapid biomarker profiling of Escherichia coli in different growth phases.

    PubMed

    Momo, Remi A; Povey, Jane F; Smales, C Mark; O'Malley, Christopher J; Montague, Gary A; Martin, Elaine B

    2013-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) has been exploited extensively in the field of microbiology for the characterisation of bacterial species, the detection of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis and bacterial identification. Here, the multivariate data analysis technique of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to 'intact cell' MALDI-ToF MS data obtained from Escherichia coli cell samples to determine if such an approach could be used to distinguish between, and characterise, different growth phases. PLS-DA is a technique that has the potential to extract systematic variation from large and noisy data sets by identifying a lower-dimensional subspace that contains latent information. The application of PLS-DA to the MALDI-ToF data obtained from cells at different stages of growth resulted in the successful classification of the samples according to the growth phase of the bacteria cultures. A further outcome of the analysis was that it was possible to identify the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio peaks or ion signals that contributed to the classification of the samples. The Swiss-Prot/TrEMBL database and primary literature were then used to provisionally assign a small number of these m/z ion signals to proteins, and these tentative assignments revealed that the major contributors from the exponential phase were ribosomal proteins. Additional assignments were possible for the stationary phase and the decline phase cultures where the proteins identified were consistent with previously observed biological interpretation. In summary, the results show that MALDI-ToF MS, PLS-DA and a protein database search can be used in combination to discriminate between 'intact cell' E. coli cell samples in different growth phases and thus could potentially be used as a tool in process development in the bioprocessing industry to enhance cell growth and cell engineering strategies.

  5. Visualizing fungal metabolites during mycoparasitic interaction by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Holzlechner, Matthias; Reitschmidt, Sonja; Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Studying microbial interactions by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) directly from growing media is a difficult task if high sensitivity is demanded. We present a quick and robust sample preparation strategy for growing fungi (Trichoderma atroviride, Rhizoctonia solani) on glass slides to establish a miniaturized confrontation assay. By this we were able to visualize metabolite distributions by MALDI MSI after matrix deposition with a home-built sublimation device and thorough recrystallization. We present for the first time MALDI MSI data for secondary metabolite release during active mycoparasitism.

  6. Visualizing fungal metabolites during mycoparasitic interaction by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holzlechner, Matthias; Reitschmidt, Sonja; Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Studying microbial interactions by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) directly from growing media is a difficult task if high sensitivity is demanded. We present a quick and robust sample preparation strategy for growing fungi (Trichoderma atroviride, Rhizoctonia solani) on glass slides to establish a miniaturized confrontation assay. By this we were able to visualize metabolite distributions by MALDI MSI after matrix deposition with a home‐built sublimation device and thorough recrystallization. We present for the first time MALDI MSI data for secondary metabolite release during active mycoparasitism. PMID:26959280

  7. Visualizing fungal metabolites during mycoparasitic interaction by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Holzlechner, Matthias; Reitschmidt, Sonja; Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Studying microbial interactions by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) directly from growing media is a difficult task if high sensitivity is demanded. We present a quick and robust sample preparation strategy for growing fungi (Trichoderma atroviride, Rhizoctonia solani) on glass slides to establish a miniaturized confrontation assay. By this we were able to visualize metabolite distributions by MALDI MSI after matrix deposition with a home-built sublimation device and thorough recrystallization. We present for the first time MALDI MSI data for secondary metabolite release during active mycoparasitism. PMID:26959280

  8. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Spatial Molecular Analysis to Enable a New Age of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gessel, Megan M.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) combines the sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry with spatial analysis to provide a new dimension for histological analyses to provide unbiased visualization of the arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. As such, MALDI IMS has the capability to become a powerful new molecular technology for the biological and clinical sciences. In this review, we briefly describe several applications of MALDI IMS covering a range of molecular weights, from drugs to proteins. Current limitations and challenges are discussed along with recent developments to address these issues. PMID:24686089

  9. Chemometric analysis of MALDI mass spectrometric images of three-dimensional cell culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Eric M.; Hummon, Amanda B.; Keithley, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    As imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has grown in popularity in recent years, the applications of this technique have become increasingly diverse. Currently there is a need for sophisticated data processing strategies that maximize the information gained from large IMS data sets. Traditional two-dimensional heat maps of single ions generated in IMS experiments lack analytical detail, yet manual analysis of multiple peaks across hundreds of pixels within an entire image is time-consuming, tedious and subjective. Here, various chemometric methods were used to analyze data sets obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS of multicellular spheroids. HT-29 colon carcinoma multicellular spheroids are an excellent in vitro model system that mimic the three dimensional morphology of tumors in vivo. These data are especially challenging to process because, while different microenvironments exist, the cells are clonal which can result in strong similarities in the mass spectral profiles within the image. In this proof-of-concept study, a combination of principal component analysis (PCA), clustering methods, and linear discriminant analysis was used to identify unique spectral features present in spatially heterogeneous locations within the image. Overall, the application of these exploratory data analysis tools allowed for the isolation and detection of proteomic changes within IMS data sets in an easy, rapid, and unsupervised manner. Furthermore, a simplified, non-mathematical theoretical introduction to the techniques is provided in addition to full command routines within the MATLAB programming environment, allowing others to easily utilize and adapt this approach. PMID:26604989

  10. The comparison of glycosphingolipids isolated from an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line using MALDI-MS and MALDI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Rajanayake, Krishani K; Taylor, William R; Isailovic, Dragan

    2016-08-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are important biomolecules, which are linked to many diseases such as GSL storage disorders and cancer. Consequently, the expression of GSLs may be altered in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to apparently healthy cell lines. Here, differential expressions of GSLs in an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 and a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line T29 were studied using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and MALDI-MS/MS. The isolation of GSLs from SKOV3 and T29 cell lines was carried out using Folch partition. GSLs were successfully detected by MALDI-MS, and structurally assigned by a comparison of their MALDI-MS/MS fragmentation patterns with MS/MS data found in SimLipid database. Additionally, LIPID MAPS was used to assign GSL ion masses in MALDI-MS spectra. Seventeen neutral GSLs were identified in Folch partition lower (chloroform/methanol) phases originating from both cell lines, while five globo series neutral GSLs were identified only in the Folch partition lower phase of SKOV3 cell line. Several different sialylated GSLs were detected in Folch partition upper (water/methanol) phases of SKOV3 and T29 cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrates the alteration and increased glycosylation of GSLs in an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line in comparison to a nontumorigenic epithelial ovarian cell line. PMID:27267063

  11. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  12. Ensembles of satellite aerosol retrievals based on three AATSR algorithms within aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmale, Miriam; Popp, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Ensemble techniques are widely used in the modelling community, combining different modelling results in order to reduce uncertainties. This approach could be also adapted to satellite measurements. Aerosol_cci is an ESA funded project, where most of the European aerosol retrieval groups work together. The different algorithms are homogenized as far as it makes sense, but remain essentially different. Datasets are compared with ground based measurements and between each other. Three AATSR algorithms (Swansea university aerosol retrieval, ADV aerosol retrieval by FMI and Oxford aerosol retrieval ORAC) provide within this project 17 year global aerosol records. Each of these algorithms provides also uncertainty information on pixel level. Within the presented work, an ensembles of the three AATSR algorithms is performed. The advantage over each single algorithm is the higher spatial coverage due to more measurement pixels per gridbox. A validation to ground based AERONET measurements shows still a good correlation of the ensemble, compared to the single algorithms. Annual mean maps show the global aerosol distribution, based on a combination of the three aerosol algorithms. In addition, pixel level uncertainties of each algorithm are used for weighting the contributions, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the ensemble. Results of different versions of the ensembles for aerosol optical depth will be presented and discussed. The results are validated against ground based AERONET measurements. A higher spatial coverage on daily basis allows better results in annual mean maps. The benefit of using pixel level uncertainties is analysed.

  13. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  14. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  15. MALDI in-source decay of high mass protein isoforms: application to alpha- and beta-tubulin variants.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, David; Villard, Claude; Terras, Lionel; Braguer, Diane; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Lafitte, Daniel

    2010-07-15

    Tubulin is one of the major targets in cancer chemotherapy and the target of more than twenty percent of the cancer chemotherapic agents. The modulation of isoform content has been hypothesized as being a cause of resistance to treatment. Isoform differences lie mostly in the C-terminus part of the protein. Extensive characterization of this polypeptide region is therefore of critical importance. MALDI-TOF fragmentation of tubulin C-terminal domains was tested using synthetic peptides. Then, isotypes from HeLa cells were successfully characterized for the first time by in-source decay (ISD) fragmentation of their C-terminus coupled to a pseudo MS(3) technique named T(3)-sequencing. The fragmentation occurred in-source, preferentially generating y(n)-series ions. This approach required guanidination for the characterization of the beta(III)-tubulin C-terminus peptide. This study is, to our knowledge, the first example of reflectron in-source decay (reISD) of the C-terminus of a 50 kDa protein. This potentially occurs via a CID-like mechanism occurring in the MALDI plume. There are now new avenues for top-down characterization of important clinical biomarkers such as beta(III)-tubulin isotypes, a potential marker of drug resistance and tumor progression. This paper raises the challenge of protein isotypes characterization for early cancer detection and treatment monitoring.

  16. Two-Dimensional N-Glycan Distribution Mapping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas W; Holst, Stephanie; Wuhrer, Manfred; Mehta, Anand S; Drake, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    A new mass spectrometry imaging approach to simultaneously map the two-dimensional distribution of N-glycans in tissues has been recently developed. The method uses Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to spatially profile the location and distribution of multiple N-linked glycan species released by peptide N-glycosidase F in frozen or formalin-fixed tissues. Multiple formalin-fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were evaluated with this method, resulting in a panel of over 30 N-glycans detected. An ethylation reaction of extracted N-glycans released from adjacent slides was done to stabilize sialic acid containing glycans, and these structures were compared to N-glycans detected directly from tissue profiling. In addition, the distribution of singly fucosylated N-glycans detected in tumor tissue microarray cores were compared to the histochemistry staining pattern of a core fucose binding lectin. As this MALDI-IMS workflow has the potential to be applied to any formalin-fixed tissue block or tissue microarray, the advantages and limitations of the technique in context with other glycomic methods are also summarized. PMID:26501333

  17. The Use of MALDI-TOF-MS and In Silico Studies for Determination of Antimicrobial Peptides' Affinity to Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Santi M.; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio L.

    2012-11-01

    Several methods have been proposed for determining the binding affinity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to bacterial cells. Here the utilization of MALDI-TOF-MS was proposed as a reliable and efficient method for high throughput AMP screening. The major advantage of the technique consists of finding AMPs that are selective and specific to a wide range of Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, providing a simple reliable screening tool to determine the potential candidates for broad spectrum antimicrobial drugs. As a prototype, amp-1 and -2 were used, showing highest activity toward Gram-negative and -positive membranes respectively. In addition, in silico molecular docking studies with both peptides were carried out for the membranes. In silico results indicated that both peptides presented affinity for DPPG and DPPE phospholipids, constructed in order to emulate an in vivo membrane bilayer. As a result, amp-1 showed a higher complementary surface for Gram-negative while amp-2 showed higher affinity to Gram-positive membranes, corroborating MS analyses. In summary, results here obtained suggested that in vitro methodology using MALDI-TOF-MS in addition to theoretical studies may be able to improve AMP screening quality.

  18. MALDI mass spectrometry-assisted molecular imaging of metabolites during nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Gemperline, Erin; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Chen, Ruibing; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Howes-Podoll, Maegen; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2013-07-01

    Symbiotic associations between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia culminate in the formation of specialized organs called root nodules, in which the rhizobia fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer it to the plant. Efficient biological nitrogen fixation depends on metabolites produced by and exchanged between both partners. The Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for dissecting this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis because of the availability of genetic information for both symbiotic partners. Here, we employed a powerful imaging technique - matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)/mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) - to study metabolite distribution in roots and root nodules of M. truncatula during nitrogen fixation. The combination of an efficient, novel MALDI matrix [1,8-bis(dimethyl-amino) naphthalene, DMAN] with a conventional matrix 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) allowed detection of a large array of organic acids, amino acids, sugars, lipids, flavonoids and their conjugates with improved coverage. Ion density maps of representative metabolites are presented and correlated with the nitrogen fixation process. We demonstrate differences in metabolite distribution between roots and nodules, and also between fixing and non-fixing nodules produced by plant and bacterial mutants. Our study highlights the benefits of using MSI for detecting differences in metabolite distributions in plant biology.

  19. Rapid species identification of seafood spoilage and pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria by MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Karola; Fernández-No, Inmaculada C; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Gallardo, Jose M; Cañas, Benito; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2011-11-01

    The rapid identification of food pathogenic and spoilage bacteria is important to ensure food quality and safety. Seafood contaminated with pathogenic bacteria is one of the major causes of food intoxications, and the rapid spoilage of seafood products results in high economic losses. In this study, a collection of the main seafood pathogenic and spoilage Gram-positive bacteria was compiled, including Bacillus spp., Listeria spp., Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. The strains, belonging to 20 different species, were obtained from the culture collections and studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A reference library was created, including the spectral fingerprints of 32 reference strains and the extracted peak lists with 10-30 peak masses. Genus-specific as well as species-specific peak masses were assigned and could serve as biomarkers for the rapid bacterial identification. Furthermore, the peak mass lists were clustered with the web-application SPECLUST to show the phyloproteomic relationships among the studied strains. Afterwards, the method was successfully applied to identify six strains isolated from seafood by comparison with the reference library. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene was carried out and contrasted with the proteomic approach. This is the first time MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is applied to Gram-positive bacterial identification in seafood, being a fast and accurate technique to ensure seafood quality and safety.

  20. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  1. Urban aerosol refractive index prediction by partial molar refraction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Stelson, A.W. )

    1990-11-01

    The ambient aerosol of the polluted troposphere is a complex mixture of water, electrolytes, ionic solids, metal oxides and glasses, and carbonaceous material. Prediction of the refractive indexes of these inhomogeneous mixtures can be a formidable task. Contained within this paper is the necessary parameterization to estimate the mean real aerosol refractive index based on aerosol chemical composition and the partial molar refraction approach. This approach assumes all chemical constituents are homogeneously distributed throughout the aerosol phase. Consistency of the data is discussed, and this approach is verified by prediction of refractive indexes of NaOH-Si-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O mixtures. Finally, aerosol chemical composition data from the Los Angeles Basin are used to predict mean real aerosol refractive indexes. These values are compared to urban aerosol refractive indexes calculated via other techniques (light scattering).

  2. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  3. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  4. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  5. Microfluidic LC Device with Orthogonal Sample Extraction for On-Chip MALDI-MS Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Iulia M.; Kabulski, Jarod L.

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device that enables on-chip matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) detection for liquid chromatography (LC) separations is described. The device comprises an array of functional elements to carry out LC separations, integrates a novel microchip-MS interface to facilitate the orthogonal transposition of the microfluidic LC channel into an array of reservoirs, and enables sensitive MALDI-MS detection directly from the chip. Essentially, the device provides a snapshot MALDI-MS map of the content of the separation channel present on the chip. The detection of proteins with biomarker potential from MCF10A breast epithelial cell extracts, and detection limits in the low fmol range, are demonstrated. In addition, the design of the novel LC-MALDI-MS chip entices the promotion of a new concept for performing sample separations within the limited time-frame that accompanies the dead-volume of a separation channel. PMID:23592150

  6. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  7. Satellite stratospheric aerosol measurement validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The validity of the stratospheric aerosol measurements made by the satellite sensors SAM II and SAGE was tested by comparing their results with each other and with results obtained by other techniques (lider, dustsonde, filter, and impactor). The latter type of comparison required the development of special techniques that convert the quantity measured by the correlative sensor (e.g., particle backscatter, number, or mass) to that measured by the satellite sensor (extinction) and quantitatively estimate the uncertainty in the conversion process. The results of both types of comparisons show agreement within the measurement and conversion uncertainties. Moreover, the satellite uncertainty is small compared to aerosol natural variability (caused by seasonal changes, volcanoes, sudden warmings, and vortex structure). It was concluded that the satellite measurements are valid.

  8. Satellite stratospheric aerosol measurement validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The validity of the stratospheric aerosol measurements made by the satellite sensors SAM II and SAGE was tested by comparing their results with each other and with results obtained by other techniques (lider, dustsonde, filter, and impactor). The latter type of comparison required the development of special techniques that convert the quantity measured by the correlative sensor (e.g. particle backscatter, number, or mass) to that measured by the satellite sensor (extinction) and quantitatively estimate the uncertainty in the conversion process. The results of both types of comparisons show agreement within the measurement and conversion uncertainties. Moreover, the satellite uncertainty is small compared to aerosol natural variability (caused by seasonal changes, volcanoes, sudden warmings, and vortex structure). It was concluded that the satellite measurements are valid.

  9. Usefulness of CHROMagar Candida Medium, Biochemical Methods--API ID32C and VITEK 2 Compact and Two MALDI-TOF MS Systems for Candida spp. Identification.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Elzbieta; Baraniak, Anna; Fortuna, Monika; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare of the yeasts identification results obtained with two new systems using the MALDI-TOF MS technique with the ones obtained using the routine identification methods of Candida spp. in clinical microbiology laboratories. All 124 Candida spp. isolates were recovered from the routine examination of clinical specimens in microbiological laboratories and collected in the Centre of Quality Control in Microbiology in Warsaw (Poland). Our findings confirm the high agreement (98%) of fungal identification using the standard, biochemistry laboratory methods and mass spectrometry technique. PMID:27282002

  10. MALDI-TOF typing highlights geographical and fluconazole resistance clusters in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; Al-Yasiri, M; Chaker, E; El Euch, D; Vranckx, K; Hendrickx, M; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra for Candida glabrata typing would be a cost-effective and easy-to-use alternative to classical DNA-based typing methods. This study aimed to use MALDI-TOF for the typing of C. glabrata clinical isolates from various geographical origins and test its capacity to differentiate between fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strains.Both microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 58 C. glabrata isolates originating from Marseilles (France) and Tunis (Tunisia) as well as collection strains from diverse geographic origins were analyzed. The same analysis was conducted on a subset of C. glabrata isolates that were either susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 mg/l) or resistant (MIC ≥ 64 mg/l) to fluconazole.According to the seminal results, both MALDI-TOF and MLP classifications could highlight C. glabrata population structures associated with either geographical dispersal barriers (p < 10(-5)) or the selection of antifungal drug resistance traits (<10(-5)).In conclusion, MALDI-TOF geographical clustering was congruent with MPL genotyping and highlighted a significant population genetic structure according to fluconazole susceptibility in C. glabrata. Furthermore, although MALDI-TOF and MLP resulted in distinct classifications, MALDI-TOF also classified the isolates with respect to their fluconazole susceptibility profile. Further prospective studies are required to evaluate the capacity of MALDI-TOF typing to investigate C. glabrata infection outbreaks and predict the antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical laboratory isolates.

  11. Ant colony optimization for biomarker identification from MALDI-TOF mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Ressom, Habtom W; Varghese, Rency S; Orvisky, Eduard; Drake, Steven K; Hortin, Glen L; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Loffredo, Christopher A; Goldman, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    We present a novel method that combines ant colony optimization with support vector machines (ACO-SVM) to select candidate biomarkers from MALDI-TOF serum profiles of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and matched controls. The method identified relevant mass points that achieve high sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing HCC patients from healthy individuals. The results indicate that the MALDI-TOF technology could provide the means to discover novel biomarkers for HCC. PMID:17946638

  12. Ant colony optimization for biomarker identification from MALDI-TOF mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Ressom, Habtom W; Varghese, Rency S; Orvisky, Eduard; Drake, Steven K; Hortin, Glen L; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Loffredo, Christopher A; Goldman, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    We present a novel method that combines ant colony optimization with support vector machines (ACO-SVM) to select candidate biomarkers from MALDI-TOF serum profiles of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and matched controls. The method identified relevant mass points that achieve high sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing HCC patients from healthy individuals. The results indicate that the MALDI-TOF technology could provide the means to discover novel biomarkers for HCC.

  13. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis to characterize Candida clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Crea, Francesca; Palazzotti, Bernardetta; Dedej, Etleva; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Clinical Candida isolates from two different hospitals in Rome were identified and clustered by MALDI-TOF MS system and their origin and evolution estimated by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The different species of Candida were correctly identified and clustered separately, confirming the ability of these techniques to discriminate between different Candida species. Focusing MALDI-TOF analysis on a single Candida species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis strains clustered differently for hospital setting as well as for period of isolation than Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis isolates. The evolutionary rates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (1.93×10(-2) and 1.17×10(-2)substitutions/site/year, respectively) were in agreement with a higher rate of mutation of these species, even in a narrow period, than what was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains (6.99×10(-4) and 7.52×10(-3)substitutions/site/year, respectively). C. albicans resulted as the species with the highest between and within clades genetic distance values in agreement with the temporal-related clustering found by MALDI-TOF and the high evolutionary rate 1.93×10(-2)substitutions/site/year.

  14. Quantification in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of modified polymers.

    PubMed

    Walterová, Zuzana; Horský, Jiří

    2011-05-01

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry quantification is hampered by the poor reproducibility of the signal intensity and by molecular-mass and compositional discrimination. The addition of a suitable compound as an internal standard increases reproducibility and allows a calibration curve to be constructed. The concept was also verified with synthetic polymers but no instructions for practical implementation were given [H. Chen, M. He, J. Pei, H. He, Anal. Chem. 75 (2003) 6531-6535.], even though synthetic polymers are generally non-uniform with respect to molecular mass and composition and access to the polymer of the same molecular mass distribution and composition as that of the quantified one is thus the exception rather than rule. On the other hand, relative quantification of polymers e.g., the content of the precursor polymer in a batch of a modified polymer, is usually sought. In this particular case, the pure precursor is usually available and the modified polymer can serve as an internal standard. However, the calibration curve still cannot be constructed and the use of the internal standard has to be combined with the method of standard addition in which the precursor polymer is added directly to the analyzed sample. The experiments with simulated modified polymers, mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (MPEG) of similar molecular-mass distribution, revealed a power dependence of the PEG/MPEG signal-intensity ratio (MS ratio) on the PEG/MPEG concentrations ratio in the mixture (gravimetric ratio). The result was obtained using standard procedures and instrumentation, which means that the basic assumption of the standard-addition method, i.e., the proportionality of the MS and gravimetric ratios, generally cannot be taken for granted. Therefore, the multi-point combined internal-standard standard-addition method was developed and experimentally verified for the quantification of the precursor in modified polymers. In this

  15. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    improved definition in the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting due to the increased absorption in the near-infrared wavelengths, while the 440nm wavelength provided better definition when black carbon mixed with dust. Utilization of this particle type scheme provides necessary information for remote sensing applications, which needs a priori knowledge of aerosol type to model the retrieved properties especially over semi-bright surfaces. In fact, this analysis reveals that the aerosol types occurred in mixtures with varying magnitudes of absorption and requires the use of more than one assumed aerosol mixture model. Furthermore, this technique will provide the aerosol transport model community a data set for validating aerosol type.

  16. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  17. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  18. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  19. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  20. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  1. MALDI direct analysis and imaging of frozen versus FFPE tissues: what strategy for which sample?

    PubMed

    Wisztorski, Maxence; Franck, Julien; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the past decade in the field of mass spectrometry imaging with MALDI ion sources (MALDI-MSI). While MALDI-MSI has high potential in the field of biology and in the clinic, a challenge for MALDI-MSI has been to adapt itself to a greater range of sample types. In particular, much of the biological archived materials for pathology studies are tissue biopsies fixed with paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin (FFPE tissues) because of the high stability of such samples. Thus, there has been a need to develop strategies for analyzing FFPE samples as this would allow retrospective studies of past clinical cases on large cohorts of existing samples. Obviously, PAF fixation, by inducing protein cross-linking, causes problems for molecular analysis by MS. We developed on tissue digestion strategies for overcoming these difficulties and allowing molecular data to be retrieved from FFPE samples no matter how long they have been stored. These digestion strategies preserve localization from digested proteins making MALDI-MSI of proteins possible by monitoring the resulting peptides. We present methods and protocols for FFPE samples. These strategies have proven to be valuable for all tested FFPE samples and have opened archived tissues from hospital banks to MALDI-MSI.

  2. On-tissue protein identification and imaging by MALDI-ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jonathan; MacAleese, Luke; Franck, Julien; Claude, Emmanuelle; Snel, Marten; Kaletas, Basak Kükrer; Wiel, Ingrid M V D; Wisztorski, Maxence; Fournier, Isabelle; Heeren, Ron M A

    2010-03-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has become a powerful tool for the detection and localization of drugs, proteins, and lipids on-tissue. Nevertheless, this approach can only perform identification of low mass molecules as lipids, pharmaceuticals, and peptides. In this article, a combination of approaches for the detection and imaging of proteins and their identification directly on-tissue is described after tryptic digestion. Enzymatic digestion protocols for different kinds of tissues--formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and frozen tissues--are combined with MALDI-ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). This combination enables localization and identification of proteins via their related digested peptides. In a number of cases, ion mobility separates isobaric ions that cannot be identified by conventional MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The amount of detected peaks per measurement increases (versus conventional MALDI-TOF), which enables mass and time selected ion images and the identification of separated ions. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of direct proteins identification by ion-mobility-TOF IMS from tissue. The tissue digestion combined with MALDI-IM-TOF-IMS approach allows a proteomics "bottom-up" strategy with different kinds of tissue samples, especially FFPE tissues conserved for a long time in hospital sample banks. The combination of IM with IMS marks the development of IMS approaches as real proteomic tools, which brings new perspectives to biological studies.

  3. MALDI In-Source Decay of Protein: The Mechanism of c-Ion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The in-source decay (ISD) phenomenon, the fragmentation at an N–Cα bond of a peptide backbone that occurs within several tens of nanoseconds in the ion-source in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS), is discussed from the standpoints of the discovery and early publications dealing with MALDI-ISD, the formation of c-ions in energy-sudden desorption/ionization methods, the formation of radical species in a MALDI, model construction for ISD, and matrix materials that are suitable for use in MALDI-ISD. The formation of c-ions derived from peptides and proteins in MALDI-ISD can be rationalized by a mechanism involving intermolecular hydrogen transfer, denoted as the “Takayama’s model” by De Pauw’s group (Anal. Chem. 79: 8678–8685, 2007). It should be emphasized that the model for MALDI-ISD was constructed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analyses of matrix crystals, as well as the use of isotopically-labelled peptides. PMID:27162707

  4. Progress in proteomics for clinical microbiology: MALDI-TOF MS for microbial species identification and more.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, Alex; Chatellier, Sonia; Girard, Victoria; Pincus, David; Deol, Parampal; Dunne, Wm Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although classical proteomic approaches are still used regularly in routine clinical diagnostic procedures, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) MS has recently moved into diagnostic microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS is currently replacing phenotypic microbial identification. Many laboratories now use MALDI-TOF MS for its high efficiency, both from a diagnostic and a cost-per-analysis point of view. The US FDA has now cleared two of the commercially available systems for in vitro diagnostics. This will further spark development of MS applications in antimicrobial susceptibility testing and epidemiology. This review summarizes the state of affairs of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical microbiology; however, this is an active field of research subject to rapid evolution. We emphasize assessment of the clinical relevance and studies focusing on data obtained through comparative analyses of different MALDI-TOF MS instrumentation and multicenter validation studies. The future of MALDI-TOF MS, including antimicrobial susceptibility testing and epidemiological typing, is also highlighted.

  5. Label-free detection of differential protein expression by LC/MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Hendrik; Bonnert, Timothy P; Rumpel, Klaus; Hunt, Brandon T; Henle, Ernst S; James, Ian T

    2008-06-01

    Protein abundance changes during disease or experimental perturbation are increasingly analyzed by label-free LC/MS approaches. Here we demonstrate the use of LC/MALDI MS for label-free detection of protein expression differences using Escherichia coli cultures grown on arabinose, fructose or glucose as a carbon source. The advantages of MALDI, such as detection of only singly charged ions, and MALDI plate archiving to facilitate retrospective MS/MS data collection are illustrated. MALDI spectra from RP chromatography of tryptic digests of the E. coli lysates were aligned and quantitated using the Rosetta Elucidator system. Approximately 5000 peptide signals were detected in all LC/MALDI runs spanning over 3 orders of magnitude of signal intensity. The average coefficients of variation for all signals across the entire intensity range in all technical replicates were found to be <25%. Pearson correlation coefficients from 0.93 to 0.98 for pairwise comparisons illustrate high replicate reproducibility. Expression differences determined by Analysis of Variance highlighted over 500 isotope clusters ( p < 0.01), which represented candidates for targeted peptide identification using MS/MS. Biologically interpretable protein identifications that could be derived underpin the general utility of this label-free LC/MALDI strategy.

  6. Stratospheric Aerosol--Observations, Processes, and Impact on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kresmer, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; von Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuna-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neeley, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfatematter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  7. Solid-state UV-MALDI-MS assay of transition metal dithiocarbamate fungicides.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The determination of transition metal containing dithiocarbamate fungicides represents a challenging aspect of analytical object. They have a low stability, low solubility and stabilize versatile coordination monomers, dimers, disulfides and/or S-oxidized derivatives. Their diverse biological activities and agricultural implementation encompass plant prevention and crop protection against a variety of plants containing fungi and diseases of 400 pathogens and 70 cultures. Nonetheless, those dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are banned for agricultural use in Europe or have expiration at years 2016-2017 because of their highly toxic degradation products and/or metabolites, in particular ethylene thiourea; they found large-scale implementations in materials research and medicine. Despite the broad interdisciplinary of DTC application, due to the above reasons, they have received little attention in the rapidly growing field of analytical chemistry, and in particular, the analytical mass spectrometry. Therefore, the study reported on qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis of ten DTCs (1-10), using the matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (UV-MALDI)-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (MS) contributed considerably to the implementation of the method for environmental and foodstuffs monitoring. Its ultrahigh resolving power and capacity for direct solid-state analysis, at limited number of sample pretreatment steps, at concentration levels of analytes of up to femtogram per gram resulted to achievement of a highly precise analytical information for these non-trivial objects. The presented fully validated method and technique is based on the successful ionization of DTCs embedded in three novel organic salts (M1-M3). In this regard, the reported MS and the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data as well as the quantum chemical one are able to correlate the molecular structures in condense and in the gas phase. Despite the novelty of the fundamental methodological character

  8. Characterization of aerosols containing microcystin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 mum. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  9. Development of a Scheimpflug Lidar System for Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a Scheimpflug lidar system which was employed for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in southern Sweden. Atmospheric aerosol fluctuation was observed around rush-hour. The extinction coefficient over 6 km was retrieved, i.e., 0.15 km-1, by employing the slop-method during the time when the atmosphere was relatively homogenous. The measurements successfully demonstrate the potential of using a Scheimpflug lidar technique for atmospheric aerosol monitoring applications.

  10. Global Aerosol Climatology Project: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines the methodology of interpreting channe1 1 and 2 AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) radiance data over the oceans and describes a detailed analysis of the sensitivity of monthly averages of retrieved aerosol parameters to the assumptions made in different retrieval algorithms. The analysis is based on using real AVHRR data and exploiting accurate numerical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering and spectral absorption of light in the vertically inhomogeneous atmospheric-ocean system. We show that two-channel algorithms can be expected tp provide significantly more biased retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness than one-channel algorithms and that imperfect cloud screening and calibration uncertainties are by far the largest sources of errors in the retrieved aerosol parameters. Both underestimating and overestimating aerosol absorption as well as the potentially strong variability of the real part of the aerosol refractive index may lead to regional and/or seasonal biases in optical thickness retrievals. The Angstrom exponent appears to be the most invariant aerosol size characteristic and should be retrieved along with optical thickness as the second aerosol parameter.

  11. LIF-imaging and gas-phase diagnostics of laser desorbed MALDI-matrix plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, A.A.; Geohegan, D.B.

    1997-07-01

    The first gated LIF-imaging and absorption spectroscopy has been performed on laser desorbed plumes from organic crystals which are commonly used as MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) matrices. These plasma diagnostic techniques, including ion probe measurements were employed to investigate the desorbed products, densities, fractional ionization, and velocity distributions of the plume of ejecta which is typically employed as the main desorption product in the mass spectrometry analysis of large biomolecules. Ultraviolet pulsed 193-nm and 248-nm irradiation of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA) crystals were studied to understand the effect of very different gas-phase absorption cross sections measured here for this material. In both cases, LIF imaging revealed two plume components: a fast (maximum {approximately} 0.1 cm/{micro}s) low-intensity component which appear to be 3-HPA fragments, and a slower component of 3-HPA expanding at 0.05 cm/{micro}s. In the case of ArF-laser irradiation, optical absorption spectroscopy indicated a breaking of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in the gas-phase matrix material.

  12. [Use of MALDI-TOF in the rapid diagnosis of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carlos Rodríguez, Juan; Ángel Bratos, Miguel; Merino, Esperanza; Ezpeleta, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of mass spectrometry through MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) in the diagnosis of bacteraemia and fungaemia has represented a revolution due to the rapidity and reliability of the results that it can offer to microbiology services and laboratories through analysis of the mass spectrum of the bacterial protein directly from positive blood culture bottles. These data are more useful if they are used in conjunction with other techniques able to identify the antibiotic resistance pattern of the microorganism. There is a need for a process of standardising sample processing protocols and for perfecting the identification of the agents causing bacteraemia, especially in some species of Gram-positive cocci and in polymicrobial processes. The introduction of this methodology provides rapid information that is highly important for the clinical management of bacteraemia. The availability of a multidisciplinary working group that applies all this information quickly and correctly in hospitals will improve the quality of care, reduce antibiotic expenditure and hospital stay and help to control the serious problem of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Tubulin-binding drug screening by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Hannewald, Paul; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2006-07-01

    Despite a large amount of drugs available to treat cancer, none is totally satisfactory with respect to its tolerance or side effects. It is very important to discover new compounds that exhibit specific features such as binding to proteic targets. Given the clinical successes of the poisons of the mitotic spindle chemotherapeutic agent class, it is often considered that tubulin represents one of the best cancer targets identified so far, and it seems likely that discovering new drugs of this class will significantly improve the range of active chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this work is to present the new screening test that has been developed in our laboratory in order to study the binding of compounds to tubulin. We have developed a screening protocol involving three sampling strategies before the MALDI-TOFMS analysis. The three strategies give very accurate and reproducible results and could therefore possibly be used in screening campaigns. We have also proved that no unspecific binding can provide a loss of specificity of the test. Our protocol presents all the requirements for being a useful tool to screen the binding of compounds to tubulin.

  14. Accuracy of near-surface aerosol extinction determined from columnar aerosol optical depth measurements in Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present work is a detailed analysis of aerosol columnar optical depth as a tool to determine near-surface aerosol extinction in Reno, Nevada, USA, during the summer of 2012. Ground and columnar aerosol optical properties were obtained by use of in situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer and Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer instruments, respectively. Both techniques showed that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes had enormous influence on local aerosol optics. The apparent optical height followed the shape but not magnitude of the development of the convective boundary layer when fire conditions were not present. Back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local flow known as the Washoe Zephyr circulation often induced aerosol transport from Northern California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that increased the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm during afternoons when compared with mornings. Aerosol fine mode fraction indicated that afternoon aerosols in June and July and fire plumes in August were dominated by submicron particles, suggesting upwind urban plume biogenically enhanced evolution toward substantial secondary aerosol formation. This fine particle optical depth was inferred to be beyond the surface, thereby complicating use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol extinction measurements. It is likely that coarse mode depletes fine mode aerosol near the surface by coagulation and condensation of precursor gases.

  15. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  16. [Identification of staphylococci directly from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS system].

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    Bloodstream infections are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Staphylococcus species are the most commonly isolated microorganisms from blood cultures in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time- of- Flight Mass Spectrometry) system allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MALDI-TOF MS system for the identification of staphylococci directly from the positive blood culture bottles which revealed the presence of gram-positive cocci by staining. A total of 96 positive blood culture bottles that yielded gram-positive cocci by Gram stain were evaluated. These blood cultures were obtained from 69 patients between December 2013-February 2014. Conventional methods and BD Phoenix™ automated bacterial identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA) were used for routine identification. The strains were also identified by real-time Taqman PCR (qPCR) which was considered as the reference method. In MALDI-TOF MS method, MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit was used for the bacterial identification and all measurements were carried out by using Microflex LT instrument and FlexControl 3.0 software (Bruker Daltonics, USA). Of 96 culture bottles positive for gram-positive cocci, 90 were correctly identified as staphylococci at genus level with all the three study methods (qPCR, BD Phoenix, Bruker MALDI-TOF MS). The other six samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium (n= 4) and Streptococcus pyogenes (n= 2) by both Phoenix and the MALDI-TOF systems. Of the 90 samples, 87 were identified at the species level (15 S.aureus, 33 S.epidermidis, 29 S.hominis, 10 S.haemolyticus) and three at the genus level by the reference qPCR method. When comparing the results obtained by qPCR and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS, incompatibility was detected for three isolates. Those isolates were identified as S.hominis by qPCR, however two of them were

  17. [Identification of staphylococci directly from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS system].

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    Bloodstream infections are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Staphylococcus species are the most commonly isolated microorganisms from blood cultures in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time- of- Flight Mass Spectrometry) system allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MALDI-TOF MS system for the identification of staphylococci directly from the positive blood culture bottles which revealed the presence of gram-positive cocci by staining. A total of 96 positive blood culture bottles that yielded gram-positive cocci by Gram stain were evaluated. These blood cultures were obtained from 69 patients between December 2013-February 2014. Conventional methods and BD Phoenix™ automated bacterial identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA) were used for routine identification. The strains were also identified by real-time Taqman PCR (qPCR) which was considered as the reference method. In MALDI-TOF MS method, MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit was used for the bacterial identification and all measurements were carried out by using Microflex LT instrument and FlexControl 3.0 software (Bruker Daltonics, USA). Of 96 culture bottles positive for gram-positive cocci, 90 were correctly identified as staphylococci at genus level with all the three study methods (qPCR, BD Phoenix, Bruker MALDI-TOF MS). The other six samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium (n= 4) and Streptococcus pyogenes (n= 2) by both Phoenix and the MALDI-TOF systems. Of the 90 samples, 87 were identified at the species level (15 S.aureus, 33 S.epidermidis, 29 S.hominis, 10 S.haemolyticus) and three at the genus level by the reference qPCR method. When comparing the results obtained by qPCR and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS, incompatibility was detected for three isolates. Those isolates were identified as S.hominis by qPCR, however two of them were

  18. Scanning Mobile Lidar for Aerosol Tracking and Biological Aerosol Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tingyao; Bergant, Klemen; Filipčič, Andrej; Forte, Biagio; Gao, Fei; Stanič, Samo; Veberič, Darko; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2010-05-01

    Optical properties of non-biological aerosols containing aromatic hydrocarbons, such as industrial chemicals and engine exhausts, have already been thoroughly studied using remote sensing techniques. However, because of their complex composition and characteristics, the identification of biological aerosols, such as fungi, pollen and bacteria that are present in the environment remains a rather difficult task. The collection of information on both non-biological and biological aerosols is of great importance for understanding their interrelation, physical and chemical properties and their influence on human health and the environment. Biological and non-biological aerosols can be simultaneously detected, tracked and identified by a scanning mobile Mie-fluorescence lidar. The device developed at the University of Nova Gorica can perform azimuth and zenith angle scans with an angular resolution of 0.1°, as well as operate in both day and night-time conditions. Aerosols of biological origin are identified through the detection of the fluorescence of the amino acid tryptophan which is present in almost all substances of biological origin. In our system, the transmitter is a solid state Nd:YAG laser which is capable of simultaneous emission of light at a base wavelength of 1064 nm (IR) and its quadrupled wavelength of 266 nm (UV) at a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Tryptophan contained in biological aerosols is excited by the 266 nm laser pulses and the returning fluorescence signals are detected in the spectral band centered at 295 nm. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope which uses a 300 mm parabolic mirror to direct received light into three detection channels - two elastic backscatter channels (IR and UV) and a fluorescence channel. First experiments show that the detection range of the lidar reaches 10 km in the IR channel and 3 km in the UV channel. Based on the preliminary simulations of the signal-to-noise ratio, the detection range for biological

  19. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  20. Sulfur speciation in individual aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Kenneth R.; Sum, Stephen T.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    1996-08-01

    Sulfur aerosols play an important role in acid deposition and the Earth's energy balance. Important species in these aerosols include methanesulfonates, hydroxymethanesulfonates, sulfates, and sulfites. Because the relative amounts of these species indicate different sources and atmospheric processes, it is important to distinguish them in single-aerosol particles. To accomplish this task, we use rapid single-particle mass spectrometry (RSMS), a technique that permits individual particles to be analyzed in an online mode. Each sulfur species produces a characteristic set of ions in the mass spectra. In simulated marine and urban aerosols the relative amounts of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and sodium hydroxymethanesulfonate (NaHMSA) in a single particle can be determined from peak area ratios in the mass spectra. Improved quantitation is possible by application of the classification and regression tree (CART) algorithm to distinguish the mass spectra of particles having different compositions. Factors that influence speciation include particle size, morphology, and laser fluence.

  1. Humidity Dependent Extinction of Clay Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, M. E.; Attwood, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the Earth’s radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of aerosol forcing can be altered by changes in relative humidity which cause aerosol size, shape and refractive index to vary. To quantify these effects, a custom cavity ring down instrument operated at 532 nm with two sample channels measures aerosols extinction under dry conditions and at elevated humidity. The optical growth, fRH(ext), is determined as a ratio of the extinction cross section at high relative humidity to that under dry conditions. Three key clay components of mineral dust and mixtures of clay components with ammonium sulfate are investigated using this method. Experimentally obtained optical growth is compared with physical growth factors from the literature and our work determined using several different techniques. Further, Mie theory calculations based on published optical constants are compared with experimental results. Differences between theory and experiment will be discussed.

  2. Light Absorbing Aerosols in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Kelley, K. L.; Kilaparty, P. S.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The direct effects of aerosol radiative forcing has been identified by the IPCC as a major uncertainty in climate modeling. The DOE Megacity Aerosol Experiment-Mexico City (MAX-Mex), as part of the MILAGRO study in March of 2006, was undertaken to reduce these uncertainties by characterization of the optical, chemical, and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols emitted from this megacity environment. Aerosol samples collected during this study using quartz filters were characterized in the uv-visible-infrared by using surface spectroscopic techniques. These included the use of an integrating sphere approach combined with the use of Kubelka-Munk theory to obtain aerosol absorption spectra. In past work black carbon has been assumed to be the only major absorbing species in atmospheric aerosols with an broad band spectral profile that follows a simple inverse wavelength dependence. Recent work has also identified a number of other absorbing species that can also add to the overall aerosol absorption. These include primary organics from biomass and trash burning and secondary organic aerosols including nitrated PAHs and humic-like substances, or HULIS. By using surface diffuse reflection spectroscopy we have also obtained spectra in the infrared that indicate significant IR absorption in the atmospheric window-region. These data will be presented and compared to spectra of model compounds that allow for evaluation of the potential importance of these species in adding strength to the direct radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64327 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  3. Neuropeptide imaging on an LTQ with vMALDI source: The complete `all-in-one' peptidome analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaert, Peter D.; Conaway, Maria C. Prieto; Pekar, Tonya M.; Miller, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Direct tissue imaging was performed on dissected insect tissue using a MALDI ion trap to visualize endogenous neuropeptides. Coupling tissue imaging to tandem MSn allows for the identification of previously known species and the ability to identify new ones by de novo sequencing, as searchable databases for insects are sparse. Direct tissue imaging is an attractive technique for the study of neuropeptides as minimal sample preparation is required prior to mass spectrometry. We successfully identified neuropeptides present in the corpora cardiaca and allata of Acheta domesticus (the house cricket). Diagnostic fragments at low m/z were used to distinguish between lipids and neuropeptides. The distribution of peptides appears to be more differentially localized than that of phospholipids, which seem to be more evenly distributed within the tissue.

  4. Graphene based soft nanoreactors for facile "one-step" glycan enrichment and derivatization for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haihong; Pan, Yiting; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Wanjun; Ren, Xiaojun; Tian, Fang; Peng, Bo; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yangjun; Deng, Yulin; Qin, Weijie; Qian, Xiaohong

    2013-12-15

    Protein glycosylation is involved in the control of many important biological processes and structural alterations of the N-linked glycans are correlated with various kinds of disease. High-throughput N-glycan profiling is a key technique for elucidating the functions of glycans in biological process and disease development as well as discovering new diagnostic biomarkers. However, the low abundance of glycans existing in living organism, the competition/suppression effect of other highly abundant biological molecules and the inherent lack of alkalinity and hydrophobicity of glycans leads to particularly poor detection sensitivity in MS analysis. Here, we demonstrated the first "one-step" approach for highly efficient glycan enrichment and derivatization using reduced graphene oxide as nanoreactors and 1-pyrenebutyric hydrazide for glycan capture and derivatization, which resulted in a 33-fold increase in the glycan detection sensitivity in MALDI-TOF-MS and the identification of 48N-glycoforms from human plasma.

  5. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Discriminates Known Species and Marine Environmental Isolates of Pseudoalteromonas.

    PubMed

    Emami, Kaveh; Nelson, Andrew; Hack, Ethan; Zhang, Jinwei; Green, David H; Caldwell, Gary S; Mesbahi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pseudoalteromonas constitutes an ecologically significant group of marine Gammaproteobacteria with potential biotechnological value as producers of bioactive compounds and of enzymes. Understanding their roles in the environment and bioprospecting for novel products depend on efficient ways of identifying environmental isolates. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) biotyping has promise as a rapid and reliable method of identifying and distinguishing between different types of bacteria, but has had relatively limited application to marine bacteria and has not been applied systematically to Pseudoalteromonas. Therefore, we constructed a MALDI-TOF MS database of 31 known Pseudoalteromonas species, to which new isolates can be compared by MALDI-TOF biotyping. The ability of MALDI-TOF MS to distinguish between species was scrutinized by comparison with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patterns of similarity given by the two approaches were broadly but not completely consistent. In general, the resolution of MALDI-TOF MS was greater than that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The database was tested with 13 environmental Pseudoalteromonas isolates from UK waters. All of the test strains could be identified to genus level by MALDI-TOF MS biotyping, but most could not be definitely identified to species level. We conclude that several of these isolates, and possibly most, represent new species. Thus, further taxonomic investigation of Pseudoalteromonas is needed before MALDI-TOF MS biotyping can be used reliably for species identification. It is, however, a powerful tool for characterizing and distinguishing among environmental isolates and can make an important contribution to taxonomic studies.

  6. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Discriminates Known Species and Marine Environmental Isolates of Pseudoalteromonas

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kaveh; Nelson, Andrew; Hack, Ethan; Zhang, Jinwei; Green, David H.; Caldwell, Gary S.; Mesbahi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pseudoalteromonas constitutes an ecologically significant group of marine Gammaproteobacteria with potential biotechnological value as producers of bioactive compounds and of enzymes. Understanding their roles in the environment and bioprospecting for novel products depend on efficient ways of identifying environmental isolates. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) biotyping has promise as a rapid and reliable method of identifying and distinguishing between different types of bacteria, but has had relatively limited application to marine bacteria and has not been applied systematically to Pseudoalteromonas. Therefore, we constructed a MALDI-TOF MS database of 31 known Pseudoalteromonas species, to which new isolates can be compared by MALDI-TOF biotyping. The ability of MALDI-TOF MS to distinguish between species was scrutinized by comparison with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patterns of similarity given by the two approaches were broadly but not completely consistent. In general, the resolution of MALDI-TOF MS was greater than that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The database was tested with 13 environmental Pseudoalteromonas isolates from UK waters. All of the test strains could be identified to genus level by MALDI-TOF MS biotyping, but most could not be definitely identified to species level. We conclude that several of these isolates, and possibly most, represent new species. Thus, further taxonomic investigation of Pseudoalteromonas is needed before MALDI-TOF MS biotyping can be used reliably for species identification. It is, however, a powerful tool for characterizing and distinguishing among environmental isolates and can make an important contribution to taxonomic studies. PMID:26903983

  7. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Discriminates Known Species and Marine Environmental Isolates of Pseudoalteromonas.

    PubMed

    Emami, Kaveh; Nelson, Andrew; Hack, Ethan; Zhang, Jinwei; Green, David H; Caldwell, Gary S; Mesbahi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pseudoalteromonas constitutes an ecologically significant group of marine Gammaproteobacteria with potential biotechnological value as producers of bioactive compounds and of enzymes. Understanding their roles in the environment and bioprospecting for novel products depend on efficient ways of identifying environmental isolates. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) biotyping has promise as a rapid and reliable method of identifying and distinguishing between different types of bacteria, but has had relatively limited application to marine bacteria and has not been applied systematically to Pseudoalteromonas. Therefore, we constructed a MALDI-TOF MS database of 31 known Pseudoalteromonas species, to which new isolates can be compared by MALDI-TOF biotyping. The ability of MALDI-TOF MS to distinguish between species was scrutinized by comparison with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patterns of similarity given by the two approaches were broadly but not completely consistent. In general, the resolution of MALDI-TOF MS was greater than that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The database was tested with 13 environmental Pseudoalteromonas isolates from UK waters. All of the test strains could be identified to genus level by MALDI-TOF MS biotyping, but most could not be definitely identified to species level. We conclude that several of these isolates, and possibly most, represent new species. Thus, further taxonomic investigation of Pseudoalteromonas is needed before MALDI-TOF MS biotyping can be used reliably for species identification. It is, however, a powerful tool for characterizing and distinguishing among environmental isolates and can make an important contribution to taxonomic studies. PMID:26903983

  8. MALDI-based intact spore mass spectrometry of downy and powdery mildews.

    PubMed

    Chalupová, Jana; Sedlářová, Michaela; Helmel, Michaela; Rehulka, Pavel; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Sebela, Marek

    2012-08-01

    Fast and easy identification of fungal phytopathogens is of great importance in agriculture. In this context, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing microorganisms. This study deals with a methodology for MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of downy and powdery mildews representing obligate biotrophic parasites of crop plants. Experimental approaches for the MS analyses were optimized using Bremia lactucae, cause of lettuce downy mildew, and Oidium neolycopersici, cause of tomato powdery mildew. This involved determining a suitable concentration of spores in the sample, selection of a proper MALDI matrix, looking for the optimal solvent composition, and evaluation of different sample preparation methods. Furthermore, using different MALDI target materials and surfaces (stainless steel vs polymer-based) and applying various conditions for sample exposure to the acidic MALDI matrix system were investigated. The dried droplet method involving solvent evaporation at room temperature was found to be the most suitable for the deposition of spores and MALDI matrix on the target and the subsequent crystallization. The concentration of spore suspension was optimal between 2 and 5 × 10(9) spores per ml. The best peptide/protein profiles (in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and number of peaks) were obtained by combining ferulic and sinapinic acids as a mixed MALDI matrix. A pretreatment of the spore cell wall with hydrolases was successfully introduced prior to MS measurements to obtain more pronounced signals. Finally, a novel procedure was developed for direct mass spectra acquisition from infected plant leaves. PMID:22899506

  9. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  10. Assessment of green cleaning effectiveness on polychrome surfaces by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hrdlickova Kuckova, Stepanka; Crhova Krizkova, Michaela; Pereira, Catarina Luísa Cortes; Hynek, Radovan; Lavrova, Olga; Busani, Tito; Branco, Luis Cobra; Sandu, Irina Crina Anca

    2014-08-01

    This article proposes an innovative methodology which employs nondestructive techniques to assess the effectiveness of new formulations based on ionic liquids, as alternative solvents for enzymes (proteases), for the removal of proteinaceous materials from painted surfaces during restoration treatments. Ionic liquids (ILs), also known as "designer" solvents, because of their peculiar properties which can be adjusted by selecting different cation-anion combinations, are potentially green solvents due totheir low vapour pressure. In this study, two ionic liquids were selected: IL1 (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4 ])) and IL2 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM][EtSO4 ])). New formulations were prepared with these ILs and two different proteases (E): one acid (E1-pepsin) and one alkaline (E2-obtained from Aspergillus sojae). These formulations were tested on tempera and oil mock-up samples, prepared in accordance with historically documented recipes, and covered with two different types of protein-based varnishes (egg white and isinglass-fish glue). A noninvasive multiscale imaging methodology was applied before and after the treatment to evaluate the cleaning's effectiveness. Different microscopic techniques-optical microscopy (OM) with visible and fluorescent light, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-together with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were applied on areas cleaned with the new formulations (IL + E) and reference areas cleaned only with the commercial enzyme formulations (gels). MALDI-TOF proved particularly very useful for comparing the diversity and abundance of peptides released by using different enzymatic systems. Microsc. Res. Tech. 77:574-585, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24825619

  11. Identification of beer spoilage microorganisms using the MALDI Biotyper platform.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth; Weiland, Florian; Meneses, Jon; Sterenberg, Nick; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Beer spoilage microorganisms present a major risk for the brewing industry and can lead to cost-intensive recall of contaminated products and damage to brand reputation. The applicability of molecular profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in combination with Biotyper software was investigated for the identification of beer spoilage microorganisms from routine brewery quality control samples. Reference mass spectrum profiles for three of the most common bacterial beer spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus lindneri, Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), four commercially available brewing yeast strains (top- and bottom-fermenting) and Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis wild yeast were established, incorporated into the Biotyper reference library and validated by successful identification after inoculation into beer. Each bacterial species could be accurately identified and distinguished from one another and from over 5600 other microorganisms present in the Biotyper database. In addition, wild yeast contaminations were rapidly detected and distinguished from top- and bottom-fermenting brewing strains. The applicability and integration of mass spectrometry profiling using the Biotyper platform into existing brewery quality assurance practices within industry were assessed by analysing routine microbiology control samples from a local brewery, where contaminating microorganisms could be reliably identified. Brewery-isolated microorganisms not present in the Biotyper database were further analysed for identification using LC-MS/MS methods. This renders the Biotyper platform a promising candidate for biological quality control testing within the brewing industry as a more rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective technology that can be tailored for the detection of brewery-specific spoilage organisms from the local environment.

  12. Identification of beer spoilage microorganisms using the MALDI Biotyper platform.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth; Weiland, Florian; Meneses, Jon; Sterenberg, Nick; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Beer spoilage microorganisms present a major risk for the brewing industry and can lead to cost-intensive recall of contaminated products and damage to brand reputation. The applicability of molecular profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in combination with Biotyper software was investigated for the identification of beer spoilage microorganisms from routine brewery quality control samples. Reference mass spectrum profiles for three of the most common bacterial beer spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus lindneri, Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), four commercially available brewing yeast strains (top- and bottom-fermenting) and Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis wild yeast were established, incorporated into the Biotyper reference library and validated by successful identification after inoculation into beer. Each bacterial species could be accurately identified and distinguished from one another and from over 5600 other microorganisms present in the Biotyper database. In addition, wild yeast contaminations were rapidly detected and distinguished from top- and bottom-fermenting brewing strains. The applicability and integration of mass spectrometry profiling using the Biotyper platform into existing brewery quality assurance practices within industry were assessed by analysing routine microbiology control samples from a local brewery, where contaminating microorganisms could be reliably identified. Brewery-isolated microorganisms not present in the Biotyper database were further analysed for identification using LC-MS/MS methods. This renders the Biotyper platform a promising candidate for biological quality control testing within the brewing industry as a more rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective technology that can be tailored for the detection of brewery-specific spoilage organisms from the local environment. PMID:26857464

  13. Performance of mass spectrometric identification of bacteria and yeasts routinely isolated in a clinical microbiology laboratory using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Xi, Haiyan; Huang, Mei; Wang, Jie; Fan, Ming; Chen, Yong; Shao, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technology newly applied to identifying bacterial and yeast strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the VITEK® MS system in the identification of bacteria and yeast strains routinely isolated from clinical samples. Methods We prospectively analyzed routine MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification in parallel with conventional phenotypic identification of bacteria and yeasts regardless of phylum or source of isolation. Discordant results were resolved with 16S rDNA or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing. Colonies (a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step) were analyzed using the VITEK® MS system. Peptide spectra acquired by the system were compared with the VITEK® MS IVD database Version 2.0, and the identification scores were recorded. Results Of the 1,181 isolates (1,061 bacterial isolates and 120 yeast isolates) analyzed, 99.5% were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry; 95.7% identified to the species level, 3.6% identified to the genus level, and 0.3% identified within a range of species belonging to different genera. Conversely, 0.1% of isolates were misidentified and 0.4% were unidentified, partly because the species were not included in the database. Re-testing using a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.5% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. Our results show that the VITEK® MS system has exceptional performance in identifying bacteria and yeast by comparing acquired peptide spectra to those contained in its database. Conclusions MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive method for bacterial and yeast identification. Our results demonstrate that the VITEK® MS system is a fast and reliable technique, and has the potential to replace conventional phenotypic

  14. New Approaches to Aerosol Optical Extinction Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Moosmuller, H.; Atkinson, D.; Covert, D.; Ahlquist, N.; Schmid, B.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols can have important influences on climate and the radiation balance of the atmosphere. However, the temporal and spatial variability of aerosols and our inadequate knowledge of aerosol optical properties have lead to large uncertainties in these effects. Thus improved in-situ measurements of aerosol optical properties, in particular measurement of their extinction coefficients, are required. Recently, the relatively new technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy has been applied to the problem of making fast, accurate measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient. Typically, extinction measurements have been made by measuring the decrease in the intensity of a light beam that has passed through a particulate-laden cell. Often, the cell contains mirrors which reflect the beam several times increasing the optical path length thereby increasing the extinction. Path lengths of up to 400 m have been obtained, which is still insufficient to measure atmospheric extinction in the visible down to background values. In cavity ring-down, a light beam is reflected many thousands of times between two highly reflective mirrors, resulting in a path length of kilometers. The light exiting the cell decreases exponentially with time, and this exponential decay is related to the extinction of the aerosol inside the cell. The CRD instruments can routinely measure sub-Rayleigh equivalent extinction levels of a few Mm-^1 and are generally more rugged and portable than traditional extinction cells. Possible applications of CRD-based extinction cells include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellites such as MODIS, MISR, and CALYPSO. This paper will present the motivation for making improved aerosol extinction measurements and discuss the problems in making the measurement. The cavity ring-down technique will be described. In June, 2002, a calibration and methods intercomparison, the Reno Aerosol Optics Study

  15. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  16. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  17. Diversity of Clonostachys species assessed by molecular phylogenetics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas M; Moreira, Gláucia M; Ferreira, Douglas; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the species diversity among 45 strains of Clonostachys from different substrates and localities in Brazil using molecular phylogenetics, and compared the results with the phenotypic classification of strains obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Phylogenetic analyses were based on beta tubulin (Tub), ITS-LSU rDNA, and a combined Tub-ITS DNA dataset. MALDI-TOF MS analyses were performed using intact conidia and conidiophores of strains cultivated on oatmeal agar and 4% malt extract agar. Six known species were identified: Clonostachys byssicola, Clonostachys candelabrum, Clonostachys pseudochroleuca, Clonostachys rhizophaga, Clonostachys rogersoniana, and Clonostachys rosea. Two clades and two singleton lineages did not correspond to known species represented in the reference DNA dataset and were identified as Clonostachys sp. 1-4. Multivariate cluster analyses of MALDI-TOF MS data classified the strains into eight clusters and three singletons, corresponding to the ten identified species plus one additional cluster containing two strains of C. rogersoniana that split from the other co-specific strains. The consistent results of MALDI-TOF MS supported the identification of strains assigned to C. byssicola and C. pseudochroleuca, which did not form well supported clades in all phylogenetic analyses, but formed distinct clusters in the MALDI-TOF dendrograms. PMID:25457948

  18. Identification of urinary tract pathogens after 3-hours urine culture by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haiko, Johanna; Savolainen, Laura E; Hilla, Risto; Pätäri-Sampo, Anu

    2016-10-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections, such as pyelonephritis, may lead to sepsis. Rapid diagnosis is needed to identify the causative urinary pathogen and to verify the appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy. We describe here a rapid identification method for urinary pathogens: urine is incubated on chocolate agar for 3h at 35°C with 5% CO2 and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS analysis by VITEK MS. Overall 207 screened clinical urine samples were tested in parallel with conventional urine culture. The method, called U-si-MALDI-TOF (urine short incubation MALDI-TOF), showed correct identification for 86% of Gram-negative urinary tract pathogens (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and other Enterobacteriaceae), when present at >10(5)cfu/ml in culture (n=107), compared with conventional culture method. However, Gram-positive bacteria (n=28) were not successfully identified by U-si-MALDI-TOF. This method is especially suitable for rapid identification of E. coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infections and urosepsis. Turnaround time for identification using U-si-MALDI-TOF compared with conventional urine culture was improved from 24h to 4-6h. PMID:27503535

  19. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria.

  20. Revisiting Rat Spermatogenesis with MALDI Imaging at 20-μm Resolution*

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Mélanie; Becker, Michael; Lavigne, Régis; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Walch, Axel; Aubry, Florence; Suckau, Detlev; Pineau, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) molecular imaging technology attracts increasing attention in the field of biomarker discovery. The unambiguous correlation between histopathology and MALDI images is a key feature for success. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MS) at high definition thus calls for technological developments that were established by a number of small steps. These included tissue and matrix preparation steps, dedicated lasers for MALDI imaging, an increase of the robustness against cell debris and matrix sublimation, software for precision matching of molecular and microscopic images, and the analysis of MALDI imaging data using multivariate statistical methods. The goal of these developments is to approach single cell resolution with imaging MS. Currently, a performance level of 20-μm image resolution was achieved with an unmodified and commercially available instrument for proteins detected in the 2–16-kDa range. The rat testis was used as a relevant model for validating and optimizing our technological developments. Indeed, testicular anatomy is among the most complex found in mammalian bodies. In the present study, we were able to visualize, at 20-μm image resolution level, different stages of germ cell development in testicular seminiferous tubules; to provide a molecular correlate for its well established stage-specific classification; and to identify proteins of interest using a top-down approach and superimpose molecular and immunohistochemistry images. PMID:21149303

  1. Aerosol MTF revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-05-01

    Different views of the significance of aerosol MTF have been reported. For example, one recent paper [OE, 52(4)/2013, pp. 046201] claims that the aerosol MTF "contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible". On the other hand, another recent paper [JOSA A, 11/2013, pp. 2244-2252] claims that aerosols "can have a non-negligible effect on the atmospheric point spread function". We present clear experimental evidence of common significant aerosol blur and evidence that aerosol contrast reduction can be extremely significant. In the IR, it is more appropriate to refer to such phenomena as aerosol-absorption MTF. The role of imaging system instrumentation on such MTF is addressed too.

  2. Direct molecular mass determination of trehalose monomycolate from 11 species of mycobacteria by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yukiko; Naka, Takashi; Doi, Takeshi; Yano, Ikuya

    2005-05-01

    Direct estimation of the molecular mass of single molecular species of trehalose 6-monomycolate (TMM), a ubiquitous cell-wall component of mycobacteria, was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. When less than 1 microg TMM was analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, quasimolecular ions [M+Na]+ of each molecular species were demonstrated and the numbers of carbons and double bonds (or cyclopropane rings) were determined. Since the introduction of oxygen atoms such as carbonyl, methoxy and ester groups yielded the appropriate shift of mass ions, the major subclasses of mycolic acid (alpha, methoxy, keto and wax ester) were identified without resorting to hydrolytic procedures. The results showed a marked difference in the molecular species composition of TMM among mycobacterial species. Unexpectedly, differing from other mycoloyl glycolipids, TMM from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a distinctive mass pattern, with abundant odd-carbon-numbered monocyclopropanoic (or monoenoic) alpha-mycolates besides dicyclopropanoic mycolate, ranging from C75 to C85, odd- and even-carbon-numbered methoxymycolates ranging from C83 to C94 and even- and odd-carbon-numbered ketomycolates ranging from C83 to C90. In contrast, TMM from Mycobacterium bovis (wild strain and BCG substrains) possessed even-carbon-numbered dicyclopropanoic alpha-mycolates. BCG Connaught strain lacked methoxymycolates almost completely. These results were confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass analysis of mycolic acid methyl esters liberated by alkaline hydrolysis and methylation of the original TMM. Wax ester-mycoloyl TMM molecular species were demonstrated for the first time as an intact form in the Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare group, M. phlei and M. flavescens. The M. avium-intracellulare group possessed predominantly C85 and C87 wax ester-mycoloyl TMM, while M. phlei and the rapid growers tested contained C80, C81, C82 and C83 wax ester

  3. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  4. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  5. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  6. Contribution of Primary and Secondary Sources to Organic Aerosol and PM2.5 at SEARCH Network Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical tracer methods for determining contributions to primary organic aerosol (POA) are fairly well established, whereas similar techniques for secondary organic aerosol (SOA), inherently complicated by time-dependent atmospheric processes, are only beginning to be studied. La...

  7. Processed stigmas of Crocus sativus L. imaged by MALDI-based MS.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Rados, Edita; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos-Stavros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-06-01

    The processed, i.e. dried under certain conditions, stigmas of Crocus sativus L. are one of the most expensive plant parts used commercially. For the color, aroma and biological activity a very complex mixture of glycolipids termed crocins are responsible. Therefore studying structural composition and distribution in the commercial plant material is of great interest. We showed successfully the application of a MALDI-based mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) approach for stigmas towards different crocin species. MSI opens up the investigation of processed plant materials in various fields allowing studying the processing in detail as well as adulteration attempts (which are quite frequent due to the price of the material). Furthermore, we could demonstrate that a similar number of crocins present in stigmas could be detected by MALDI MSI compared to the classical approach of analyzing the solvent-extract of stigmas by MALDI-MS.

  8. Processed stigmas of Crocus sativus L. imaged by MALDI-based MS.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Rados, Edita; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos-Stavros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-06-01

    The processed, i.e. dried under certain conditions, stigmas of Crocus sativus L. are one of the most expensive plant parts used commercially. For the color, aroma and biological activity a very complex mixture of glycolipids termed crocins are responsible. Therefore studying structural composition and distribution in the commercial plant material is of great interest. We showed successfully the application of a MALDI-based mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) approach for stigmas towards different crocin species. MSI opens up the investigation of processed plant materials in various fields allowing studying the processing in detail as well as adulteration attempts (which are quite frequent due to the price of the material). Furthermore, we could demonstrate that a similar number of crocins present in stigmas could be detected by MALDI MSI compared to the classical approach of analyzing the solvent-extract of stigmas by MALDI-MS. PMID:27006097

  9. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: spatial molecular analysis to enable a new age of discovery.

    PubMed

    Gessel, Megan M; Norris, Jeremy L; Caprioli, Richard M

    2014-07-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) combines the sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry with spatial analysis to provide a new dimension for histological analyses to provide unbiased visualization of the arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. As such, MALDI IMS has the capability to become a powerful new molecular technology for the biological and clinical sciences. In this review, we briefly describe several applications of MALDI IMS covering a range of molecular weights, from drugs to proteins. Current limitations and challenges are discussed along with recent developments to address these issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez.

  10. Molecular imaging of drug transit through the blood-brain barrier with MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Ide, Jennifer L; Norton, Isaiah; Marchionni, Mark A; Ebling, Maritza C; Wang, Lan Y; Davis, Erin; Sauvageot, Claire M; Kesari, Santosh; Kellersberger, Katherine A; Easterling, Michael L; Santagata, Sandro; Stuart, Darrin D; Alberta, John; Agar, Jeffrey N; Stiles, Charles D; Agar, Nathalie Y R

    2013-10-04

    Drug transit through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is essential for therapeutic responses in malignant glioma. Conventional methods for assessment of BBB penetrance require synthesis of isotopically labeled drug derivatives. Here, we report a new methodology using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to visualize drug penetration in brain tissue without molecular labeling. In studies summarized here, we first validate heme as a simple and robust MALDI MSI marker for the lumen of blood vessels in the brain. We go on to provide three examples of how MALDI MSI can provide chemical and biological insights into BBB penetrance and metabolism of small molecule signal transduction inhibitors in the brain - insights that would be difficult or impossible to extract by use of radiolabeled compounds.

  11. Evaporative Derivatization of Phenols with 2-Sulfobenzoic Anhydride for Detection by MALDI-MS

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Phenols are an important class of analytes, for example as bioactive environmental contaminants. Towards a goal of improving their detection by MALDI-TOF-MS or MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, we studied their derivatization with 2-sulfobenzoic anhydride (SBA). We chose SBA for this purpose since it is commercially available, inexpensive, and forms an anionic derivative. METHODS In selected conditions developed here for phenols, a reaction mixture of one or more of such compounds in acetonitrile containing SBA and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) is evaporated to a solid, heated at 60°C for 1 h, redissolved in 50% acetonitrile containing matrix, spotted onto a MALDI target, and subjected to negative ion MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. RESULTS While conventional (solution-phase) reaction of 4-phenylphenol (model analyte) with SBA and DMAP only gave a 47% yield of SBA-tagged 4-phenylphenol, evaporative derivatization as above gave a 96% yield, and 25 pmol (4.3 ng) of 4-phenylphenol could be detected in this way by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS at S/N = 260, whereas even 1 nmol of the nonderivatized phenol was not detected in the absence of derivatization. A wide range of responses was observed when a mixture of 15 phenols was derivatized, with the higher responses coming from phenols with a pKa value above 9. Without derivatization, phenols with pKa values below 5 were the most readily detected. CONCLUSION Evaporative derivatization with SBA (a convenient reagent) can improve the detection of phenols with relatively high pKa values (above 9) by negative ion MALDI-TOF-MS, and accomplish this in the absence of post-derivatization reaction cleanup. PMID:24519828

  12. The Construction and Evaluation of Reference Spectra for the Identification of Human Pathogenic Microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Di; Ye, Changyun; Zhang, Huifang; Kan, Biao; Lu, Jingxing; Xu, Jianguo; Jiang, Xiugao; Zhao, Fei; You, Yuanhai; Yan, Xiaomei; Wang, Duochun; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Maojun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique for the rapid and high-throughput identification of microorganisms. There remains a dearth of studies in which a large number of pathogenic microorganisms from a particular country or region are utilized for systematic analyses. In this study, peptide mass reference spectra (PMRS) were constructed and evaluated from numerous human pathogens (a total of 1019 strains from 94 species), including enteric (46 species), respiratory (21 species), zoonotic (17 species), and nosocomial pathogens (10 species), using a MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper system (MBS). The PMRS for 380 strains of 52 species were new contributions to the original reference database (ORD). Compared with the ORD, the new reference database (NRD) allowed for 28.2% (from 71.5% to 99.7%) and 42.3% (from 51.3% to 93.6%) improvements in identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. Misidentification rates were 91.7% and 57.1% lower with the NRD than with the ORD for genus and species identification, respectively. Eight genera and 25 species were misidentified. For genera and species that are challenging to accurately identify, identification results must be manually determined and adjusted in accordance with the database parameters. Through augmentation, the MBS demonstrated a high identification accuracy and specificity for human pathogenic microorganisms. This study sought to provide theoretical guidance for using PMRS databases in various fields, such as clinical diagnosis and treatment, disease control, quality assurance, and food safety inspection. PMID:25181391

  13. The construction and evaluation of reference spectra for the identification of human pathogenic microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Ye, Changyun; Zhang, Huifang; Kan, Biao; Lu, Jingxing; Xu, Jianguo; Jiang, Xiugao; Zhao, Fei; You, Yuanhai; Yan, Xiaomei; Wang, Duochun; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Maojun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique for the rapid and high-throughput identification of microorganisms. There remains a dearth of studies in which a large number of pathogenic microorganisms from a particular country or region are utilized for systematic analyses. In this study, peptide mass reference spectra (PMRS) were constructed and evaluated from numerous human pathogens (a total of 1019 strains from 94 species), including enteric (46 species), respiratory (21 species), zoonotic (17 species), and nosocomial pathogens (10 species), using a MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper system (MBS). The PMRS for 380 strains of 52 species were new contributions to the original reference database (ORD). Compared with the ORD, the new reference database (NRD) allowed for 28.2% (from 71.5% to 99.7%) and 42.3% (from 51.3% to 93.6%) improvements in identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. Misidentification rates were 91.7% and 57.1% lower with the NRD than with the ORD for genus and species identification, respectively. Eight genera and 25 species were misidentified. For genera and species that are challenging to accurately identify, identification results must be manually determined and adjusted in accordance with the database parameters. Through augmentation, the MBS demonstrated a high identification accuracy and specificity for human pathogenic microorganisms. This study sought to provide theoretical guidance for using PMRS databases in various fields, such as clinical diagnosis and treatment, disease control, quality assurance, and food safety inspection.

  14. Proteomic profiling of renal allograft rejection in serum using magnetic bead-based sample fractionation and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Huang, Liling; Dai, Yong; Chen, Jiejing; Yan, Qiang; Huang, He

    2010-12-01

    Proteomics is one of the emerging techniques for biomarker discovery. Biomarkers can be used for early noninvasive diagnosis and prognosis of diseases and treatment efficacy evaluation. In the present study, the well-established research systems of ClinProt Micro solution incorporated unique magnetic bead sample preparation technology, which, based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), have become very successful in bioinformatics due to its outstanding performance and reproducibility for discovery disease-related biomarker. We collected fasting blood samples from patients with biopsy-confirmed acute renal allograft rejection (n = 12), chronic rejection (n = 12), stable graft function (n = 12) and also from healthy volunteers (n = 13) to study serum peptidome patterns. Specimens were purified with magnetic bead-based weak cation exchange chromatography and analyzed with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. The results indicated that 18 differential peptide peaks were selected as potential biomarkers of acute renal allograft rejection, and 6 differential peptide peaks were selected as potential biomarkers of chronic rejection. A Quick Classifier Algorithm was used to set up the classification models for acute and chronic renal allograft rejection. The algorithm models recognize 82.64% of acute rejection and 98.96% of chronic rejection episodes, respectively. We were able to identify serum protein fingerprints in small sample sizes of recipients with renal allograft rejection and establish the models for diagnosis of renal allograft rejection. This preliminary study demonstrated that proteomics is an emerging tool for early diagnosis of renal allograft rejection and helps us to better understand the pathogenesis of disease process.

  15. Profiling and Imaging Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Cholesterol and 7-Dehydrocholesterol in Cells Via Sputtered Silver MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Libin; Kliman, Michal; Forsythe, Jay G.; Korade, Zeljka; Hmelo, Anthony B.; Porter, Ned A.; McLean, John A.

    2015-06-01

    Profiling and imaging of cholesterol and its precursors by mass spectrometry (MS) are important in a number of cholesterol biosynthesis disorders, such as in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), where 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) is accumulated in affected individuals. SLOS is caused by defects in the enzyme that reduces 7-DHC to cholesterol. However, analysis of sterols is challenging because these hydrophobic olefins are difficult to ionize for MS detection. We report here sputtered silver matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) analysis of cholesterol and 7-DHC. In comparison with liquid-based AgNO3 and colloidal Ag nanoparticle (AgNP), sputtered silver NP (10-25 nm) provided the lowest limits-of-detection based on the silver coordinated [cholesterol + Ag]+ and [7-DHC + Ag]+ signals while minimizing dehydrogenation products ([M + Ag-2H]+). When analyzing human fibroblasts that were directly grown on poly-L-lysine-coated ITO glass plates with this technique, in situ, the 7-DHC/cholesterol ratios for both control and SLOS human fibroblasts are readily obtained. The m/z of 491 (specific for [7-DHC + 107Ag]+) and 495 (specific for [cholesterol + 109Ag]+) were subsequently imaged using MALDI-IM-MS. MS images were co-registered with optical images of the cells for metabolic ratio determination. From these comparisons, ratios of 7-DHC/cholesterol for SLOS human fibroblasts are distinctly higher than in control human fibroblasts. Thus, this strategy demonstrates the utility for diagnosing/assaying the severity of cholesterol biosynthesis disorders in vitro.

  16. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  17. Peak intensity prediction in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: A machine learning study to support quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Wiebke; Scherbart, Alexandra; Böcker, Sebastian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2008-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry is a key technique in proteomics and can be used to analyze complex samples quickly. One key problem with the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins, however, is the fact that absolute quantification is severely hampered by the unclear relationship between the observed peak intensity and the peptide concentration in the sample. While there are numerous approaches to circumvent this problem experimentally (e.g. labeling techniques), reliable prediction of the peak intensities from peptide sequences could provide a peptide-specific correction factor. Thus, it would be a valuable tool towards label-free absolute quantification. Results In this work we present machine learning techniques for peak intensity prediction for MALDI mass spectra. Features encoding the peptides' physico-chemical properties as well as string-based features were extracted. A feature subset was obtained from multiple forward feature selections on the extracted features. Based on these features, two advanced machine learning methods (support vector regression and local linear maps) are shown to yield good results for this problem (Pearson correlation of 0.68 in a ten-fold cross validation). Conclusion The techniques presented here are a useful first step going beyond the binary prediction of proteotypic peptides towards a more quantitative prediction of peak intensities. These predictions in turn will turn out to be beneficial for mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics. PMID:18937839

  18. Spectral Reproducibility and Quantification of Peptides in MALDI of Samples Prepared by Micro-Spotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Yong Jin; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we reported that MALDI spectra of peptides became reproducible when temperature was kept constant. Linear calibration curves derived from such spectral data could be used for quantification. Homogeneity of samples was one of the requirements. Among the three popular matrices used in peptide MALDI [i.e., α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), and sinapinic acid (SA)], homogeneous samples could be prepared by conventional means only for CHCA. In this work, we showed that sample preparation by micro-spotting improved the homogeneity for all three cases.

  19. Implementation of a Gaussian beam laser and aspheric optics for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging MS.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  20. Sinapinic acid clusters distribution from monomer to mega Dalton's region in MALDI process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chang, Kuang-Hua; Lin, Jung-Lee; Wu, Chia-Lin; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we report the first complete sinapinic acid clusters distribution from monomer to mega Dalton's region by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). A decrease of eight orders in intensity was observed from monomer ion to 10 000-mer ion. The results fit to the model of laser ablation induced desorption process with bimodal power-law dependence. In addition, the detailed measurements on the populations of different sizes of clusters can provide some insight of different models of the mechanism for MALDI.

  1. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  2. Improved MALDI-TOF Microbial Mass Spectrometry Imaging by Application of a Dispersed Solid Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergeiner, Stefan; Schafferer, Lukas; Haas, Hubertus; Müller, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The key step in high quality microbial matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (microbial MALDI MSI) is the fabrication of a homogeneous matrix coating showing a fine-grained morphology. This application note addresses a novel method to apply solid MALDI matrices onto microbial cultures grown on thin agar media. A suspension of a mixture of 2,5-DHB and α-CHCA is sprayed onto the agar sample surface to form highly homogeneous matrix coatings. As a result, the signal intensities of metabolites secreted by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus were found to be clearly enhanced.

  3. Detection and Identification of Bioanalytes with High Resolution LSPR Spectroscopy and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Jeffrey N.; Hall, W. Paige; Lambert, Mary P.; Velasco, Pauline T.; Mrksich, Milan; Klein, William L.

    2009-01-01

    High resolution localized surface plasmon resonance (HR-LSPR) sensors were combined with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the first time. LSPR sensors provide real-time label-free detection of molecular adsorption. Subsequent MALDI-MS analysis enables identification of the adsorbed molecules. This synergistic LSPR-MS approach was applied to the detection and identification of amyloid beta oligomers which play an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:20161175

  4. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  5. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  6. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  7. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  8. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  9. Separating Dust Mixtures and Other External Aerosol Mixtures Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Vaughan, M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for source attribution and for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing. The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) has acquired considerable datasets of both aerosol extensive parameters (e.g. aerosol optical depth) and intensive parameters (e.g. aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) that can be used to infer aerosol type. An aerosol classification methodology has been used extensively to classify HSRL-1 aerosol measurements of different aerosol types including dust, smoke, urban pollution, and marine aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. Here we present a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing external mixtures using several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. Our mixing rules apply not just to the scalar values of aerosol intensive parameters, but to multi-dimensional normal distributions with variance in each measurement dimension. We illustrate the applicability of the mixing rules using examples of HSRL-1 data where mixing occurred between different aerosol types, including advected Saharan dust mixed with the marine boundary layer in the Caribbean Sea and locally generated dust mixed with urban pollution in the Mexico City surroundings. For each of these cases we infer a time-height cross section of mixing ratio along the flight track and we partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types. Since multiple aerosol intensive parameters are measured and included in these calculations, the techniques can also be used for cases without significant depolarization (unlike similar work by earlier researchers), and so a third example of a

  10. Determining and characterizing hapten loads for carrier proteins by MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/RTOF MS.

    PubMed

    Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Stephan, Christopher; Häubl, Georg; Allmaier, Günter; Krska, Rudolf; Cvak, Barbara

    2016-07-15

    The increasing number of bioconjugates used for bioanalytical purposes and in pharmaceutical industries has led to an increasing demand for robust quality control of products derived from covalently linking small molecules to proteins. Here we report, for the first time, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)-based method to determine the quantity and location of the hapten zearalenone (ZEN) introduced to the carrier protein conalbumin (Con). This bioconjugate is of special interest because of its application in lateral flow immunoassays commercially available for fast testing of food and feed for the presence of ZEN, a common contaminant of all major cereal grains worldwide. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the intact protein turned out to be highly reproducible allowing for the determination of the average hapten load of the carrier protein. In that way an easy and fast method to screen for changes in ZEN load after bioconjugate synthesis was established. For a more detailed hapten load characterization, measurements at the peptide level were of importance. Systematic studies, implementing post-source decay (PSD) and high- and low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), showed characteristic fragmentation pattern for three model peptides carrying between one and three lysines (the primary target for the ZEN modification) besides other, less obvious modification sites (serine, arginine and the N-terminus). By this, indicative reporter ions (m/z 203 and 316) and neutral losses (Δm/z 373 and 317) for the ZEN modification in general, plus immonium ions (m/z 87, 142 and 159) for the lysine modification in particular were identified. Based on these findings, proteolytic peptides, tentatively assigned to be modified, were unequivocally confirmed to be affected by bioconjugation. For a protein carrying on average only 2-3 modifications per molecule 29 Lys out of 59 potential modifications sites were actually modified

  11. Multi-channel electric aerosol spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, A.; Noppel, M.; Peil, I.; Salm, J.; Tamm, E.; Tammet, H.

    Multi-channel electric mobility spectrometry is a most efficient technique for the rapid measurement of an unstable aerosol particle size spectrum. The measuring range of the spectrometer from 10 microns to 10 microns is achieved by applying diffusional and field charging mechanisms simultaneously. On-line data processing is carried out with a microcomputer. Experimental calibration ensures correctness of measurement.

  12. FACTORS AFFECTING THE DEPOSITION OF AEROSOLIZED INSULIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Background
    The inhalation of insulin for absorption into the bloodstream via the lung seems to be a promising technique for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. A fundamental issue to be resolved in the development of such insulin aerosol delivery systems is their...

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    applications. The HSRL products are used to apportion AOT by type and vertical location in the column, and to characterize the frequency of cases where multiple types are present in the column. Resolving scenes with multiple types in the column is not possible with passive imaging radiometer and polarimeter measurements. The HSRL aerosol type also has higher resolution than the CALIPSO layer-wise product and provides insight into the performance of CALIPSO layer separation. Information about the vertical distribution of aerosol types is useful for estimating radiative forcing, understanding aerosol lifetime and transport, and assessing the predictions of transport models. CALIPSO has been a pathfinder, providing the first long-term global data set of aerosol vertical distribution. Based on our results, a future satellite lidar similar to CALIPSO, but with the addition of polarization sensitivity at 1064 nm and the HSRL technique at 532 nm, could provide a significant advance in characterizing the vertical distribution of aerosol.

  14. Subcellular-level resolution MALDI-MS imaging of maize leaf metabolites by MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Korte, Andrew R; Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D; Nikolau, Basil J; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-03-01

    A significant limiting factor in achieving high spatial resolution for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) imaging is the size of the laser spot at the sample surface. Here, we present modifications to the beam-delivery optics of a commercial MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument, incorporating an external Nd:YAG laser, beam-shaping optics, and an aspheric focusing lens, to reduce the minimum laser spot size from ~50 μm for the commercial configuration down to ~9 μm for the modified configuration. This improved system was applied for MALDI-MS imaging of cross sections of juvenile maize leaves at 5-μm spatial resolution using an oversampling method. A variety of different metabolites including amino acids, glycerolipids, and defense-related compounds were imaged at a spatial resolution well below the size of a single cell. Such images provide unprecedented insights into the metabolism associated with the different tissue types of the maize leaf, which is known to asymmetrically distribute the reactions of C4 photosynthesis among the mesophyll and bundle sheath cell types. The metabolite ion images correlate with the optical images that reveal the structures of the different tissues, and previously known and newly revealed asymmetric metabolic features are observed.

  15. Subcellular-level resolution MALDI-MS imaging of maize leaf metabolites by MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Korte, Andrew R.; Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-01-25

    A significant limiting factor in achieving high spatial resolution for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) imaging is the size of the laser spot at the sample surface. We present modifications to the beam-delivery optics of a commercial MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument, incorporating an external Nd:YAG laser, beam-shaping optics, and an aspheric focusing lens, to reduce the minimum laser spot size from ~50 μm for the commercial configuration down to ~9 μm for the modified configuration. This improved system was applied for MALDI-MS imaging of cross sections of juvenile maize leaves at 5-μm spatial resolution using an oversampling method. Theremore » are a variety of different metabolites including amino acids, glycerolipids, and defense-related compounds were imaged at a spatial resolution well below the size of a single cell. Such images provide unprecedented insights into the metabolism associated with the different tissue types of the maize leaf, which is known to asymmetrically distribute the reactions of C4 photosynthesis among the mesophyll and bundle sheath cell types. The metabolite ion images correlate with the optical images that reveal the structures of the different tissues, and previously known and newly revealed asymmetric metabolic features are observed.« less

  16. Subcellular-level resolution MALDI-MS imaging of maize leaf metabolites by MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, Andrew R.; Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-01-25

    A significant limiting factor in achieving high spatial resolution for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) imaging is the size of the laser spot at the sample surface. We present modifications to the beam-delivery optics of a commercial MALDI-linear ion trap-Orbitrap instrument, incorporating an external Nd:YAG laser, beam-shaping optics, and an aspheric focusing lens, to reduce the minimum laser spot size from ~50 μm for the commercial configuration down to ~9 μm for the modified configuration. This improved system was applied for MALDI-MS imaging of cross sections of juvenile maize leaves at 5-μm spatial resolution using an oversampling method. There are a variety of different metabolites including amino acids, glycerolipids, and defense-related compounds were imaged at a spatial resolution well below the size of a single cell. Such images provide unprecedented insights into the metabolism associated with the different tissue types of the maize leaf, which is known to asymmetrically distribute the reactions of C4 photosynthesis among the mesophyll and bundle sheath cell types. The metabolite ion images correlate with the optical images that reveal the structures of the different tissues, and previously known and newly revealed asymmetric metabolic features are observed.

  17. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Hatch, Courtney D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-07-01

    Aerosols represent an important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Because aerosols are composed of solid and liquid particles of varying chemical complexity, size, and phase, large challenges exist in understanding how they impact climate, health, and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Only through the integration of field, laboratory, and modeling analysis can we begin to unravel the roles atmospheric aerosols play in these global processes. In this article, we provide a brief review of the current state of the science in the analysis of atmospheric aerosols and some important challenges that need to be overcome before they can become fully integrated. It is clear that only when these areas are effectively bridged can we fully understand the impact that atmospheric aerosols have on our environment and the Earth's system at the level of scientific certainty necessary to design and implement sound environmental policies.

  18. Aerosol physical properties and their impact on climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Piskozub, Jacek; Drozdowska, Violetta; Gutowska, Dorota; Rozwadowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensing. Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies, and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. It was one of the reasons for the growth in the number of research programs dealing with marine aerosols. Sea salt aerosols are among the most abundant components of the atmospheric aerosol, and thus it exerts a strong influence on radiation, cloud formation, meteorology and chemistry of the marine atmosphere. An accurate understanding and description of these mechanisms is crucial to modeling climate and climate change. This work provides information on combined aerosol studies made with lidars and sun photometers onboard the ship and in different coastal areas. We concentrate on aerosol optical thickness and its variations with aerosol advections into the study area. We pay special attention to the problem of proper data collection and analyses techniques. We showed that in order to detect the dynamics of potential aerosol composition changes it is necessary to use data from different stations where measurements are made using the same techniques. The combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides comprehensive picture of aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01

  19. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  20. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  1. Synergic use of TOMS and AERONET observations for characterization of aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.

    2003-04-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  2. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  3. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions. PMID:24601011

  4. Combining light microscopy, dielectric spectroscopy, MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry, FTIR spectromicroscopy and multivariate data mining for morphological and physiological bioprocess characterization of filamentous organisms.

    PubMed

    Posch, Andreas E; Koch, Cosima; Helmel, Michaela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Macfelda, Karin; Lendl, Bernhard; Allmaier, Günter; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Along with productivity and physiology, morphological growth behavior is the key parameter in bioprocess design for filamentous fungi. Lacking tools for fast, reliable and efficient analysis however, fungal morphology is still commonly tackled by empirical trial-and-error techniques during strain selection and process development procedures. Bridging the gap, this work presents a comprehensive analytical approach for morphological analysis combining automated high-throughput microscopy, multi-frequency dielectric spectroscopy, MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry and FTIR spectromicroscopy. Industrial fed-batch production processes were investigated in fully instrumented, automated bioreactors using the model system Penicillium chrysogenum. Physiological process characterization was based on the determination of specific conversion rates as scale-independent parameters. Conventional light microscopic morphological analysis was based on holistic determination of time series for more than 30 morphological parameters and their frequency distributions over the respective parameter range by automated high-throughput light microscopy. Characteristic protein patterns enriched in specific morphological and physiological states were further obtained by MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry. Spatial resolution of molecular biomass composition was facilitated by FTIR spectromicroscopy. Real-time in situ monitoring of morphological process behavior was achieved by linking multi-frequency dielectric spectroscopy with above outlined off-line methods. Data integration of complementing orthogonal techniques for morphological and physiological analysis together with multivariate modeling of interdependencies between morphology, physiology and process parameters facilitated complete bioprocess characterization. The suggested approach will thus help understanding morphological and physiological behavior and, in turn, allow to control and optimize those complex processes.

  5. New insights into the structural and spatial variability of cell-wall polysaccharides during wheat grain development, as revealed through MALDI mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rogniaux, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) and (1→3),(1→4)-β-glucans (BG) are the major components of wheat grain cell walls. Although incompletely described at the molecular level, it is known that the chemical and distributional heterogeneity of these compounds impacts the quality and use of wheat. In this work, an emerging technique based on MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was employed to map variations in the quantity, localization, and structure of these polysaccharides in the endosperm during wheat maturation. MALDI MSI couples detailed structural information with the spatial localization observed at the micrometer scale. The enzymic hydrolysis of AX and BG was performed directly on the grain sections, resulting in the efficient formation of smaller oligosaccharides that are easily measurable through MS, with no relocation across the grain. The relative quantification of the generated oligosaccharides was achieved. The method was validated by confirming data previously obtained using other analytical techniques. Furthermore, in situ analysis of grain cell walls through MSI revealed previously undetectable intense acetylation of AX in young compared to mature grains, together with findings concerning the feruloylation of AX and different structural features of BG. These results provide new insights into the physiological roles of these polysaccharides in cell walls and the specificity of the hydrolytic enzymes involved. PMID:24600018

  6. MALDI-TOF MS Distinctly Differentiates Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae from Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huifang; Zhang, Yongchan; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Li; Lv, Jing; Wang, Yingtong; Zhang, Jianzhong; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Haemophilus haemolyticus exhibit different pathogenicities, but to date, there remains no definitive and reliable strategy for differentiating these strains. In this study, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a potential method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. The phylogenetic analysis of concatenated 16S rRNA and recombinase A (recA) gene sequences, outer membrane protein P6 gene sequencing and single-gene PCR were used as reference methods. The original reference database (ORD, provided with the Biotyper software) and new reference database (NRD, extended with Chinese strains) were compared for the evaluation of MALDI-TOF MS. Through a search of the ORD, 76.9% of the NTHi (40/52) and none of the H. haemolyticus (0/20) strains were identified at the species level. However, all NTHi and H. haemolyticus strains used for identification were accurately recognized at the species level when searching the NRD. From the dendrogram clustering of the main spectra projections, the Chinese and foreign H. influenzae reference strains were categorized into two distinct groups, and H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus were also separated into two categories. Compared to the existing methods, MALDI-TOF MS has the advantage of integrating high throughput, accuracy and speed. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is an excellent method for differentiating NTHi and H. haemolyticus. This method can be recommended for use in appropriately equipped laboratories. PMID:23457514

  7. Ellagitannin Composition of Blackberry As Determined by HPLC-ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apache blackberries (Rubus sp.) were evaluated by HPLC-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS to identify ellagitannins present in the flesh, torus (receptacle tissue), and seeds. Most ellagitannins were only present or detectable in seed tissues. Ellagitannins identified by HPLC-MS in the seeds included pedunculagi...

  8. Compelling Evidence for Lucky Survivor and Gas Phase Protonation: The Unified MALDI Analyte Protonation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskolla, Thorsten W.; Karas, Michael

    2011-06-01

    This work experimentally verifies and proves the two long since postulated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) analyte protonation pathways known as the Lucky Survivor and the gas phase protonation model. Experimental differentiation between the predicted mechanisms becomes possible by the use of deuterated matrix esters as MALDI matrices, which are stable under typical sample preparation conditions and generate deuteronated reagent ions, including the deuterated and deuteronated free matrix acid, only upon laser irradiation in the MALDI process. While the generation of deuteronated analyte ions proves the gas phase protonation model, the detection of protonated analytes by application of deuterated matrix compounds without acidic hydrogens proves the survival of analytes precharged from solution in accordance with the predictions from the Lucky Survivor model. The observed ratio of the two analyte ionization processes depends on the applied experimental parameters as well as the nature of analyte and matrix. Increasing laser fluences and lower matrix proton affinities favor gas phase protonation, whereas more quantitative analyte protonation in solution and intramolecular ion stabilization leads to more Lucky Survivors. The presented results allow for a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes causing analyte ionization in MALDI and may alleviate future efforts for increasing the analyte ion yield.

  9. Pyrylium Salts as Reactive Matrices for MALDI-MS Imaging of Biologically Active Primary Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Karlsson, Oskar; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Svenningsson, Per; Andren, Per E.

    2015-06-01

    Many neuroactive substances, including endogenous biomolecules, environmental compounds, and pharmaceuticals possess primary amine functional groups. Among these are catecholamine neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine), many substituted phenethylamines (e.g., amphetamine), as well as amino acids and neuropeptides. In most cases, mass spectrometric (ESI and MALDI) analyses of trace amounts of such compounds are challenging because of their poor ionization properties. We present a method for chemical derivatization of primary amines by reaction with pyrylium salts that facilitates their detection by MALDI-MS and enables the imaging of primary amines in brain tissue sections. A screen of pyrylium salts revealed that the 2,4-diphenyl-pyranylium ion efficiently derivatizes primary amines and can be used as a reactive MALDI-MS matrix that induces both derivatization and desorption. MALDI-MS imaging with such matrix was used to map the localization of dopamine and amphetamine in brain tissue sections and to quantitatively map the distribution of the neurotoxin β- N-methylamino-L-alanine.

  10. MALDI MS analysis of oligonucleotides: desalting by functional magnetite beads using microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-11-01

    The presence of alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides commonly deteriorates matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra. Thus, desalting is required for oligonucleotide samples prior to MALDI MS analysis in order to prevent the mass spectra from developing poor quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to extract traces of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of salts using microwave-assisted extraction. The C18-presenting magnetite beads, capable of absorbing microwave irradiation, are used as affinity probes for oligonucleotides with the addition of triethylammonium acetate as the counterions. This new microwave-assisted extraction approach using magnetite beads as the trapping agents and as microwave-absorbers has been demonstrated to be very effective in the selective binding of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions. The extraction of oligonucleotides from solutions onto the C18-presenting magnetite beads takes only 30 s to enrich oligonucleotides in sufficient quantities for MALDI MS analysis. After using this desalting approach, alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides are dramatically reduced in the MALDI mass spectra. The presence of saturated NaCl (approximately 6 M) in the oligonucleotide sample is tolerated without degrading the mass spectra. The detection limit for d(A)6 is approximately 2.8 fmol. PMID:17902633

  11. MALDI-TOF MS in microbiological diagnostics-identification of microorganisms and beyond (mini review).

    PubMed

    Wieser, Andreas; Schneider, Lukas; Jung, Jette; Schubert, Sören

    2012-02-01

    Few developments in microbiological diagnostics have had such a rapid impact on species level identification of microorganisms as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Conventional differentiation methods rely on biochemical criteria and require additional pre-testing and lengthy incubation procedures. In comparison, MALDI-TOF MS can identify bacteria and yeast within minutes directly from colonies grown on culture plates. This radically new, methodically simple approach profoundly reduces the cost of consumables and time spent on diagnostics. The reliability and accuracy of the method have been demonstrated in numerous studies and different systems are already commercially available. Novel applications of the system besides microbial species level identification are also being explored. This includes identification of pathogens from positive blood cultures or directly from patient samples, such as urine. Currently, intriguing MALDI-TOF MS developments are being made regarding the phenotypic detection of certain antibiotic resistance mechanisms, e.g., β-lactamases and carbapenemases. This mini review provides an overview of the literature in the field and also includes our own data and experiences gathered from over 4 years of routine MALDI-TOF MS use in a university hospital's microbiological diagnostics facility.

  12. Preparation of positive blood cultures for direct MALDI-ToF MS identification.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew M; Ussher, James E

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-ToF MS can be used to identify microorganisms directly from blood cultures. This study compared two methods of sample preparation. Similar levels of genus- (91% vs 90%) and species-level identifications (79% vs 74%) were obtained with differential centrifugation and SDS methods. The SDS method is faster and requires minimal handling.

  13. Assessment of MALDI-TOF MS as Alternative Tool for Streptococcus suis Identification.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sancho, Marta; Vela, Ana Isabel; García-Seco, Teresa; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identifying Streptococcus suis isolates obtained from pigs, wild animals, and humans was evaluated using a PCR-based identification assay as the gold standard. In addition, MALDI-TOF MS was compared with the commercial multi-tests Rapid ID 32 STREP system. From the 129 S. suis isolates included in the study and identified by the molecular method, only 31 isolates (24.03%) had score values ≥2.300 and 79 isolates (61.24%) gave score values between 2.299 and 2.000. After updating the currently available S. suis MALDI Biotyper database with the spectra of three additional clinical isolates of serotypes 2, 7, and 9, most isolates had statistically significant higher score values (mean score: 2.65) than those obtained using the original database (mean score: 2.182). Considering the results of the present study, we suggest using a less restrictive threshold score of ≥2.000 for reliable species identification of S. suis. According to this cut-off value, a total of 125 S. suis isolates (96.9%) were correctly identified using the updated database. These data indicate an excellent performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of S. suis. PMID:26347858

  14. Investigation and optimization of parameters affecting the multiply charged ion yield in AP-MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Ryumin, Pavel; Brown, Jeffery; Morris, Michael; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-07-15

    Liquid matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allows the generation of predominantly multiply charged ions in atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion sources for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. The charge state distribution of the generated ions and the efficiency of the ion source in generating such ions crucially depend on the desolvation regime of the MALDI plume after desorption in the AP-to-vacuum inlet. Both high temperature and a flow regime with increased residence time of the desorbed plume in the desolvation region promote the generation of multiply charged ions. Without such measures the application of an electric ion extraction field significantly increases the ion signal intensity of singly charged species while the detection of multiply charged species is less dependent on the extraction field. In general, optimization of high temperature application facilitates the predominant formation and detection of multiply charged compared to singly charged ion species. In this study an experimental set-up and optimization strategy is described for liquid AP-MALDI MS which improves the ionization efficiency of selected ion species up to 14 times. In combination with ion mobility separation, the method allows the detection of multiply charged peptide and protein ions for analyte solution concentrations as low as 2fmol/μL (0.5μL, i.e. 1fmol, deposited on the target) with very low sample consumption in the low nL-range. PMID:26827934

  15. A simple MALDI plate functionalization by Vmh2 hydrophobin for serial multi-enzymatic protein digestions.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, Sara; Gravagnuolo, Alfredo Maria; Funari, Riccardo; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Pane, Francesca; Galano, Eugenio; Amoresano, Angela; Marino, Gennaro; Giardina, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The development of efficient and rapid methods for the identification with high sequence coverage of proteins is one of the most important goals of proteomic strategies today. The on-plate digestion of proteins is a very attractive approach, due to the possibility of coupling immobilized-enzymatic digestion with direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. The crucial step in the development of on-plate immobilization is however the functionalization of the solid surface. Fungal self-assembling proteins, the hydrophobins, are able to efficiently functionalize surfaces. We have recently shown that such modified plates are able to absorb either peptides or proteins and are amenable to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. In this paper, the hydrophobin-coated MALDI sample plates were exploited as a lab-on-plate for noncovalent immobilization of enzymes commonly used in protein identification/characterization, such as trypsin, V8 protease, PNGaseF, and alkaline phosphatase. Rapid and efficient on-plate reactions were performed to achieve high sequence coverage of model proteins, particularly when performing multiple enzyme digestions. The possibility of exploiting this direct on-plate MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis has been investigated on model proteins and, as proof of concept, on entire whey milk proteome. PMID:25395204

  16. MALDI imaging MS reveals candidate lipid markers of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Hermelindis; Salonikios, Theresia; Fuchser, Jens; Schwartz, Matthias; Sticht, Carsten; Hochheim, Christina; Wirnitzer, Bernhard; Gretz, Norbert; Hopf, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe, monogenetically inherited kidney and liver disease. PCK rats carrying the orthologous mutant gene serve as a model of human disease, and alterations in lipid profiles in PCK rats suggest that defined subsets of lipids may be useful as molecular disease markers. Whereas MALDI protein imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a promising tool for disease classification, widely applicable workflows that link MALDI lipid imaging and identification as well as structural characterization of candidate disease-classifying marker lipids are lacking. Here, we combine selective MALDI imaging of sulfated kidney lipids and Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) of imaging data sets for identification of candidate markers of progressive disease in PCK rats. Our study highlights strong increases in lower mass lipids as main classifiers of cystic disease. Structure determination by high-resolution mass spectrometry identifies these altered lipids as taurine-conjugated bile acids. These sulfated lipids are selectively elevated in the PCK rat model but not in models of related hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases, suggesting that they be molecular markers of the disease and that a combination of MALDI imaging with high-resolution MS methods and Fisher discriminant data analysis may be applicable for lipid marker discovery.

  17. Decellularization of intact tissue enables MALDI imaging mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gessel, Megan; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Voziyan, Paul; Hudson, Billy G; Caprioli, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) is a powerful molecular mapping technology that offers unbiased visualization of the spatial arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. Although there has been a significant increase in the number of applications employing this technology, the extracellular matrix (ECM) has received little attention, likely because ECM proteins are mostly large, insoluble and heavily cross-linked. We have developed a new sample preparation approach to enable MALDI IMS analysis of ECM proteins in tissue. Prior to freezing and sectioning, intact tissues are decellularized by incubation in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Decellularization removes the highly abundant, soluble species that dominate a MALDI IMS spectrum while preserving the structural integrity of the ECM. In situ tryptic hydrolysis and imaging of tryptic peptides are then carried out to accommodate the large sizes of ECM proteins. This new approach allows the use of MALDI IMS for identification of spatially specific changes in ECM protein expression and modification in tissue.

  18. Assessment of MALDI-TOF MS as Alternative Tool for Streptococcus suis Identification

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sancho, Marta; Vela, Ana Isabel; García-Seco, Teresa; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identifying Streptococcus suis isolates obtained from pigs, wild animals, and humans was evaluated using a PCR-based identification assay as the gold standard. In addition, MALDI-TOF MS was compared with the commercial multi-tests Rapid ID 32 STREP system. From the 129 S. suis isolates included in the study and identified by the molecular method, only 31 isolates (24.03%) had score values ≥2.300 and 79 isolates (61.24%) gave score values between 2.299 and 2.000. After updating the currently available S. suis MALDI Biotyper database with the spectra of three additional clinical isolates of serotypes 2, 7, and 9, most isolates had statistically significant higher score values (mean score: 2.65) than those obtained using the original database (mean score: 2.182). Considering the results of the present study, we suggest using a less restrictive threshold score of ≥2.000 for reliable species identification of S. suis. According to this cut-off value, a total of 125 S. suis isolates (96.9%) were correctly identified using the updated database. These data indicate an excellent performance of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of S. suis. PMID:26347858

  19. Rapid detection of carbapenemase activity: benefits and weaknesses of MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Mirande, C; Canard, I; Buffet Croix Blanche, S; Charrier, J-P; van Belkum, A; Welker, M; Chatellier, S

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as an identification procedure for bacteria and fungi. The MALDI-TOF MS-based analysis of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics has been applied to detect hydrolysis of carbapenems by different bacterial strains. However, the detection of enzymatic carbapenem degradation by MALDI-TOF MS lacks well-standardized protocols and several methods and models of interpretation using different calculations of ratio-of-peak intensities have been described in the literature. Here, we used faropenem and ertapenem hydrolysis as model compounds. In an attempt to propose a universal protocol, the hydrolysis was regularly monitored during 24 h using well-characterized bacterial strains producing different types of carbapenemases (KPC, IMP, NDM, VIM, and OXA-48). Variable responses and different timing for detectable hydrolysis, depending on the enzyme produced, were observed. KPC degrades its template antibiotics very quickly (15 min for some KPC producers) compared to other types of enzymes (more than 90 min for other enzymes). Prior bacterial lysis was shown to be of no interest in the modulation or optimization of the hydrolytic kinetics. The adequate detection of carbapenem hydrolysis would, therefore, require several MALDI-TOF MS readouts for the timely detection of rapid hydrolysis without missing slow hydrolysis. This enzymatic constraint limits the implementation of a standard protocol in routine microbiology laboratories. PMID:26337432

  20. 9,10-Diphenylanthracene as a matrix for MALDI-MS electron transfer secondary reactions.

    PubMed

    Boutaghou, M Nazim; Cole, Richard B

    2012-08-01

    The most common secondary-ionization mechanism in positive ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) involves a proton transfer reaction to ionize the analyte. Peptides and proteins are molecules that have basic (and acidic) sites that make them susceptible to proton transfer. However, non-polar, aprotic compounds that lack basic sites are more difficult to protonate, and creating charged forms of this type of analyte can pose a problem when conventional MALDI matrices are employed. In this case, forming a radical molecular ion through electron transfer is a viable alternative, and certain matrices may facilitate the process. In this work, we investigate the performance of a newly developed electron-transfer secondary reaction matrix: 9,10-diphenylanthracene (9,10-DPA). The use of 9,10-DPA as matrix for MALDI analysis has been tested using several model compounds. It appears to promote ionization through electron transfer in a highly efficient manner as compared to other potential matrices. Thermodynamic aspects of the observed electron transfers in secondary-ionization reactions were also considered, as was the possibility for kinetically controlled/endothermic, electron-transfer reactions in the MALDI plume.

  1. The ongoing revolution of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for microbiology reaches tropical Africa.

    PubMed

    Fall, Bécaye; Lo, Cheikh Ibrahima; Samb-Ba, Bissoume; Perrot, Nadine; Diawara, Silman; Gueye, Mamadou Wague; Sow, Kowry; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Mediannikov, Oleg; Sokhna, Cheikh; Diemé, Yaya; Chatellier, Sonia; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Fenollar, Florence

    2015-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) represents a revolution in routine pathogen identification in clinical microbiology laboratories. A MALDI-TOF MS was introduced to tropical Africa in the clinical microbiology laboratory of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Senegal) and used for routine pathogen identification. Using MS, 2,429 bacteria and fungi isolated from patients were directly assayed, leading to the identification of 2,082 bacteria (85.7%) and 206 fungi (8.5%) at the species level, 109 bacteria (4.5%) at the genus level, and 16 bacteria (0.75%) at the family level. Sixteen isolates remained unidentified (0.75%). Escherichia coli was the most prevalent species (25.8%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.8%), Streptococcus agalactiae (6.2%), Acinetobacter baumannii (6.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%). MALDI-TOF MS has also enabled the detection of rare bacteria and fungi. MALDI-TOF MS is a powerful tool for the identification of bacterial and fungal species involved in infectious diseases in tropical Africa.

  2. Decellularization of intact tissue enables MALDI imaging mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gessel, Megan; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Voziyan, Paul; Hudson, Billy G; Caprioli, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) is a powerful molecular mapping technology that offers unbiased visualization of the spatial arrangement of biomolecules in tissue. Although there has been a significant increase in the number of applications employing this technology, the extracellular matrix (ECM) has received little attention, likely because ECM proteins are mostly large, insoluble and heavily cross-linked. We have developed a new sample preparation approach to enable MALDI IMS analysis of ECM proteins in tissue. Prior to freezing and sectioning, intact tissues are decellularized by incubation in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Decellularization removes the highly abundant, soluble species that dominate a MALDI IMS spectrum while preserving the structural integrity of the ECM. In situ tryptic hydrolysis and imaging of tryptic peptides are then carried out to accommodate the large sizes of ECM proteins. This new approach allows the use of MALDI IMS for identification of spatially specific changes in ECM protein expression and modification in tissue. PMID:26505774

  3. Chemical composition of emissions from urban sources of fine organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Hildemann, L.M.; Markowski, G.R.; Cass, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    A dilution source sampling system was used to collect primary fine aerosol emissions from important sources of urban organic aerosol, including a boiler burning No. 2 fuel oil, a home fireplace, a fleet of catalyst-equipped and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternative dilution sampling techniques were used to collect emissions from cigarette smoking and a roofing tar pot, and grab sample techniques were employed to characterize paved road dust, brake lining wear, and vegetative detritus. Organic aerosol constituted the majority of the fine aerosol mass emitted from many of the sources tested. Fine primary organic aerosol emissions within the heavily urbanized western portion of the Los Angeles Basin were determined to total 29.8 metric ton/day. Over 40% of these organic aerosol emissions are from anthropogenic pollution sources that are expected to emit contemporary (nonfossil) aerosol carbon, in good agreement with the available ambient monitoring data.

  4. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.; Salt, K.; Nordmeyer, T.; Fergenson, D.; Morrical, B.

    1995-12-31

    Particulate pollution is an area of growing concern in light of recent studies which suggest a link between high concentrations of ambient PM{sub 10} (particles with diameters equal to or less than 10 {mu}m) and adverse health effects ranging from respiratory ailments to premature death. However, analytical chemistry techniques aimed at sampling and analysis of atmospheric aerosols are extremely limited in comparison to the number of methods that exist for studying gas phase smog components. As a result, current government regulations for levels of ambient particulates are necessarily general, lacking any chemical specificity. The authors have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. In one of the aerosol studies performed in this laboratory, this instrument is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. To date, the authors have observed very distinct size/composition correlations for organic and inorganic particles.

  5. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  6. Toward Investigating Optically Trapped Organic Aerosols with CARS Microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change notes the huge uncertainty in the effect that atmospheric aerosols play in determining overall global temperature, specifically in their ability to nucleate clouds. To better understand aerosol chemistry, the novel coupling of gradient force optical trapping with broad bandwidth coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is being developed to study single particles suspended in air. Building on successful designs employed separately for the techniques, this hybrid technology will be used to explain how the oxidation of organic compounds changes the chemical and physical properties of aerosols. By trapping the particles, an individual aerosol can be studied for up to several days. Using a broad bandwidth pulse for one of the incident beams will result in a Raman vibrational spectrum from every laser pulse. Combined with signal enhancement due to resonance and coherence of nonlinear CARS spectroscopy, this technique will allow for acquisition of data on the millisecond time scale, facilitating the study of dynamic processes. This will provide insights on how aerosols react with and absorb species from the gas phase. These experiments will increase understanding of aerosol oxidation and growth mechanisms and the effects that aerosols have on our atmosphere and climate. Progress in efforts developing this novel technique to study model systems is presented.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy of UV-MALDI matrices and implications of ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hou-Yu; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lu, I.-Chung; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Liao, Chih-Yu; Lee, Yin-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Ming; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2014-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) has been widely used in the mass analysis of biomolecules; however, there are a lot of debates about the ionization mechanisms. Previous studies have indicated that S1-S1 annihilation might be a key process in the generation of primary ions. This study investigates S1-S1 annihilation by examining the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of 12 matrices. No S1-S1 annihilation was observed in six of these matrices (3-hydroxy-picolinic acid, 6-aza-2-thiothymine, 2,4-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,6-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,4,6-trihydroxy-acetophenone, and ferulic acid). We observed two matrix molecules reacting in an electronically excited state (S1) in five of these matrices (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, 2,5-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and S1-S1 annihilation was a possible reaction. Among these five matrices, no S1-S1 annihilation was observed for 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid in typical peak power region of nanosecond laser pulses in MALDI, but a very small value of reaction rate constant was observed only in the high peak power region. The excited-state lifetime of sinapinic acid was too short to determine whether the molecules reacted in an electronically excited state. No correlation was observed between the ion generation efficiency of MALDI and S1-S1 annihilation. The results indicate that the proposal of S1-S1 annihilation is unnecessary in MALDI and energy pooling model for MALDI ionization mechanism has to be modified.

  8. MALDI FTICR IMS of Intact Proteins: Using Mass Accuracy to Link Protein Images with Proteomics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Rose, Kristie L.; Hammer, Neal D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and selective tool used to visualize biomolecules in tissue. However, identification of detected proteins remains a difficult task. Indirect identification strategies have been limited by insufficient mass accuracy to confidently link ion images to proteomics data. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of MALDI FTICR MS for imaging intact proteins. MALDI FTICR IMS provides an unprecedented combination of mass resolving power (~75,000 at m/z 5000) and accuracy (<5ppm) for proteins up to ~12kDa, enabling identification based on correlation with LC-MS/MS proteomics data. Analysis of rat brain tissue was performed as a proof-of-concept highlighting the capabilities of this approach by imaging and identifying a number of proteins including N-terminally acetylated thymosin β4 ( m/z 4,963.502, 0.6ppm) and ATP synthase subunit ɛ ( m/z 5,636.074, -2.3ppm). MALDI FTICR IMS was also used to differentiate a series of oxidation products of S100A8 ( m/z 10,164.03, -2.1ppm), a subunit of the heterodimer calprotectin, in kidney tissue from mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus. S100A8 - M37O/C42O3 ( m/z 10228.00, -2.6ppm) was found to co-localize with bacterial microcolonies at the center of infectious foci. The ability of MALDI FTICR IMS to distinguish S100A8 modifications is critical to understanding calprotectin's roll in nutritional immunity.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of UV-MALDI matrices and implications of ionization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hou-Yu; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lu, I-Chung; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Liao, Chih-Yu; Lee, Yin-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Ming

    2014-10-28

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) has been widely used in the mass analysis of biomolecules; however, there are a lot of debates about the ionization mechanisms. Previous studies have indicated that S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation might be a key process in the generation of primary ions. This study investigates S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation by examining the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of 12 matrices. No S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation was observed in six of these matrices (3-hydroxy-picolinic acid, 6-aza-2-thiothymine, 2,4-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,6-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,4,6-trihydroxy-acetophenone, and ferulic acid). We observed two matrix molecules reacting in an electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) in five of these matrices (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, 2,5-dihydroxy-acetophenone, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation was a possible reaction. Among these five matrices, no S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation was observed for 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid in typical peak power region of nanosecond laser pulses in MALDI, but a very small value of reaction rate constant was observed only in the high peak power region. The excited-state lifetime of sinapinic acid was too short to determine whether the molecules reacted in an electronically excited state. No correlation was observed between the ion generation efficiency of MALDI and S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation. The results indicate that the proposal of S{sub 1}-S{sub 1} annihilation is unnecessary in MALDI and energy pooling model for MALDI ionization mechanism has to be modified.

  10. Selected protein monitoring in histological sections by targeted MALDI-FTICR in-source decay imaging.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, David; Longuespée, Rémi; Debois, Delphine; Asakawa, Daiki; Turtoi, Andrei; Castronovo, Vincent; Noël, Agnès; Bertrand, Virginie; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-02-19

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a rapidly growing method in biomedical research allowing molecular mapping of proteins on histological sections. The images can be analyzed in terms of spectral pattern to define regions of interest. However, the identification and the differential quantitative analysis of proteins require off line or in situ proteomic methods using enzymatic digestion. The rapid identification of biomarkers holds great promise for diagnostic research, but the major obstacle is the absence of a rapid and direct method to detect and identify with a sufficient dynamic range a set of specific biomarkers. In the current work, we present a proof of concept for a method allowing one to identify simultaneously a set of selected biomarkers on histological slices with minimal sample treatment using in-source decay (ISD) MSI and MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR). In the proposed method, known biomarkers are spotted next to the tissue of interest, the whole MALDI plate being coated with 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) matrix. The latter enhances MALDI radical-induced ISD, providing large tags of the amino acid sequences. Comparative analysis of ISD fragments between the reference spots and the specimen in imaging mode allows for unambiguous identification of the selected biomarker while preserving full spatial resolution. Moreover, the high resolution/high mass accuracy provided by FTICR mass spectrometry allows the identification of proteins. Well-resolved peaks and precise measurements of masses and mass differences allow the construction of reliable sequence tags for protein identification. The method will allow the use of MALDI-FTICR MSI as a method for rapid targeted biomarker detection in complement to classical histology.

  11. An impulse-driven liquid-droplet deposition interface for combining LC with MALDI MS and MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Young, J Bryce; Li, Liang

    2006-03-01

    A simple and robust impulse-driven droplet deposition system was developed for off-line liquid chromatography matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LC-MALDI MS). The system uses a solenoid operated with a pulsed voltage power supply to generate impulses that dislodge the hanging droplets from the LC outlet directly to a MALDI plate via a momentum transfer process. There is no contact between the LC outlet and the collection surface. The system is compatible with solvents of varying polarity and viscosity, and accommodates the use of hydrophobic and hydrophilic MALDI matrices. MALDI spots are produced on-line with the separation, and do not require further processing before MS analysis. It is shown that high quality MALDI spectra from 5 fmol of pyro-Glu-fibrinopeptide deposition after LC separation could be obtained using the device, indicating that there was no sample loss in the interface. To demonstrate the analytical performance of the system as a proteome analysis tool, a range of BSA digest concentrations covering about 3 orders of magnitude, from 5 fmol to 1 pmol, were analyzed by LC-MALDI quadrupole time-of-flight MS, yielding 6 and 57% amino acid sequence coverage, respectively. In addition, a complex protein mixture of an E. coli cell extract was tryptically digested and analyzed by LC-MALDI MS, resulting in the detection of a total of 409 unique peptides from 100 fractions of 15-s intervals.

  12. Trace elemental characteristics of aerosols emitted from municipal incinerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a continuing investigation of high temperature combustion aerosols, elemental composition of size differentiated aerosols emitted from a local municipal incinerator was studied. Aerosols were aerodynamically separated into eight diameter groups ranging from 0.43 mm to 20 mm, collected, and analyzed by charged particle induced X-ray emission technique. On line data collection and reduction codes generated aerial densities for elements from Na to U with sensitivities in the ng/cu m range for most elements. From the total weights of aerosols collected per stage, their size distribution was determined to be bimodal, with one group centered at a diameter of 0.54 mm and the other at a diameter of 5.6 mm. Measured elemental concentrations in various size ranges indicate that K and S show a strong tendency to concentrate on aerosol surfaces. A weaker trend for surface preference was also observed for Mn and Ni, but other elements show no such trend.

  13. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  14. A Cough Aerosol Simulator for the Study of Disease Transmission by Human Cough-Generated Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, William G.; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Szalajda, Jonathan V.; Noti, John D.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles expelled during human coughs are a potential pathway for infectious disease transmission. However, the importance of airborne transmission is unclear for many diseases. To better understand the role of cough aerosol particles in the spread of disease and the efficacy of different types of protective measures, we constructed a cough aerosol simulator that produces a humanlike cough in a controlled environment. The simulated cough has a 4.2 l volume and is based on coughs recorded from influenza patients. In one configuration, the simulator produces a cough aerosol containing particles from 0.1 to 100 µm in diameter with a volume median diameter (VMD) of 8.5 µm and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.9. In a second configuration, the cough aerosol has a size range of 0.1–30 µm, a VMD of 3.4 µm, and a GSD of 2.3. The total aerosol volume expelled during each cough is 68 µl. By generating a controlled and reproducible artificial cough, the simulator allows us to test different ventilation, disinfection, and personal protection scenarios. The system can be used with live pathogens, including influenza virus, which allows isolation precautions used in the healthcare field to be tested without risk of exposure for workers or patients. The information gained from tests with the simulator will help to better understand the transmission of infectious diseases, develop improved techniques for infection control, and improve safety for healthcare workers and patients. PMID:26500387

  15. Gram-Stain Plus MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry) for a Rapid Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burillo, Almudena; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Belén; Ramiro, Ana; Cercenado, Emilia; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological confirmation of a urinary tract infection (UTI) takes 24–48 h. In the meantime, patients are usually given empirical antibiotics, sometimes inappropriately. We assessed the feasibility of sequentially performing a Gram stain and MALDI-TOF MS mass spectrometry (MS) on urine samples to anticipate clinically useful information. In May-June 2012, we randomly selected 1000 urine samples from patients with suspected UTI. All were Gram stained and those yielding bacteria of a single morphotype were processed for MALDI-TOF MS. Our sequential algorithm was correlated with the standard semiquantitative urine culture result as follows: Match, the information provided was anticipative of culture result; Minor error, the information provided was partially anticipative of culture result; Major error, the information provided was incorrect, potentially leading to inappropriate changes in antimicrobial therapy. A positive culture was obtained in 242/1000 samples. The Gram stain revealed a single morphotype in 207 samples, which were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS. The diagnostic performance of the Gram stain was: sensitivity (Se) 81.3%, specificity (Sp) 93.2%, positive predictive value (PPV) 81.3%, negative predictive value (NPV) 93.2%, positive likelihood ratio (+LR) 11.91, negative likelihood ratio (−LR) 0.20 and accuracy 90.0% while that of MALDI-TOF MS was: Se 79.2%, Sp 73.5, +LR 2.99, −LR 0.28 and accuracy 78.3%. The use of both techniques provided information anticipative of the culture result in 82.7% of cases, information with minor errors in 13.4% and information with major errors in 3.9%. Results were available within 1 h. Our serial algorithm provided information that was consistent or showed minor errors for 96.1% of urine samples from patients with suspected UTI. The clinical impacts of this rapid UTI diagnosis strategy need to be assessed through indicators of adequacy of treatment such as a reduced time to appropriate empirical treatment or earlier

  16. On particle ionization/enrichment of multifunctional nanoprobes: washing/separation-free, acceleration and enrichment of microwave-assisted tryptic digestion of proteins via bare TiO2 nanoparticles in ESI-MS and comparing to MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Fen; Agrawal, Kavita; Shrivas, Kamlesh; Lee, Yi-Hsien

    2010-12-01

    A simple, rapid, straightforward and washing/separation free of in-solution digestion method for microwave-assisted tryptic digestion of proteins (cytochrome c, lysozyme and myoglobin) using bare TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared in aqueous solution to serve as multifunctional nanoprobes in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was demonstrated. The current approach is termed as 'on particle ionization/enrichment (OPIE)' and it can be applied in ESI-MS, atmospheric pressure-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The bare TiO(2) NPs can assist, accelerate and effectively enhance the digestion efficiency, sequence coverage and detection sensitivity of peptides for the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion of proteins in ESI-MS. The reason is attributed to the fact that proteins or partially digested proteins are easily attracted or concentrated onto the surface of TiO(2) NPs, resulting in higher efficiency of digestion reactions in the microwave experiments. Besides, the TiO(2) NPs could act as a microwave absorber to accelerate and enrich the protein fragments in a short period of time (40-60 s) from the microwave experiments in ESI-MS. Furthermore, the bare TiO(2) NPs prepared in aqueous solution exhibit high adsorption capability toward the protein fragments (peptides); thus, the OPIE approach for detecting the digested protein fragments via ESI and MALDI ionization could be achieved. The current technique is also a washing and separation-free technique for accelerating and enriching microwave-assisted tryptic digestion of proteins in the ESI-MS and MALDI-MS. It exhibits potential to be widely applied to biotechnology and proteome research in the near future.

  17. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  18. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  19. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  20. Interrogating the Venom of the Viperid Snake Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii by a Combined Approach of Electrospray and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chapeaurouge, Alex; Reza, Md Abu; Mackessy, Stephen P.; Carvalho, Paulo C.; Valente, Richard H.; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Perales, Jonas; Lin, Qingsong; Kini, R. Manjunatha

    2015-01-01

    The complete sequence characterization of snake venom proteins by mass spectrometry is rather challenging due to the presence of multiple isoforms from different protein families. In the present study, we investigated the tryptic digest of the venom of the viperid snake Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii by a combined approach of liquid chromatography coupled to either electrospray (online) or MALDI (offline) mass spectrometry. These different ionization techniques proved to be complementary allowing the identification a great variety of isoforms of diverse snake venom protein families, as evidenced by the detection of the corresponding unique peptides. For example, ten out of eleven predicted isoforms of serine proteinases of the venom of S. c. edwardsii were distinguished using this approach. Moreover, snake venom protein families not encountered in a previous transcriptome study of the venom gland of this snake were identified. In essence, our results support the notion that complementary ionization techniques of mass spectrometry allow for the detection of even subtle sequence differences of snake venom proteins, which is fundamental for future structure-function relationship and possible drug design studies. PMID:25955844

  1. Imaging and Mapping of Tissue Constituents at the Single-Cell Level Using MALDI MSI and Quantitative Laser Scanning Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Catherine M; Salisbury, Joseph P; Feldman, Daniel R; Isim, Sinan; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Luther, Ed; Agar, Jeffery N

    2015-01-01

    For nearly a century, histopathology involved the laborious morphological analyses of tissues stained with broad-spectrum dyes (i.e., eosin to label proteins). With the advent of antibody-labeling, immunostaining (fluorescein and rhodamine for fluorescent labeling) and immunohistochemistry (DAB and hematoxylin), it became possible to identify specific immunological targets in cells and tissue preparations. Technical advances, including the development of monoclonal antibody technology, led to an ever-increasing palate of dyes, both fluorescent and chromatic. This provides an incredibly rich menu of molecular entities that can be visualized and quantified in cells-giving rise to the new discipline of Molecular Pathology. We describe the evolution of two analytical techniques, cytometry and mass spectrometry, which complement histopathological visual analysis by providing automated, cellular-resolution constituent maps. For the first time, laser scanning cytometry (LSC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) are combined for the analysis of tissue sections. The utility of the marriage of these techniques is demonstrated by analyzing mouse brains with neuron-specific, genetically encoded, fluorescent proteins. We present a workflow that: (1) can be used with or without expensive matrix deposition methods, (2) uses LSC images to reveal the diverse landscape of neural tissue as well as the matrix, and (3) uses a tissue fixation method compatible with a DNA stain. The proposed workflow can be adapted for a variety of sample preparation and matrix deposition methods. PMID:26542720

  2. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  3. Emergency protection from aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-07-01

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  4. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  5. MISR Aerosol Typing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of global aerosol properties and aerosol impacts on climate. A central goal is to more strongly tie and constrain modeling efforts to observational data. A major element for exchanges between data and modeling groups are annual meetings. The meeting was held September 20 through October 2, 1014 and the organizers would like to post the presentations.

  6. Aerosol charge state characterisation using an ELPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. C.; Wright, M. D.; Biddiscombe, M. F.; Usmani, O. S.; Henshaw, D. L.

    2011-06-01

    A new technique has been developed to measure the size distribution and charge state of highly charged aerosols using an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The internal charger was switched alternately on and off and the time between stable charge states found to be ~ 10 s. The size distribution of aerosols was found when the charger was on, from which the charge distribution can be estimated when the charger is off using the current at each impactor stage. This method was tested in background conditions, when a candle was burning and when a negative air ioniser was used. The ELPI electrometers were not sensitive enough to accurately measure the charge state on background and candle air, but gave a value for air charged by an ioniser. Comparing results from the ELPI with other techniques showed inaccuracies in this method that need to be addressed before further use of this technique.

  7. Pressurised aerosol inhalers: the cost of misuse.

    PubMed

    King, D; Earnshaw, S M; Delaney, J C

    1991-01-01

    Bronchodilator aerosols, if used correctly, have many advantages over other therapies in patients with chronic airflow limitation caused by asthma or chronic bronchitis. The use of pressurized aerosol inhalers was examined in a district general hospital: of 57 patients on these inhalers, 39 were unable to use the inhaler effectively, and 23 had never received any advice on inhaler technique. A single demonstration of correct technique decreased the failures to 21 patients and, after two demonstrations, to ten. The cost of the misused inhalers in this relatively small population was 450 pounds, and obviously this figure escalates when the prescription for these inhalers is repeated monthly. It is also increased when the total numbers of misused inhalers in the country are accounted for. The cost in terms of finance, in these days of medical audit and drug budgets, and, more importantly, in terms of patient health, is unacceptable and can be avoided by repeated tuition of technique.

  8. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding these transformation processes has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyl tetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  9. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-07-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding the process of these transformations has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a South East Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyltetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  10. Present role of PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy

    2015-11-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s nearly half of the elemental analyses of atmospheric aerosol samples were performed by PIXE. Since then, other techniques for elemental analysis became available and there has been a steady increase in studies on organic aerosol constituents and other aspects of aerosols, especially in the areas of nucleation (new particle formation), optical properties, and the role of aerosol particles in cloud formation and properties. First, a brief overview and discussion is given of the developments and trends in atmospheric aerosol analysis and research of the past three decades. Subsequently, it is indicated that there is still invaluable work to be done by PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research, especially if one teams up with other aerosol researchers and performs complementary measurements, e.g., on small aerosol samples that are taken with high-time resolution. Fine examples of such research are the work done by the Lund group in the CARIBIC aircraft studies and the analysis of circular streaker samples by the Florence PIXE group. These and other examples are presented and other possibilities of PIXE are indicated.

  11. Is benzene a precursor for secondary organic aerosol?

    PubMed

    Martín-Reviejo, Montserrat; Wirtz, Klaus

    2005-02-15

    It is currently assumed that benzene contributes only negligibly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the atmosphere. Our understanding of the capacity of benzene to generate secondary aerosols is based on the work of Izumi and Fukuyama (Atmos. Environ. 1990, 24A, 1433) in which two photosmog experiments with benzene in the presence of NOx were performed and no particle formation was observed. In contrast to the observations of Izumi and Fukuyama, experiments performed in the EUPHORE large outdoor simulation chamber have clearly shown aerosol formation during the photochemical oxidation of benzene in various NOx regimes. The maximum aerosol yields of 8-25% on a mass basis are comparable to yields obtained during the photochemical oxidation of other aromatic compounds under similar conditions. In addition, a density of 1.35+/-0.04 g/cm3 for the secondary organic aerosol from the benzene photochemical oxidation in the presence of NOx has been determined through the simultaneous measurement of aerosol volume and aerosol mass using two independent measurement techniques. Comparing the results in the present work with previous findings underscores the strong influence that the NOx content in the system has on aerosol formation during the photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons and the importance of performing experiments with NOx concentrations relevant to the atmosphere.

  12. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  13. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  14. Interaction of giant extracellular Glossoscolex paulistus hemoglobin (HbGp) with ionic surfactants: a MALDI-TOF-MS study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marilene Silva; Moreira, Leonardo Marmo; Tabak, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    The giant extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) is constituted by approximately 144 subunits containing heme groups with molecular masses in the range of 16-19kDa forming a monomer (d) and a trimer (abc), and around 36 non-heme structures, named linkers (L). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis was performed recently, to obtain directly information on the molecular masses of the different subunits from HbGp in the oxy-form. This technique demonstrated structural similarity between HbGp and the widely studied hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt). Indeed, two major isoforms (d(1) and d(2)) of identical proportions with masses of 16,355+/-25 and 16,428+/-24Da, respectively, and two minor isoforms (d(3) and d(4)) with masses around 16.6kDa were detected for monomer d of HbGp. In the present work, the effects of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic cethyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on the oligomeric structure of HbGp have been studied by MALDI-TOF-MS in order to evaluate the interaction between ionic surfactants and HbGp. The data obtained with this technique show an effective interaction of cationic surfactant CTAC with the two isoforms of monomer d, d(1) and d(2), both in the whole protein as well as in the pure isolated monomer. The results show that up to 10 molecules of CTAC are bound to each isoform of the monomer. Differently, the mass spectra obtained for SDS-HbGp system showed that the addition of the anionic surfactant SDS does not originate any mass increment of the monomeric subunits, indicating that SDS-HbGp interaction is, probably, significantly less effective as compared to CTAC-HbGp one. The acid pI of the protein around 5.5 is, probably, responsible for this behavior. The results of this work suggest also some interaction of both surfactants with linker chains as well as with trimers, as judged from observed mass increments. Our data are consistent with a recent

  15. Retrieval of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from MFRSR Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I; Barnard, James C; Ackerman, Thomas P

    2006-05-01

    Aerosols can have significant impact on the radiative and heat balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by absorbing and scattering solar radiation (direct aerosol effect) and altering cloud optical properties and suppressing precipitation (indirect aerosol effect). However, both the sign and magnitude of the aerosol impact has proven difficult to determine due to incomplete knowledge of aerosol properties and their strong temporal and spatial variations. Reduction of these uncertainties requires an accurate global inventory of aerosol microphysical properties, such as size distribution and the refractive index. Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) are widely deployed over the world (e.g., the surface radiation budget network). These radiometers provide measurements of the direct and the diffuse solar irradiances at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94 ). Currently, the direct irradiance observations are used to derive routinely spectral values of the aerosol optical depth only. We propose a simple retrieval technique that significantly extends the capability of the MFRSR to study atmospheric aerosols. In our retrieval, we assume the shape of aerosol size distribution (e.g., combination of three lognormal distributions) and the value of the real refractive index. The technique consists of three steps that compose an iterative scheme. The first step obtains the aerosol size distribution from the spectral measurements of the direct irradiance (for a given complex refractive index). To reduce the effect of ozone and water vapor contamination, we use wavelengths where ozone and water vapor weakly affect the direct irradiance (0.415 mu and 0.870 mu). The second step determines the effective value of the imaginary refractive index from the diffuse irradiance (for the aerosol size distribution determined during the first step). To reduce the effect of the surface albedo on the retrievals, we select a wavelength where the surface albedo

  16. Initial velocity distribution of MALDI/LDI ions measured by internal MALDI source Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagovets, Vitaliy; Frankevich, Vladimir; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-11-01

    A new method for measuring the ion velocity distribution using an internal matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The method provides the possibility of studying ion velocities without any influence of electric fields in the direction of the instrument axis until the ions reach the ICR cell. It also allows to simultaneously account for and to estimate not only the velocity distribution but the angular distribution as well. The method was demonstrated using several types of compounds in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mode.

  17. Detection of phosphorylated subunits by combined LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis in yeast mitochondrial membrane complexes separated by blue native/SDS-PAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Buchholz, Udo; Becker, J. Susanne; Zoriy, Miroslav; Pickhardt, Carola; Przybylski, Michael; Rödel, Gerhard; Becker, J. Sabine

    2006-01-01

    We report on the identification of phosphorylated subunits of yeast mitochondrial ATPase using a novel screening technique in combination with BN/SDS-PAGE. Protein complexes present in yeast mitochondrial membranes were separated in their native state in the first dimension and their subunit composition was resolved by SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to rapidly screen for the presence of phosphorus in the subunits. The detection limits of elements investigated in selected protein spots are in the low [mu]g g-1 concentration range. Sulfur was used as the internal standard element for quantification. Phosphorus was detected in two of the proteins, that were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR-MS) as subunits Atp1p and Atp2p of the ATPase. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using antibodies directed against phosphorylated amino acids. The combination of LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS with BN/SDS-PAGE provides a fast and sensitive tool for structure analysis of phosphorus and metal-containing subunits of membrane protein complexes.

  18. High resolution mass spectrometric brain proteomics by MALDI-FTICR-MS combined with determination of P, S, Cu, Zn and Fe by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Susanne; Zoriy, Miroslav; Przybylski, Michael; Becker, J. Sabine

    2007-03-01

    The combination of atomic and molecular mass spectrometric methods was applied for characterization and identification of several human proteins from Alzheimer's diseased brain. A brain protein mixture was separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and the protein spots were fast screened by microlocal analysis using LA-ICP-MS (laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) in respect to phosphorus, sulfur, copper, zinc and iron content. Five selected protein spots in 2D gel containing these elements were investigated after tryptic digestion by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR-MS). Than element concentrations (P, Cu, Zn and Fe) were determined in three identified human brain proteins by LA-ICP-MS in the 2D gel. Results of structure analysis of human brain proteins by MALDI-FTICR-MS were combined with those of the direct determination of phosphorus, copper, zinc and iron concentrations in protein spots with LA-ICP-MS. From the results of atomic and molecular mass spectrometric techniques the human brain proteins were characterized in respect to their structure, sequence, phosphorylation state and metal content as well.

  19. Spatial Segmentation of MALDI FT-ICR MSI Data: A Powerful Tool to Explore the Head and Neck Tumor In Situ Lipidome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasny, Lukas; Hoffmann, Franziska; Ernst, Günther; Trede, Dennis; Alexandrov, Theodore; Havlicek, Vladimir; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Crecelius, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI MSI) is a well-established analytical technique for determining spatial localization of lipids in biological samples. The use of Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers for the molecular imaging of endogenous compounds is gaining popularity, since the high mass accuracy and high mass resolving power enables accurate determination of exact masses and, consequently, a more confident identification of these molecules. The high mass resolution FT-ICR imaging datasets are typically large in size. In order to analyze them in an appropriate timeframe, the following approach has been employed: the FT-ICR imaging datasets were spatially segmented by clustering all spectra by their similarity. The resulted spatial segmentation maps were compared with the histologic annotation. This approach facilitates interpretation of the full datasets by providing spatial regions of interest. The application of this approach, which has originally been developed for MALDI-TOF MSI datasets, to the lipidomic analysis of head and neck tumor tissue revealed new insights into the metabolic organization of the carcinoma tissue.

  20. Biomarker- and similarity coefficient-based approaches to bacterial mixture characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Smart, Sonja; Sandrin, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS profiling has been shown to be a rapid and reliable method to characterize pure cultures of bacteria. Currently, there is keen interest in using this technique to identify bacteria in mixtures. Promising results have been reported with two- or three-isolate model systems using biomarker-based approaches. In this work, we applied MALDI-TOF MS-based methods to a more complex model mixture containing six bacteria. We employed: 1) a biomarker-based approach that has previously been shown to be useful in identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures and simple mixtures and 2) a similarity coefficient-based approach that is routinely and nearly exclusively applied to identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures. Both strategies were developed and evaluated using blind-coded mixtures. With regard to the biomarker-based approach, results showed that most peaks in mixture spectra could be assigned to those found in spectra of each component bacterium; however, peaks shared by two isolates as well as peaks that could not be assigned to any individual component isolate were observed. For two-isolate blind-coded samples, bacteria were correctly identified using both similarity coefficient- and biomarker-based strategies, while for blind-coded samples containing more than two isolates, bacteria were more effectively identified using a biomarker-based strategy. PMID:26537565

  1. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  2. Identification of Algerian Field-Caught Phlebotomine Sand Fly Vectors by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Lafri, Ismail; Almeras, Lionel; Bitam, Idir; Caputo, Aurelia; Yssouf, Amina; Forestier, Claire-Lise; Izri, Arezki; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are known to transmi