Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol mass distribution

  1. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2015-11-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m(3)/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m(3) (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m(3) (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources.

  2. Measurement of mass distribution of chemical species in aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    Aerosols may be generated through the nebulizing of solutions and the evaporation of their solvent, leaving the dry solute particles. Attention is presently given to a method for the direct determination of the masses of chemical species in individual aerosol particles on a continuous, real-time basis, using mass spectrometry. After the aerosol particles are introduced into the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the particles impinge on a hot rhenium filament in the mass spectrometer's ion source. The resulting vapor plume is ionized by electron bombardment, and a pulse of ions is generated by each particle. The intensities of different masses in the ion pulses can then be measured by the mass spectrometer.

  3. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  4. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  5. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  6. Detailed mass size distributions of atmospheric aerosol species in the Negev desert, Israel, during ARACHNE-96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Ptasinski, Jacek; Cafmeyer, Jan

    1999-04-01

    As part of the 1996 summer intensive of the Aerosol, RAdiation and CHemistry Experiment (ARACHNE-96), the mass size distribution of various airborne particulate elements was studied at a remote site in the Negev Desert, Israel. Aerosol collections were made with 8-stage PIXE International cascade impactors (PCIs) and 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactors (SDIs) and the samples were analyzed by PIXE for about 20 elements. The mineral elements (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe) exhibited a unimodal size distribution which peaked at about 6 μm, but the contribution of particles larger than 10 μm was clearly more pronounced during the day than during night. Sulphur and Br had a tendency to exhibit two modes in the submicrometer size range, with diameters at about 0.3 and 0.6 μm, respectively. The elements V and Ni, which are indicators of residual fuel burning, showed essentially one fine mode (at 0.3 μm) in addition to a coarse mode which represented the mineral dust contribution. Overall, good agreement was observed between the mass size distributions from the PCI and SDI devices. The PCI was superior to the SDI for studying the size distribution in the coarse size range, but the SDI was clearly superior for unravelling the various modes in the submicrometer size range.

  7. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  8. Size and mass distributions of ground-level sub-micrometer biomass burning aerosol from small wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Rintaro; Rasheed, Abdur; Chen Reddy, Greeshma; McCrowey, Clinton J.; Curtis, Daniel B.

    2014-06-01

    Biomass burning emits large amounts of aerosol particles globally, influencing human health and climate, but the number and size of the particles is highly variable depending on fuel type, burning and meteorological conditions, and secondary reactions in the atmosphere. Ambient measurements of aerosol during wildfire events can therefore improve our understanding of particulate matter produced from biomass burning. In this study, time-resolved sub-micrometer ambient aerosol size and mass distributions of freshly emitted aerosol were measured for three biomass burning wildfire events near Northridge, California, located in the highly populated San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles. One fire (Marek) was observed during the dry Santa Ana conditions that are typically present during large Southern California wildfires, but two smaller fires (Getty and Camarillo) were observed during the more predominant non-Santa Ana weather conditions. Although the fires were generally small and extinguished quickly, they produced particle number concentrations as high as 50,000 cm-3 and mass concentrations as large as 150 μg cm-3, well above background measurements and among the highest values observed for fires in Southern California. Therefore, small wildfires can have a large impact on air quality if they occur near urban areas. Particle number distributions were lognormal, with peak diameters in the accumulation mode at approximately 100 nm. However, significant Aitken mode and nucleation mode particles were observed in bimodal distributions for one fire. Significant variations in the median diameter were observed over time, as particles generally became smaller as the fires were contained. The results indicate that it is likely that performing mass measurements alone could systematically miss detection of the smaller particles and size measurements may be better suited for studies of ambient biomass burning events. Parameters of representative unimodal and bimodal lognormal

  9. Overview of Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate. I shall discuss these topics and application of the data to air quality monitoring.

  10. New approach using lidar measurements to characterize spatiotemporal aerosol mass distribution in an underground railway station in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Fortain, A.

    For the first time eye safe lidar measurements were performed at 355 nm simultaneously to in situ measurements in an underground station so as to test the potential interest of active remote sensing measurements to follow the spatiotemporal evolution of aerosol content inside such a confined microenvironment. The purpose of this paper is to describe different methods enabling the conversion of lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient into aerosol mass concentrations (PM 2.5 and PM 10). A theoretical method based on a well marked linear regression between mass concentrations simulated from the size distribution and extinction coefficients retrieved from Mie calculations provides averaged mass to optics' relations over the campaign for traffic (6.47 × 10 5 μg m -2) or no traffic conditions (3.73 × 10 5 μg m -2). Two empirical methods enable to significantly reduce CPU time. The first one is based upon the knowledge of size distribution measurements and scattering coefficients from nephelometer and allows retrieving mass to optics' relations for well determined periods or particular traffic conditions, like week-ends, with a good accuracy. The second method, that is more direct, is simply based on the ratio between TEOM concentrations and extinction coefficients obtained from nephelometer. This method is easy to set up but is not suitable for nocturnal measurements where PM stabilization time is short. Lidar signals thus converted into PM concentrations from those approaches with a fine accuracy (30%) provide a spatiotemporal distribution of concentrations in the station. This highlights aerosol accumulation in one side of the station, which can be explained by air displacement from the tunnel entrance. Those results allow expecting a more general use of lidar measurement to survey indoor air quality.

  11. Black carbon mass size distributions of diesel exhaust and urban aerosols measured using differential mobility analyzer in tandem with Aethalometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhi; Chan, K. L.; Wong, K. C.; Westerdahl, Dane; Močnik, Griša; Zhou, J. H.; Cheung, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant component of the light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, changing earth's radiative balance and affecting the climate. The mixing state and size distribution of atmospheric BC are largely unknown and cause uncertainties in climate models. BC is also a major component of diesel PM emissions, recently classified by World Health Organization as Category I Carcinogen, and has been associated with various adverse health effects. This study presents a novel approach of direct and continuous measurement of BC mass size distribution by tandem operation of a differential mobility spectrometry and a refined Aethalometer. A condensation particle counter was deployed in parallel with the Aethalometer to determine particle number size distribution. A wide range of particle sizes (20-600 nm) was investigated to determine the BC modal characteristics in fresh diesel engine tailpipe emissions and in different urban environments including a typical urban ambient site and a busy roadside. The study provided a demonstration of a new analytic approach and showed the evolution of BC mass size distribution from fresh engine emissions to the aged aerosols in the roadside and ambient environments. The results potentially can be used to refine the input for climate modeling to determine the effect of particle-bound atmospheric BC on the global climate.

  12. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  13. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m 3)...

  14. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  15. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  16. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m 3)...

  17. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  18. Aerosol mass size distribution and black carbon over a high altitude location in Western Trans-Himalayas: Impact of a dust episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Suresh Babu, S.; Manoj, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The information on the aerosol properties from remote locations provides insights into the background and natural conditions against which anthropogenic impacts could be compared. Measurements of the near surface aerosol mass size distribution from the high altitude remote site help us to understand the natural processes, such as, the association between Aeolian and fluvial processes that have a direct bearing on the mass concentrations, especially in the larger size ranges. In the present study, the total mass concentration and mass-size distribution of the near surface aerosols, measured using a 10-channel Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) Impactor from a high altitude location-Hanle (32.78°N, 78.95°E, 4520 m asl) in the western Trans-Himalayas, have been used to characterize the composite aerosols. Also the impact of a highly localized, short-duration dust storm episode on the mass size distribution has been examined. In general, though the total mass concentration (Mt) remained very low (∼0.75 ± 0.61 μg m-3), interestingly, coarse mode (super-micron) aerosols contributed almost 72 ± 6% to the total aerosol mass loading near the surface. The mass-size distribution showed 3 modes, a fine particle mode (∼0.2 μm), an accumulation mode at ∼0.5 μm, and a coarse mode at ∼3 μm. During a localized short duration dust storm episode, Mt reached as high as ∼13.5 μg m-3 with coarse mode aerosols contributing to nearly 90% of it. The mass size distribution changed significantly, with a broad coarse mode so that the accumulation mode became inconspicuous. Concurrent measurements of aerosol black carbon (BC) using twin wavelength measurements of the aethalometer showed an increase in the wavelength index of absorption, from the normal values of ∼1 to 1.5 signifying the enhanced absorption at the short wavelength (380 nm) by the dust.

  19. Volume and surface area size distribution, water mass and model fitting of GCE/CASE/WATOX marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.

    1990-06-01

    As a part of the Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX), size distributions of marine aerosols were measured at two altitudes of about 2750 and 150 m above sea level (asl) over the size range 0.1 ˜ 32 μm. Lognormal fitting was applied to the corrected aerosol size spectra to determine the volume and surface area size distributions of the CASE-WATOX marine aerosols. Each aerosol size distribution was fitted with three lognormal distributions representing fine-, large-, and giant-particle modes. Water volume fraction and dry particle size of each aerosol size distribution were also calculated using empirical formulas for particle size as a function of relative humidity and particle type. Because of the increased influence from anthropogenic sources in the continental United States, higher aerosol volume concentrations were observed in the fine-particle mode near-shore off the east coast; 2.11 and 3.63 μm3 cm-3 for free troposphere (FT) and marine boundary layer (MBL), compared with the open-sea Bermuda area values; 0.13 and 0.74 μm3 cm-3 for FT and MBL. The large-particle mode exhibits the least variations in volume distributions between the east coast and open-sea Bermuda area, having a volume geometric median diameter (VGMD) between 1.4 and 1.6 μm and a geometric standard deviation between 1.57 and 1.68. For the giant-particle mode, larger VGMD and volume concentrations were observed for marine aerosols nearshore off the east coast than in the open-sea Bermuda area because of higher relative humidity and higher surface wind speed conditions. Wet VGMD and aerosol water volume concentrations at 15 m asl ship level were determined by extrapolating from those obtained by analysis of the CASE-WATOX aircraft aerosol data. Abundance of aerosol water in the MBL serves as an important pathway for heterogeneous conversion of SO2 in sea salt aerosol particles.

  20. Aerosol size distribution and aerosol water content measurements during Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.; Wellman, D.; Pszenny, A.

    1995-11-01

    Aerosol size distribution data measured during the June 1992 Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of fine marine aerosol particles measured over the North Atlantic near the Azores Islands. Measured aerosol size distribution data were corrected using the corrected size calibration data based on the optical properties of particles being measured. The corrected size distribution data were then approximated with either one or two lognormal size distributions, depending on air mass conditions. Under clean air mass conditions <3 μm diameter aerosol size distributions typically exhibited two modes, consisting of an accumulation mode and the small end of the sea-salt particle mode. However, under the influence of continental polluted air masses, the aerosol size distribution was dominated by <1 μm diameter particles in a single mode with an increased aerosol concentration. Aerosol water content of accumulation mode marine aerosols was estimated from differences between several series of ambient and dried aerosol size distributions. The average aerosol water fraction was 0.31, which is in good agreement with an empirical aerosol growth model estimate. The average rate of SO4= production in the accumulation mode aerosol water by H2O2 oxidation was estimated to be <7×10-10 mol L-1 s-1, which is an insignificant contributor to the observed non-sea-salt SO4= in the accumulation mode.

  1. Size segregated mass concentration and size distribution of near surface aerosols over a tropical Indian semi-arid station, Anantapur: Impact of long range transport.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra Kumar, K; Narasimhulu, K; Balakrishnaiah, G; Suresh Kumar Reddy, B; Rama Gopal, K; Reddy, R R; Moorthy, K Krishna; Suresh Babu, S

    2009-10-15

    Regular measurements of size segregated as well as total mass concentration and size distribution of near surface composite aerosols, made using a ten-channel Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) cascade impactor during the period of September 2007-May 2008 are used to study the aerosol characteristics in association with the synoptic meteorology. The total mass concentration varied from 59.70+/-1.48 to 41.40+/-1.72 microg m(-3), out of which accumulation mode dominated by approximately 50%. On a synoptic scale, aerosol mass concentration in the accumulation (submicron) mode gradually increased from an average low value of approximately 26.92+/-1.53 microg m(-3) during the post monsoon season (September-November) to approximately 34.95+/-1.32 microg m(-3) during winter (December-February) and reaching a peak value of approximately 43.56+/-1.42 microg m(-3) during the summer season (March-May). On the contrary, mass concentration of aerosols in the coarse (supermicron) mode increased from approximately 9.23+/-1.25 microg m(-3)during post monsoon season to reach a comparatively high value of approximately 25.89+/-1.95 microg m(-3) during dry winter months and a low value of approximately 8.07+/-0.76 microg m(-3) during the summer season. Effective radius, a parameter important in determining optical (scattering) properties of aerosol size distribution, varied between 0.104+/-0.08 microm and 0.167+/-0.06 microm with a mean value of 0.143+/-0.01 microm. The fine mode is highly reduced during the post monsoon period and the large and coarse modes continue to remain high (replenished) so that their relative dominance increases. It can be seen that among the two parameters measured, correlation of total mass concentration with air temperature is positive (R(2)=0.82) compared with relative humidity (RH) (R(2)=0.75).

  2. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  3. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-6 Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  4. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  5. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-6 Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  6. [Characteristics of mass distributions of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in summer over a suburb farmland in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Tong; Liang, Bao-sheng; Hu, Min; Kang, Ling; Gong, Ji-cheng

    2006-02-01

    Agricultural activity is one of the important sources of aerosol particle. To understand the mass distribution and sources of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the suburb farmland of Beijing, particle samples were collected with a MOUDI cascade impactor in the summer of 2004 in a suburb vegetable field. The mass distributions of the particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the diameter range of 0.18 to approximately 18 microm were measured. The dominant ions in the fine particle were SO4(2-), NOS3(-) and NH4+. The association of day to day variation of the concentration of these ions with temperature, humidity and solar radiation suggests that they are formed by the reaction of NH3 released from the vegetable field with the acid species produced from photochemical reactions. K+ in the fine particle is likely from the vegetation emission and biomass burning. Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in the coarse particle are suggested to come from the mechanical process by which the soil particle entered the atmosphere, and from the reactions of the acid species at the surface of the soil particle. The results show that fertilizer and soil are possibly important factors determining the aerosol particle over the agricultural fields, and the vegetable fields in suburb Beijing could contribute significantly to the aerosol particle.

  7. Determination of aerosol ammonium using an aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia, A. E.; Toohey, D. W.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    The chemical composition of fine aerosols is a significant issue both because it influences the chemical and radiative properties of the aerosols, which in turn impact the regional and global climate and human health, and because it is difficult to measure accurately. The Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) developed by Aerodyne Research measures both chemical composition and aerodynamic size of submicron aerosols quantitatively. However, the measurement of aerosol ammonium is more difficult than that of the other major inorganic species, nitrate and sulfate, because of interferences in the mass spectrum from air and water. This presentation will describe the successful procedure developed for dealing with these interferences and accurately determining the ammonium mass. In addition, the application of this procedure to aerosols from a range of ambient conditions will be demonstrated using data from several field studies.

  8. Boundary layer aerosol size distribution, mass concentration and mineralogical composition in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is dedicated to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. Two major field experiments were performed: A first joint field campaign took place at Ouarzazate and near Zagora, southern Morocco, from May 13 to June 7, 2006. Aircraft and ground based measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out to collect a data set of surface and atmospheric columnar information within a major dust source. This data set combined with satellite data provides the base of the first thorough columnar radiative closure tests in Saharan dust. A second field experiment was conducted during January-February 2008, in the Cape Verde Islands region, where about 300 Tg of mineral dust are transported annually from Western Africa across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon basin. Along its transport path, the mineral dust is expected to influence significantly the radiation budget - by direct and indirect effects - of the subtropical North Atlantic. We are lacking a radiative closure in the Saharan air plume. One focus of the investigation within the trade wind region is the spatial distribution of mixed dust/biomass/sea salt aerosol and their physical and chemical properties, especially with regard to radiative effects. We report on measurements of size distributions, mass concentrations and mineralogical composition conducted at the Zagora (Morocco) and Praia (Cape Verde islands) ground stations. The aerosol size distribution was measured from 20 nm to 500

  9. Analysis of spatial and seasonal distributions of MODIS aerosol optical properties and ground-based measurements of mass concentrations in the Yellow Sea region in 2009.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Chung, Yong-Seung; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-retrieved data on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) using a moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) were used to analyze large-scale distributions of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. AOD was relatively high in March (0.44 ± 0.25) and low in September (0.24 ± 0.21) in the East Asian region in 2009. Sandstorms originating from the deserts and dry areas in northern China and Mongolia were transported on a massive scale during the springtime, thus contributing to the high AOD in East Asia. However, whereas PM10 with diameters ≤10 μm was the highest in February at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung, located leeward about halfway through the Korean Peninsula, AOD rose to its highest in May. The growth of hygroscopic aerosols attendant on increases in relative humidity prior to the Asian monsoon season contributed to a high AOD level in May. AE typically appears at high levels (1.30 ± 0.37) in August due to anthropogenic aerosols originating from the industrial areas in eastern China, while AOD stays low in summer due to the removal process caused by rainfall. The linear correlation coefficients of the MODIS AOD and ground-based mass concentrations of PM10 at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung were measured at 0.4~0.6. Four cases (6 days) of mineral dustfall from sandstorms and six cases (12 days) of anthropogenically polluted particles were observed in the central area of the Korean Peninsula in 2009. PM10 mass concentrations increased at both Anmyon and Cheongwon in the cases of mineral dustfall and anthropogenically polluted particles. Cases of dustfall from sandstorms and anthropogenic polluted particles, with increasing PM10 mass concentrations, showed higher AOD values in the Yellow Sea region.

  10. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  11. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  12. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  13. Aerosol distributions and an Arctic aerosol front during AGASP: Norwegian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Raatz, W.E.; Schnell, R.C.

    1984-05-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol characteristics obtained near Svalbard, Norway, during the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP) indicate that high aerosol concentrations and strong visible haze were distributed throughout the troposphere. Layers of Arctic haze were observed in both dry air and moist air. A research flight on March 31, 1983, crossed a previously undocumented Arctic aerosol front structure. Condensation nucleus concentrations of 450 cm/sup -3/ within the polluted continental air mass south of the front decreased to 80 cm/sup -3/ within the clean Arctic air north of the front. Aerosols above the Aitken size range decreased one order of magnitude in both number and mass across this same air mass boundary.

  14. Charicteristics of Aerosol indices distribution followed by Aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, S.; Song, C.

    2010-12-01

    Transboundary transport of aerosol has been a hot issue in East Asia and with various aerosol types from different source region. To detect signals from aerosols, OMI provides aerosol indices. Aerosol Indices (AI) represent the change of spectral contrast between two wavelengths and these indices are derived in UV and Visible regions. These indices also can get not only in ocean but also in land region so that AI is good to observe the source region and transport of aerosols. In UV region, AI (UV-AI) can classify the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998) so that this value is frequently used for dust detection. Additionally, visible AI (VIS-AI) uses to differentiate the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types. If we combine two types of indices at the coordinate system of two types of AI, distribution of indices contains different signals if aerosol types change theoretically. In this study, we want to find out classification results based by the observation data to see the theoretical distribution in two AI values. For the observation data, aerosol types are obtained from the results of MODIS-OMI algorithm and 4-channel algorithm classify four types of aerosols, i.e. dust, carbonaceous, sea-salt and Non-Absorbing (NA). These algorithms classify aerosol by using the characteristics of aerosol optical properties in visible and near IR regions. MODIS-OMI algorithm uses the MODIS AOD and UV-AI in OMI values. For UV-AI case, dust and carbonaceous types have larger UV-AI values than non-absorbing aerosols because of absorbing characteristics. However, dust and carbonaceous types cannot classify if UV-AI values use only. For VIS-AI case, dust has larger proportion, but carbonaceous aerosol has smaller proportion in high AI value. However, VIS-AI cannot clearly classify between dust and carbonaceous types except for the case of extremely high AI cases. In NA type, VIS-AI has almost positive values, but the distribution has smaller than the absorbing

  15. Long-term observations of tropospheric particle number size distributions and equivalent black carbon mass concentrations in the German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmili, Wolfram; Weinhold, Kay; Rasch, Fabian; Sonntag, André; Sun, Jia; Merkel, Maik; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Bastian, Susanne; Schladitz, Alexander; Löschau, Gunter; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Gu, Jianwei; Kusch, Thomas; Flentje, Harald; Quass, Ulrich; Kaminski, Heinz; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Meinhardt, Frank; Schwerin, Andreas; Bath, Olaf; Ries, Ludwig; Gerwig, Holger; Wirtz, Klaus; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN) is a cooperative atmospheric observation network, which aims at improving the scientific understanding of aerosol-related effects in the troposphere. The network addresses research questions dedicated to both climate- and health-related effects. GUAN's core activity has been the continuous collection of tropospheric particle number size distributions and black carbon mass concentrations at 17 observation sites in Germany. These sites cover various environmental settings including urban traffic, urban background, rural background, and Alpine mountains. In association with partner projects, GUAN has implemented a high degree of harmonisation of instrumentation, operating procedures, and data evaluation procedures. The quality of the measurement data is assured by laboratory intercomparisons as well as on-site comparisons with reference instruments. This paper describes the measurement sites, instrumentation, quality assurance, and data evaluation procedures in the network as well as the EBAS repository, where the data sets can be obtained (doi:10.5072/guan).

  16. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  17. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  18. An 'in-stack' diffusion classifier for aerosol mass distribution measurement. Final report Jun 78-Jun 80

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, D.A.; Rangaraj, C.N.

    1981-04-01

    A five-stage, screen-type diffusion classifier was designed and built to make in-situ measurement of submicron aerosols at temperatures and pressures encountered in industrial-type exhaust stacks. Laboratory calibration proceeded satisfactorily and held strong promise of successful field demonstration. However, major problems were encountered in test procedures during both field tests (at the Jacksonville Florida Electric Authority (J.E.A.)) Southside generating Station, Unit 4 (oil-fired boiler) and the Naval Air Rework Facility, Jacksonville, Jet Engine test Cell 11 (J-52 engines). Conditioning of the glass fiber filters to sulfur oxides was not done at the Southside Power Plant - this appears to have been the major problem there. Temperatures of the exhaust stack exceeded 200 C at the Jet Engine Test Cell - consequent weight loss due to grease vaporization appears to have been the problem there.

  19. Synchronised Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, Eiko

    2010-05-01

    Up to twelve Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMSs) were operated simultaneously at rural and background stations (EMEP and EUSAAR sites) across Europe. Measurements took place during three intensive periods, in collaboration between the European EUCAARI IP and the EMEP monitoring activities under the UNECE Convention for Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) during three contrasting months (May 2008, Sep/Oct 2008, Feb/Mar 2009). These measurements were conducted, analysed and quality controlled carefully using a unified protocol, providing the largest spatial database of aerosol chemical composition measured with a unified online technique to date, and a unique snapshots of the European non-refractory submicron aerosol climatology. As campaign averages over all active monitoring sites, organics represent 28 to 43%, sulphate 18 to 25%, ammonium 13 to 15% and nitrate 15 to 36% of the resolved aerosol mass, with the highest relative nitrate contribution during the Feb/Mar campaign. The measurements demonstrate that in NW Europe (e.g. Ireland, UK, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland) the regional submicron aerosol tends to be neutralised and here nitrates make a major contribution to the aerosol mass. By contrast, periods with low nitrate and acidic aerosol were observed at sites in S and E Europe (e.g. Greece, Finland), presumably due to a combination of larger SO2 point sources in Easter Europe, smaller local NH3 sources and, in the case of Greece, higher temperatures. While at the more marine and remote sites (Ireland, Scotland, Finland) nitrate concentrations were dominated by episodic transport phenomena, at continental sites (Switzerland, Germany, Hungary) nitrate followed a clear diurnal cycle, reflecting the thermodynamic behaviour of ammonium nitrate. The datasets clearly shows spatially co-ordinated, large-scale pollution episodes of organics, sulphate and nitrate, the latter being most pronounced during the Feb/Mar campaign. At selected

  20. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  1. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  2. Reconciling satellite aerosol optical thickness and surface fine particle mass through aerosol liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien Khoi V.; Ghate, Virendra P.; Carlton, Annmarie G.

    2016-11-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the southeast U.S. is sharply enhanced over wintertime values. This seasonal pattern is unique and of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years. Patterns in surface fine particle mass are inconsistent with satellite reported AOT. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with particle mass measurements at the surface by examining trends in aerosol liquid water (ALW), a particle constituent that scatters radiation and affects satellite AOT but is removed in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIAv2.1 to estimate ALW mass concentrations at Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments sites using measured ion mass concentrations and North American Regional Reanalysis meteorological data. Excellent agreement between Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations AOT and estimated ALW provides a plausible explanation for the discrepancies in the geographical patterns of AOT and aerosol mass measurements.

  3. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  4. Coastal Aerosol Distribution By Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    have global coverage and include data gathering, quality control and data assimilation of the available aerosol observations, including satellite...when combined with NOGAPS fields. The area was dominated by a deep, dry, polluted air mass with near-neutral stability (not shown), in contrast to...to 6.4 efforts in EOTDA evaluation and aerosol measurement (PE 0603207N). REFERENCES 1999, Prospero, J., D. L. Westphal, and R. Poirot: The extreme air

  5. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  6. Background aerosol over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: observed characteristics of aerosol mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cong, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Xin, Jinyuan; Wan, Xin; Pan, Yuepeng; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Zhongyan; Wang, Yongjie; Kang, Shichang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric aerosols of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), an observation network was established within the region's various ecosystems, including at the Ngari, Qomolangma (QOMS), Nam Co, and Southeastern Tibetan (SET) stations. In this paper we illustrate aerosol mass loadings by integrating in situ measurements with satellite and ground-based remote sensing datasets for the 2011-2013 period, on both local and large scales. Mass concentrations of these surface atmospheric aerosols were relatively low and varied with land cover, showing a general tendency of Ngari and QOMS (barren sites) > Nam Co (grassland site) > SET (forest site). Daily averages of online PM2.5 (particulates with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5 µm) at these sites were sequentially 18.2 ± 8.9, 14.5 ± 7.4, 11.9 ± 4.9 and 11.7 ± 4.7 µg m-3. Correspondingly, the ratios of PM2.5 to total suspended particles (TSP) were 27.4 ± 6.65, 22.3 ± 10.9, 37.3 ± 11.1 and 54.4 ± 6.72 %. Bimodal mass distributions of size-segregated particles were found at all sites, with a relatively small peak in accumulation mode and a more notable peak in coarse mode. Diurnal variations in fine-aerosol masses generally displayed a bi-peak pattern at the QOMS, Nam Co and SET stations and a single-peak pattern at the Ngari station, controlled by the effects of local geomorphology, mountain-valley breeze circulation and aerosol emissions. Dust aerosol content in PM2.1 samples gave fractions of 26 % at the Ngari station and 29 % at the QOMS station, or ˜ 2-3 times that of reported results at human-influenced sites. Furthermore, observed evidence confirmed the existence of the aerodynamic conditions necessary for the uplift of fine particles from a barren land surface. Combining surface aerosol data and atmospheric-column aerosol optical properties, the TSP mass and aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) generally decreased as land cover changed from

  7. Variability of aerosol vertical distribution in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, O.; Cairo, F.; Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Snels, M.; Viterbini, M.; Cardillo, F.; Chatenet, B.; Formenti, P.; Marticorena, B.; Rajot, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the aerosol vertical distribution over Sahelian Africa for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008, characterizing the different kind of aerosols present in the atmosphere in terms of their optical properties observed by ground-based and satellite instruments, and their sources searched for by using trajectory analysis. This study combines data acquired by three ground-based micro lidar systems located in Banizoumbou (Niger), Cinzana (Mali) and M'Bour (Senegal) in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA), by the AEROsol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometers and by the space-based Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the CALIPSO satellite (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Observations). During winter, the lower levels air masses arriving in the Sahelian region come mainly from North, North-West and from the Atlantic area, while in the upper troposphere air flow generally originates from West Africa, crossing a region characterized by the presence of large biomass burning sources. The sites of Cinzana, Banizoumbou and M'Bour, along a transect of aerosol transport from East to West, are in fact under the influence of tropical biomass burning aerosol emission during the dry season, as revealed by the seasonal pattern of the aerosol optical properties, and by back-trajectory studies. Aerosol produced by biomass burning are observed mainly during the dry season and are confined in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This is particularly evident for 2006, which was characterized by a large presence of biomass burning aerosols in all the three sites. Biomass burning aerosol is also observed during spring when air masses originating from North and East Africa pass over sparse biomass burning sources, and during summer when biomass burning aerosol is transported from the southern part of the continent by the monsoon flow. During summer

  8. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than

  9. Analysis of long-term aerosol size distribution data from Jungfraujoch with emphasis on free tropospheric conditions, cloud influence, and air mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Erik; Weingartner, Ernest; Henne, Stephan; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Steinbacher, Martin; Conen, Franz; Collaud Coen, Martine; Hammer, Emanuel; Jurányi, Zsofia; Baltensperger, Urs; Gysel, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Six years of aerosol size distribution measurements between 20 and 600 nm diameters and total aerosol concentration above 10 nm from March 2008 to February 2014 at the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch are presented. The size distribution was found to be typically bimodal with mode diameters and widths relatively stable throughout the year and the observation period. New particle formation was observed on 14.5% of all days without a seasonal preference. Particles typically grew only into the Aitken mode and did not reach cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) sizes on the time scale of several days. Growth of preexisting particles in the Aitken mode, on average, contributed very few CCN. We concluded that the dominant fraction of CCN at Jungfraujoch originated in the boundary layer. A number of approaches were used to distinguish free tropospheric (FT) conditions and episodes with planetary boundary layer (PBL) influence. In the absence of PBL injections, the concentration of particles larger than 90 nm (N90, roughly corresponding to the CCN concentration) reached a value ~40 cm-3 while PBL influence caused N90 concentrations of several hundred or even 1000 cm-3. Comparing three criteria for free tropospheric conditions, we found FT prevalence for 39% of the time with over 60% during winter and below 20% during summer. It is noteworthy that a simple criterion based on standard trace gas measurements appeared to outperform alternative approaches.

  10. White Dwarf Mass Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Romero, A. D.; Ourique, G.; Pelisoli, I.

    2017-03-01

    We present the mass distribution for all S/N ≥ 15 DA white dwarfs detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey up to Data Release 12 in 2015, fitted with Koester models for ML2/α=0.8 (Teff≥ 10000 K), and for DBs with S/N ≥ 10, fitted with ML2/α=1.25, for Teff >16 000 K. These mass distributions are for logg≥6.5 stars, i.e., excluding the Extremely Low Mass white dwarfs. We also present the mass distributions corrected by volume with the 1/Vmax approach, for stars brighter than g=19. Both distributions have a maximum at M=0.624 M ⊙ but very distinct shapes.

  11. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  12. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  13. Trends in aerosol abundances and distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Clancy, R. T.; Curran, R.; Deluisi, J.; Hamill, P.; Kent, G.; Rosen, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Yue, G.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of aerosols that reside in the upper atmosphere are described. Special emphasis is given to the influence these aerosols have on ozone observation systems, mainly through radiative effects, and on ambient ozone concentrations, mainly through chemical effects. It has long been appreciated that stratospheric particles can interfere with the remote sensing of ozone distribution. The mechanism and magnitude of this interference are evaluated. Separate sections deal with the optical properties of upper atmospheric aerosols, long-term trends in stratospheric aerosols, perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions, and estimates of the impacts that such particles have on remotely measured ozone concentrations. Another section is devoted to a discussion of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). These unique clouds, recently discovered by satellite observation, are now thought to be intimately connected with the Antarctic ozone hole. Accordingly, interest in PSC's has grown considerably in recent years. This chapter describes what we know about the morphology, physical chemistry, and microphysics of PSC's.

  14. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Shindell, D. T.

    2014-09-01

    The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS) has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic), mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic), hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2) differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found for naturally

  15. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  16. Coastal Aerosol Distribution by Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Westphal, and L. J. B. McArthur: Sunphotometric observations of the 2001 Asian dust storm over Canada and the U.S. Geophys. Res. Lett., 9, 94.1-94.4 ...2K2. Several years of NAAPS simulations for the Pacific Ocean have been analyzed for use in planning the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM...experiment, scheduled for April 2003, and intended to study the properties and distribution of the Asian dust and aerosols that cross the Pacific every

  17. Identification and Characterization of Biogenic SOA Component in Ambient Aerosols Based on Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Allan, J. D.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tian, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Williams, B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Coe, H.; Goldstein, A.; Mentel, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    Recently studies have shown that multivariate factor analysis of the highly time-resolved mass spectral data obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) may allow the classification and simplification of complex organic aerosol (OA) mixtures into components that are chemically meaningful and can be related to different sources and transformation processes. Two factor analysis techniques, including the Multiple Component Analysis (MCA) method (Zhang et al., 2007) and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method (Paatero and Tapper, 1994), were applied to a Quadrupole-AMS dataset acquired from Chebogue Pt., Nova Scotia in summer 2004. Multiple OA components were determined, including a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations and two oxygenated OA (OA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen-to-carbon ratios in their mass spectra. The HOA component correlates with inert primary emission tracers (e.g., EC and CO) and likely represents diluted POA transported from urban locations. The highly oxygenated component (OOA-I) correlates well with sulfate and shows a mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid - a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment. The less oxygenated OA component (OOA-II) reveals a mass spectral pattern that compares well with those of the biogenic SOA produced from the mixture of VOCs emitted by spruce, pine and birch trees during exposure to ozone and UV-photolysis in the Jülich plant chamber. In addition, the time series of OOA-II correlates with biogenic SOA tracer compounds determined by the thermal desorption aerosol GC/MS-FID (TAG) instrument. Furthermore, the time-resolved size distributions of OOA components, their correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements, and backtrajectory analysis of air masses all support the association of OOA-II to biogenic sources. Finally

  18. A method for retrieving vertical distribution of aerosol mass concentration in atmosphere from results of lidar sensing at Nd:YAG laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2011-03-01

    A method for retrieving the vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol concentration from the results of lidar sensing at Ng:YAG laser wavelengths is developed based on the found multiple regressions between the optical location characteristics of aerosol at wavelengths of 0.355, 0.532, and 1.064 nm, as well as between the aerosol backscattering coefficient at these wavelengths and the concentration of aerosol particles. The method does not require solving ill-posed inverse problems and minimizes the use of a priori information. The reliability and generality of regressions obtained are confirmed by their good agreement with the AERO-NET data. The method efficiency is demonstrated by numerical experiments on retrieving profiles of back-scattering coefficients and concentration that corresponds to different optical models of aerosol.

  19. Aerosol Measurements by the Globally Distributed Micro Pulse Lidar Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Berkoff, Tim; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Full time measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol are now being acquired at a number of globally distributed MP (micro pulse) lidar sites. The MP lidar systems provide full time profiling of all significant cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation from compact, eye safe instruments. There are currently eight sites in operation and over a dozen planned. At all sited there are also passive aerosol and radiation measurements supporting the lidar data. Four of the installations are at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites. The network operation includes instrument operation and calibration and the processing of aerosol measurements with standard retrievals and data products from the network sites. Data products include optical thickness and extinction cross section profiles. Application of data is to supplement satellite aerosol measurements and to provide a climatology of the height distribution of aerosol. The height distribution of aerosol is important for aerosol transport and the direct scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution, but no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is an orbital lidar to be launched in early 2002. GLAS will provide global measurements of the height distribution of aerosol. The MP lidar network will provide ground truth and analysis support for GLAS and other NASA Earth Observing System data. The instruments, sites, calibration procedures and standard data product algorithms for the MPL network will be described.

  20. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  1. Aerosol size distribution at Nansen Ice Sheet Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosi, F.; Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.

    2012-04-01

    During austral summer 2006, in the framework of the XXII Italian Antarctic expedition of PNRA (Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica), aerosol particle number size distribution measurements were performed in the 10-500 range nm over the Nansen Ice Sheet glacier (NIS, 74°30' S, 163°27' E; 85 m a.s.l), a permanently iced branch of the Ross Sea. Observed total particle number concentrations varied between 169 and 1385 cm- 3. A monomodal number size distribution, peaking at about 70 nm with no variation during the day, was observed for continental air mass, high wind speed and low relative humidity. Trimodal number size distributions were also observed, in agreement with measurements performed at Aboa station, which is located on the opposite side of the Antarctic continent to the NIS. In this case new particle formation, with subsequent particle growth up to about 30 nm, was observed even if not associated with maritime air masses.

  2. Coarse atmospheric aerosol: size distributions of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.

    A sampler, employing nine single stage impactors placed in parallel within a portable wind tunnel, has been used to determine the metal content of coarse atmospheric aerosol. The wind tunnel maintains a constant flow environment for the collectors housed inside it, so that representative sampling conditions are achieved compared to the varied ambient wind conditions. At a flow rate of 8 m s -1 the 50% cut-off diameters of the impactors ranged from 7.8 to 38.8 μm. Measurements were conducted at a rural and urban site near Colchester in south east England. The samplers were analysed by PIXE for P, K, Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, Cu, V, Co, Cr, Br, Zn, Ni, Sc and Pb. It is found that the sampler can be employed to quantitatively characterise the elemental mass size distribution for aerosol larger than 10 μm. The results indicate that a small fraction of the above earth and trace elements' metal mass is present in particles greater than 10 μm. This fraction for earth metals (Ca, K, Ti) is comparatively greater in the rural site than the urban site, while for trace metals (Mn, V, Cu, Cr) this fraction constitutes a more significant part of the coarse mass at the urban site. Trace element concentrations were of a similar order of magnitude to earlier literature reports. Although the number of measurements was limited it can be concluded that the size distributions obtained were characteristic of an unpolluted area.

  3. Size distribution and speciation of chromium in paint spray aerosol at an aerospace facility.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Harris, Patricia A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosol containing Cr(VI) via inhalation of chromate-based paint spray. Two field studies were conducted at an aerospace facility to determine the size distribution and speciation of Cr(VI) in paint spray aerosol. Sampled paint products consisted of sparingly soluble strontium chromate in an epoxy resin matrix, a matrix generally known for its durability and toughness. Personal aerosol samples were collected using Sierra Marple personal cascade impactors and analyzed for Cr(VI) and total Cr. The size distribution of total Cr particles in the paint aerosol had a Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) of 7.5 mum [Geometric Standard Deviation (GSD = 2.7 mum)] in both field studies. The MMAD of Cr(VI) particles was 8.5 mum (GSD = 2.2 mum). Particles >2 mum constituted 90% or more of the total Cr and the Cr(VI) mass, in all sampled paint aerosols and were lognormally distributed. The target site for respiratory deposition of Cr in the aerosol was estimated based on the mass distribution of Cr according to particle size. On an average, 62% of the Cr and Cr(VI) mass in the paint aerosol consisted of particles >10 mum. This study showed that 71.8% of Cr(VI) mass in paint spray aerosol potentially inhaled by a spray painter may deposit in the head airways region. Only 2.0 and 1.4% of Cr(VI) mass in the paint aerosol may potentially deposit in the alveolar and tracheobronchial region, respectively. The ratio of Cr(VI) mass to total Cr mass was determined in bulk paint and the data indicate that Cr was predominantly in the Cr(VI) valence state, before spraying. The ratio of Cr(VI) mass to total Cr mass was also determined in paint aerosol samples. The data indicated that there was a reduction of Cr(VI) regardless of Cr aerosol particle size. Cr(VI) reduction occurred most likely during the 8 h sample collection time period. These findings are in agreement with the findings that observed Cr(VI) reduction during collection of airborne

  4. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  5. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the Southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8±8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5±8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva)~200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  6. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva) ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  7. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Using Raman-lidar-based regularized microphysical retrievals and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements for the characterization of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Nicolae, Doina; Böckmann, Christine; Vasilescu, Jeni; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2015-10-01

    In this work we extract the microphysical properties of aerosols for a collection of measurement cases with low volume depolarization ratio originating from fire sources captured by the Raman lidar located at the National Institute of Optoelectronics (INOE) in Bucharest. Our algorithm was tested not only for pure smoke but also for mixed smoke and urban aerosols of variable age and growth. Applying a sensitivity analysis on initial parameter settings of our retrieval code was proved vital for producing semi-automatized retrievals with a hybrid regularization method developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University. A direct quantitative comparison of the retrieved microphysical properties with measurements from a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (CToF-AMS) is used to validate our algorithm. Microphysical retrievals performed with sun photometer data are also used to explore our results. Focusing on the fine mode we observed remarkable similarities between the retrieved size distribution and the one measured by the AMS. More complicated atmospheric structures and the factor of absorption appear to depend more on particle radius being subject to variation. A good correlation was found between the aerosol effective radius and particle age, using the ratio of lidar ratios (LR: aerosol extinction to backscatter ratios) as an indicator for the latter. Finally, the dependence on relative humidity of aerosol effective radii measured on the ground and within the layers aloft show similar patterns.

  9. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  10. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number.

    PubMed

    Saide, Pablo E; Carmichael, Gregory R; Spak, Scott N; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J Kirk

    2012-07-24

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (N(d)) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent N(d) observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions.

  11. Determination of aromatic tracer compounds for environmental tobacco smoke aerosol by two step laser mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrical, Brad D.; Zenobi, Renato

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of indoor aerosol pollution. Determination of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) aerosol is critical to understanding health effects. Sizing studies have shown that ETS has a size distribution that is efficiently deposited into the lungs and can therefore provide effective delivery of carcinogenic compounds into the human body. Two-step laser mass spectrometry is used to analyze aromatic compounds on aerosols collected from a smoking lobby. The determination and suitability of ETS tracers on aerosols is examined. Additionally, the transport of aerosol from the smoking lobby is examined to determine what effect deposition and dilution have on the mass spectrum observed. Results from the analysis of ETS, both from lobby samples and direct cigarette sampling, show that several unique peaks are present in the mass spectrum when compared to other combustion sources, such as automobiles and diesel trucks. In particular, ions at m/ z 118, 132, 146, and 160 are consistently present and are not found in other combustion sources. For the indoor environment, where chemical transformation is much less rapid than in the outdoor environment, these ions were found to be present as soon as the first smokers appeared and persisted over the course of the day. Aerosol samples taken in the morning prior to the presence of smokers in the lobby reveal the presence of skeletal PAHs, indicative of outdoor urban traffic aerosol penetration into the building.

  12. Mass spectrometric approaches for chemical characterisation of atmospheric aerosols: critical review of the most recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-06-29

    This manuscript presents an overview of the most recent instrument developments for the field and laboratory applications of mass spectrometry (MS) to investigate the chemistry and physics of atmospheric aerosols. A range of MS instruments, employing different sample introduction methods, ionisation and mass detection techniques are used both for ‘online’ and ‘offline’ characterisation of aerosols. Online MS techniques enable detection of individual particles with simultaneous measurement of particle size distributions and aerodynamic characteristics and are ideally suited for field studies that require high temporal resolution. Offline MS techniques provide a means for detailed molecular-level analysis of aerosol samples, which is essential to gain fundamental knowledge regarding aerosol chemistry, mechanisms of particle formation and atmospheric aging. Combined, complementary MS techniques provide comprehensive information on the chemical composition, size, morphology and phase of aerosols – data of key importance for evaluating hygroscopic and optical properties of particles, their health effects, understanding their origins and atmospheric evolution. Over the last few years, developments and applications of MS techniques in aerosol research have expanded remarkably as evident by skyrocketing publication statistics. Finally, the goal of this review is to present the most recent developments in the field of aerosol mass spectrometry for the time period of late 2010 to early 2012, which have not been conveyed in previous reviews.

  13. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    SciTech Connect

    GIESEKE, J. A.

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure, and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.

  14. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol by Globally Distributed MP Lidar Network Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global distribution of aerosol has an important influence on climate through the scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation and through modification of cloud optical properties. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution. However there are critical parameters that can only be obtained by active optical profiling. For aerosol, no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The aerosol height distribution is required for any model for aerosol transport and the height resolved radiative heating/cooling effect of aerosol. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is an orbital lidar to be launched by 2002. GLAS will provide global measurements of the height distribution of aerosol. The sampling will be limited by nadir only coverage. There is a need for local sites to address sampling, and accuracy factors. Full time measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol are now being acquired at a number of globally distributed MP (micro pulse) lidar sites. The MP lidar systems provide profiling of all significant cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation from compact, eye safe instruments. There are currently six sites in operation and over a dozen planned. At all sites there are a complement of passive aerosol and radiation measurements supporting the lidar data. Four of the installations are at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites. The aerosol measurements, retrievals and data products from the network sites will be discussed. The current and planned application of data to supplement satellite aerosol measurements is covered.

  15. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  16. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  17. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  18. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  19. Regional and local variations in atmospheric aerosols using ground-based sun photometry during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko; Holben, Brent N.

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol mass concentrations are affected by local emissions as well as long-range transboundary (LRT) aerosols. This work investigates regional and local variations of aerosols based on Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON). We constructed DRAGON-Japan and DRAGON-Osaka in spring of 2012. The former network covers almost all of Japan in order to obtain aerosol information in regional scale over Japanese islands. It was determined from the DRAGON-Japan campaign that the values of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) decrease from west to east during an aerosol episode. In fact, the highest AOT was recorded at Fukue Island at the western end of the network, and the value was much higher than that of urban areas. The latter network (DRAGON-Osaka) was set as a dense instrument network in the megalopolis of Osaka, with a population of 12 million, to better understand local aerosol dynamics in urban areas. AOT was further measured with a mobile sun photometer attached to a car. This transect information showed that aerosol concentrations rapidly changed in time and space together when most of the Osaka area was covered with moderate LRT aerosols. The combined use of the dense instrument network (DRAGON-Osaka) and high-frequency measurements provides the motion of aerosol advection, which coincides with the wind vector around the layer between 700 and 850 hPa as provided by the reanalysis data of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP).

  20. Lidar Investigation of Aerosol Pollution Distribution near a Coal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsev, TS.; Kolarov, G.

    1992-01-01

    Using aerosol lidars with high spatial and temporal resolution with the possibility of real-time data interpretation can solve a large number of ecological problems related to the aerosol-field distribution and variation and the structure of convective flows. Significantly less expensive specialized lidars are used in studying anthropogenic aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. Here, we present results of lidar measurements of the mass-concentration field around a coal-fired power plant with intensive local aerosol sources. We studied the pollution evolution as a function of the emission dynamics and the presence of retaining layers. The technique used incorporates complex analysis of three types of lidar mapping: horizontal map of the aerosol field, vertical cross-section map, and a series of profiles along a selected path. The lidar-sounding cycle was performed for the time of atmosphere's quasi-stationarity.

  1. Correlation of aerosol mass near the ground with aerosol optical depth during two seasons in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Harbusch, Andreas; Emeis, Stefan; Koepke, Peter; Wiegner, Matthias

    2008-06-01

    Relations of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) with aerosol mass concentration near the ground, particulate matter (PM), have been studied on the basis of measurements. The objective is with respect to possible remote sensing methods to get information on the spatial and temporal variation of aerosols which is important for human health effects. Worldwide the AOD of the atmospheric column is routinely monitored by sun-photometers and accessible from satellite measurements also. It is implied here that the AOD is caused mainly by attenuation processes within the mixing layer because this layer includes nearly all atmospheric aerosols. Thus the mixing layer height (MLH) is required together with the AOD, measured by ground-based sun-photometers (around 560 nm), to get information about aerosols near the ground. MLH is determined here from surface-based remote sensing. Investigations were performed during two measurement campaigns in and near Munich in May and November/December 2003 on the basis of daily mean values. Using AOD and MLH measurements the aerosol extinction coefficient of the mixing layer has been calculated. This quantity was correlated with the measured PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations near the ground by performing a linear regression and thus providing a mass extinction efficiency giving squares of the correlation coefficients (R2) between 0.48 (PM1 during summer campaign) and 0.90 (PM2.5 during winter campaign). These correlations suggest that the derived mass extinction efficiencies represent a statistically significant relation between the aerosol extinction coefficients and the surface-based PM mass concentrations mainly during winter conditions.

  2. Development of a continuous aerosol mass concentration measurement device.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Thomas, D; Contal, P; Subra, I

    2003-08-01

    A dynamic aerosol mass concentration measurement device has been developed for personal sampling. Its principle consists in sampling the aerosol on a filter and monitoring the change of pressure drop over time (Delta P). Ensuring that the linearity of the Delta P = f(mass of particles per unit area of filter) relationship has been well established, the change of concentration can be deduced. The response of the system was validated in the laboratory with a 3.5 microm alumina aerosol (mass median diameter) generated inside a 1-m(3) ventilated enclosure. As the theory predicted that the mass sensitivity of the system would vary inversely with the square of the particle diameter, only sufficiently fine aerosols were able to be measured. The system was tested in the field in a mechanical workshop in the vicinity of an arc-welding station. The aerosol produced by welding is indeed particularly well-adapted due to the sub-micronic size of the particles. The device developed, despite this limitation, has numerous advantages over other techniques: robustness, compactness, reliability of calibration, and ease of use.

  3. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer

  4. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  5. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  6. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  7. Source contributions to black carbon mass fractions in aerosol particles over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Seizi; Maeda, Takahisa; Kaneyasu, Naoki

    Aerosol particle number size distributions above 0.3 μm in diameter and black carbon mass concentrations in aerosols were observed on Chichi-jima of the Ogasawara Islands in the northwestern Pacific from January 2000 to December 2002. Chichi-jima is suitable to observe polluted air masses from East Asia in winter and clean air masses over the western North Pacific in summer. In winter, aerosols over Chichi-jima were strongly affected by anthropogenic emissions in East Asia. The form of energy consumption in East Asia varies in various regions. Hence, each source region is expected to be characterized by an individual black carbon mass fraction. A three-dimensional Eulerian transport model was used to estimate contribution rates to air pollutants from each source region in East Asia. Because the Miyake-jima eruption began at the end of June 2000, the influence of smokes from Miyake-jima was also considered in the model calculation. The results of model calculations represent what must be noticed about smokes from volcanoes including Miyake-jima to interpret temporal variations of sulfur compounds over the northwestern Pacific. To evaluate black carbon mass fractions in anthropogenic aerosols as a function of source region, the relationships between the volume concentration of aerosol particles and the black carbon mass concentration in the winter were classified under each source region in East Asia. Consequently, the black carbon mass fractions in aerosols from China, Japan and the Korean Peninsula, and other regions were estimated to be 9-13%, 5-7%, and 4-5%, respectively.

  8. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-13

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  9. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  10. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks. PMID:27733773

  11. Measurement and Modeling Results on the Evolution of Aerosol Size Distributions in the Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Kazil, J.; Reeves, J. M.; Froyd, K. D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol particles in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) affect local chemistry and radiation balance due to their role in heterogeneous reactions and contribution to light scattering. Tropical UTLS particles also act as a source of lower stratospheric aerosol populations in the mid-latitudes. Therefore, understanding the processes controlling evolution of the particles in the tropical UTLS is of great importance. We present measurements of aerosol size distributions (4-1000 nm) in the tropics during winter (Pre-AVE, 2004 and CRAVE, 2006) and summer (TC4, 2007), using NMASS (Nuclei Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer) and FCAS (Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) instruments aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft. At altitudes below the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), integrated number and volume distributions indicate a factor of 2-5 variability between 2004 and 2006, reflecting the influence of different air mass origins on the local aerosol population. However, above TTL, the distributions are unified, without a significant change between the two years. Furthermore, above the TTL, number fraction of nucleation mode particles decreases from up to 90% to <40% while total aerosol volume and the volume fraction of particles larger than 350 nm increase. We use an aerosol dynamic model (MAIA, Kazil et al. (2007), Weigel et al. (2011)), constrained by observations to account for the horizontal air mass mixing from mid-latitudes, to simulate aerosol evolution in the tropical UTLS. We will discuss the results of MAIA's sensitivity runs along with the available aerosol composition information to gain insight into the processes controlling the increase in aerosol volume above the TTL. We will also use 2007 observations and MAIA's model results to compare winter-summer aerosol growth processes in the tropical UTLS. Kazil, J., et al., Is aerosol formation in cirrus clouds possible?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 1407-1413, doi:10.5194/acp-7-1407-2007, 2007. Weigel et al., In situ

  12. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  13. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  14. Sulfate aerosol distributions and cloud variations during El Nino anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F. ); Hicks, B. )

    1993-02-20

    The effects of aerosols on cloud characteristics, albedo, rainfall amount, and overall climate changes were investigated by assessing the qualitative associations and quantitative correlations between the relevant variables during El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) perturbations. Both historical records and data from recent field measurements for the Pacific Ocean region were used for the investigation. The results show that ENSO perturbations could change sulfate aerosol production and distribution over the surveyed regions. Strong correlations were observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and sulfate aerosol concentrations, and between cloud amount and albedo. Weak but significant correlations were also observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and cloud amounts, and between sulfate aerosol concentrations and rainfall amounts. Although sulfate aerosols appeared to have a strong impact on cloud microphysics, the present data confirm that cloud dynamics play the pivotal role in control of cloud types and cloud amount in the studied regions. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of Arctic aerosols: new insights from the CALIPSO satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pierro, Maurizio

    The Arctic is a receptor of pollution transported from distant regions. Pollution reaches the Arctic both in gaseous and aerosol form, both of which have important climatic and ecological implications. This dissertation focuses on aerosols in the Arctic, specifically their transport to and their distribution in space and time within the arctic troposphere. The cornerstone of this thesis is the analysis of the retrievals made by the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a two-wavelength polarization-sensitive lidar that measures the atmospheric attenuated backscatter return and provides high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds. Chapter 2 uses CALIOP observations to follow the evolution of pollution aerosols transported from East Asia to the Arctic. The transport pathway is elucidated with backtrajectories and aerosol simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The polluted air mass experiences strong ascent within a cyclonic circulation near the source region. Once in the free troposphere, a block in the upper-air flow forces the circulation to take on a strongly southerly route. Since the air mass reaches the Arctic very rapidly (3-5 days), the aerosol scavenging is incomplete. Transport is nearly-isentropic except in its initial phase. Once in the Arctic, the aerosol plume slowly subsides due to radiative cooling. Using six years of CALIOP observations, Chapter 3 focuses on the horizontal, vertical and temporal distribution of Arctic aerosols. At low altitudes in the High Arctic (poleward of 70°N), aerosol extinctions maximize in winter/early spring and reach their lowest values during summer. In the lower troposphere in the Low Arctic, in addition to the winter/early spring maximum, aerosol extinctions also display a secondary maximum in summer due to boreal forest fires. CALIOP measurements show that a major low-level Eurasian pollution transport pathway occurs on the western flank of the

  17. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  18. Measurement of size distributions of a coagulating aerosol. [Calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.G.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements have been performed for the determination of the size distribution of a coagulating ultrafine aerosol over a time interval of up to about 30 min. The aerosol was contained in a balloon with an initial volume of 60 l subject to a temperature inversion for the purpose of quenching the free convection and thereby diminishing the aerosol loss to the balloon wall. The aerosol size distribution was measured with the TSI electrostatic aerosol classifier hooked up to a TSI aerosol electrometer. The initial aerosol had an average diameter of about 12 nm. Measurements were taken by computer at a rate of 1 measurement cycle every 3 s; 1 cycle consists of a measurement of time, and burst measurements of electrometer current, classifier rod voltage, 3 flow rates, and 5 temperatures, followed by the calculation of averages and standard deviations, and storage of the results in a data string. The TSI instruments have been modified to permit the automatic computer reading of the parameters mentioned above. A multiplexer has been built to allow the multiplet data to be measured by a single system voltmeter. Channel switching in the multiplexer can be done either automatically by using the ''delay'' signal emitted by the system voltmeter every time it makes a reading or by software control through the 16-bit parallel interface of the computer.

  19. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM(sub l)) was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA) species dominate the NR-PM(sub l) mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA) and biomass burning (BB) are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 microg/cubic m (STP) ppm(exp -1). This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006) and Kleinman et al. (2008). The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance of nitrate decreases with distance from the city

  20. Urban increments of gaseous and aerosol pollutants and their sources using mobile aerosol mass spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, Miriam; Bozzetti, Carlo; El-Haddad, Imad; Maasikmets, Marek; Teinemaa, Erik; Richter, Rene; Wolf, Robert; Slowik, Jay G.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-06-01

    Air pollution is one of the main environmental concerns in urban areas, where anthropogenic emissions strongly affect air quality. This work presents the first spatially resolved detailed characterization of PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameter daero ≤ 2.5 µm) in two major Estonian cities, Tallinn and Tartu. The measurements were performed in March 2014 using a mobile platform. In both cities, the non-refractory (NR)-PM2.5 was characterized by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) using a recently developed lens which increases the transmission of super-micron particles. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) and several trace gases including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were also measured. The chemical composition of PM2.5 was found to be very similar in the two cities. Organic aerosol (OA) constituted the largest fraction, explaining on average about 52 to 60 % of the PM2.5 mass. Four sources of OA were identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF): hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, from traffic emissions), biomass burning OA (BBOA, from biomass combustion), residential influenced OA (RIOA, probably mostly from cooking processes with possible contributions from waste and coal burning), and oxygenated OA (OOA, related to secondary aerosol formation). OOA was the major OA source during nighttime, explaining on average half of the OA mass, while during daytime mobile measurements the OA was affected by point sources and dominated by the primary fraction. A strong increase in the secondary organic and inorganic components was observed during periods with transport of air masses from northern Germany, while the primary local emissions accumulated during periods with temperature inversions. Mobile measurements offered the identification of different source regions within the urban areas and the assessment of the extent to which pollutants concentrations exceeded regional background

  1. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  2. Mass spectroscopy of single aerosols from field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.S.; Murphy, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    We are developing an aircraft instrument for the chemical analysis of individual ambient aerosols in real time. In order to test the laboratory version of this instrument, we participated in a field campaign near the continental divide in Colorado in September, 1993. During this campaign, over 5000 mass spectra of ambient aerosols were collected. Analysis of the negative ion spectra shows that sulfate was the most commonly seen component of smaller particles, while nitrate was more common in larger particles. Organic compounds are present in most particles, and we believe we can distinguish inorganic carbon in some particles. Although numerous distinct classes of particles were observed, indicating external mixtures, almost all of these particle types were themselves mixtures of several compounds. Finally, we note that although the field site experienced distinct polluted and unpolluted episodes, aerosol composition did not correlate with gas phase chemistry.

  3. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  4. Organic Aerosols in Rural and Remote Atmospheric Environments: Insights from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Ulbrich, I.; Dunlea, E.; Decarlo, P.; Huffman, A.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Alfarra, R.; Canagaratna, M.; Onasch, T.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D.; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Shimono, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Drewnick, F.; Schneider, J.; Middlebrook, A.; Bahreini, R.; Cotrell, L.; Griffin, R.; Leaitch, R.; Li, S.; Hayden, K.; Rautiainen, J.

    2006-12-01

    Organic matter usually accounts for a large fraction of the fine particle mass in rural and remote atmospheres. However, little is known about the sources and properties of this material. Here we report findings on the characteristics and the major types of organic aerosols (OA) in urban downwind, high elevation, forested, and marine atmospheres based on analyses of more than 20 highly time resolved AMS datasets sampled from various locations in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere. Organic aerosol components are extracted from these datasets using a custom multiple component mass spectral analysis technique and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method. These components are evaluated according to their extracted mass spectra and correlations to aerosol species, such as sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon, and gas-phase tracer compounds, such as CO and NOx. We have identified a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations. We have also identified several oxygenated OA (OOA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen to carbon ratios in their mass spectra. Two OOA components a highly oxygenated that has mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid (a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment) and a less oxygenated OOA component, whose spectrum is dominated with ions that are mainly associated with carbonyls and alcohols, are very frequently observed at various rural/remote sites. The oxygenated OOA component is more prevalent at downwind sites influenced by urban transport and the less oxygenated shows correlation to biogenic chamber OA at some locations. Compared to the total OOA concentration, HOA is generally very small and accounts for < 10% of the total OA mass at rural/remote sites. The comparisons between the concentrations of HOA and primary OA (POA) that would be predicted according to inert

  5. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station.

  6. Aerosols and past environments: A global investigation into cave aerosol identification, distribution, and contribution to speleothem geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harrison, R. M.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J.; Mattey, D.

    2013-12-01

    A new sector of interest is developing within cave science regarding the influence of aerosols on the cave environment and the potential speleothem palaeoenvironmental aerosol record which may be preserved. This paper presents the results from a global collaboration project which explored all aspects of aerosols in the cave environment. Cave aerosol identification, introduction and distribution Cave aerosol multivariable environmental monitoring projects were carried out in the UK, Spain, Austria and Australia. Results demonstrate that cave ventilation is the predominant control on the introduction and distribution of aerosols throughout the cave environment (Dredge et al., 2013). Consequently, aerosol transportation processes vary as a result of seasonal ventilation changes and cave morphological features. Cave aerosol contribution to speleothem geochemistry Aerosol contributions to speleothem geochemistry were determined by comparing monitored aerosol deposition to speleothem trace element data. Significant aerosol contribution scenarios were identified as: hiatus events, high aerosol flux situations and secondary microbial concentration processes. Modelling indicates that a >99.9% reduction in drip water flow rates is required to reduce trace element supply quantities to equal that of aerosol supply (Dredge et al., 2013). Aerosol palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental records Aerosol contributions and the ability to utilise aerosol records in speleothem are investigated in samples from Gibraltar and Australia. Long range dust sources and past atmospheric circulation over several glacial cycles is studied through Sr isotope analysis of a Flowstone core from Gibraltar. Results of organic fire proxy analysis from Australian speleothem samples indicate an aerosol deposition forest fire record. In addition to primary fire deposition, secondary biological feedbacks and subsequent bioaccumulation processes in the cave environment are explored by microbial analysis

  7. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  8. Method of measuring charge distribution of nanosized aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Woo, K S; Liu, B Y H; Zachariah, M R

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a method to accurately measure the positive and negative charge distribution of nanosized aerosols using a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) system. From the series of TDMA measurements, the charge fraction of nanosized aerosol particles was obtained as a function of equivalent mobility particle diameter ranging from 50 to 200 nm. The capability of this new approach was implemented by sampling from a laminar diffusion flame which provides a source of highly charged particles due to naturally occurring flame ionization process. The results from the TDMA measurement provide the charge distribution of nanosized aerosols which we found to be in reasonable agreement with Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution theory and a theory based upon charge population balance equation (PBE) combined with Fuchs theory (N.A. Fuchs, Geofis. Pura Appl. 56 (1963) 185). The theoretically estimated charge distribution of aerosol particles based on the PBE provides insight into the charging processes of nanosized aerosols surrounded by bipolar ions and electrons, and agree well with the TDMA results.

  9. Online Aerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Micrometer-Sized Particles Containing Poly(ethylene glycol)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Patton, E; Srivastava, A; Martin, S; Fergenson, D; Steele, P; Tobias, H; Gard, E; Frank, M

    2006-10-25

    Analysis of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-containing particles by online single particle aerosol mass spectrometers equipped with laser desorption ionization (LDI) is reported. We demonstrate that PEG-containing particles are useful in the development of aerosol mass spectrometers because of their ease of preparation, low cost, and inherently recognizable mass spectra. Solutions containing millimolar quantities of PEGs were nebulized and, after drying, the resultant micrometer-sized PEG containing particles were sampled. LDI (266 nm) of particles containing NaCl and PEG molecules of average molecular weight <500 generated mass spectra reminiscent of mass spectra of PEG collected by other MS schemes including the characteristic distribution of positive ions (Na{sup +} adducts) separated by the 44 Da of the ethylene oxide units separating each degree of polymerization. PEGs of average molecular weight >500 were detected from particles that also contained t the tripeptide tyrosine-tyrosine-tyrosine or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, which were added to nebulized solutions to act as matrices to assist LDI using pulsed 266 nm and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Experiments were performed on two aerosol mass spectrometers, one reflectron and one linear, that each utilize two time-of-flight mass analyzers to detect positive and negative ions created from a single particle. PEG-containing particles are currently being employed in the optimization of our bioaerosol mass spectrometers for the application of measurements of complex biological samples, including human effluents, and we recommend that the same strategies will be of great utility to the development of any online aerosol LDI mass spectrometer platform.

  10. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  11. A Minimal Fragmentation Approach to Real Time Aerosol Mass Spectrometry: A New Tool for Detailed Laboratory Studies of Organic Aerosol Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hanna, S.; Simpson, E.; Robb, D.; Blades, M. W.; Hepburn, J. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    The study of the atmospheric distribution and chemical processing of both biogenic and anthropogenic organics is one of the oldest and still most enduring challenges in atmospheric chemistry. The large number and structural complexity of many of the compounds as well as the high reactivity of many intermediates makes it hard to design analytical tools that are at the same time sensitive enough as well as being reasonably broad in scope. Despite big advances in techniques to characterize the gaseous phase component, there is still a dearth of instruments capable of doing the same for the organic aerosol component. This is due in part to the type of the compounds present in the aerosol phase, which in general lend themselves less to classical analytical methods such as GC/MS, as well as the inherent problems of any aerosol analysis, namely to transfer the aerosol to a suitable phase for analysis without altering it and while keeping track, at the same time, of the physical properties of the aerosol. Although impaction methods coupled to conventional analysis techniques have some specific advantages, the most widely used approach is the aerosol mass spectrometer. Unlike their predecessors, current aerosol mass spectrometer designs do a reasonably good job of delivering a representative sample of the aerosol phase to the detector while keeping track of the physical properties of the aerosol. However, the ionization step (either multitphoton absorption or electron impact in most cases) still leads to massive fragmentation of all but the most stable organics, making it very difficult to characterize individual compounds beyond establishing their functional groups(Allan et al. 2003; Su et al. 2004). Single photon near threshold ionization has been proposed and used recently (Oktem et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2005), but the challenges of producing coherent VUV radiation has led to a high detection threshold and a still significant amount of fragmentation, since these studies

  12. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  13. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  14. Spatial Distribution of Carbonaceous Aerosol in the Southeastern Baltic Sea Region (Event of Grass Fires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudoitis, Vadimas; Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Bozzetti, Carlo; Fröhlich, Roman; Mordas, Genrik; Ulevičius, Vidmantas

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol chemical composition in air masses affected by large vegetation fires transported from the Kaliningrad region (Russia) and southeast regions (Belarus and Ukraine) during early spring (March 2014) was characterized at the remote background site of Preila, Lithuania. In this study, the chemical composition of the particulate matter was studied by high temporal resolution instruments, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a seven-wavelength aethalo-meter. Air masses were transported from twenty to several hundred kilometres, arriving at the measurement station after approximately half a day of transport. The concentration-weighted trajectory analysis suggests that organic aerosol particles are mainly transported over the Baltic Sea and the continent (southeast of Belarus). Results show that a significant fraction of the vegetation burning organic aerosol is transformed into oxidised forms in less than a half-day. Biomass burning aerosol (BBOA) was quantified from the ACSM data using a positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis, while its spatial distribution was evaluated using air mass clustering approach.

  15. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  16. Mass distributions in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas; Verheijen, Marc; Bershady, Matthew; Westfall, Kyle; Andersen, David; Swaters, Rob

    2017-03-01

    We present results on luminous and dark matter mass distributions in disk galaxies from the DiskMass Survey. As expected for normal disk galaxies, stars dominate the baryonic mass budget in the inner region of the disk; however, at about four optical scale lengths (hR ) the atomic gas starts to become the dominant contributor. Unexpectedly, we find the total baryon to dark-matter fraction within a galaxy stays nearly constant with radius from 1hR out to at least 6hR , with a baryon fraction of 15-50% among galaxies. On average, only one third of the mass within 2.2hR in a disk galaxy is baryonic and these baryons appear to have had only a minor effect on the distribution of the dark matter.

  17. Development of the RAQM2 aerosol chemical transport model and predictions of the Northeast Asian aerosol mass, size, chemistry, and mixing type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, M.; Inomata, Y.; Sato, K.; Ueda, H.; Han, Z.; An, J.; Katata, G.; Deushi, M.; Maki, T.; Oshima, N.; Kurokawa, J.; Ohara, T.; Takami, A.; Hatakeyama, S.

    2012-12-01

    A new aerosol chemical transport model, the Regional Air Quality Model 2 (RAQM2), was developed to simulate the Asian air quality. We implemented a simple version of a triple-moment modal aerosol dynamics model (MADMS) and achieved a completely dynamic (non-equilibrium) solution of a gas-to-particle mass transfer over a wide range of aerosol diameters from 1 nm to super-μm. To consider a variety of atmospheric aerosol properties, a category approach was utilized in which the aerosols were distributed into four categories: particles in the Aitken mode (ATK), soot-free particles in the accumulation mode (ACM), soot aggregates (AGR), and particles in the coarse mode (COR). The aerosol size distribution in each category is characterized by a single mode. The condensation, evaporation, and Brownian coagulations for each mode were solved dynamically. A regional-scale simulation (Δx = 60 km) was performed for the entire year of 2006 covering the Northeast Asian region. The modeled PM1/bulk ratios of the chemical components were consistent with observations, indicating that the simulated aerosol mixing types were consistent with those in nature. The non-sea-salt SO42- mixed with ATK + ACM was the largest at Hedo in summer, whereas the SOSO42- was substantially mixed with AGR in the cold seasons. Ninety-eight percent of the modeled NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Hedo, whereas 53.7% of the NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Gosan, which is located upwind toward the Asian continent. The condensation of HNO3 onto sea salt particles during transport over the ocean accounts for the difference in the NO3- mixing type at the two sites. Because the aerosol mixing type alters the optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity, its accurate prediction and evaluation are indispensable for aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction studies.

  18. Aerosol distributions and radiative forcing over the Asian Pacific region simulated by Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Ohta, Sachio; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model coupled with a general circulation model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), simulates atmospheric aerosol distributions and optical properties. The simulated results are compared with aerosol sampling and optical observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite acquired by intensive observation campaigns over east Asia in spring 2001. Temporal variations of the aerosol concentrations, optical thickness, and Ångström exponent are in good agreement between the simulation and observations. The midrange values of the Ångström exponent, even at the Asian dust storm events over the outflow regions, suggest that the contribution of the anthropogenic aerosol, such as carbonaceous and sulfate, to the total optical thickness is of an order comparable to that of the Asian dust. The radiative forcing by the aerosol direct and indirect effects is also calculated. The negative direct radiative forcing is simulated to be over -10 W m-2 at the tropopause in the air mass during the large-scale dust storm, to which both anthropogenic aerosols and Asian dust contribute almost equivalently. The direct radiative forcing, however, largely depends on the cloud water content and the vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud. The simulation shows that not only sulfate and sea salt aerosols but also black carbon and soil dust aerosols, which absorb solar and thermal radiation, make strong negative radiative forcing by the direct effect at the surface, which may exceed the positive forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases over the east Asian region.

  19. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Ship measurements of submicron aerosol size distributions over the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hwan; Yum, Seong Soo; Lee, Young-Gon; Choi, Byoung-Cheol

    2009-08-01

    During the spring of 2005, the total particle concentrations and the submicron aerosol size distributions were measured on board the research vessel over the south sea of Korea and the Korean sector of the Yellow Sea. Similar measurements were made over the East China Sea in autumn 2005. The aerosol properties varied dynamically according to the meteorological conditions, the proximity to the land masses and the air mass back trajectories. The average total particle concentration was the lowest over the East China Sea, 4335 ± 2736 cm - 3, but the instantaneous minimum, 837 cm - 3, for the entire ship measurement was recorded during the Yellow Sea cruise. There was also a long (more than 6 h) stretch of low total particle concentrations that fell as low as 1025 cm - 3 during the East China Sea cruise when the ship was the farthest from the shores and the air mass back trajectories resided long hours over the sea. These observations lead to the suggestion of ~ 1000 cm - 3 as the background total particle concentration over the marine boundary layer in the studied region of the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, implying significant anthropogenic influence even for the background value. In the mean time, average aerosol size distributions were unimodal and the mode diameter ranged between 52 and 86 nm, excluding the fog periods, which suggests that the aerosols measured in this study experienced relatively less aging processes within the marine boundary layer.

  1. Real-time measurement of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of particle analysis by mass spectrometry has been applied to the quantitative measurement of sodium chloride in individual particles on a real-time basis. Particles of known masses are individually introduced, in the form of a beam, into a miniature Knudsen cell oven (1600 K). The oven is fabricated from rhenium metal sheet (0.018 mm thick) and is situated in the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A particle once inside the oven is trapped and completely volatilized; this overcomes the problem of partial volatilization due to particles bouncing from the filament surface. Individual particles are thermally volatilized and ionized inside the rhenium oven, and produce discrete sodium ion pulses whose intensities are measured with the quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion pulse width of several milliseconds (4-12 ms) is found for particles in the mass range 1.3 x 10 to the -13th to 5.4 x 10 to the -11th g. The sodium ion intensity is found to be proportional to the particle mass to the 0.86-power. The intensity distribution for monodisperse aerosol particles possesses a geometric standard deviation of 1.09, showing that the method can be used for the determination of the mass distribution function with good resolution in a polydisperse aerosol.

  2. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  3. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  4. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  5. A model for predicting fog aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiger, Joshua J.; Book, Kevin; Baker, Brooke; deGrassie, John Stephen; Hammel, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    An accurate model and parameterization of fog is needed to increase the reliability and usefulness of electro-optical systems in all relevant environments. Current models vary widely in their ability to accurately predict the size distribution and subsequent optical properties of fog. The Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), developed to model the distribution of aerosols in the maritime environment, does not currently include a model for fog. One of the more prevalent methods for modeling particle size spectra consists of fitting a modified gamma function to fog measurement data. This limits the fog distribution to a single mode. Here we establish an empirical model for predicting complicated multimodal fog droplet size spectra using machine learning techniques. This is accomplished through careful measurements of fog in a controlled laboratory environment and measuring fog particle size distributions during outdoor fog events.

  6. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Aerosol: 1 nanometer to 1 micron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, D. R.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles remains the largest uncertainty in quantitatively assessing past, current and future climate change. The principal reason for that uncertainty arises from the need to characterize and model composition and size dependent aerosol processes, ranging from nanometer to micron scales. Aerosol mass spectrometry results have shown that about half the sub-micron aerosol composition is composed of highly oxygenated organics that are not well understood in terms of photochemical reaction mechanisms (Jimenez et al, 2009). This work has included application of high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) in order to determine elemental and functional group composition of complex organic components. Recently, we have applied similar ToFMS to determine the composition of ambient ions, molecules and clusters, potentially involved in formation and growth of nano-particles (Junninen et al, 2010). Observed organic anions (molecular weight range 200-500 Th) have similar chemical composition as the least volatile secondary organics observed in fine particles; while organic cations are dominated by amines and pyridines. During nucleation events, anions are dominated by sulphuric acid cluster ions (Ehn et al, 2010). In both nanometer and micrometer size ranges, the goal to elucidate the roles of inorganic and organic species, particularly how particle evolution and physical properties depend on mixed compositions. Recent results will be discussed, including ambient and experimental chamber observations. Ehn et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 14897-14946, 2010 Jimenez et al, Science, 326, 1525-1529, 2009 Junninen et al, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 1039-1053, 2010

  7. Aerosol Size Distributions Measured in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Formation, Coagulation, Transport and Sedimentation of the Background Non-Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Lowenstein, M.; Mahoney, M. J.; Herman, R. L.; Anderson, J. G.; Xueref, I.; Gerbig, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Hinsta, E.

    2002-12-01

    This study presents the particle size distribution of non-volcanic aerosols in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere measured from 1995 to 2000 during five different high-altitude aircraft missions (STRAT, POLARIS, WAM, ACCENT, and SOLVE). The Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (FCAS), Condensation Nucleus Counter (CNC), and Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Sizing Spectrometer (N-MASS) were used to characterize the particle sizes in the diameter range from 4 to 2000 nm. Measurements were made at latitudes from 3.4S to 90N and the pressure altitudes form 7 to 21 km. These particle size distributions were analyzed using the potential temperature, tropopause height, and the mixing ratio of gas phase tracers such as N2O, CO2, NOy, O3 and water vapor. Particle formation, growth and sedimentation were studied to examine how the aerosol dynamics and atmospheric transport (Holton et al., 1995) determine the steady state aerosol size distribution in the lower stratosphere. This comprehensive data set will help us to better understand the origins and fate of the stratospheric background aerosols. Reference: Holton, J. R., et al., Stratosphere-troposphere exchange, Rev. Geophys., 33, 403-439, 1995.

  8. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  9. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9% and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/z 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ~10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  10. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-07-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9 and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/zs 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time (LST) when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ∼10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  11. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and MODIS to AERONET AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 Mass at Bondville, Illinois Stratified by Chemical Composition, RH, Particle Size, and Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. C.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.

    2008-05-01

    The USEPA is interested in using satellite remote sensing data to estimate levels of PM2.5. Here we report on comparisons of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to IMPROVE network PM2.5 mass and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based AOD. Before we compare GASP and MODIS AOD to PM2.5, we first evaluate satellite AOD using the ground-based AERONET measurements and how it varies by aerosol chemical composition and size distribution. We focus attention on the Bondville, Illinois site because there is collocated IMPROVE sampling and an AERONET site. GASP provides aerosol optical depth at 0.55 um using top of atmosphere visible channel radiance measured from GOES east and GOES west. Time resolution is typically every 30 minutes during daylight hours. MODIS provides typically once per day AOD for any given location. The IMPROVE sampler provides a 24-hour integrated sample of PM10 mass, and PM2.5 mass and elemental composition on a one day in three schedule. AERONET provides aerosol optical depth at multiple wavelengths and aerosol size distribution as well as other derived parameters such as Angstrom exponent from ground based daytime measurements. We stratified cases by RH group, major chemical component, size distribution, and season. GOES AOD correlated best with PM2.5 mass during periods with mainly small particles, moderate RH, and sulfate dominated aerosol. It correlated poorly when RH is very high or low, aerosol is primarily organic, and when coarse to fine mass ratio is high. GASP AOD also correlated best with AERONET AOD when particles are mainly fine, suggesting the aerosol model assumptions (e.g. size distribution) may need to be varied geographically for GASP to achieve better AOD results.

  12. [Comparative studies of particle distribution range of aerosol cromolyn sodium generated by MDI systems].

    PubMed

    Gradoń, L; Sosnowski, T R

    1999-05-01

    Particles size distribution of the sodium cromoglycate preparations: CROPOZ PLUS and CROMOGEN EB generated with MDI and for under-pressure releasing methods were measured. Results of measurements indicate a significant repeatability of each sample properties. An average contribution of mass of the respirable fraction for both aerosolized pharmaceuticals is in the range of 40% of the generated dose. CROMOGEN EB with optimizer (spacer) gives a higher contribution of the respirable fraction--up to 50% of dose, with simultaneous lower value of the released mass of aerosol. Particles size distribution of CROPOZ PLUS within a respirable fraction indicates an efficient penetration and deposition of particles in the upper, central and peripheral parts of tracheobronchial tree (TB). High contribution of submicron particles of CROMOGEN EB with optimizer gives efficient penetration and deposition of these particles in the lungs.

  13. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Size Distributions During PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Gandrud, B.; Campos, T.; Kok, G.; Stith, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX) is an airborne project that attempts to characterize the indirect aerosol effect by tracing plumes of dust and pollution across the Pacific Ocean. This project occurred during April-May 2007 and used the NSF/NCAR HIAPER research aircraft. When a period of strong generation of dust particles and pollution was detected by ground-based and satellite sensors, then the aircraft was launched from Colorado to Alaska, Hawaii, and Japan. Its mission was to intercept and track these plumes from Asia, across the Pacific Ocean, and ultimately to the edges of North America. For more description, see the abstract by Stith and Ramanathan (this conference) and other companion papers on PACDEX. The HIAPER aircraft carried a wide variety of sensors for measuring aerosols, cloud particles, trace gases, and radiation. Sampling was made in several weather regimes, including clean "background" air, dust and pollution plumes, and regions with cloud systems. Altitude ranges extended from 100 m above the ocean to 13.4 km. This paper reports on aerosol measurements made with a new Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), a Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer (RDMA), a water-based CN counter, and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). These cover the size range 10 nm to 10 um diameter. In clear air, dust was detected with the UHSAS and CDP. Polluted air was identified with high concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and CN. Aerosol size distributions will be presented, along with data to define the context of weather regimes.

  14. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  15. Mass spectra deconvolution of low, medium, and high volatility biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Engelhart, Gabriella J; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Pandis, Spyros N

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) consists of compounds with a wide range of volatilities and its ambient concentration is sensitive to this volatility distribution. Recent field studies have shown that the typical mass spectrum of ambient oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is quite different from the SOA mass spectra reported in smog chamber experiments. Part of this discrepancy is due to the dependence of SOA composition on the organic aerosol concentration. High precursor concentrations lead to higher concentrations of the more volatile species in the produced SOA while at lower concentrations the less volatile compounds dominate the SOA composition. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, and beta-caryophyllene ozonolysis experiments were performed at moderate concentration levels. Using a thermodenuder the more volatile SOA species were removed achieving even lower SOA concentration. The less volatile fraction was then chemically characterized by an AMS. The signal fraction of m/z44, and thus the concentration of C02+, is significantly higher for the less volatile SOA. High NO(x) conditions result in less oxidized SOA than low NO(x) conditions, while increasing relative humidity levels results in more oxidized products for limonene but has little effect on alpha-and beta-pinene SOA. Combining a smog chamber with a thermodenuder model employing the volatility basis-set framework, the AMS SOA mass spectrum for each experiment and for each precursor is deconvoluted into low, medium, and high volatility component mass spectra. The spectrum of the surrogate component with the lower volatility is quite similar to that of ambient OOA.

  16. Direct evaluation of aerosol-mass loadings from multispectral extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Mckellar, B. H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A formula is derived for the evaluation of the total volume of aerosol in a column, and hence for the aerosol columnar mass loading, from multispectral extinction data. This formula is exact in the 'anomalous diffraction' approximation, and reasonably accurate for Mie scattering, over a fairly wide range of refractive indices typical of real aerosols.

  17. Mass absorption indices of various types of natural aerosol particles in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K

    1975-12-01

    The mass absorption index of aerosol particles has been measured in the 2-17-microm wavelength region. The measurements were performed on films of aerosol particles that were collected by an automatic jet impactor at polluted and various uncontaminated remote sites. All but marine aerosols possess strong absorption bands in the transparent part of the atmospheric long-wave spectrum, indicating marked influence of aerosol particles on the radiation budget of the atmosphere.

  18. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  19. Characterization of organic aerosols in Beijing using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi; Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Ji, Dongsheng; Sun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fine particle of organic aerosol (OA), mostly arising from pollution, are abundant in Beijing. To achieve a better understanding of the difference in OA in summer and autumn, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) was deployed in urban Beijing in August and October 2012. The mean OA mass concentration in autumn was 30±30 μg m-3, which was higher than in summer (13±6.9 μg m-3). The elemental analysis found that OA was more aged in summer (oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios were 0.41 and 0.32 for summer and autumn, respectively). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis identified three and five components in summer and autumn, respectively. In summer, an oxygenated OA (OOA), a cooking-emission-related OA (COA), and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) were indentified. Meanwhile, the OOA was separated into LV-OOA (low-volatility OOA) and SV-OOA (semi-volatile OOA); and in autumn, a nitrogen-containing OA (NOA) was also found. The SOA (secondary OA) was always the most important OA component, accounting for 55% of the OA in the two seasons. Back trajectory clustering analysis found that the origin of the air masses was more complex in summer. Southerly air masses in both seasons were associated with the highest OA loading, while northerly air masses were associated with the lowest OA loading. A preliminary study of OA components, especially the POA (primary OA), in different periods found that the HOA and COA all decreased during the National Day holiday period, and HOA decreased at weekends compared with weekdays.

  20. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment

  1. Bio-Aerosol Detection Using Mass Spectrometry: Public Health Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ludvigson, Laura D.

    2004-01-01

    I recently spent a summer as an intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I worked on a project involving the real-time, reagentless, single cell detection of aerosolized pathogens using a novel mass spectrometry approach called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS). Based upon preliminary results showing the differentiation capabilities of BAMS, I would like to explore the development and use of this novel detection system in the context of both environmental and clinical sample pathogen detection. I would also like to explore the broader public health applications that a system such as BAMS might have in terms of infectious disease prevention and control. In order to appreciate the potential of this instrument, I will demonstrate the need for better pathogen detection methods, and outline the instrumentation, data analysis and preliminary results that lead me toward a desire to explore this technology further. I will also discuss potential experiments for the future along with possible problems that may be encountered along the way.

  2. Coastal Aerosol Distribution by Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    sample shows the COAMPS weather and dust forecast for the severe dust storm of March 26, 2003 during OIF. 5 RELATED PROJECTS The NRL 6.1 base...Research Laboratory. The image on the left is valid at 1027 UTC on March 27th or towards the end of the massive dust storm that impacted troops during...utilized during the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) experiment in April 2003. The goal of ADAM is to study the properties and distribution of the

  3. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  4. Aerosol Composition in the Los Angeles Basin Studied by High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hu, W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Allan, J. D.; Taylor, J.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Massoli, P.; Zhang, X.; Weber, R.; Zhao, Y.; Cliff, S. S.; Wexler, A. S.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact climate and health, but their sources and composition are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and complementary instrumentation were deployed during the 2010 CalNex campaign to characterize aerosol composition in the Los Angeles (LA) area. Total mass concentrations as well as the species concentrations measured by the AMS compare well with most other instruments. Nitrate dominates in the mornings, but its concentration is reduced in the afternoon when organic aerosols (OA) increase and dominate. The diurnal variations in concentrations are strongly influenced by emission transport from the source-rich western basin. The average OA to enhanced CO ratio increases with photochemical age from 25 to 80 μg m-3 ppm-1, which indicates significant secondary OA (SOA) production and that a large majority of OA is secondary in aged air. The ratio values are similar to those from Mexico City as well as New England and the Mid-Atlantic States. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) is used to assess the concentrations of different OA components. The major OA classes are oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for total SOA), and hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary combustion OA). Several subclasses of OA are identified as well including diesel-influenced HOA (DI-HOA) and non-diesel HOA. DI-HOA exhibits low concentrations on Sundays consistent with the well-known weekday/weekend effect in LA. PMF analysis finds that OOA is 67% of the total OA concentration. A strong correlation between OOA and Ox (O3 + NO2) concentrations is observed with a slope of 0.15 that suggests the production of fresh SOA in Pasadena. Plotting the OA elemental ratios in a Van Krevelen diagram (H:C vs. O:C) yields a slope of -0.6, which is less steep than that observed in Riverside during the SOAR-2005 campaign. The difference in slopes may be attributed to the highly oxidized HOA present in Pasadena that is

  5. Retrieval of optical depth and particle size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols by means of sun photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, B.; Maetzler, C.; Kaempfer, N.; Heimo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth measurements by means of ground-based Sun photometry were made in Bern, Switzerland during two and a half years primarily to provide quantitative corrections for atmospheric effects in remotely sensed data in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. An investigation of the spatial variability of tropospheric aerosol was accomplished in the summer of 1994 in the Swiss Central Plain, a region often covered by a thick aerosol layer. Intercomparisons are made with two Sun photometers operated by the Swiss Meteorological Institute in Payerne and Davos. By means of an inversion technique, columnar particle size distributions were derived from the aerosol optical depth spectra. Effective radius, columnar surface area, and columnar mass were computed from the inversion results. Most of the spectra measured in Bern exhibit an Angstroem-law dependence. Consequently, the inverted size distributions are very close to power-law distributions. Data collected during a four month calibration campaign in fall 1993 at a high-mountain station in the Swiss Alps allowed the authors to study optical properties of stratospheric aerosol. The extinction spectra measured have shown to be still strongly influenced by remaining aerosol of the June 1991 volcanic eruptions of Mount Pinatubo. Inverted particle size distributions can be characterized by a broad monodisperse peak with a mode radius around 0.25 {micro}m. Both aerosol optical depths and effective radii had not yet returned to pre-eruption values. Comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth, columnar surface area and mass, with the values derived from lidar observations performed in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Southern-Germany, yielded good agreement.

  6. Aerosols in polluted versus nonpolluted air masses Long-range transport and effects on clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United States, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, NY, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types - background continental, polluted continental, and maritime - that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following: (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds of thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (2) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (3) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (4) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  7. Seasonal differences in aerosol water may reconcile AOT and surface mass measurements in the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. K. V.; Ghate, V. P.; Carlton, A. M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the Southeast U.S. is high and sharply enhanced (2-3 times) compared to wintertime AOT. This seasonal pattern is unique to the Southeast U.S. and is of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years, contrasting with trends in other U.S. regions. Some investigators hypothesize the Southeast temperature trend is due to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from interactions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and anthropogenic emissions that create a cooling haze. However, aerosol measurements made at the surface do not exhibit strong seasonal differences in mass or organic fraction to support this hypothesis. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with surface mass measurements by examining trends in particle-phase liquid water, an aerosol constituent that effectively scatters radiation and is removed from aerosols in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA (v2.1) to estimate surface and aloft aerosol water mass concentrations at locations of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites using measured speciated ion mass concentrations and NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) meteorological data. Results demonstrate strong seasonal differences in aerosol water in the eastern compared to the western part of the U.S., consistent with geographic patterns in AOT. The highest mean regional seasonal difference from 2000 to 2007 is 5.5 μg m-3 and occurs the Southeast, while the lowest is 0.44 μg m-3 and occurs in the dry Mountain West. Our findings suggest 1) similarity between spatial trends in aerosol water in the U.S. and previously published AOT data from the MODIS-TERRA instrument and 2) similar interannual trends in mean aerosol water and previously published interannual AOT trends from MISR, MODIS-TERRA, MODIS

  8. The evolution of biomass-burning aerosol size distributions due to coagulation: dependence on fire and meteorological details and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Laing, James R.; Stevens, Robin G.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols have a significant effect on global and regional aerosol climate forcings. To model the magnitude of these effects accurately requires knowledge of the size distribution of the emitted and evolving aerosol particles. Current biomass-burning inventories do not include size distributions, and global and regional models generally assume a fixed size distribution from all biomass-burning emissions. However, biomass-burning size distributions evolve in the plume due to coagulation and net organic aerosol (OA) evaporation or formation, and the plume processes occur on spacial scales smaller than global/regional-model grid boxes. The extent of this size-distribution evolution is dependent on a variety of factors relating to the emission source and atmospheric conditions. Therefore, accurately accounting for biomass-burning aerosol size in global models requires an effective aerosol size distribution that accounts for this sub-grid evolution and can be derived from available emission-inventory and meteorological parameters. In this paper, we perform a detailed investigation of the effects of coagulation on the aerosol size distribution in biomass-burning plumes. We compare the effect of coagulation to that of OA evaporation and formation. We develop coagulation-only parameterizations for effective biomass-burning size distributions using the SAM-TOMAS large-eddy simulation plume model. For the most-sophisticated parameterization, we use the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) to build a parameterization of the aged size distribution based on the SAM-TOMAS output and seven inputs: emission median dry diameter, emission distribution modal width, mass emissions flux, fire area, mean boundary-layer wind speed, plume mixing depth, and time/distance since emission. This parameterization was tested against an independent set of SAM-TOMAS simulations and yields R2 values of 0.83 and 0.89 for Dpm and modal width, respectively. The

  9. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species.

  10. Molecular composition of organic aerosols in central Amazonia: an ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Godoi, Ricardo H. M.; Connors, Sarah; Levine, James G.; Archibald, Alex T.; Godoi, Ana F. L.; Paralovo, Sarah L.; Barbosa, Cybelli G. G.; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steve; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Saewung; Smith, James; Martin, Scot T.; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The Amazon Basin plays key role in atmospheric chemistry, biodiversity and climate change. In this study we applied nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) for the analysis of the organic fraction of PM2.5 aerosol samples collected during dry and wet seasons at a site in central Amazonia receiving background air masses, biomass burning and urban pollution. Comprehensive mass spectral data evaluation methods (e.g. Kendrick mass defect, Van Krevelen diagrams, carbon oxidation state and aromaticity equivalent) were used to identify compound classes and mass distributions of the detected species. Nitrogen- and/or sulfur-containing organic species contributed up to 60 % of the total identified number of formulae. A large number of molecular formulae in organic aerosol (OA) were attributed to later-generation nitrogen- and sulfur-containing oxidation products, suggesting that OA composition is affected by biomass burning and other, potentially anthropogenic, sources. Isoprene-derived organosulfate (IEPOX-OS) was found to be the most dominant ion in most of the analysed samples and strongly followed the concentration trends of the gas-phase anthropogenic tracers confirming its mixed anthropogenic-biogenic origin. The presence of oxidised aromatic and nitro-aromatic compounds in the samples suggested a strong influence from biomass burning especially during the dry period. Aerosol samples from the dry period and under enhanced biomass burning conditions contained a large number of molecules with high carbon oxidation state and an increased number of aromatic compounds compared to that from the wet period. The results of this work demonstrate that the studied site is influenced not only by biogenic emissions from the forest but also by biomass burning and potentially other anthropogenic emissions from the neighbouring urban environments.

  11. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  12. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to org...

  13. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  14. Extensive aerosol optical properties and aerosol mass related measurements during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 - Implications for PM compliance and planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Monica E.; Atkinson, Dean B.; Ziemba, Luke; Griffin, Robert; Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Perna, Ryan; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Luke, Winston; Kelley, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Extensive aerosol optical properties, particle size distributions, and Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer measurements collected during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 were examined in light of collocated meteorological and chemical measurements. Much of the evident variability in the observed aerosol-related air quality is due to changing synoptic meteorological situations that direct emissions from various sources to the TRAMP site near the center of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) metropolitan area. In this study, five distinct long-term periods have been identified. During each of these periods, observed aerosol properties have implications that are of interest to environmental quality management agencies. During three of the periods, long range transport (LRT), both intra-continental and intercontinental, appears to have played an important role in producing the observed aerosol. During late August 2006, southerly winds brought super-micron Saharan dust and sea salt to the HGB area, adding mass to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) measurements, but apparently not affecting secondary particle growth or gas-phase air pollution. A second type of LRT was associated with northerly winds in early September 2006 and with increased ozone and sub-micron particulate matter in the HGB area. Later in the study, LRT of emissions from wildfires appeared to increase the abundance of absorbing aerosols (and carbon monoxide and other chemical tracers) in the HGB area. However, the greatest impacts on Houston PM 2.5 air quality are caused by periods with low-wind-speed sea breeze circulation or winds that directly transport pollutants from major industrial areas, i.e., the Houston Ship Channel, into the city center.

  15. MISR Aerosol Air Mass Type Mapping over Mega-City: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Most aerosol air-quality monitoring in mega-city environments is done from scattered ground stations having detailed chemical and optical sampling capabilities. Satellite instruments such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) can retrieve total-column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), along with some information about particle microphysical properties. Although the particle property information from MISR is much less detailed than that obtained from the ground sampling stations, the coverage is extensive, making it possible to put individual surface observations into the context of regional aerosol air mass types. This paper presents an analysis of MISR aerosol observations made coincident with aircraft and ground-based instruments during the INTEX-B field campaign. These detailed comparisons of satellite aerosol property retrievals against dedicated field measurements provide the opportunity to validate the retrievals quantitatively at a regional level, and help to improve aerosol representation in retrieval algorithms. Validation of MISR retrieved AOD and other aerosol properties over the INTEX-B study region in and around Mexico City will be presented. MISR’s ability to distinguish among aerosol air mass types will be discussed. The goal of this effort is to use the MISR aerosol property retrievals for mapping both aerosol air mass type and AOD gradients in mega-city environments over the decade-plus that MISR has made global observations.

  16. Organic Mass Fragments and Organic Functional Groups in Aged Biomass Burning and Fossil Fuel Combustion Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, D. A.; Hawkins, L. N.; Russell, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    Organic functional group concentrations in submicron aerosol particles collected from 27 June to 17 September at the Scripps Pier in La Jolla, California as part of AeroSCOPE 2008 were quantified using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Organic and inorganic non-refractory components in the same air masses were quantified using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). Previous measurements at the Scripps pier indicate that a large fraction of submicron particle mass originates in Los Angeles and the port of Long Beach. Additional particle sources to the region include local urban emissions and periodic biomass burning during large wildfires. Three distinct types of organic aerosol components were identified from organic composition and elemental tracers, including biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and polluted marine components. Fossil fuel combustion organic aerosol was dominated by unsaturated alkane and was correlated with sulfur, vanadium, and nickel supporting ship and large trucks in and around the Los Angeles/Long Beach region as the dominant source. Biomass burning organic aerosol comprised a smaller unsaturated alkane fraction and larger fractions of non-acid carbonyl, amine, and carboxylic acid and was correlated with potassium and bromine. Polluted marine organic aerosol was dominated by organic hydroxyl and unsaturated alkane and was not correlated with any elemental tracers. Mass spectra of the organic aerosol support the aerosol sources determined by organic functional groups and elemental tracers and contain fragments commonly attributed to oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), and biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA). Comparisons of the PMF-derived Q-AMS source spectra with FTIR source spectra and functional group composition provide additional information on the relationship between commonly reported organic aerosol factors and organic functional groups in specific organic aerosol

  17. Concentrations and size distributions of Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Neish, E.; Schultz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Particle Measuring Systems laser particle spectrometer (ASAS-X and FSSP) probes were used to measure aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions during 11 ER-2 flights between Punta Arenas (53 deg S) and Antarctica (up to 72 deg S) from August 17 to September 22, 1987. The time resolution was 10 s, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 2 km. The data were divided into two size classes (0.05-0.25 and 0.53-5.5 micron radius) to separate the small particle from the coarse particle populations. Results show that the small-particle concentrations are typical for a background aerosol during volcanic quiescence. This concentration is generally constant along a flight track; in only one instance a depletion of small particles during a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) encounter was measured, suggesting a nucleation of type I PSC particles on background aerosols. Temporary increases of the coarse particle concentrations indicated the presence of tenuous polar stratospheric clouds that were encountered most frequently at the southernmost portion of a flight track and when the aircraft descended to lower altitudes. During 'particle events', particle modes were found at 0.6-micron radius, corresponding to type I PSCs, and occasionally, at 2.0-micron radius corresponding to type II PSCs.

  18. Non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions of urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Madronich, S; Conley, A J; Lee-Taylor, J; Kleinman, L I; Hodzic, A; Aumont, B

    2016-07-18

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult's law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA mass to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: a strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as a mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the normalized sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. The rather low exponents suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.

  19. Demonstration of a VUV lamp photoionization source for improvedorganic speciation in an aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Toohey, D.W.; Canagaratna, M.R.; Trimborn, A.; Akiyama, K-I.; Shimono, A.; Jimenez, J.L.; DeCarlo, P.F.; Wilson, K.R.; Worsnop, D.R.

    2007-10-03

    In recent years, the Aerodyne AerosolMass Spectrometer(AMS) has become a widely used tool for determining aerosol sizedistributions and chemical composition for non-refractory inorganic andorganic aerosol. The current version of the AMS uses a combination offlash thermal vaporization and 70 eV electron impact (EI) ionization.However, EI causes extensive fragmentation and mass spectra of organicaerosols are difficult to deconvolute because they are composites of theoverlapping fragmentation patterns of all species present. Previous AMSstudies have been limited to classifying organics in broad categoriessuch as oxidized and hydrocarbon-like." In this manuscript we present newefforts to gain more information about organic aerosol composition byemploying the softer technique of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization ina Time-of-Flight AMS (ToF-AMS). In our novel design a VUV lamp is placedin direct proximity of the ionization region of the AMS, with only awindow separating the lamp and the ionizer. This design allows foralternation of photoionization and electron impact ionization within thesame instrument on the timescale of minutes. Thus, the EI-basedquantification capability of the AMS is retained while improved spectralinterpretation is made possible by combined analysis of the complementaryVUV and EI ionization spectra. Photoionization and electron impactionization spectra are compared for a number of compounds including oleicacid, long chain hydrocarbons, and cigarette smoke. In general, the VUVspectra contain much less fragmentation than the EI spectra and for manycompounds the parent ion is the dominant ion in the VUV spectrum. As anexample of the usefulness of the integration of PI within the fullcapability of the ToF-AMS, size distributions and size-segregated massspectra are examined for the cigarette smoke analysis. As a finalevaluation of the new VUV module, spectra for oleic acid are compared tosimilar experiments conducted using the tunable VUV radiation

  20. Fog-Influenced Submicron Aerosol Number Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikova, N.; Zdimal, V.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of fog on aerosol particle number size distributions (PNSD) in submicron range. Thus, five-year continuous time series of the SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) data giving information on PNSD in five minute time step were compared with detailed meteorological records from the professional meteorological station Kosetice in the Czech Republic. The comparison included total number concentration and PNSD in size ranges between 10 and 800 nm. The meteorological records consist from the exact times of starts and ends of individual meteorological phenomena (with one minute precision). The records longer than 90 minutes were considered, and corresponding SMPS spectra were evaluated. Evaluation of total number distributions showed considerably lower concentration during fog periods compared to the period when no meteorological phenomenon was recorded. It was even lower than average concentration during presence of hydrometeors (not only fog, but rain, drizzle, snow etc. as well). Typical PNSD computed from all the data recorded in the five years is in Figure 1. Not only median and 1st and 3rd quartiles are depicted, but also 5th and 95th percentiles are plotted, to see the variability of the concentrations in individual size bins. The most prevailing feature is the accumulation mode, which seems to be least influenced by the fog presence. On the contrary, the smallest aerosol particles (diameter under 40 nm) are effectively removed, as well as the largest particles (diameter over 500 nm). Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the projects GAUK 62213 and SVV-2013-267308. Figure 1. 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile of aerosol particle number size distributions recorded during fog events.

  1. Water-Soluble Organic Species in Biomass Burning Aerosols in Southern Africa: Their Chemical Identification and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Magi, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the SAFARI-2000 field campaign, 14 aerosol samples were collected from an aircraft in plumes from biomass fires (under both flaming and smoldering conditions), at various distances from the fire source. Also collected were 36 aerosol samples in haze layers ranging from the surface to 16,000 feet, some of which could be associated with specific fires. The samples were collected on teflon membrane filters (lower size limit of about 30nm in diameter) which were analyzed for total aerosol mass loading and chemical composition using several analytical techniques. Particular effort was made to speciate the water-soluble portion of the aerosol organics. Seven organic acids and seven carbohydrate species (and their possible stereoisomers) were identified and quantified, along with three inorganic anions and five inorganic cations. The identified organic species accounted for up to 32% of the total aerosol mass; compared with concurrent total carbon and organic carbon measurements, the identified organics constituted at least 5% to 30% of the mass of the total aerosol organics. A number of conspicuous spatial distribution patterns were observed for these species. For instance, using K+ to correct for dilution, it was found that gluconate, oxalate, succinate, and glutarate, along with sulfate and nitrate, all increased significantly in mass concentration from the fire source going downwind. This suggests secondary formation of these species during aerosol aging. On the other hand, formate and acetate showed decreasing trends downwind, probably due to the loss of these volatile species to the gas phase. Another striking pattern is that anhydrosugars (e.g. levoglucosan) had the highest aerosol mass fraction near smoldering fires but a very low fraction in the haze layers, whereas, dicarboxylic acids showed an almost opposite trend. This implies possible chemical reaction processes converting intermediate organic products, such as levoglucosan, to smaller products like

  2. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Rastak, N.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of multicomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures using solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in the VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture as a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a given range. We conducted Köhler theory calculations for 144 different mixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption about the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility distribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation nucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive calculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about organic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of activation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and density into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter κ; and (3) assuming a fixed water-soluble fraction ϵeff. The complete dissolution was able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy only when the majority (70-80%) of the material was dissolved at the point of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex mixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools for representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the activation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations. Depending mostly on the condensed-phase interactions between the organic molecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1 could be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over atmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations. Our results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility distribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for capturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility range will probably not add

  3. Temporal variation of 7Be and 210Pb size distributions in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Dietl, F.; Frank, G.; Tschiersch, J.

    The size distributions of the cosmogenic 7Be and of the long-lived radon progeny 210Pb in ambient aerosols were measured continuously from December 1994 to the end of March 1996 in ground-level air at a semi-rural location in south Germany. Aerosol sampling was performed at a height of 4 m above ground with a low-pressure cascade impactor of the Berner type covering the size range from 0.06 to 16 μm and simultaneously with an high-volume sampler. Each sampling period was 10 d. Activities of 7Be and 210Pb were measured by gamma spectrometry and aerosol mass was determined gravimetrically. In all experiments the activity distributions of 7Be as well as of 210Pb were unimodal (log-normal) and associated with submicron aerosols of about 0.5-0.6 μm aerodynamic diameter. On average, the activity median diameters of 7Be (AMD: 0.57 μm) and of 210Pb (AMD: 0.53 μm) have been found to be significantly lower than the average mass median diameter (MMD: 0.675 μm) and higher or at most equal than the respective surface median diameter (SMD: 0.465 μm) of the aerosols: SMD⩽AMD Pb210distributions of 210Pb (AMD: 0.595 μm) and 7Be (AMD: 0.59 μm) was not detectable, in summer, 210Pb was associated with significantly smaller aerosols (AMD: 0.43 μm) than 7Be (AMD: 0.52 μm). Comparing the activity median diameters observed in summer with those in winter, on average significantly lower diameters were found in summer pointing to shorter residence times in the summer months.

  4. Particle size distribution of ambient aerosols in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Padma; Srivastava, A; Yasmin, F; Ray, S; Gupta, N; Chauhan, C; Rao, C V C; Wate, S R

    2012-05-01

    Aerosol samples of PM(10) and PM(2.5) were collected from 38 sampling locations in and around the industrial area. The 24 h average mass concentration of PM(10) and PM(2.5) was 137.5 and 61.5 μg/m(3) respectively during summer, 122 and 97.5 μg/m(3) respectively in winter and 70 and 54 μg/m(3) respectively during post monsoon season. The relative contribution of coarse, fine and ultrafine particle to ambient air was analyzed for its temporal and seasonal variability in an industrialized area. This paper aims to establish baseline between PM(10) and PM(2.5) mass concentration levels.

  5. Characterization of ice-nucleating bacteria using on-line electron impact ionization aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R; Slowik, J G; Schaupp, C; Amato, P; Saathoff, H; Möhler, O; Prévôt, A S H; Baltensperger, U

    2015-04-01

    The mass spectral signatures of airborne bacteria were measured and analyzed in cloud simulation experiments at the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) facility. Suspensions of cultured cells in pure water were sprayed into the aerosol and cloud chambers forming an aerosol which consisted of intact cells, cell fragments and residual particles from the agar medium in which the bacteria were cultured. The aerosol particles were analyzed with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer equipped with a newly developed PM2.5 aerodynamic lens. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) using the multilinear engine (ME-2) source apportionment was applied to deconvolve the bacteria and agar mass spectral signatures. The bacteria mass fraction contributed between 75 and 95% depending on the aerosol generation, with the remaining mass attributed to agar. We present mass spectra of Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria typical for ice-nucleation active bacteria in the atmosphere to facilitate the distinction of airborne bacteria from other constituents in ambient aerosol, e.g. by PMF/ME-2 source apportionment analyses. Nitrogen-containing ions were the most salient feature of the bacteria mass spectra, and a combination of C4 H8 N(+) (m/z 70) and C5 H12 N(+) (m/z 86) may be used as marker ions.

  6. Analysis of Fine and Coarse mode Aerosol Distributions from AERONET's mini-DRAGON Set-up at Singapore 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Muller, A.; Liew, S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol type and particle size regime. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from industrial and urban areas. However, depending on the time of the year (July-October), there can be a strong bio-mass component originated from uncontrolled forest/plantation fires from the neighboring land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. Unlike urban/fossil fuel aerosols, smoke or bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. Trans-boundary smoke episodes has become an annual phenomenon in this region. Severe episodes were recorded in 1997 and 2006 and other minor episodes happened during 2002, 2004, 2010 and more recently on 2013. On August-September 2012, as part of CRISP participation on the August-September ground campaign of the Southeast Asia Composition, Cloud Climate Coupling Regional Study (SEAC4RS), a Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) set of six CIMEL CE-318A automatic Sun-tracking photometers have been deployed at sites located at North (Yishun ITE), East (Temasek Poly), West (NUS and Pandan Reservoir), Central (NEA) and South (St. John's island) of Singapore. In order to fully discriminate bio-mass burning events over other local sources, we perform a spectral discrimination of fine/coarse mode particle regime to all DRAGON sites; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponent are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set. Spatio-temporal relationship between sites are also investigated.

  7. FDATMOS16 non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions in urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, Sasha; Kleinman, Larry; Conley, Andrew; Lee-Taylor, Julie; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, Bernard

    2015-12-17

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult’s law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: A strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as a mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. Furthermore, the rather low values suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.

  8. FDATMOS16 non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions in urban aerosols

    DOE PAGES

    Madronich, Sasha; Kleinman, Larry; Conley, Andrew; ...

    2015-12-17

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult’s law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: A strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as amore » mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. Furthermore, the rather low values suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.« less

  9. Mass spectrometry investigation of Titan aerosols analogs formed with traces of aromatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa; Sebree, Joshua; Li, Xiang; Pinnick, Veronica; Getty, Stephanie; Brinckerhoff, Will

    2016-06-01

    The detection of benzene at ppm levels in Titan's atmosphere [1] by Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) supports the idea that aromatic and heteroaromatic reaction pathways may play an important role in Titan's aerosols formation. In laboratory studies it has been shown that these aromatic molecules are easily dissociated by ultraviolet radiation and can therefore contribute significantly to aerosol formation [2] and be used to dope the production of aerosol analogs [3]. In this work we investigate the effect on the aerosol composition and growth pattern of the chemical nature of the aromatic reactant used to produce aerosol. Analysis are performed using Laser Desorption-Time of Flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Infrared analysis of our samples shows that inclusion of aromatic compounds as trace precursors allows to better fit laboratory data to Titan aerosol spectra observed by Cassini [3,4]. The improvement is especially visible on the far infrared (˜200 cm-1) bands observed by CIRS [5]. LDMS results show that the aerosol growth patterns depend both on the number of rings and on the nitrogen content of the trace precursor used. We also perform MS/MS analysis on some prominent peaks of aerosol mass spectra. This MS/MS approach allows us to identify some of the key compounds in the aerosol growth processes.

  10. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Pristine Aerosol Particles During the wet Season of Amazonia - Detection of Primary Biological Particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Freutel, F.; Borrmann, S.; Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Jimenez, J. L.; Flores, M.; Roldin, P.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2008-12-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (POA) particles to the natural organic aerosol is a subject of current research. Estimations of the POA contribution to the total aerosol particle concentration range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that POA is a major source of supermicron, possibly also of submicron particles. During AMAZE (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment), a field project near Manaus, Brazil, in February/March 2008, an Aerodyne ToF-AMS was equipped with a high pressure aerodynamic lens. This high pressure lens (operating pressure 14.6 torr) is designed with the objective to extend the detectable size range of the AMS into the supermicron size range where primary biological particles are expected. Size distribution measured by the AMS were compared with size distribution from an optical particle counter and indicate that the high pressure lens has a 50% cut-off at a vacuum aerodynamic diameter of about 1 μm, but still has significant transmission up to a vacuum aerodynamic diameter of about 2 μm, thus extending the detectable size range of the AMS into the coarse mode. The measuring instruments were situated in a container at ground level. The aerosol was sampled through a 40 m vertical, laminar inlet, which was heated and dried to maintain a relative humidity between 30 and 40%. The inlet was equipped with a 7 μm cut-off cyclone. Size distributions recorded with an optical particle counter parallel to the AMS show that the inlet transmitted aerosol particles up to an optically detected diameter of 10 μm. POA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. Laboratory experiments have been performed in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds. These laboratory data were compared to size resolved particle

  11. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Will M.; Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vicky; Cantrell, Andrew; Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D.; Mandel, Ilya E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com E-mail: andrew.cantrell@yale.edu E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu

    2011-11-10

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes using the observed masses of 15 low-mass X-ray binary systems undergoing Roche lobe overflow and 5 high-mass, wind-fed X-ray binary systems. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo calculations, we model the mass distribution both parametrically-as a power law, exponential, Gaussian, combination of two Gaussians, or log-normal distribution-and non-parametrically-as histograms with varying numbers of bins. We provide confidence bounds on the shape of the mass distribution in the context of each model and compare the models with each other by calculating their relative Bayesian evidence as supported by the measurements, taking into account the number of degrees of freedom of each model. The mass distribution of the low-mass systems is best fit by a power law, while the distribution of the combined sample is best fit by the exponential model. This difference indicates that the low-mass subsample is not consistent with being drawn from the distribution of the combined population. We examine the existence of a 'gap' between the most massive neutron stars and the least massive black holes by considering the value, M{sub 1%}, of the 1% quantile from each black hole mass distribution as the lower bound of black hole masses. Our analysis generates posterior distributions for M{sub 1%}; the best model (the power law) fitted to the low-mass systems has a distribution of lower bounds with M{sub 1%}>4.3 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence, while the best model (the exponential) fitted to all 20 systems has M{sub 1%}>4.5 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence. We conclude that our sample of black hole masses provides strong evidence of a gap between the maximum neutron star mass and the lower bound on black hole masses. Our results on the low-mass sample are in qualitative agreement with those of Ozel et al., although our broad model selection analysis more reliably reveals the best-fit quantitative description of the

  12. Characterization of submicron aerosols during a serious pollution month in Beijing (2013) using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. K.; Sun, Y.; Liu, Z. R.; Ji, D. S.; Hu, B.; Liu, Q.; Wang, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    In January 2013, Beijing experienced several serious haze events. To achieve a better understanding of the characteristics, sources and processes of aerosols during this month, an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at an urban site between 1 January and 1 February 2013 to obtain the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron particles (NR-PM1). During this period, the mean measured NR-PM1 mass concentration was 87.4 μg m-3 and was composed of organics (49.8%), sulfate (21.4%), nitrate (14.6%), ammonium (10.4%), and chloride (3.8%). Moreover, inorganic matter, such as sulfate and nitrate comprised an increasing fraction of the NR-PM1 load as NR-PM1 loading increased, denoting their key roles in particulate pollution during this month. The average size distributions of the species were all dominated by an accumulation mode peaking at approximately 600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter and organics characterized by an additional smaller size (∼200 nm). Elemental analyses showed that the average O/C, H/C, and N/C (molar ratio) of organic matter were 0.34, 1.44 and 0.015, respectively, corresponding to an OM/OC ratio (mass ratio of organic matter to organic carbon) of 1.60. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of the high-resolution organic mass spectral dataset differentiated the organic aerosol into four components, i.e., oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA), cooking-related (COA), nitrogen-containing (NOA) and hydrocarbon-like (HOA), which on average accounted for 40.0, 23.4, 18.1 and 18.5% of the total organic mass, respectively. Back trajectory clustering analyses indicated that the WNW air masses were associated with the highest NR-PM1 pollution during the campaign. Aerosol particles in southern air masses were especially rich in inorganic and oxidized organic species, whereas northern air masses contained a large fraction of primary species.

  13. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  14. DEVELOPMENTS IN DIRECT THERMAL EXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FINE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This examines thermal extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE/GC/MS) applied to aerosols collected on filters. Several different TE/GC/MS systems as a group have speciated hundreds of individual organic constituents in ambient fine aerosols. Molecular marker source ap...

  15. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  16. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, A. M. L.; Engström, A.; Söderberg, A.

    2010-03-01

    A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008). However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1) account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2) better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3) increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the Aitken mode (here

  17. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  18. Ultrahigh mass resolution and accurate mass measurements as a tool to characterize oligomers in secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Alain; Emmenegger, Christian; Gerrits, Bertran; Panse, Christian; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs; Zenobi, Renato; Kalberer, Markus

    2007-06-01

    Organic aerosols are a major fraction, often more than 50%, of the total atmospheric aerosol mass. The chemical composition of the total organic aerosol mass is poorly understood, although hundreds of compounds have been identified in the literature. High molecular weight compounds have recently gained much attention because this class of compounds potentially represents a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. Here we analyze secondary organic aerosols, generated in a smog chamber from alpha-pinene ozonolysis with ultra-high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). About 450 compounds are detected in the mass range of m/z 200-700. The mass spectrum is clearly divided into a low molecular weight range (monomer) and a high molecular weight range, where dimers and trimers are distinguishable. Using the Kendrick mass analysis, the elemental composition of about 60% of all peaks could be determined throughout the whole mass range. Most compounds have high O:C ratios between 0.4 and 0.6. Small compounds (i.e., monomers) have a higher maximum O:C ratio than dimers and trimers, suggesting that condensation reactions with, for example, the loss of water are important in the oligomer formation process. A program developed in-house was used to determine exact mass differences between peaks in the monomer, dimer, and trimer mass range to identify potential monomer building blocks, which form the co-oligomers observed in the mass spectrum. A majority of the peaks measured in the low mass region of the spectrum (m/z < 300) is also found in the calculated results. For the first time the elemental composition of the majority of peaks over a wide mass range was determined using advanced data analysis methods for the analysis of ultra-high-resolution MS data. Possible oligomer formation mechanisms in secondary organic aerosols were investigated.

  19. Secondary Aerosol Formation in the planetary boundary layer observed by aerosol mass spectrometry on a Zeppelin NT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubach, Florian; Trimborn, Achim; Mentel, Thomas; Wahner, Andreas; Zeppelin Pegasos-Team 2012

    2014-05-01

    The airship Zeppelin NT is an airborne platform capable of flying at low speed throughout the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL). In combination with the high scientific payload of more than 1 ton, the Zeppelin is an ideal platform to study regional processes in the lowest layers of the atmosphere with high spatial resolution. Atmospheric aerosol as a medium long lived tracer substance is of particular interest due to its influence on the global radiation budget. Due its lifetime of up to several days secondaray aerosol at a certain location can result from local production or from transport processes. For aerosol measurements on a Zeppelin, a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass spectrometer (DeCarlo et al, 2006) was adapted to the requirements posed by an airborne platform. A weight reduction of over 20 % compared to the commercial instrument was achieved, while space occupation and footprint were each reduced by over 25 %. Within the PEGASOS project, the instrument was part of 10 measurement flight days over the course of seven weeks. Three flights were starting from Rotterdam, NL, seven flights were starting from Ozzano in the Po Valley, IT. Flight patterns included vertical profiles to study the dynamics of the PBL and cross sections through regions of interest to shed light on local production and transport processes. Analysis of data from transects between the Apennin and San Pietro Capofiume in terms of "residence time of air masses in the Po valley" indicates that aerosol nitrate has only local sources while aerosol sulfate is dominated by transport. The organic aerosol component has significant contributions of both processes. The local prodcution yields are commensurable with imultaneously observed precursor concentrations and oxidant levels. The PEGASOS project is funded by the European Commission under the Framework Programme 7 (FP7-ENV-2010-265148). DeCarlo, P.F. et al (2006), Anal. Chem., 78, 8281-8289.

  20. Estimation of particle number size distributions from mass based model simulations and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Christa; Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina

    2014-05-01

    The atmospheric Chemistry Transport Model system COSMO-MUSCAT was used to determine the particle mass concentrations of dust and anthropogenically emitted aerosol particles over Europe. The model system consists of the online coupled code of the operational forecast model COSMO (Schättler et al., 2009) and the chemistry-transport model MUSCAT (Wolke et al., 2012). For a four-months-period in 2008 (May to August), the dust and anthropogenic aerosol mass concentrations for six different species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic and elemental carbon and sea salt) were simulated. For the dust, five different size bins were used and a representative particle size and density were assumed for each size bin. Afterwards, the number concentration was calculated. For the anthropogenic aerosol, lognormal modes were assumed with a representative mode diameter, sigma and density for each component. These parameters were then used to convert the simulated mass concentrations to number concentrations and number size distributions for each component. Those individual size distributions can then be summed up to a total particle number size distribution. A first comparison with measurement data from the Cape Verde Islands showed a good agreement between observed and simulated dust particle size distributions. Both, the shape of the number size distributions and the order of magnitude of the particle number concentrations compared well. Only for the smallest size bin, observed numbers were occasionally higher, which can be explained by anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol, which is included in the measurements of the total particle size distributions but was not included in the model runs. Comparisons of measured and simulated size distributions of the anthropogenic aerosol will be available soon. In case the data are available, we will also present an estimation of the particle number concentrations with the aerosol microphysical aerosol module ext-M7 for the duration of a

  1. Evaluating Simulations of Primary Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Organic Aerosols using Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Data and Positive Matrix Factorization Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J.; Aiken, A.; Alexander, L.; Canagaratna, M.; Decarlo, P.; Herndon, S.; Jimenez, J.; Kleinman, L.; Ochoa, C.; Onasch, T.; Song, C.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Yu, X.; Zaveri, R.

    2008-12-01

    Most model predictions of organic matter are currently underestimated because the processes contributing to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and transformation are not well understood. Since research associated with developing a better framework to improve the representation of specific gas-to-particle partitioning processes controlling SOA based on new measurements and theoretical relationships is on- going, this study seeks to determine whether 3-D models can adequately predict concentrations of primary organic aerosols (POA). If one assumes POA is non-volatile, then errors in POA predictions will results from uncertainties in the emission inventories and errors in transport and mixing processes. The WRF-chem model is used to predict POA in the vicinity of Mexico City during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign. Particulate matter emission rates were obtained from urban and regional Mexican emission inventories and from biomass burning estimates derived from MODIS "hotspot" and vegetation databases. Organic aerosol predictions are evaluated using data from Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) instruments deployed at four ground sites and on two research aircraft and from Sunset Laboratory OCEC instruments deployed at two ground sites. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) has recently been applied to derive components of organic aerosols including: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA). The temporal variation of HOA is often similar to primary emissions of other species in urban areas. PMF analysis is currently available for three of the ground sites and for some of the aircraft flights. We found that the predicted POA was consistently lower than the measured organic matter at the ground sites, which is consistent with the expectation that SOA should be a large fraction of the total organic aerosol mass. A much better agreement was found when predicted POA was compared with HOA

  2. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P.

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  3. Aerosol vertical distribution over east China from RIEMS-Chem simulation in comparison with CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Han, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC) and mass concentration over east China in October 2010 were investigated by using an online-coupled regional climate model and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) data. Model performance was evaluated comprehensively against ground observations of meteorological variables and PM10 concentrations and CALIPSO retrieved AEC profiles, which demonstrated a good ability of the model in simulating spatial distribution and evolution of aerosol concentration and optical properties. Severe pollution episodes were found over wide areas of east China during the study period, with the maximum mean PM10 concentration exceeding 200 μg m-3 in the Chongqing district and a part of the lower reaches of the Yellow River on 8-10 October. Both CALIPSO retrievals and model simulations revealed high AEC values (≥1 km-1) often occurred within 2 km above ground over most areas of east China. AEC vertical profile in or in the vicinity of China major cities along CALIPSO orbit track exhibited two typical features: one was AEC reached its maximum (∼4 km-1) near the surface (<200 m) and decreased rapidly to < 0.1 km-1 at altitudes above 1 km, another one was AEC peaked at higher altitudes of about 0.5-1 km with a maximum up to 3 km-1. AEC vertical profile was strongly dependent on vertical distribution of both aerosol concentration, composition and relative humidity. The vertical cross sections over typical regions of east China exhibited a decreasing AEC in magnitude from the continent to the China seas. Over the continent, AEC was either maximum near the surface or peaked at higher altitudes (0.5-1.0 km) due to increases of relative humidity or aerosol concentration in those regions, whereas over the seas of China, AEC profile was characterized by peak values at an altitude around 1 km, mainly due to an elevated relative humidity there, which favored rapid aerosol

  4. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  5. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-13

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for low aerosol concentration; here, [Formula: see text] is the phase-relaxation time and [Formula: see text] is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as [Formula: see text], and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  6. Unraveling the Complexity of Atmospheric Aerosol: Insights from Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Zhao, Yunzhu; Samburova, Vera; Gannet Hallar, A.; Lowenthal, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol organic matter (AOM) is a complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds, which may have significant influence on the climate-relevant properties of atmospheric aerosols. An improved understanding of the molecular composition of AOM is needed to evaluate the effect of aerosol composition upon aerosol physical properties. Products of gas, aqueous and particle phase reactions contribute to the aerosol organic mass. Thus, ambient aerosols carry a complex array of AOM components with variable chemical signatures depending upon its origin and aerosol life-cycle processes. In this work, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize ambient aerosol AOM collected at the Storm Peak Laboratory (3210 m a.s.l.) near Steamboat Springs, CO. Thousands of molecular formulas were assigned in the mass range of m/z 100-800 after negative-ion electrospray ionization. Using multivariate statistical analysis, correlations between the site meteorological conditions and specific molecular compositions were identified. For example, days with strong UV radiation and high temperature were found to contain large numbers of biogenic SOA molecular formulas. Similarly, days with high relative humidity and high sulfate concentrations were found to contain many sulfur-containing compounds, suggesting their aqueous phase formation.

  7. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionment of black carbon aerosol in London during wintertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterised in both winter- and summertime 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However, the size distribution of sf (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different sf distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), and easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm and 169 ± 29 nm, respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size/BC core - Dp/Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  8. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionments of black carbon aerosols in London during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-06-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterized in both winter and summer time 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However the size distribution of Dc (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different Dc distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), or easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm, and 169 ± 29 nm respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size / BC core - Dp / Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  9. Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight (CXIDB ID 16)

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N. Duane

    2012-06-20

    This deposition includes the aerosol diffraction images used for phasing, fractal morphology, and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Files in this deposition are ordered in subdirectories that reflect the specifics.

  10. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Murphy, Benjamin N.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney; Vasilakos, Petros; Wyat Appel, K.; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Surratt, Jason D.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hu, Weiwei; Jimenez, Jose L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM / OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH > SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM / OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were highly water soluble and expected to contribute to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Organic aerosol and SOA precursors were abundant at night, but additional improvements in daytime organic aerosol are needed to close the model-measurement gap. When taking into account deviations from ideality, including both inorganic (when RH > SRH) and organic water in the organic partitioning medium reduced the mean bias in SOA for routine monitoring networks and improved model performance compared to observations from SOAS. Property updates from

  11. Highly time-resolved urban aerosol characteristics during springtime in Yangtze River Delta, China: insights from soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Yanfang; Shen, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Xu, Jianzhong; Ge, Shun; Yu, Huan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Aerodyne soot particle - aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed for the first time during the spring of 2015 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, for online characterization of the submicron aerosols (PM1). The SP-AMS enables real-time and fast quantification of refractory black carbon (rBC) simultaneously with other non-refractory species (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and organics). The average PM1 concentration was found to be 28.2 µg m-3, with organics (45 %) as the most abundant component, following by sulfate (19.3 %), nitrate (13.6 %), ammonium (11.1 %), rBC (9.7 %), and chloride (1.3 %). These PM1 species together can reconstruct ˜ 44 % of the light extinction during this campaign based on the IMPROVE method. Chemically resolved mass-based size distributions revealed that small particles especially ultrafine ones (< 100 nm vacuum aerodynamic diameter) were dominated by organics and rBC, while large particles had significant contributions from secondary inorganic species. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) yielded four OA subcomponents, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Overall, secondary organic aerosol (SOA, equal to the sum of SV-OOA and LV-OOA) dominated the total OA mass (55.5 %), but primary organic aerosol (POA, equal to the sum of HOA and COA) can outweigh SOA in the early morning and evening due to enhanced human activities. High OA concentrations were often associated with high mass fractions of POA and rBC, indicating the important role of anthropogenic emissions during heavy pollution events. The diurnal cycles of nitrate, chloride, and SV-OOA both showed good anti-correlations with air temperatures, suggesting their variations were likely driven by thermodynamic equilibria and gas-to-particle partitioning. On the other hand, in contrast to other species

  12. Airborne measurements of biomass burning aerosol distribution and composition in the springtime Arctic 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T.; Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Thomson, D. S.; Brock, C. A.; Cozic, J.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Bahreini, R.; Brioude, J.

    2008-12-01

    The springtime Arctic troposphere in 2008 was characterized by high concentrations of biomass burning aerosol. During the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) campaign, airborne measurements of aerosol composition by the NOAA single particle mass spectrometer instrument (PALMS) identified biomass burning particles using an established composition tracer. Fires in northern Asia produced biomass burning aerosol that were transported to the Arctic within 3-12 days. Concentrations of biomass burning aerosols were elevated not only within well defined plumes, but also regionally throughout the Arctic. Above the boundary layer, biomass burning particles dominated the total aerosol volume and were largely responsible for the Arctic Haze observed during the period of study. The composition of plume aerosols varied according to source region, transport time, and anthropogenic influence.

  13. Online Simulations and Forecasts of the Global Aerosol Distribution in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of simulations of the global aerosol system in the NASA GEOS-5 transport, radiation, and chemistry model. The model includes representations of all major tropospheric aerosol species, including dust, sea salt, black carbon, particulate organic matter, and sulfates. The aerosols are run online for the period 2000 through 2005 in a simulation driven by assimilated meteorology from the NASA Goddard Data Assimilation System. Aerosol surface mass concentrations are compared with existing long-term surface measurement networks. Aerosol optical thickness is compared with ground-based AERONET sun photometry and space-based retrievals from MODIS, MISR, and OMI. Particular emphasis is placed here on consistent sampling of model and satellite aerosol optical thickness to account for diurnal variations in aerosol optical properties. Additionally, we illustrate the use of this system for providing chemical weather forecasts in support of various NASA and community field missions.

  14. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05

    the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

  15. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  16. New mass measurement method of aerosol particle using vibrating probe particle controlled by radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariyama, Tatsuo; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particles with sub-micro meter size inhaled into respiratory systems cause serious damage to human body. In order to evaluate the health effects of the particles, classification methods of the particles with size and mass are needed. Several measurement methods of the particle size are established. However, conventional mass measurement methods are not enough to measure the particles with sub- pico gram. We propose a new mass measurement method of the aerosol particles based on laser trapping. In this method, an optically trapped silica particle is used as a measuring probe particle. The probe particle is trapped at a beam waist of the focused laser light and is forced to vibrate by deflecting the beam waist using AOD. The vibrating probe particle has a resonance frequency because it is governed by the spring-mass-damper system. When an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shifts according to the increase of the total mass. The mass of the aerosol particle can be measured from the shift of the resonance frequency. Experimentally, it is confirmed that the probe particle is governed by the spring-mass-damper system and has a resonance frequency. When a silica fine particle of 3pg in mass used as an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shift occurs as expected in the dynamic system and the fine particle mass can be measured based on the proposed method.

  17. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature, and CO2 concentrations. Recent reconstructions of BVOC emissions have predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased, while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased; however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS (Goddard Earth Observing System; TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional) global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g., SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) turned off and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of > 25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in the combined aerosol radiative effect (direct and indirect) of > 0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields, and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2 and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  18. Aerosol Composition in Los Angeles During the 2010 CalNex Campaign Studied by High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hu, W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglueck, B.; Allan, J. D.; McKeen, S. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Richter, R.; Hofer, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Submicron atmospheric aerosols impact climate and human health, but their sources and composition are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) [DeCarlo et al. Anal. Chem. 2006] and other advanced instrumentation were deployed during the CalNex field campaign in May and June 2010 for 4 weeks to characterize the composition of aerosols in the Los Angeles area. Utilizing AMS, the concentrations for both organic and non-refractory inorganic (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride) submicron aerosols were quantified at the Caltech/Pasadena ground site 15 km NE of downtown Los Angeles. The total submicron mass concentration as well as the species concentrations measured by AMS compare well with other instruments. Nitrate aerosols appear to dominate in the cooler mornings, but their concentration is reduced in the afternoon when organic aerosols (OA) increase and dominate. The diurnal variations in concentration are strongly influenced by vertical dilution from the rising planetary boundary layer in the afternoon. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are an important fraction of submicron aerosols. To assess the concentrations of different OA components present at the site, positive matrix factorization (PMF) is used to analyze the field data. The major OA classes are oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for total SOA), and hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary combustion OA). Preliminary PMF analysis finds that OOA is consistently the largest type of OA present (~75% of the total OA concentration). This result suggests that the air mass over the site has undergone substantial chemical aging. The correlations between OOA and Ox (O3 + NO2) concentrations, as well as between HOA, CO and black carbon concentrations are strong and consistent with previous studies. AMS and 14C measurements are combined to determine the fractions of HOA and OOA from non-fossil vs. fossil sources. Using measurements of SOA

  19. The Field White Dwarf Mass Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Cummings, J.; Kalirai, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    We study the white dwarf mass distributions for the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the SDSS magnitude-limited sample. The observed mass distributions are modelled with Monte Carlo simulations. We find that under fixed standard assumptions for Galactic and stellar evolution, the predicted masses are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. Nevertheless, the number of massive white dwarfs is overpredicted and we find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disk vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution.

  20. Measuring the vertical distributions of the upper tropospheric and stratospheric dust with a LOAC aerosol counter under meteorological balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Dulac, François; Coute, Benoit; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jegou, Fabrice; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla

    2014-05-01

    The aerosol issue is in a constant growing. At ground, the airborne particles in boundary layer represent a real risk for population and must be control. In the middle troposphere, aerosols play an important role in the microphysics and meteorology, the heterogeneous chemistry is not well understood. In the stratosphere, several teams of researchers have shown that solid aerosols might exist, the question of the dynamic of these solid aerosol in the stratosphere is open. The aim was to develop an instrument that it can make measurements from the ground to the middle stratosphere. This instrument must be able to be put under meteorological balloons, which represent the worst conditions for the development of such instruments in terms of weight, resistance under large variations of temperature and pressure, autonomy and cost if we consider that something throw under a meteorological balloon can be lost after the fly. In the consideration of these conditions, we have developed a new instrument able to make such kind of measurements. This instrument is call LOAC for Light Optical Aerosol Counter. LOAC provides the concentration and size distribution of aerosols on 19 channels from 0.2 μm to 50.0 μm every ten seconds, and determine the main nature of particles (carbonaceous aerosol, mineral, droplets of water or sulfuric acid) in relation with a large range of samples in laboratory. The physical technique is based on the observation of the scattered light by particles at two angles. LOAC is light enough (1 kilogram) to be placed under a meteorological balloon that is very easy to launch such balloons. The goal is to perform a large number of flights to gather information about the dust distribution in stratosphere and to understand the various mechanisms controlling their spatial and temporal variability. About 25 flights with have been performed in the stratosphere with the LOAC above the Mediterranean Sea, from south of Paris, from Aire-Sur-l'Adour (South-West of

  1. Seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol extinction profile and type distribution from CALIPSO 5-year observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Tackett, Jason L.; Su, Hui; Fu, Rong

    2013-05-01

    The new Level 3 aerosol profile data derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provide a multiyear global aerosol distribution with high vertical resolution. We analyzed seasonal and diurnal variations of the vertical distributions of aerosol properties represented by 5-year CALIPSO data. Results show that dust, smoke, and polluted dust are the most frequently detected aerosol types during all seasons. Dust is the dominant type, especially in the middle to upper troposphere, over most areas during boreal spring and summer, while smoke and polluted dust tend to dominate during biomass burning seasons. The seasonal variations of dust layer top height and dust contribution to all-aerosol extinction are positively correlated with the seasonal variation of the dust occurrence frequency. The seasonal cycle of aerosol properties over west Australia is similar to that over biomass burning regime areas, despite its desert regime. In general, smoke is detected more frequently from the lower to middle troposphere; clean marine and polluted continental aerosols are detected more frequently, while polluted dust is detected less frequently, in the lower troposphere during nighttime than daytime. The all-aerosol extinction is generally larger, and the aerosol layer top is detected at high altitudes more frequently during nighttime than daytime. The diurnal changes of aerosol properties are similar within the same aerosol regime. Dust extinction shows little diurnal variation except when dust is the dominant aerosol type. The results contribute to an initial global 3-D aerosol climatology which will likely be extended and improved in the future.

  2. Mexico City aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 1: Fine particle composition and organic source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; Salcedo, D.; Cubison, M. J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Docherty, K. S.; Sueper, D.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.; Northway, M.; Stone, E. A.; Schauer, J. J.; Volkamer, R. M.; Fortner, E.; de Foy, B.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Gaffney, J.; Marley, N. A.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-09-01

    Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Mass concentrations, diurnal cycles, and size distributions of inorganic and organic species are similar to results from the CENICA supersite in April 2003 with organic aerosol (OA) comprising about half of the fine PM mass. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution OA spectra identified three major components: chemically-reduced urban primary emissions (hydrocarbon-like OA, HOA), oxygenated OA (OOA, mostly secondary OA or SOA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA) that correlates with levoglucosan and acetonitrile. BBOA includes several very large plumes from regional fires and likely also some refuse burning. A fourth OA component is a small local nitrogen-containing reduced OA component (LOA) which accounts for 9% of the OA mass but one third of the organic nitrogen, likely as amines. OOA accounts for almost half of the OA on average, consistent with previous observations. OA apportionment results from PMF-AMS are compared to the PM{sub 2.5} chemical mass balance of organic molecular markers (CMB-OMM, from GC/MS analysis of filters). Results from both methods are overall consistent. Both assign the major components of OA to primary urban, biomass burning/woodsmoke, and secondary sources at similar magnitudes. The 2006 Mexico City emissions inventory underestimates the urban primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions by a factor of {approx}4, and it is {approx}16 times lower than afternoon concentrations when secondary species are included. Additionally, the forest fire contribution is at least an order-of-magnitude larger than in the inventory.

  3. ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio; Narayan, Ramesh

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

  4. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  5. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  6. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  7. Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol distributions during the 1992 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Carter, Arlen F.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley airborne differential absorption lidar system was operated from the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft during the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition to investigate the distribution of stratospheric aerosols and ozone (O3) across the Arctic vortex from January to March 1992. Aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the Arctic vortex with distinctly different scattering characteristics and spatial distributions in the two regions. The aerosol and O3 distributions clearly identified the edge of the vortex and provided additional information on vortex dynamics and transport processes. Few polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the AASE-2; however, those that were found had enhanced scattering and depolarization over the background Pinatubo aerosols. The distribution of aerosols inside the vortex exhibited relatively minor changes during the AASE-2. Ozone depletion inside the vortex as limited to less than or equal to 20 percent in the altitude region from 15-20 km.

  8. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Q.; Han, Y. X.; Zhao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols.

  9. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol particles during wintertime in a northwest city of China using an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinghua; Zhang, Yangmei; Sun, Junying; Yu, Yangchun; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, Andre S H; Li, Gang

    2017-03-01

    An Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry (Q-AMS) was utilized to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron particles (NR-PM1) from October 27 to December 3, 2014 at an urban site in Lanzhou, northwest China. The average NR-PM1 mass concentration was 37.3 μg m(-3) (ranging from 2.9 to 128.2 μg m(-3)) under an AMS collection efficiency of unity and was composed of organics (48.4%), sulfate (17.8%), nitrate (14.6%), ammonium (13.7%), and chloride (5.7%). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) with the multi-linear engine (ME-2) solver identified six organic aerosol (OA) factors, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), coal combustion OA (CCOA), cooking-related OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) and two oxygenated OA (OOA1 and OOA2), which accounted for 8.5%, 20.2%, 18.6%, 12.4%, 17.8% and 22.5% of the total organics mass on average, respectively. Primary emissions were the major sources of fine particulate matter (PM) and played an important role in causing high chemically resolved PM pollution during wintertime in Lanzhou. Back trajectory analysis indicated that the long-range regional transport air mass from the westerly was the key factor that led to severe submicron aerosol pollution during wintertime in Lanzhou.

  10. Effect of Vaporizer Temperature on Ambient Non-Refractory Submicron Aerosol Composition and Mass Spectra Measured by the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) are routinely operated with a constant vaporizer temperature (Tvap) of 600oC in order to facilitate quantitative detection of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) species. By analogy with other thermal desorption instrument...

  11. Ozone and aerosol distributions measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to O3 and aerosol distributions measured from an aircraft using a DIAL system in order to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during summer 1988. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere.

  12. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in northwest China: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 11 July-7 August 2012. The average (PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory (PM1 (NR-(PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105 μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. Organic aerosol (OA) on average consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns, both with peak at ~ 07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8), corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking-emission related OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ~ 07:00 and 15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak between ~ 08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon maximum in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by downward mixing of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during nighttime. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA was

  13. Spatial distributions and seasonal cycles of aerosol climate effects in India seen in a global climate-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, S. V.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Räisänen, P.; Kupiainen, K.; Tonttila, J.; Hooda, R.; Lihavainen, H.; O'Donnell, D.; Backman, L.; Klimont, Z.; Laaksonen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Climate-aerosol interactions in India are studied by employing the global climate-aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM and the GAINS inventory for anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Model validation is done for black carbon surface concentrations in Mukteshwar and for features of the monsoon circulation. Seasonal cycles and spatial distributions of radiative forcing and the temperature and rainfall responses are presented for different model setups. While total aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in the summer, anthropogenic forcing is considerably stronger in winter than in summer. Local seasonal temperature anomalies caused by aerosols are mostly negative with some exceptions, e.g., parts of northern India in March-May. Rainfall increases due to the elevated heat pump (EHP) mechanism and decreases due to solar dimming mechanisms (SDMs) and the relative strengths of these effects during different seasons and for different model setups are studied. Aerosol light absorption does increase rainfall in northern India, but effects due to solar dimming and circulation work to cancel the increase. The total aerosol effect on rainfall is negative for northern India in the months of June-August, but during March-May the effect is positive for most model setups. These differences between responses in different seasons might help converge the ongoing debate on the EHPs and SDMs. Due to the complexity of the problem and known or potential sources for error and bias, the results should be interpreted cautiously as they are completely dependent on how realistic the model is. Aerosol-rainfall correlations and anticorrelations are shown not to be a reliable sole argument for deducing causality.

  14. Progress Toward a Global, EOS-Era Aerosol Air Mass Type Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    The MISR and MODIS instruments aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra Satellite have been collecting data containing information about the state of Earth's atmosphere and surface for over eleven years. Data from these instruments have been used to develop a global, monthly climatology of aerosol amount that is widely used as a constraint on climate models, including those used for the 2007 IPCC assessment report. The next frontier in assessing aerosol radiative forcing of climate is aerosol type, and in particular, the absorption properties of major aerosol air masses. This presentation will focus on the prospects for constraining aerosol type globally, and the steps we are taking to apply a combination of satellite and suborbital data to this challenge.

  15. A review of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Molecular distributions, sources and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas

    2016-03-01

    This review aims to update our understanding on molecular distributions of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols with a focus on their geographical variability, size distribution, sources and formation pathways. In general, molecular distributions of diacids in aerosols from the continental sites and over the open ocean waters are often characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic acid (C3) and/or succinic acid (C4), while those sampled over the polar regions often follow the order of C4 ≥ C2 and C3. The most abundant and ubiquitous diacid is oxalic acid, which is principally formed via atmospheric oxidation of its higher homologues of long chain diacids and other pollution-derived organic precursors (e.g., olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons). However, its occurrence in marine aerosols is mainly due to the transport from continental outflows (e.g., East Asian outflow during winter/spring to the North Pacific) and/or governed by photochemical/aqueous phase oxidation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., oleic acid) and isoprene emitted from the productive open ocean waters. The long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants from mid latitudes to the Arctic in dark winter facilitates to accumulate the reactants prior to their intense photochemical oxidation during springtime polar sunrise. Furthermore, the relative abundances of C2 in total diacid mass showed similar temporal trends with downward solar irradiation and ambient temperatures, suggesting the significance of atmospheric photochemical oxidation processing. Compound-specific isotopic analyses of oxalic acid showed the highest δ13C among diacids whereas azelaic acid showed the lowest value, corroborating the significance of atmospheric aging of oxalic acid. On the other hand, other diacids gave intermediate values between these two diacids, suggesting that aging of oxalic acid is associated with 13C enrichment.

  16. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  17. Gas-phase CO2 subtraction for improved measurements of the organic aerosol mass concentration and oxidation degree by an aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Collier, S; Zhang, Q

    2013-12-17

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) has been widely used for real-time characterization of the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micrometer aerosol particles. The first step in AMS sampling is the pre-concentration of aerosols while stripping away the gas-phase components, which contributes to the high sensitivity of this instrument. The strength of the instrument lies in particle phase measurement; however, ion signals generated from gas-phase species can influence the interpretation of the particle-phase chemistry data. Here, we present methods for subtracting the varying contributions of gas-phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in the AMS spectra of aerosol particles, which is critical for determining the mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of organic aerosol. This report gives details on the gaseous CO2 subtraction analysis performed on a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data set acquired from sampling of fresh and diluted vehicle emissions. Three different methods were used: (1) collocated continuous gas-phase CO2 measurement coupled with periodic filter tests consisting of sampling the same particle-free air by the AMS and the CO2 analyzer, (2) positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis to separate the gas- and particle-phase signals of CO2(+) at m/z 44, and (3) use of the particle time-of-flight (PTOF) size-resolved chemical information for separation of gas- and particle-phase signals at m/z 44. Our results indicate that these three different approaches yield internally consistent values for the gas/particle apportionment of m/z 44, but methods 2 and 3 require certain conditions to be met to yield reliable results. The methods presented are applicable to any situation where gas-phase components may influence the PM signal of interest.

  18. Observations and regional modeling of aerosol optical properties, speciation and size distribution over Northern Africa and western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; Siour, Guillaume; Mailler, Sylvain; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The aerosol speciation and size distribution is modeled during the summer 2013 and over a large area encompassing Africa, Mediterranean and western Europe. The modeled aerosol is compared to available measurements such as the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution (ASD) and the EMEP network for surface concentrations of particulate matter PM2.5, PM10 and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). The main goal of this study is to quantify the model ability to realistically model the speciation and size distribution of the aerosol. Results first showed that the long-range transport pathways are well reproduced and mainly constituted by mineral dust: spatial correlation is ≈ 0.9 for AOD and Ångström exponent, when temporal correlations show that the day-to-day variability is more difficult to reproduce. Over Europe, PM2.5 and PM10 have a mean temporal correlation of ≈ 0.4 but the lowest spatial correlation ( ≈ 0.25 and 0.62, respectively), showing that the fine particles are not well localized or transported. Being short-lived species, the uncertainties on meteorology and emissions induce these lowest scores. However, time series of PM2.5 with the speciation show a good agreement between model and measurements and are useful for discriminating the aerosol composition. Using a classification from the south (Africa) to the north (northern Europe), it is shown that mineral dust relative mass contribution decreases from 50 to 10 % when nitrate increases from 0 to 20 % and all other species, sulfate, sea salt, ammonium, elemental carbon, primary organic matter, are constant. The secondary organic aerosol contribution is between 10 and 20 % with a maximum at the latitude of the Mediterranean Sea (Spanish stations). For inorganic species, it is shown that nitrate, sulfate and ammonium have a mean temporal correlation of 0.25, 0.37 and 0.17, respectively. The spatial correlation is better (0.25, 0.5 and 0.87), showing that the mean

  19. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced by Ozonation of Limonene

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Maggie L.; Dessiaterik, Yury; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

    2008-02-08

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from the ozone-initiated oxidation of limonene are characterized by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in both the positive and negative ion modes. The mass spectra reveal a large number of both monomeric (m/z < 300) and oligomeric (m/z > 300) products of oxidation. A combination of high resolving power (m/Δm ~60,000) and Kendrick mass defect analysis makes it possible to unambiguously determine the composition for hundreds of individual compounds in SOA samples. Van Krevelen analysis shows that the SOA compounds are heavily oxidized, with average O:C ratios of 0.43 and 0.50 determined from the positive and negative ion mode spectra, respectively. An extended reaction mechanism for the formation of the first generation SOA molecular components is proposed. The mechanism includes known isomerization and addition reactions of the carbonyl oxide intermediates generated during the ozonation of limonene, and numerous isomerization pathways for alkoxy radicals resulting from the decomposition of unstable carbonyl oxides. The isomerization reactions yield numerous products with a progressively increasing number of alcohol and carbonyl groups, whereas C-C bond scission reactions in alkoxy radicals shorten the carbon chain. Together these reactions yield a large number of isomeric products with broadly distributed masses. A qualitative agreement is found between the number and degree of oxidation of the predicted and measured reaction products in the monomer range.

  20. Accuracy Remote-Sensing of Aerosol Spatial Distribution in the Lower Troposphere by Twin Scanning Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Hua, D.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the lower troposphere play an important role in the absorption and scattering of atmospheric radiation, the forming of precipitation and the circulation of chemistry. Due to the influence of solar heating at the surface, the aerosol distribution is inhomogeneous and variation with time. Lidar is proven to be a powerful tool in the application of remote sensing of atmospheric properties (Klett 1981). However, the existing of overlap function in lidar equation limits the fine detection of aerosol optical properties in the lower troposphere by vertical measurement, either by Raman lidar (Whiteman 2003) or by high spectral resolution lidar (Imaki 2005). Although the multi-angle method can succeed the aerosol measurement from the ground, the homogeneous atmospheric is needed (Pahlow 2004). Aiming to detect the inhomogeneous aerosols in the lower troposphere and to retrieve the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients in the lidar equation, a novel method for accuracy remote-sensing of aerosol properties based on twin scanning lidars has been proposed. In order to realize the fine detection of the aerosol spatial distribution from the ground to the height of interest of atmosphere, the scanning lidar is utilized as the remote sensing tool combined with the cross scanning by the twin systems, which makes the exact solutions of those two unknown parameters retrievable. Figure shows the detection method for aerosol spatial distribution using twin scanning lidars. As two lidar equations are provided simultaneously, the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are retrievable. Moreover, by selecting the transmitting laser wavelength, the presented method can realize the fine detection of aerosol at any spectrum, even the theoretical and technical analysis of the aerosol characteristics by applying multi-spectra.

  1. Relationship between column aerosol optical properties and surface aerosol gravimetric concentrations during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network - Northeast ASIA 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Seo, S.; Choi, M.; Kim, W. V.; Holben, B. N.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main objectives of Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) campaign in Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is to understand the relationship between the column optical properties of the atmosphere and the surface level air quality in terms of aerosols and gases. This study aims to identify the important parameters that affecting the relationship between those variables during the DRAGON - northeast Asia 2012 campaign. Column aerosol optical properties from ten Cimel sun photometers at DRAGON sites in Seoul, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) and particulate matter (PM10) sampling from 40 NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research of South Korea) measurement sites in Seoul during the period of 1st March - 31th May 2012 were employed in this study. The key parameters in relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM are reported to be aerosol vertical profile and hygroscopicity of the aerosols. The meteorological conditions including relative humidity, surface temperature, and wind speed that could affect those parameters were investigated.

  2. Size distributions and source function of sea spray aerosol over the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yingjia; Sheng, Lifang; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Dongliang; Jia, Nan; Kong, Yawen

    2016-08-01

    The number concentrations in the radius range of 0.06-5 μm of aerosol particles and meteorological parameters were measured on board during a cruise in the South China Sea from August 25 to October 12, 2012. Effective fluxes in the reference height of 10 m were estimated by steady state dry deposition method based on the observed data, and the influences of different air masses on flux were discussed in this paper. The number size distribution was characterized by a bimodal mode, with the average total number concentration of (1.50 ± 0.76)×103 cm-3. The two mode radii were 0.099 µm and 0.886 µm, both of which were within the scope of accumulation mode. A typical daily average size distribution was compared with that measured in the Bay of Bengal. In the whole radius range, the number concentrations were in agreement with each other; the modes were more distinct in this study than that abtained in the Bay of Bengal. The size distribution of the fluxes was fitted with the sum of log-normal and power-law distribution. The impact of different air masses was mainly on flux magnitude, rather than the shape of spectral distribution. A semiempirical source function that is applicable in the radius range of 0.06 µm< r 80<0.3 µm with the wind speed varying from 1.00 m s-1 to 10.00 m s-1 was derived.

  3. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  4. Periodic Patterns in Distributions of Peptide Masses

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Shane L.; Craciun, Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    We are investigating the distribution of the number of peptides for given masses, and especially the observation that peptide density reaches a local maximum approximately every 14 Daltons. This wave pattern exists across species (e.g. human or yeast) and enzyme digestion techniques. To analyze this phenomenon we have developed a mathematical method for computing the mass distributions of peptides, and we present both theoretical and empirical evidence that this 14-Dalton periodicity does not arise from species selection of peptides but from the number-theoretic properties of the masses of amino acid residues. We also describe other, more subtle periodic patterns in the distribution of peptide masses. We also show that these periodic patterns are robust under a variety of conditions, including the addition of amino acid modifications and selection of mass accuracy scale. The method used here is also applicable to any family of sequential molecules, such as linear hydrocarbons, RNA, single- and double-stranded DNA. PMID:22579741

  5. Aerosol Chemistry Resolved by Mass Spectrometry: Linking Field Measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity to Organic Aerosol Composition.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander L; Schneider, Johannes; Müller-Tautges, Christina; Phillips, Gavin J; Pöhlker, Mira L; Rose, Diana; Zuth, Christoph; Makkonen, Ulla; Hakola, Hannele; Crowley, John N; Andreae, Meinrat O; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-10-06

    Aerosol hygroscopic properties were linked to its chemical composition by using complementary online mass spectrometric techniques in a comprehensive chemical characterization study at a rural mountaintop station in central Germany in August 2012. In particular, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry ((-)APCI-MS) provided measurements of organic acids, organosulfates, and nitrooxy-organosulfates in the particle phase at 1 min time resolution. Offline analysis of filter samples enabled us to determine the molecular composition of signals appearing in the online (-)APCI-MS spectra. Aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) provided quantitative measurements of total submicrometer organics, nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium. Inorganic sulfate measurements were achieved by semionline ion chromatography and were compared to the AMS total sulfate mass. We found that up to 40% of the total sulfate mass fraction can be covalently bonded to organic molecules. This finding is supported by both on- and offline soft ionization techniques, which confirmed the presence of several organosulfates and nitrooxy-organosulfates in the particle phase. The chemical composition analysis was compared to hygroscopicity measurements derived from a cloud condensation nuclei counter. We observed that the hygroscopicity parameter (κ) that is derived from organic mass fractions determined by AMS measurements may overestimate the observed κ up to 0.2 if a high fraction of sulfate is bonded to organic molecules and little photochemical aging is exhibited.

  6. Polar organic marker compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Determination, time series, size distributions and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan

    Terrestrial vegetation releases substantial amounts of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs; e.g., isoprene, monoterpenes) into the atmosphere. The VOCs can be rapidly photooxidized under conditions of high solar radiation, yielding products that can participate in new particle formation and growth processes above forests. This thesis focuses on the characterization, identification and quantification of oxidation products of biogenic VOC (BVOCs) as well as other species (tracer compounds) that provide information on aerosol sources and source processes. Atmospheric aerosols from various forested sites (i.e., Hyytiala, southern Finland; Rondonia, Brazil; K-Puszta, Hungary and Julich, Germany) were analyzed with Gas Chromotography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) using analytical procedure that targets polar organic compounds. The study demonstrated that isoprene (i.e., 2-methyerythritol, 2-methylthreitol, 2-methylglyceric acid and C5-alkene triols (2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-l-butene (cis and trans) and 3 methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene)) and monoterpene (pinic acid, norpinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid) oxidation products were present in substantial concentrations in atmospheric aerosols suggesting that oxidation of BVOC from the vegetation is an important process in all studied sites. On the other hand, presence of levoglucosan, biomass burning marker, especially in Amazonian rain forest site at Rondonia, Brazil, pointed that all sites were affected by anthropogenic activities, namely biomass burning. Other identified compounds included plyols, arabitol, mannitol and erythritol, which are marker compounds for fungal spores and monosacharides, glucose and fructose, markers for plant polens. Temporal variations as well as mass size distributions of the detected species confirmed the possible formation mechanisms of marker compounds.

  7. Aerosol optical depth distribution in extratropical cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-10-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database, the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the postcold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  8. Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution in Extratropical Cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database,the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the post-cold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  9. Comparison of GOES and MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) to aerosol robotic network (AERONET) AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 mass at Bondville, Illinois.

    PubMed

    Green, Mark; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ciren, Pubu; Xu, Chuanyu

    2009-09-01

    Collocated Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) chemically speciated data, mass of PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution at Bondville, IL, were compared with satellite-derived AOD. This was done to evaluate the quality of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data and their potential to predict surface PM2.5 concentrations. MODIS AOD correlated better to AERONET AOD (r = 0.835) than did GOES AOD (r = 0.523). MODIS and GOES AOD compared better to AERONET AOD when the particle size distribution was dominated by fine mode. For all three AOD methods, correlation between AOD and PM2.5 concentration was highest in autumn and lowest in winter. The AERONET AOD-PM2.5 relationship was strongest with moderate relative humidity (RH). At low RH, AOD attributable to coarse mass degrades the relationship; at high RH, added AOD from water growth appears to mask the relationship. For locations such as many in the central and western United States with substantial coarse mass, coarse mass contributions to AOD may make predictions of PM2.5 from AOD data problematic. Seasonal and diurnal variations in particle size distributions, RH, and seasonal changes in boundary layer height need to be accounted for to use satellite AOD to predict surface PM2.5.

  10. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  11. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  12. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  13. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric characterization of organic aerosol from European and Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Huang, Ru-Jin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol constitutes a substantial fraction (20-90%) of submicrometer aerosol mass, playing an important role in air quality and human health. Over the past few years, ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) has been applied to elucidate the chemical composition of ambient aerosols. However, most of the UHRMS studies used direct infusion without prior separation by liquid chromatography, which may cause the loss of individual compound information and interference problems. In the present study, urban ambient aerosol with particle diameter < 2.5 μm was collected in Mainz, Germany and Beijing, China, respectively. Two pretreatment procedures were applied to extract the organic compounds from the filter samples: One method uses a mixture of acetonitrile and water, the other uses pure water and prepared for the extraction of humic-like substances. The extracts were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with an Orbitrap mass spectrometer in both negative and the positive modes. The effects of pretreatment procedures on the characterization of organic aerosol and the city-wise difference in chemical composition of organic aerosol will be discussed in detail.

  14. Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in atmospheric marine boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine boundary layer and frequently above. This study presents observations of atmospheric sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 < rd < 14 μm based on external impaction of sea-spray aerosol particles onto microscope polycarbonate microscope slides. The slides have very large sample volumes, typically about 250 L over a 10-second sampling period. This provides unprecedented sampling of giant sea-salt particles for flights in marine boundary layer air. The slides were subsequently analyzed in a humidified chamber using dual optical digital microscopy. At a relative humidity of 90% the sea-salt aerosol particles form spherical cap drops. Based on measurement the volume of the spherical cap drop and assuming NaCl composition, the Kohler equation is used to derive the dry salt mass of tens of thousands of individual aerosol particles on each slide. Size distributions are given with a 0.2 μm resolution. The slides were exposed from the NSF/NCAR C-130 research aircraft during the 2008 VOCALS project off the coast of northern Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other atmospheric conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine atmospheres.

  15. On the Implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for modeled organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current chemical transport models assume that organic aerosol (OA)-forming compounds partition mostly to a water-poor, organic-rich phase in accordance with their vapor pressures. However, in the southeast United States, a significant fraction of ambient organic compounds are wat...

  16. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  17. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  18. Mass distribution and mass resolved angular distribution of fission products in 28Si+232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodaye, Suparna; Tripathi, R.; John, B. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fission process with heavier projectiles and actinide targets has contributions from processes, such as compound nucleus fission, transfer-induced fission, and noncompound nucleus fission. Mass distribution and mass-dependent anisotropy can be used to identify and delineate the contributions due to these different processes. Purpose: Mass distribution in 28Si+232Th has been studied at beam energies of 180 and 158 MeV to investigate the nature of mass distribution arising from complete and incomplete momentum-transfer fission events. Mass-dependent angular anisotropy has been measured at 166 MeV to investigate the dominant noncompound nucleus process contributing to the fission. Method: Mass distribution and mass resolved angular distribution of fission products were measured by the recoil catcher method followed by off-line γ -ray spectrometry. Results: Mass distributions for full momentum-transfer fission processes were found to be symmetric, and those for transfer-induced fission were found to be asymmetric at both beam energies. The relative contribution from transfer-induced fission was found to be higher at lower beam energy. The anisotropy of the fission product angular distribution was found to increase with decreasing mass asymmetry. Conclusions: The mass distribution indicates that, apart from the full momentum-transfer fission process, there is a significant contribution due to transfer-induced fission. The mass dependence of angular anisotropy indicated that preequilibrium fission is the dominant noncompound nucleus process in the present reaction system at near barrier energy (Ec .m ./VC=1.06 ) .

  19. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean, a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition, small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions, could be identified in the particle phase

  20. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  1. A rocket-borne mass analyzer for charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Friedrich, Martin

    2008-10-15

    An electrostatic mass spectrometer for nanometer-sized charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere has been developed and tested. The analyzer is mounted on the forward end of a rocket and has a slit opening for admitting a continuous sample of air that is exhausted through ports at the sides. Within the instrument housing are two sets of four collection plates that are biased with positive and negative voltages for the collection of negative and positive aerosol particles, respectively. Each collection plate spans about an order of magnitude in mass which corresponds to a factor of 2 in radius. The number density of the charge is calculated from the current collected by the plates. The mean free path for molecular collisions in the mesosphere is comparable to the size of the instrument opening; thus, the analyzer performance is modeled by a Monte Carlo computer code that finds the aerosol particles trajectories within the instrument including both the electrostatic force and the forces from collisions of the aerosol particles with air molecules. Mass sensitivity curves obtained using the computer models are near to those obtained in the laboratory using an ion source. The first two flights of the instrument returned data showing the charge number densities of both positive and negative aerosol particles in four mass ranges.

  2. Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Yuan; Kuang, Zhongyu; Fang, Sihua; Chen, Yonghang; Kang, Yanming; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Daoyuan; Fu, Yingying

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai was conducted based on the data obtained from a micro pulse lidar. There was a distinct difference in layer thickness and extinction coefficient under the two types of weather conditions. Aerosols were concentrated below 1 km and the aerosol extinction coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 1.50 km-1 on haze days. In contrast, aerosols with smaller extinction coefficients (0.20-0.35 km-1) accumulated mainly from the surface to 2 km on floating dust days. The seasonal variations of extinction and aerosol optical depth (AOD) for both haze and floating dust cases were similar—greatest in winter, smaller in spring, and smallest in autumn. More than 85% of the aerosols appeared in the atmosphere below 1 km during severe haze and floating dust weather. The diurnal variation of the extinction coefficient of haze exhibited a bimodal shape with two peaks in the morning or at noon, and at nightfall, respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient gradually increased throughout the day during floating dust weather. Case studies showed that haze aerosols were generated from the surface and then lifted up, but floating dust aerosols were transported vertically from higher altitude to the surface. The AOD during floating dust weather was higher than that during haze. The boundary layer was more stable during haze than during floating dust weather.

  3. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  4. Mass Distributions of Linear Chain Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Shane L.; Craciun, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    Biochemistry has many examples of linear chain polymers, i.e., molecules formed from a sequence of units from a finite set of possibilities; examples include proteins, RNA, single-stranded DNA, and paired DNA. In the field of mass spectrometry, it is useful to consider the idea of weighted alphabets, with a word inheriting weight from its letters. We describe the distribution of the mass of these words in terms of a simple recurrence relation, the general solution to that relation, and a canonical form that explicitly describes both the exponential form of this distribution and its periodic features, thus explaining a wave pattern that has been observed in protein mass databases. Further, we show that a pure exponential term dominates the distribution and that there is exactly one such purely exponential term. Finally, we illustrate the use of this theorem by describing a formula for the integer mass distribution of peptides and we compare our theoretical results with mass distributions of human and yeast peptides. PMID:23024448

  5. The field white dwarf mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Cummings, J.; Kalirai, J. S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Gentile-Fusillo, N.; Raddi, R.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disc vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Nevertheless, we find that fixed standard assumptions for the above parameters result in predicted mean masses that are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. It suggests that derived masses for both studied samples are consistent with our current knowledge of stellar and Galactic evolution. Our simulations overpredict by 40-50 per cent the number of massive white dwarfs (M > 0.75 M⊙) for both surveys, although we can not exclude a Salpeter IMF when we account for all biases. Furthermore, we find no evidence of a population of double white dwarf mergers in the observed mass distributions.

  6. Assessment of Aerosol Distributions from GEOS-5 Using the CALIPSO Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth

    2010-01-01

    A-train sensors such as MODIS, MISR, and CALIPSO are used to determine aerosol properties, and in the process a means of estimating aerosol type (e.g. smoke vs. dust). Correct classification of aerosol type is important for climate assessment, air quality applications, and for comparisons and analysis with aerosol transport models. The Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) satellite mission proposed in the NRC Decadal Survey describes a next generation aerosol and cloud suite similar to the current A-train, including a lidar. The future ACE lidar must be able to determine aerosol type effectively in conjunction with modeling activities to achieve ACE objectives. Here we examine the current capabilities of CALIPSO and the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5), to place future ACE needs in context. The CALIPSO level 2 feature mask includes vertical profiles of aerosol layers classified by type. GEOS-5 provides global 3D aerosol mass for sulfate, sea salt, dust, and black and organic carbon. A GEOS aerosol scene classification algorithm has been developed to provide estimates of aerosol mixtures and extinction profiles along the CALIPSO orbit track. In previous work, initial comparisons between GEOS-5 derived aerosol mixtures and CALIPSO derived aerosol types were presented for July 2007. In general, the results showed that model and lidar derived aerosol types did not agree well in the boundary layer. Agreement was poor over Europe, where CALIPSO indicated the presence of dust and pollution mixtures yet GEOS-5 was dominated by pollution with little dust. Over the ocean in the tropics, the model appeared to contain less sea salt than detected by CALIPSO, yet at high latitudes the situation was reserved. Agreement between CALIPSO and GEOS-5, aerosol types improved above the boundary layer, primarily in dust and smoke dominated regions. At higher altitudes (> 5 km), the model contained aerosol layers not detected

  7. Analysis of secondary organic aerosols from ozonolysis of isoprene by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Sato, Kei; Hirokawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Okumura, Motonori; Tohno, Susumu; Imamura, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    To understand the mechanism of formation of the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) produced by the ozonolysis of isoprene, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to identify the semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) produced in both the gaseous and the aerosol phases and to estimate the gas-aerosol partitioning of each SVOC in chamber experiments. To aid in the identification of the SVOCs, the products were also studied with negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS), which can selectively detect carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides. The gaseous products were observed by on-line PTR-MS and NI-CIMS, whereas the SVOCs in SOAs collected on a filter were vaporized by heating the filter and were then analysed by off-line PTR-MS and NI-CIMS. The formation of oligomeric hydroperoxides involving a Criegee intermediate as a chain unit was observed in both the gaseous and the aerosol phases by NI-CIMS. PTR-MS also detected oligomeric hydroperoxides as protonated molecules from which a H2O molecule was eliminated, [M-OH]+. In the aerosol phase, oligomers involving formaldehyde and methacrolein as chain units were observed by PTR-MS in addition to oligomeric hydroperoxides. The gas-aerosol partitioning of each component was calculated from the ion signals in the gaseous and aerosol phases measured by PTR-MS. From the gas-aerosol partitioning, the saturated vapour pressures of the oligomeric hydroperoxides were estimated. Measurements by a fast-mobility-particle-sizer spectrometer revealed that the increase of the number density of the particles was complete within a few hundred seconds from the start of the reaction.

  8. Characterization of Organic Nitrogen in the Atmosphere Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts on characterizing organic nitrogen (ON) compounds in atmospheric aerosols and aqueous droplets, knowledge of ON chemistry is still limited, mainly due to its chemical complexity and lack of highly time-resolved measurements. This work is aimed at optimizing the method of using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) to characterize ON compounds in atmospheric aerosols. Seventy-five pure nitrogen-containing organic compounds covering a variety of functional groups were analyzed with the HR-AMS. Our results show that ON compounds commonly produce NHx+, NOx+, which are usually attributed to inorganic N species such as ammonium and nitrate, and CH2N+ at m/z = 28, which is rarely quantified in ambient aerosol due to large interference from N2+ in the air signal. As a result, using the nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) calibration factor proposed by Aiken et al. (2008) on average leads to ~ 20% underestimation of N/C in ambient organic aerosol. A new calibration factor of 0.79 is proposed for determining the average N/C in organics. The relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) of different ON species, on average, are found to be consistent with the default RIE value (1.4) for the total organics. The AMS mass spectral features of various types of ON species (amines, amides, amino acids, etc.) are examined and used for characterizing ON composition in ambient aerosols. Our results indicate that submicron organic aerosol measured during wintertime in Fresno, CA contains significant amounts of amino-compounds whereas more diversified ON species, including N-containing aromatic heterocycle (e.g., imidazoles), are observed in fog waters collected simultaneously. Our findings have important implications for understanding atmospheric ON behaviors via the widespread HR-AMS measurements of ambient aerosols and droplets.

  9. Investigate the relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and aerosol size distributions using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Hua, Dengxin; Mao, Jiandong; Zhou, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The real aerosol size distributions were obtained by aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) in China YinChuan. The lidar ratios at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm were calculated using Mie theory. The effective radius of aerosol particles reff and volume C/F ratio (coarse/fine) Vc/f were retrieved from the real aerosol size distributions. The relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and particle reff and Vc/f were investigated. The results indicate that the lidar ratio is positive correlated to the particle reff and Vc/f. The lidar ratio is more sensitive to the coarse particles. The short wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle Vc/f and the long wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle reff. The wavelength dependency indicated that the lidar ratios decrease with increasing the wavelength. The lidar ratios are almost irrelevant to the shape and total particles of aerosol size distributions.

  10. Physical properties, chemical composition, sources, spatial distribution and sinks of indoor aerosol particles in a university lecture hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, I.; Dosztály, K.; Borsós, T.; Söveges, B.; Weidinger, T.; Kristóf, G.; Péter, N.; Kertész, Zs.

    2013-01-01

    PM10 mass, particle number (N) and CO2 concentrations, particle number size distributions and meteorological parameters were determined with high time resolution, and daily aerosol samples were collected in the PM10-2.0 and PM2.0 size fractions for chemical analysis in the middle of a university lecture hall for one week. Median concentrations for the PM10 mass and N of 15.3 μg m-3 and 3.7 × 103 cm-3, respectively were derived. The data are substantially smaller than the related outdoor levels or typical values for residences. There were considerable concentration differences for workdays, weekends and various lectures. Main sources of PM10 mass include the usage of chalk sticks for writing, wiping the blackboard, ordinary movements and actions of students and cleaning. High PM10 mass concentration levels up to 100 μg m-3 were realised for short time intervals after wiping the blackboard. The mass concentrations decreased rapidly after the emission source ceased to be active. Two classes of coarse particles were identified. General indoor dust particles exhibited a residence time of approximately 35 min, while the residence time for the chalk dust particles was approximately 20 min as lower estimates. Emission source rate for wiping the blackboard was estimated to be between 8 and 14 mg min-1. This represents a substantial emission rate but the source is active only up to 1 min. Suspension of the chalk (made mainly of gypsum) dust particles was confirmed by enrichment of Ca and S in the hall with respect to ambient urban aerosol. Contribution of ambient aerosol via the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) facility was considerable for time intervals when the indoor sources of PM10 mass were not intensive. The HVAC facility introduces, however, the major amount of aerosol particles from the outdoors as far as their number concentration is regarded. Mean contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number was (69 ± 7)%, which is smaller

  11. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption in Xianghe, SE of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2005-12-01

    China's rapid industrialization over the last few decades has affected air quality in many regions of China, and even the regional climate. As a part of the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals since January 2005 at Xianghe, about 70 km southeast of Beijing. Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations during the winter months (January-March) ranged from 9 to 459 μg/m3 in the coarse mode with an average concentration of 122 μg/m3, and from 11 to 203 μg/m3 in the fine mode with an average concentration of 45 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Absorption efficiency measurements at 550 nm show very high values compared to measurements performed in the United States during the CLAMS experiment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in refractive indices from the several collected species and particle size effects. The absorption properties from aerosols measured in China show large absorption efficiencies, compared to aerosols measured in the US, possibly linked to different technology practices used in these countries. For organic plus black carbon aerosols, where the refractive index seems to be relatively constant, the absorption efficiency spectral dependence for fine mode aerosols falls between 1/λ and 1/λ2. The coarse mode absorption shows much less spectral dependence.

  12. Aerosol generation and distribution system for the Third International Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.; Dea, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain identical samples participating CCN instruments and aerosol characterizing equipment were located along and connected to a 8.2 cm diameter aluminum tube through which the test aerosols were pumped directly from the source at very slight overpressure. Of the total of 29 experiments, 18 were carried out with artificial NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 aerosols. These were generated from salt solutions by pneumatic atomizers of special design to ensure high constancy of the aerosol output concentration. In three experiments with insoluble CCN (AgI, paraffin wax) the aerosols were generated thermally. In some of the tests, an electrostatic classifier was used for narrowing the particle size distributions.

  13. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  14. Formation and Processing of Organic Aerosols Measured by a Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Denlea, E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Brock, C. A.; Degouw, J. A.; Flocke, F.; Gallar, C.; Holloway, J. S.; Neuman, J. A.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Trainer, M. K.; Warneke, C.; Wollny, A. G.; Zhang, W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2007-12-01

    Formation of particulate matter is common in areas with high emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NOx, and SO2. These particles have lifetimes of days to weeks, and thus can have both local and regional effects on visibility, air quality, and human health as well as direct and indirect effects on climate. During TexAQS 2006, mass concentrations of non-refractory inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and total organics in submicron aerosols were measured by a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) onboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. In this presentation, we analyze composition changes of organic aerosols in different air masses. We examine organic mass spectra along with simultaneous measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products in order to determine the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources to the aerosol organic mass. These measurements were performed in plumes intercepted during the daytime north of Houston where large isoprene emissions were observed. Furthermore, the fresh hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and processed oxygenated-like organics (OOA) fractions of the total organic aerosol mass in several plumes transected during daytime and nighttime are presented and compared. We will also discuss differences in correlations between organic aerosol composition markers and primary or secondary gas-phase species in different plumes.

  15. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported over the main body of the TP across the northeastern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be because the altitude is much lower at the northeastern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A natural boundary seems to extend to an altitude of 6-8 km a.s.l., which may act as a dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP, especially in spring and summer. This boundary appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that this natural boundary extending to upper troposphere is consistent with the spatial pattern of aerosol loading. The whole TP blocks the atmospheric aerosols transported from surrounding regions, and the extreme high mountains on the TP also cause an obstruction to the transport of aerosols. The aerosol distribution patterns are primarily driven by atmospheric

  16. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes, this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various non-refractory ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic or marine sources of semi-refractory aerosols, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be incorrectly interpreted if not carefully analyzed for unique ions, isotope patterns, and potential slow vaporization associated with semi-refractory species. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components - i.e., components that vaporize but do not flash-vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g., chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) - can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g., NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, under certain conditions their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in thresholded measurements. Chemical reactions with oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g., organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g., WO2Cl2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer, with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are

  17. Particulate PAH emissions from residential biomass combustion: time-resolved analysis with aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A C; Nordin, E Z; Nyström, R; Pettersson, E; Swietlicki, E; Bergvall, C; Westerholm, R; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2014-06-17

    Time-resolved emissions of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total organic particulate matter (OA) from a wood log stove and an adjusted pellet stove were investigated with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). The highest OA emissions were found during the addition of log wood on glowing embers, that is, slow burning pyrolysis conditions. These emissions contained about 1% PAHs (of OA). The highest PAH emissions were found during fast burning under hot air starved combustion conditions, in both stoves. In the latter case, PAHs contributed up to 40% of OA, likely due to thermal degradation of other condensable species. The distribution of PAHs was also shifted toward larger molecules in these emissions. AMS signals attributed to PAHs were found at molecular weights up to 600 Da. The vacuum aerodynamic size distribution was found to be bimodal with a smaller mode (Dva ∼ 200 nm) dominating under hot air starved combustion and a larger sized mode dominating under slow burning pyrolysis (Dva ∼ 600 nm). Simultaneous reduction of PAHs, OA and total particulate matter from residential biomass combustion may prove to be a challenge for environmental legislation efforts as these classes of emissions are elevated at different combustion conditions.

  18. Effects of anthropogenic emissions on the molecular composition of urban organic aerosols: An ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, I.; O'Connor, I. P.; Giorio, C.; Fuller, S. J.; Kristensen, K.; Maenhaut, W.; Wenger, J. C.; Sodeau, J. R.; Glasius, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-06-01

    Identification of the organic composition of atmospheric aerosols is necessary to develop effective air pollution mitigation strategies. However, the majority of the organic aerosol mass is poorly characterized and its detailed analysis is a major analytical challenge. In this study, we applied state-of-the-art direct infusion nano-electrospray (nanoESI) ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) and liquid chromatography ESI Quadrupole Time-of-Flight (Q-TOF) MS for the analysis of the organic fraction of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected at an urban location in Cork, Ireland. Comprehensive mass spectral data evaluation methods (e.g., Kendrick Mass Defect and Van Krevelen) were used to identify compound classes and mass distributions of the detected species. Up to 850 elemental formulae were identified in negative mode nanoESI-UHR-MS. Nitrogen and/or sulphur containing organic species contributed up to 40% of the total identified formulae and exhibited strong diurnal variations suggesting the importance of night-time NO3 chemistry at the site. The presence of a large number of oxidised aromatic and nitroaromatic compounds in the samples indicated a strong anthropogenic influence, i.e., from traffic emissions and domestic solid fuel (DSF) burning. Most of the identified biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) compounds are later-generation nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products, indicating that SOA composition is strongly affected by anthropogenic species such as NOx and SO2. Unsaturated and saturated C12-C20 fatty acids were found to be the most abundant homologs with a composition reflecting a primary marine origin. The results of this work demonstrate that the studied site is a very complex environment affected by a variety of anthropogenic activities and natural sources.

  19. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: use of the junge power-law aerosol size distribution with variable refractive index to handle aerosol absorption.

    PubMed

    Chomko, R M; Gordon, H R

    1998-08-20

    When strongly absorbing aerosols are present in the atmosphere, the usual two-step procedure of processing ocean color data-(1) atmospheric correction to provide the water-leaving reflectance (rho(w)), followed by (2) relating rho(w) to the water constituents-fails and simultaneous estimation of the ocean and aerosol optical properties is necessary. We explore the efficacy of using a simple model of the aerosol-a Junge power-law size distribution consisting of homogeneous spheres with arbitrary refractive index-in a nonlinear optimization procedure for estimating the relevant oceanic and atmospheric parameters for case 1 waters. Using simulated test data generated from more realistic aerosol size distributions (sums of log-normally distributed components with different compositions), we show that the ocean's pigment concentration (C) can be retrieved with good accuracy in the presence of weakly or strongly absorbing aerosols. However, because of significant differences in the scattering phase functions for the test and power-law distributions, large error is possible in the estimate of the aerosol optical thickness. The positive result for C suggests that the detailed shape of the aerosol-scattering phase function is not relevant to the atmospheric correction of ocean color sensors. The relevant parameters are the aerosol single-scattering albedo and the spectral variation of the aerosol optical depth. We argue that the assumption of aerosol sphericity should not restrict the validity of the algorithm and suggest an avenue for including colored aerosols, e.g., wind-blown dust, in the procedure. A significant advantage of the new approach is that realistic multicomponent aerosol models are not required for the retrieval of C.

  20. Mass Spectrometry of Liquid Aniline Aerosol Particles by IR/UV Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, A; Cabalo, J; Baer, T; Miller, R E

    1999-05-01

    The first results are reported from a new single-particle two-color laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer, incorporating a combination of infrared (CO(2)) and UV (excimer) laser irradiation. This combination of lasers has the capability to effectively separate the desorption or evaporation step from the ionization step, thereby greatly improving the analytical capabilities of such an instrument. The results on liquid aerosols, such as aniline, show that prior evaporation of the aerosol particle with the IR laser increases the ion signal produced by the excimer laser by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In the case of nitrobenzene aerosols, the excimer laser alone produces no ions, while a very large signal is observed when the aerosol is first irradiated with the CO(2) laser. A simple model, based on the Coulomb explosion of the ionized aerosol, is used to estimate the number of ions generated by the excimer laser (∼10(5) ions). Experimental evidence based on the observed time delay of protonated aniline parent ions indicates that the laser irradiation of the liquid aerosol results in a stable neutral plasma which separates into positive and negative charges only after a 100-500-ns delay.

  1. An inexpensive active optical remote sensing instrument for assessing aerosol distributions.

    PubMed

    Barnes, John E; Sharma, Nimmi C P

    2012-02-01

    Air quality studies on a broad variety of topics from health impacts to source/sink analyses, require information on the distributions of atmospheric aerosols over both altitude and time. An inexpensive, simple to implement, ground-based optical remote sensing technique has been developed to assess aerosol distributions. The technique, called CLidar (Charge Coupled Device Camera Light Detection and Ranging), provides aerosol altitude profiles over time. In the CLidar technique a relatively low-power laser transmits light vertically into the atmosphere. The transmitted laser light scatters off of air molecules, clouds, and aerosols. The entire beam from ground to zenith is imaged using a CCD camera and wide-angle (100 degree) optics which are a few hundred meters from the laser. The CLidar technique is optimized for low altitude (boundary layer and lower troposphere) measurements where most aerosols are found and where many other profiling techniques face difficulties. Currently the technique is limited to nighttime measurements. Using the CLidar technique aerosols may be mapped over both altitude and time. The instrumentation required is portable and can easily be moved to locations of interest (e.g. downwind from factories or power plants, near highways). This paper describes the CLidar technique, implementation and data analysis and offers specifics for users wishing to apply the technique for aerosol profiles.

  2. Development and characterization of an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Mayer, Joseph E; Holecek, John C; Moffet, Ryan C; Sanchez, Rene O; Rebotier, Thomas P; Furutani, Hiroshi; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Su, Yongxuan; Guazzotti, Sergio; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of atmospheric aerosols are necessary for understanding the impact of air pollution on regional and global climate. To gain further insight into the size-resolved chemistry of individual atmospheric particles, a smaller aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) with increased data acquisition capabilities was developed for aircraft-based studies. Compared to previous ATOFMS systems, the new instrument has a faster data acquisition rate with improved ion transmission and mass resolution, as well as reduced physical size and power consumption, all required advances for use in aircraft studies. In addition, real-time source apportionment software allows the immediate identification and classification of individual particles to guide sampling decisions while in the field. The aircraft (A)-ATOFMS was field-tested on the ground during the Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) and aboard an aircraft during the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L). Initial results from ICE-L represent the first reported aircraft-based single-particle dual-polarity mass spectrometry measurements and provide an increased understanding of particle mixing state as a function of altitude. Improved ion transmission allows for the first single-particle detection of species out to approximately m/z 2000, an important mass range for the detection of biological aerosols and oligomeric species. In addition, high time resolution measurements of single-particle mixing state are demonstrated and shown to be important for airborne studies where particle concentrations and chemistry vary rapidly.

  3. Determination of minimum mass and spatial location of initiator for detonation of propylene oxide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apparao, A.; Saji, J.; Balaji, M.; Devangan, A. K.; Rao, C. R.

    2017-03-01

    The mishandling of liquid fuels during production, processing or transportation can lead to the formation of combustible two-phase mixtures. These mixtures, with the availability of a suitable energy source, may be ignited generating a deflagration, or even a detonation wave. For military applications, unconfined fuel aerosols are created and detonated with the help of a strong shock generated by a powerful energy source. The minimum energy requirement is expressed in terms of the shock strength, or mass of the high-explosive-based initiator. In this study, the detonability of unconfined aerosols of 4.3 kg propylene oxide was studied by positioning different quantities of cylindrical-shaped initiators of RDX/wax (95/5) at a fixed spatial location in the aerosol cloud, and the minimum mass of the initiator required for detonation initiation was determined. The effect of spatial location and the requirement of initiator mass, especially at farther locations where the fuel concentration is likely to be lower and closer to the lower explosive limit, was also investigated. The experimental findings help identify the detonable zone in unconfined propylene oxide aerosol clouds for different combinations of spatial location and mass of initiator.

  4. Assessment of the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Ayantika, D. C.; Pandithurai, G.; Niranjan, K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models (excepting HADGEM2-ES, HADGEM2-CC) seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since IGP region is dominated by anthropogenic activities, high population density, and wind driven transport of dust and other aerosol species, MODIS observations reveal high AOD values over this region. Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of

  5. Detection of cw-related species in complex aerosol particles deposited on surfaces with an ion trap-based aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William A; Reilly, Pete; Whitten, William B

    2007-01-01

    A new type of aerosol mass spectrometer was developed by minimal modification of an existing commercial ion trap to analyze the semivolatile components of aerosols in real time. An aerodynamic lens-based inlet system created a well-collimated particle beam that impacted into the heated ionization volume of the commercial ion trap mass spectrometer. The semivolatile components of the aerosols were thermally vaporized and ionized by electron impact or chemical ionization in the source. The nascent ions were extracted and injected into the ion trap for mass analysis. The utility of this instrument was demonstrated by identifying semivolatile analytes in complex aerosols. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop methods for identifying chemical species related to CW agent exposure. Our efforts focused on detection of CW-related species doped on omnipresent aerosols such as house dust particles vacuumed from various surfaces found in any office building. The doped aerosols were sampled directly into the inlet of our mass spectrometer from the vacuumed particle stream. The semivolatile analytes were deposited on house dust and identified by positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry up to 2.5 h after deposition. Our results suggest that the observed semivolatile species may have been chemisorbed on some of the particle surfaces in submonolayer concentrations and may remain hours after deposition. This research suggests that identification of trace CW agent-related species should be feasible by this technique.

  6. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large-scale precipitation change.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien

    2015-12-28

    The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol-induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol-cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data.

  7. In situ measurements of aerosols optical properties and number size distributions in a subarctic coastal region of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lopez, J. F.; Montilla, E.; Torres, B.; Rodríguez, E.; Bennouna, Y.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    sized between 30 and 100 nm (Aitken mode) are presented as a function of the concentration of the particles sized between 100 and 390 nm (accumulation mode). The optical and the microphysical parameters are related to each other, and the results are presented. The origins and pathways of air masses were examined by computing the back-trajectories in a trajectory model (HYSPLIT). Six geographical sectors were defined to classify the air masses, and, based on the sector classification, the linkage between the air mass origin and the optical parameters was established. Aerosol size distributions were also evaluated in relation to the air masses. The relationships between the air mass origins and other parameters, especially those related to the single scattering albedo, allow us to describe two characteristic situations: northern and western air masses, which had predominantly marine aerosols, presented lower optical parameter values, indicating predominantly coarser and non-absorbent particles; and eastern and southern air masses, in which continental aerosols were predominant, presented higher values for all optical parameters, indicating the presence of smaller absorbent particles.

  8. Aerosol distribution and efficacy in a commercial food warehouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of field trials were conducted in a commercial field storage facility to evaluate exposure of stored-product insects to aerosol formulations of pyrethrin and the insect growth regulator methoprene. When adults of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle, and Tribolium confusum (Ja...

  9. Simple mass distribution for the lunar potential.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levie, S. L., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A set of twenty-one point masses gravitationally equivalent to the L1 lunar potential model is presented. By construction, the equivalence is valid only in a region of space 'sampled' by Apollo spacecraft. That region is taken to be a finite, torus-shaped shell. When used in place of the L1 model for Apollo 12 lunar orbit determination, the solution set gives spacecraft positions identical to within about 100 m. The solution is developed in two steps: first the L1 potential is examined to determine favorable mass locations, and then the mass values are computed to force an optimum matching of the L1 potential. Therefore the solution set is 'artificial.' It is related to the moon's actual mass distribution only in its similar gravitational effects in a limited region of space.

  10. A numerical study of the particle size distribution of an aerosol undergoing turbulent coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, Walter C.; Collins, Lance R.

    2000-07-01

    Coagulation and growth of aerosol particles subject to isotropic turbulence has been explored using direct numerical simulations. The computations follow the trajectories of 262 144 initial particles as they are convected by the turbulent flow field. Collision between two parent particles leads to the formation of a new daughter particle with the mass and momentum (but not necessarily the energy) of the parent particles. The initially monodisperse population of particles will develop a size distribution over time that is controlled by the collision dynamics. In an earlier study, Sundaram & Collins (1997) showed that collision rates in isotropic turbulence are controlled by two statistics: (i) the radial distribution of the particles and (ii) the relative velocity probability density function. Their study considered particles that rebound elastically; however, we find that the formula that they derived is equally valid in a coagulating system. However, coagulation alters the numerical values of these statistics from the values they attain for the elastic rebound case. This difference is substantial and must be taken into consideration to properly predict the evolution of the size distribution of a population of particles. The DNS results also show surprising trends in the relative breadth of the particle size distribution. First, in all cases, the standard deviation of the particle size distribution of particles with finite Stokes numbers is much larger than the standard deviation for either the zero-Stokes-number or infinite-Stokes-number limits. Secondly, for particles with small initial Stokes numbers, the standard deviation of the final particle size distribution decreases with increasing initial particle size; however, the opposite trend is observed for particles with slightly larger initial Stokes numbers. An explanation for these phenomena can be found by carefully examining the functional dependence of the radial distribution function on the particle size

  11. Analysis of the vertical structure and size distribution of dust aerosols over the semi-arid region of the Loess Plateau in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Li, X.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2012-02-01

    Using measurements of dual-wavelength polarisation lidar, particle sizer, and nephelometer from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL), the properties of dust aerosol extinction coefficient, optical depth, depolarisation ratio, colour ratio, size distribution, and concentration over the semi-arid region of the Loess Plateau in north-western China are analysed in a case study of dust storms from 16-18 March 2010. The results show that dust aerosols are distributed mostly within the lower layer (below 3.0 km), with the dust aerosol extinction coefficient ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 km-1. The average optical depth and depolarisation ratio are near 0.6 and 0.3, respectively, while the colour ratio ranges from 0.8 to 1.0. The mass size distribution of dust aerosols has two peaks at 0.7 μm and 5.0 μm, respectively, while the number size distribution of dust aerosols is log-normal with a maximum near 0.8 μm. Particles in the fine mode (r ≤ 2.5 μm) are predominant in the dust storm. Their number concentration decreases while those of particles in the moderate (2.5 μm < r ≤ 10.0 μm) and coarse (10.0 μm < r ≤ 20.0 μm) modes increase. Based on Mie theory and the number size distribution of the aerosol, the dust aerosol scattering coefficient and its variation with particle size are calculated and analysed. A fairly close correlation is found with that measured by the nephelometer, for which the correlation coefficients are 0.89 and 0.94, respectively, at 520 and 700 nm. It shows a Gaussian distribution of dust aerosol scattering coefficient against effective diameter, with a fitting coefficient of 0.96 and centre diameter of 5.5 μm. The contribution percentages of aerosol within fine, moderate, and coarse modes to dust aerosol scattering coefficient are 20.95%, 62.93%, and 16.12%, respectively, meaning that PM10 is a dominant factor in the dust aerosol scattering properties.

  12. Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquart, Y.; Bonnel, B.; Chaoui Roquai, M.; Santer, R.; Cerf, A.

    1987-01-01

    A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from (i) in situ measurements using singe particle optical counters (a Kratel and a Knollenberg FSSP), (ii) a ground-based cascade impactor, and (iii) ground-based measurements of the spectral variation of the sober extinction.During the experiment, aerosol optical thicknesses (at 550 nm) varied from 0.20 on very clear days to 1.5 during a so-called `dry haze' episode.Comparisons between size distributions derived from in situ measurements from ground-based cascade impactor, and from inversion of the spectral optical thicknesses, showed that the optical counters drastically underestimated the concentration of small (r<0.5 m) particles It was shown that the occurrence of a `dry haze' episode was characterized by a large increase (an order of magnitude in this particular case) of the intermediate particles (r0.5 m), whereas the concentration in very (r<0.2 m) and large (r>1 m) particles remained roughly constant.

  13. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. Satellite observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation for cloud-free scenes. We do so by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation of the difference was 0.6 ± 8 %. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 68 % of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 30 % of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10 % higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30 %, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and

  14. Temporal variability of aerosol optical thickness vertical distribution observed from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Travis D.; Zhang, Jianglong; Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2016-08-01

    Temporal variability in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) derived from the 0.532 µm aerosol extinction coefficient is described using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations over 8.5 years (June 2006 to December 2014). Temporal variability of CALIOP column-integrated AOT is largely consistent with total column AOT trends from several passive satellite sensors, such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor. Globally, a 0.0002 AOT per year positive trend in deseasonalized CALIOP total column AOT for daytime conditions is attributed to corresponding changes in near-surface (i.e., 0.0-0.5 km or 0.5-1.0 km above ground level (agl)) aerosol particle loading, while a -0.0006 AOT per year trend during nighttime is attributed to elevated (i.e., 1.0-2.0 km or >2.0 km agl) aerosols. Regionally, increasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are found over Southern Africa and India, mostly due to changes in aerosol loading at the 1.0-2.0 km and 0.0-0.5 km agl layers, respectively. Decreasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are observed over Northern Africa, Eastern U.S., and South America (due mostly to elevated aerosol loading), while the negative CALIOP AOT trends found over Eastern China, Europe, and Western U.S. are due mostly to aerosol layers nearer the surface. To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide both a globally comprehensive estimation of the temporal variation in aerosol vertical distribution and an insight into passive sensor column AOT trends in the vertical domain.

  15. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Ceburnis, D.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Dupuy, R.; Jennings, S. G.; Berresheim, H.; Wenger, J. C.; Sodeau, J. R.; Healy, R. M.; Facchini, M. C.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Finessi, E.; Worsnop, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the NE Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm-3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400-600 cm-3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm-3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Black carbon concentrations in polluted air were between 300-400 ng m-3, and in clean marine air were less than 50 ng m-3. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt) was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to total condensation nuclei (CN) concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40-50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water

  16. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Ceburnis, D.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Dupuy, R.; Jennings, S. G.; Berresheim, H.; Wenger, J.; Healy, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Rinaldi, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Finessi, E.; Worsnop, D.; Ehn, M.; Mikkilä, J.; Kulmala, M.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2010-09-01

    As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June, 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the N. E. Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm-3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400-600 cm-3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm-3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt) was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to total condensation nuclei (CN) concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40-50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water soluble organic carbon, which, in turn, was dominated by methanesulphonic acid (MSA). Sulphate concentrations were

  17. Urban organic aerosols measured by single particle mass spectrometry in the megacity of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Harrison, R. M.

    2012-05-01

    During the month of October 2006, as part of the REPARTEE-I experiment (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment) an Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at an urban background location in the city of London, UK. Fifteen particle types were classified, some of which were already discussed (Dall'Osto et al., 2009a,b; Harrison et al., 2012). In this manuscript the origins and properties of four unreported particle types postulated to be due to locally generated aerosols, independent of the air mass type advected into London, are examined. One particle type, originating from lubricating oil (referred to as Ca-EC), was associated with morning rush hour traffic emissions. A second particle type, composed of both inorganic and organic species (called Na-EC-OC), was found enhanced in particle number concentration during evening time periods, and is likely to originate from a source operating at this time of day, or more probably from condensation of semi-volatile species. A third class, internally mixed with organic carbon and sulphate (called OC), was found to spike both in the morning and evenings although it could not unambiguously associated with a specific source or atmospheric process. The fourth class (Secondary Organic Aerosols - Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon; SOA-PAH) exhibited maximum frequency during the warmest part of the day, and a number of factors point towards secondary aerosol production from traffic-related volatile aromatic compounds. Single particle mass spectra of this particle type showed an oxidized polycyclic aromatic compound signature. A comparison of ATOFMS particle class data is then made with factors obtained by Positive Matrix Factorization and PAH signatures obtained from Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data (Allan et al., 2010). Both the Ca-EC and OC particle types correlate with primary Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA, R2 = 0.65 and 0.50 respectively), and Na-EC-OC correlates weakly with the AMS

  18. Aerosol Size Distribution Determined From Multiple Field-Of-View Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.; Uesugi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol size distribution is essential for its influence on atmosphere and human health, especially for small particles because they are able to penetrate lung tissues, thus increasing the risk of bronchitis or lung diseases. Lidar as an active optical remote sensing technique is effective for monitoring aerosols with high temporal and spatial variations. Particles with diameters comparable to the detecting light wavelength have been effectively detected by using UV, VIS, and near-IR wavelengths. However, to quantitatively estimate the shape of the particle size distribution, more information is required with respect to sub-micrometer and smaller particles. Conventional lidar employs tiny field-of-view (FOV) to detect single scatter reflected from aerosols in the direction opposite to incident light. However, the complicated reflection on the path of laser causes multiple scatter which contains also the size distribution information of aerosols. In this study, a UV Lidar with multiple FOV receiver was used for detecting such multiple scattering effects in order to obtain more quantitative information related to particle size distribution. The FOV of Lidar receiver was program controlled in a range from 0.1 mrad to 12.4 mrad. The pacific retrieval method for aerosol size distribution using this feature and field measurement results will be introduced in the presentation.

  19. CCN frequency distributions and aerosol chemical composition from long-term observations at European ACTRIS supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Schmale, Julia Yvonne; Gysel, Martin; Fröhlich, Roman; Poulain, Laurent; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration is regulated by the availability of aerosol acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Predicting the air concentrations of CCN involves knowledge of all physical and chemical processes that contribute to shape the particle size distribution and determine aerosol hygroscopicity. The relevance of specific atmospheric processes (e.g., nucleation, coagulation, condensation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol, etc.) is time- and site-dependent, therefore the availability of long-term, time-resolved aerosol observations at locations representative of diverse environments is strategic for the validation of state-of-the-art chemical transport models suited to predict CCN concentrations. We focused on long-term (year-long) datasets of CCN and of aerosol composition data including black carbon, and inorganic as well as organic compounds from the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at selected ACTRIS supersites (http://www.actris.eu/). We discuss here the joint frequency distribution of CCN levels and of aerosol chemical components concentrations for two stations: an alpine site (Jungfraujoch, CH) and a central European rural site (Melpitz, DE). The CCN frequency distributions at Jungfraujoch are broad and generally correlated with the distributions of the concentrations of aerosol chemical components (e.g., high CCN concentrations are most frequently found for high organic matter or black carbon concentrations, and vice versa), which can be explained as an effect of the strong seasonality in the aerosol characteristics at the mountain site. The CCN frequency distributions in Melpitz show a much weaker overlap with the distributions of BC concentrations or other chemical compounds. However, especially at high CCN concentration levels, a statistical correlation with organic matter (OM) concentration can be observed. For instance, the number of CCN (with particle diameter between 20 and 250 nm) at a supersaturation of 0.7% is

  20. Assessment of the Aerosol Distribution Over Indian Subcontinent in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains(IGP). Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of the art climate models. As reported in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), the level of scientific understanding (LOSU) of climatic impact of aerosols is medium-low. For better understanding of

  1. Collection efficiency of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol particles explored via light-scattering single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas; Donahue, Neil M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the collection efficiency and effective ionization efficiency for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles made from α-pinene + O3 using the single-particle capabilities of the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). The mean count-based collection efficiency (CEp) for SOA across these experiments is 0.30 (±0.04 SD), ranging from 0.25 to 0.40. The mean mass-based collection efficiency (CEm) is 0.49 (±0.07 SD). This sub-unit collection efficiency and delayed vaporization is attributable to particle bounce in the vaporization region. Using the coupled optical and chemical detection of the light-scattering single-particle (LSSP) module of the AMS, we provide clear evidence that delayed vaporization is somewhat of a misnomer for these particles: SOA particles measured as a part of the AMS mass distribution do not vaporize at a slow rate; rather, they flash-vaporize, albeit often not on the initial impact with the vaporizer but instead upon a subsequent impact with a hot surface in the vaporization region. We also find that the effective ionization efficiency (defined as ions per particle, IPP) decreases with delayed arrival time. CEp is not a function of particle size (for the mobility diameter range investigated, 170-460 nm), but we did see a decrease in CEp with thermodenuder temperature, implying that oxidation state and/or volatility can affect CEp for SOA. By measuring the mean ions per particle produced for monodisperse particles as a function of signal delay time, we can separately determine CEp and CEm and thus more accurately measure the relative ionization efficiency (compared to ammonium nitrate) of different particle types.

  2. Space Technology 7 : Micropropulsion and Mass Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnaub, A.; Dunn, C.; Ziemer, J,; Hruby, V.; Spence, D.; Demmons, N.; Roy, T.; McCormick, R.; Gasaska, C.; Young, J.; Connolly, W.; O'Donnell, J.; Markley, F.; Maghami, P.; Hsu, O.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program Space Technology 7 (ST7) project will validate technology for precision spacecraft control. The ST7 disturbance reduction system (DRS) will contain new micropropulsion technology to be flown as part of the European Space Agency's LISA (laser interferometer space antenna) Pathfinder project. After launch into a low Earth orbit in early 2010, the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft will be maneuvered to a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun LI Lagrange point for operations. The DRS will control the position of the spacecraft relative to a reference to an accuracy of one nanometer over time scales of several thousand seconds. To perform the control the spacecraft will use a new colloid thruster technology. The thrusters will operate over the range of 5 to 30 micro-Newtons with precision of 0.1 micro-Newton. The thrust will be generated by using a high electric field to extract charged droplets of a conducting colloid fluid and accelerating them with a precisely adjustable voltage. The control position reference will be provided by the European LISA Technology Package, which will include two nearly free-floating test masses. The test mass position and attitude will be sensed and adjusted using electrostatic capacitance bridges. The DRS will control the spacecraft position with respect to one test mass while minimizing disturbances on the second test mass. The dynamic control system will cover eighteen degrees of freedom, six for each of the test masses and six for the spacecraft. In the absence of other disturbances, the test masses will slowly gravitate toward local concentrations of spacecraft mass. The test mass acceleration must be minimized to maintain the acceleration of the enclosing drag-free spacecraft within the control authority of the micropropulsion system. Therefore, test mass acceleration must be predicted by accurate measurement of mass distribution, then offset by the placement of specially shaped balance masses near each test mass

  3. Constraining climate model simulations of aerosol size distributions over the North Pacific and North America using in-situ airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Cameron Stuart

    The effect of aerosols on climate is poorly understood compared to green house gases. Aerosols can scatter and/or absorb solar radiation (the "direct effect") and modify cloud properties (the "indirect effect"), affecting Earth's radiation balance and hydrological cycle. Aerosol lifetimes vary from minutes to weeks in the Earth's atmosphere, so they are heterogeneously distributed in both time and space. Over longer time scales, aerosols can influence climate through sulfur (e.g. CLAW Hypothesis) and iron (e.g. Iron Hypothesis) biogeochemical cycling. Determination of natural and anthropogenic aerosol effects on past and future climate can only be achieved using global climate models (GCM's). Satellites allow global measurements of the present-day atmosphere, but require calibration/validation by observations in-situ. Ground- and ship-based observations are confined to the surface boundary layer which can be decoupled from overlying layers and the free troposphere. Here I use in-situ aircraft measurements from five NASA and NSF airborne field campaigns conducted over the North Pacific and North America between 2001 and 2006 to establish a reduced set of airmass types that are stratified vertically, by source region and according to processes governing their characteristics. For each airmass type the aerosol size distribution, mixing state, optical properties and chemical composition are summarized and discussed. In this study I found, (i) parameterizations of background free troposphere aerosol overestimate extinction by ˜50%, minimizing the differences between pre-industrial versus contemporary radiative forcing, (i) meteorological model errors in water vapour mixing ratio can overwhelm the influence of composition-dependent aerosol hygroscopicity on radiating forcing, (iii) aerosol number in convective cloud outflow over North America in summer were reduced by 1/e after ˜2 days with no detectable increase in aerosol mass or decrease in SO2, illustrating the

  4. Molecular composition of atmospheric aerosols from Halley Bay, Antarctica, using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Brough, Neil; Rincon, Angela; Jones, Anna; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is one of the few pristine places to study natural processes of atmospheric aerosols and anthropogenic impacts on the clean remote atmosphere. Although stratospheric aerosol in Antarctica has now been explored in some detail because of the ozone depletion phenomenon, tropospheric aerosol particles in Antarctica remain very little studied. The main goal of this work is to identify in detail the organic chemical composition of aerosol from Halley Bay station, which is located on the Brunt Ice Shelf floating on the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. In this study we characterise the molecular composition of aerosols from three seasons (summer, autumn and winter in 2012) using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS). The technique provides high accuracy and high mass resolving power that allows determining unambiguous number of organic compounds present in complex organic mixtures (Noziere et al., 2015). The molecular composition interpretation was facilitated using visualisation methods (e.g. double bond equivalent, Van Krevelen diagrams, Kendrick mass analysis, and carbon oxidation state), which allowed to identify patterns, such as differences between sampling times and atmospheric processes. The majority of the identified compounds were attributed to nitrogen and sulphur containing species which exhibited very strong seasonal trends. Relatively large fraction (up to 30% of the total number of molecules) of these species contained very low hydrogen to carbon ratios (below 1) indicating that the site is impacted by anthropogenic emissions. Influences of the meteorological parameters and air mass trajectories on the molecular composition are discussed. Nozière et al., The Molecular Identification of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere: State of the Art and Challenges, Chem. Rev., 115, 3920-3983, 2015.

  5. Measurement of the atmospheric aerosol particle size distribution in a highly polluted mega-city in Southeast Asia (Dhaka-Bangladesh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Mamoon, Hassan Al; Ullah, Md. Basir; Ullah, Shah M.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol particle size distribution was measured with an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer continuously from January 21 to April 24, 2006 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Particles number, surface and mass distributions data were stored automatically with Aerosol Instrument Manager (AIM) software on average every half an hour in a computer attached to the APS. The grand total average of number, surface and mass concentrations were 8.2 × 103 ± 7.8 × 103 particles cm-3, 13.3 × 103 ± 11.8 × 103 μm2 cm-3 and 3.04 ± 2.10 mg m-3, respectively. Fine particles with diameter smaller than 1.0 μm aerodynamic diameter (AD) dominated the number concentration, accounted for 91.7% of the total particles indicating vehicular emissions were dominating in Dhaka air either from fossil fuel burning or compressed natural gas (CNGs). The surface and mass concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 μm AD were about 56.0% and 26.4% of the total particles, respectively. Remarkable seasonal differences were observed between winter and pre-monsoon seasons with the highest monthly average in January and the lowest in April. Aerosol particles in winter were 3.79 times higher for number, 3.15 times for surface and 2.18 times for mass distributions than during the pre-monsoon season. Weekends had lower concentrations than weekdays due to less vehicular traffic in the streets. Aerosol particles concentrations were about 15.0% (ranging from 9.4% to 17.3%) higher during traffic peak hours (6:00am-8:00pm) than off hours (8:00pm-6:00am). These are the first aerosol size distribution measurements with respect to number, surface and mass concentrations in real time at Dhaka, Bangladesh.

  6. Variation of the vertical distribution of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere observed by LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Shin, Dong Ho; Müller, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    We present results of the vertical distribution variation of volcanic aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The data were taken with our multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first measurement of the aerosol layer over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The aerosol layers appeared between 15 km and 17 km height asl (above sea level). The maximum value of the aerosol layer of the particle backscatter coefficient (1.5 ± 0.3 Mm-1 sr-1) and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm (2.2%) were observed at 16.4 km height asl. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this volcanic aerosol layer during the following 6 months, until December 2011. The volcanic aerosol layer showed a single-peak of the particle backscatter coefficient and a comparably narrow vertical thickness at our observation site at the beginning of our observation period (i.e. comparably soon after the initial eruption period). After that initial period the vertical distribution of the plume changed. Multiple peaks and a comparably broad geometrical thickness developed with progressing observation time. The vertical thickness of the volcanic aerosol layer expanded up to 10 km by 3 August 2011. The linear particle depolarization ratios were larger in the lower part of the aerosol layer than the upper part of the aerosol layer. We observed a strong variation of the AOD (aerosol optical depth) in the first two months of our lidar observations. After these two months the AOD gradually decreased with time from September to December 20111 and the maximum particle backscatter coefficients consistently decreased. The corresponding e

  7. SAGE and SAM II measurements of global stratospheric aerosol optical depth and mass loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Several volcanic eruptions between November 1979 and April 1981 have injected material into the stratosphere. The SAGE and SAM II satellite systems have measured, with global coverage, the 1-micron extinction produced by this material, and examples of the data product are shown in the form of global maps of stratospheric optical depth and altitude-latitude plots of zonal mean extinction. These data, and that for the volcanically quiet period in early 1979, have been used to determine the changes in the total stratospheric mass loading. Estimates have also been made of the contribution to the total aerosol mass from each eruption. It has been found that between 1979 and mid-1981, the total stratospheric aerosol mass increased from a background level of approximately 570,000 metric tons to a peak of approximately 1,300,000 metric tons.

  8. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai.

  9. On the mass distribution of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentim, R.; Rangel, E.; Horvath, J. E.

    2011-06-01

    The distribution of masses for neutron stars is analysed using the Bayesian statistical inference, evaluating the likelihood of the proposed Gaussian peaks by using 54 measured points obtained in a variety of systems. The results strongly suggest the existence of a bimodal distribution of the masses, with the first peak around 1.37 M⊙ and a much wider second peak at 1.73 M⊙. The results support earlier views related to the different evolutionary histories of the members for the first two peaks, which produces a natural separation (even if no attempt to 'label' the systems has been made here). They also accommodate the recent findings of ˜M⊙ masses quite naturally. Finally, we explore the existence of a subgroup around 1.25 M⊙, finding weak, if any, evidence for it. This recently claimed low-mass subgroup, possibly related to the O-Mg-Ne core collapse events, has a monotonically decreasing likelihood and does not stand out clearly from the rest of the sample.

  10. Enhancing non-refractory aerosol apportionment from an urban industrial site through receptor modelling of complete high time-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Jeong, C.-H.; Healy, R. M.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2014-02-01

    Receptor modelling was performed on quadrupole unit mass resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) sub-micron particulate matter (PM) chemical speciation measurements from Windsor, Ontario, an industrial city situated across the Detroit River from Detroit, Michigan. Aerosol and trace gas measurements were collected on board Environment Canada's CRUISER mobile laboratory. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed on the AMS full particle-phase mass spectrum (PMFFull MS) encompassing both organic and inorganic components. This approach was compared to the more common method of analysing only the organic mass spectra (PMFOrg MS). PMF of the full mass spectrum revealed that variability in the non-refractory sub-micron aerosol concentration and composition was best explained by six factors: an amine-containing factor (Amine); an ammonium sulphate and oxygenated organic aerosol containing factor (Sulphate-OA); an ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organic aerosol containing factor (Nitrate-OA); an ammonium chloride containing factor (Chloride); a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor; and a moderately oxygenated organic aerosol factor (OOA). PMF of the organic mass spectrum revealed three factors of similar composition to some of those revealed through PMFFull MS: Amine, HOA and OOA. Including both the inorganic and organic mass proved to be a beneficial approach to analysing the unit mass resolution AMS data for several reasons. First, it provided a method for potentially calculating more accurate sub-micron PM mass concentrations, particularly when unusual factors are present, in this case, an Amine factor. As this method does not rely on a priori knowledge of chemical species, it circumvents the need for any adjustments to the traditional AMS species fragmentation patterns to account for atypical species, and can thus lead to more complete factor profiles. It is expected that this method would be even more useful for HR-ToF-AMS data, due to the ability

  11. Enhancing non-refractory aerosol apportionment from an urban industrial site through receptor modeling of complete high time-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Jeong, C.-H.; Healy, R. M.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2014-08-01

    Receptor modeling was performed on quadrupole unit mass resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) sub-micron particulate matter (PM) chemical speciation measurements from Windsor, Ontario, an industrial city situated across the Detroit River from Detroit, Michigan. Aerosol and trace gas measurements were collected on board Environment Canada's Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research (CRUISER) mobile laboratory. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed on the AMS full particle-phase mass spectrum (PMFFull MS) encompassing both organic and inorganic components. This approach compared to the more common method of analyzing only the organic mass spectra (PMFOrg MS). PMF of the full mass spectrum revealed that variability in the non-refractory sub-micron aerosol concentration and composition was best explained by six factors: an amine-containing factor (Amine); an ammonium sulfate- and oxygenated organic aerosol-containing factor (Sulfate-OA); an ammonium nitrate- and oxygenated organic aerosol-containing factor (Nitrate-OA); an ammonium chloride-containing factor (Chloride); a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor; and a moderately oxygenated organic aerosol factor (OOA). PMF of the organic mass spectrum revealed three factors of similar composition to some of those revealed through PMFFull MS: Amine, HOA and OOA. Including both the inorganic and organic mass proved to be a beneficial approach to analyzing the unit mass resolution AMS data for several reasons. First, it provided a method for potentially calculating more accurate sub-micron PM mass concentrations, particularly when unusual factors are present, in this case the Amine factor. As this method does not rely on a priori knowledge of chemical species, it circumvents the need for any adjustments to the traditional AMS species fragmentation patterns to account for atypical species, and can thus lead to more complete factor profiles. It is expected that this

  12. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-10-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP throughout the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is maybe partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental aerosol and smoke are also investigated, based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at an altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high-altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  13. Aerosol generation and circulation in the shore zone of a Large Alpine lake - 2 - Aerosol distributions over Lake Tahoe, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanCuren, R.; Pederson, J.; Lashgari, A.; Dolislager, L.; McCauley, E.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal, spatial, and size-distribution patterns of particles in ambient air over the surface of Lake Tahoe (Nevada and California) were studied as part of the 2003-2004 Lake Tahoe atmospheric deposition study (LTADS). The concentration of population along the shoreline of Lake Tahoe makes accurate characterization of local aerosol generation and transport especially important in estimation of annual particle flux to the surface of the lake. Measurements taken while cruising on the lake show that aerosol concentrations in near shore areas are primarily controlled by a combination of diurnal cycling of land- and lake- breezes and particle emissions driven by cycles of human activity near the shore. These effects were observed to be highly localized. Highest concentrations were found just offshore from urbanized areas, especially shoreline centers of activity; lowest concentrations were found along undeveloped shoreline; low-to-intermediate concentrations were measured over the middle areas of the lake. The on-lake data reported here indicate that aerosols over the lake, and thus dry deposition to the lake, are dominated by the same processes that control onshore emissions, and that the impact is strongest in the near shore areas of the lake.

  14. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions, with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in BC and OA emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. Cycloalkanes predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. The presence of trace elements in vehicle exhaust raises the concern that ash deposits may accumulate over time in diesel particle filter systems, and may eventually lead to performance problems that require servicing.

  15. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic sources or in marine environments, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be misinterpreted. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components, i.e. components that vaporize but do not flash vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g. chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g. NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in the measurements. Chemical reactions with water vapor and oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g. NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g. WO2C2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are presented and are discussed together with field results showing that measurements of typical continental or urban aerosols are not significantly affected while laboratory

  16. Vertical distribution of dimethylsulfide, sulfur dioxide, aerosol ions, and radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Andreae, T. W.; Kritz, M. A.; Bates, T. S.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical distributions, in temperate latitudes, of dimethylsulfide (DMS), SO2, radon, methanesulfonate (MSA), nonsea-salt sulfate (nss-sulfate), and aerosol Na(+), NH4(+), and NO(-) ions were determined in samples collected by an aircraft over the northeast Pacific Ocean during May 3-12, 1985. DMS was also determined in surface seawater. It was found that DMS concentrations, both in seawater and in the atmospheric boundary layer, were significantly lower than the values reported previously for subtropical and tropical regions, reflecting the seasonal variability in the temperate North Pacific. The vertical profiles of DMS, MSA, SO2, and nss-sulfate were found to be strongly dependent on the convective stability of the atmosphere and on air mass origin. Biogenic sulfur emissions could account for most of the sulfur budget in the boundary layer, while the long-range transport of continentally derived air masses was mainly responsible for the elevated levels of both SO2 and nss-sulfate in the free troposphere.

  17. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  18. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

  19. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols II: Particle Size Distributions as a Function of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing depleted uranium from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluated particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using beta spectrometry, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements was quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 um and a large size mode between 2 and 15 um. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 um shortly after perforation to around 1 um at the end of the 2-hr sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

  20. Size distribution and mixing state of refractory black carbon aerosol from a coastal city in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhao, Zhuzi; Zhang, Ningning; Wang, Yichen; Ni, Haiyan; Tie, Xuexi; Han, Yongming; Zhuang, Mazhan; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jieru; Zhang, Xuemin; Dusek, Uli; Cao, Junji

    2016-11-01

    An intensive measurement campaign was conducted in the coastal city of Xiamen, China to investigate the size distribution and mixing state of the refractory black carbon (rBC) aerosol. The average rBC concentration for the campaign, measured with a ground-based single particle soot photometer (SP2), was 2.3 ± 1.7 μg m- 3, which accounted for ~ 4.3% of the PM2.5 mass. A potential source contribution function model indicated that emissions from coastal cities to the southwest were the most important source for the rBC and that shipping traffic was another likely source. The mass size distribution of the rBC particles was mono-modal and approximately lognormal, with a mass median diameter (MMD) of ~ 185 nm. Larger MMDs (~ 195 nm) occurred during polluted conditions compared with non-polluted times (~ 175 nm) due to stronger biomass burning activities during pollution episodes. Uncoated or thinly-coated particles composed the bulk of the rBC aerosol, and on average ~ 31% of the rBC was internally-mixed or thickly-coated. A positive matrix factorization model showed that organic materials were the predominant component of the rBC coatings and that mixing with nitrate increased during pollution conditions. These findings should lead to improvements in the parameterizations used to model the radiative effects of rBC.

  1. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  2. Retrieving the aerosol particle distribution in Titan's detached layer from ISS limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, B.; Rannou, P.; Lavvas, P.; Cours, T.; West, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    The study of the detached haze layer above Titan's thick atmosphere is one of the key elements to understand the growth of the aerosols in the upper atmosphere of Titan. In this work we will present the results of a radiative transfer inversion of the vertical profile distribution of aerosols in the detached haze layer (from 300 to 600 km) by using the I/F ratio ob- served by Cassini ISS camera. The analyses will focus on the derivation of the particle size distribution.

  3. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  4. Seasonal variation of near surface black carbon and satellite derived vertical distribution of aerosols over a semi-arid station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Raja Obul Reddy; Gugamsetty, Balakrishnaiah; Kotalo, Rama Gopal; Nagireddy, Siva Kumar Reddy; Tandule, Chakradhar Rao; Thotli, Lokeswara Reddy; Shaik, Nazeer Hussain; Maraka, Vasudeva Reddy; Rajuru, Ramakrishna Reddy; Surendran Nair, Suresh Babu

    2017-02-01

    Extensive measurements of aerosol black carbon mass concentration (BC) and vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosols have been carried out using Aethalometer and CALIPSO level - 2 satellite data from December 2012 to November 2014 over a semi-arid station, Anantapur. We found a bimodal distribution in the mass concentrations of BC aerosols on a diurnal scale. A sharp peak was observed during morning rush hours (7:00 to 8:00 LT) almost an hour after the local sunrise. After which, a broad nocturnal peak was found during 21:00 to 22:00 LT. The seasonal mean BC concentrations (Mixed layer height (ML)) were found to be 3.45 ± 1.44 μg/m3 (676 ± 117 m), 2.55 ± 0.85 μg/m3 (1215 ± 190 m), 1.22 ± 0.31 μg/m3 (1134 ± 194 m) and 1.75 ± 0.70 μg/m3 (612 ± 135 m), during the winter, summer, monsoon and post-monsoon respectively. The vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficient and back scattering ratio profiles were derived from Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) showed a strong seasonal variation with aerosols mostly confined below 2 km during the post-monsoon and winter seasons whereas in the other two seasons, the aerosol layer expands beyond 6 km. Depolarization ratios (> 0.2) are higher during summer and monsoon at higher altitude regions demonstrate the presence of dust particles, which contribute to the large aerosol extinction at higher levels. These results are further supported by the backward trajectory cluster analysis.

  5. Distribution of 125Iricin in mice following aerosol inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Doebler, J.A.; Wiltshire, N.D.; Mayer, T.W.; Estep, J.E.; Moeller, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were conducted to examine the uptake and redistribution of 251Iricin from the lungs of mice following nose-only aerosol inhalation exposure. Radiolabelled contents were measured in lung and various extra-pulmonary tissues 15 min through 30 h following 10 min aerosol exposures. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed on whole organ data obtained for lungs, stomach, liver and spleen. Radioactivity within the lungs, maximal at 15 min post-exposure, was eliminated in a biexponential fashion with a long Beta half-life (approx. 40 h). Large amounts of radiolabel were also found within the gastrointestinal tract. Radiolabel within the stomach exhibited an absorption phase and two-compartment elimination. Radiolabel content of many other tissues, including known accumulation sites for intravenously administered toxin, was significantly (p < 0,05) increased (relative to 15 min post-exposure) in association with the early elimination of radiolabel from the lungs, but levels in these tissues were very low and did not increase after 4 h post-exposure. The only exception was our sample of trachea, which showed delayed elevations in radiolabel (peak at 24 h); this pattern was attributable to the contained thyroid (not removed at necropsy) and its trapping of free (125I released) upon tissue 125Iricin degradation. The overall data indicate that ricin administered by aerosol inhalation is delivered to both respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; however, it is not extensively transported from either tract to other potential target sites. Ricin delivered to the lungs is primarily sequestered within the lungs until degradation. Only small amounts of ricin delivered to the gastrointestinal tract are absorbed into the circulation.

  6. Aerosol Size Distribution in a City Influenced by Both Rural and Urban Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. M.; Polanco, J.; Lozano, A.

    2006-12-01

    Most atmospheric studies have focused on sites located in either rural or urban areas. However, there are regions affected by air from both, such as the city of El Paso. Adjacent to the neighboring city of Juarez, Mexico, and in close proximity to rural areas, it is affected by desert particles and both biogenic, anthropogenic emissions. Aerosol properties largely depend upon particle size and this makes it the most important parameter for characterizing the aerosol. We focus on studies using inverse reconstruction models for particle size distribution using aerosol optical depth data. Our methodology uses Twomey's regularization technique that suppresses ill-posedness by imposing smoothing and non-negativity constraints on the desired size distributions. We have also applied T-matrix codes to study the scattering from irregularly shaped particles that exhibit rotational symmetry. Furthermore, our studies include analysis of aerosol size distributions using optic probes and soot photometers, sampled from aircraft at different heights. This work will lead to better characterization of aerosols and their impact in our rural-urban interface region. In addition, it will provide a more accurate assessment of regional transport and better boundary conditions for air quality models.

  7. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  8. Surface acoustic-wave piezoelectric crystal aerosol mass microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, W. D.; Chuan, R. L.

    1989-07-01

    The development of a particulate mass-sensing instrument based on a quartz-crystal microbalance and enhanced with the new surface acoustic-wave (SAW) technology is reported. Mass sensitivity comparisons of a 158-MHz SAW piezoelectric microbalance and a conventional 10-MHz quartz-crystal microbalance show that the SAW crystal is 266 times more sensitive, in good agreement with the theoretical value of 250. The frequency stability of a single SAW resonator is 6 parts in 10 to the 8th over 1 min. The response to temperature changes is found to be very linear over the range +30 to -30 C. A strong response to 15 ppm SO2 has been demonstrated on a chemically coated SAW crystal.

  9. Urban organic aerosols measured by single particle mass spectrometry in the megacity of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Harrison, R. M.

    2011-02-01

    During the month of October 2006, as part of the REPARTEE-I experiment (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment) an Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at an urban background location in the city of London, UK. Fifteen particle types were classified, some of which were accompanied by Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) quantitative aerosol mass loading measurements (Dall'Osto et al., 2009a, b). In this manuscript the origins and properties of four particle types associated with locally generated aerosols, independent of the air mass type advected into London, are examined. One particle type, originating from lubricating oil (referred to as Ca-EC), was associated with morning rush hour traffic emissions. A second particle type, composed of both inorganic and organic species (called Na-EC-OC), was found enhanced in particle number concentration during evening time periods, and is likely to originate from a source operating at this time of day, or more probably from condensation of semi-volatile species, and contains both primary and secondary components. A third class, internally mixed with organic carbon and sulphate (called OC), was found to spike both in the morning and evenings. The fourth class (SOA-PAH) exhibited maximum frequency during the warmest part of the day, and a number of factors point towards secondary production from traffic-related volatile aromatic compounds. Single particle mass spectra of this particle type showed an oxidized polycyclic aromatic compound signature. Finally, a comparison of ATOFMS particle class data is made with factors obtained by Positive Matrix Factorization from AMS data.. Both the Ca-EC and OC particle types correlate with the AMS HOA primary organic fraction (R2 = 0.65 and 0.50 respectively), and Na-EC-OC, but not SOA-PAH, which correlates weakly with the AMS OOA secondary organic aerosol factor (R2 = 0.35). A detailed analysis was conducted to identify ATOFMS particle type(s) representative

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the lowermost troposphere over the Amazonian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, R.; Ström, J.; de Reus, M.; Williams, J.; Fischer, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Hansson, H.-C.

    2004-06-01

    We present measurements of aerosol physico-chemical properties below 5 km altitude over the tropical rain forest and the marine boundary layer (MBL) obtained during the LBA-CLAIRE 1998 project. The MBL aerosol size distribution some 50-100 km of the coast of French Guyana and Suriname showed a bi-modal shape typical of aged and cloud processed aerosol. The average particle number density in the MBL was 383 cm-3. The daytime mixed layer height over the rain forest for undisturbed conditions was estimated to be between 1200-1500 m. During the morning hours the height of the mixed layer increased by 4-5 cm s-1. The median daytime aerosol number density in the mixed layer increased from 450 cm-3 in the morning to almost 800 cm-3 in the late afternoon. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution in the daytime mixed layer over the rain forest showed two distinct patterns. Between dawn and midday, the Aitken mode particle concentrations increased, whereas later during the day, a sharp increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities was observed, resulting in a doubling of the morning accumulation mode concentrations from 150 cm-3 to 300 cm-3. Potential sources of the Aitken mode particles are discussed here including the rapid growth of ultrafine aerosol particles formed aloft and subsequently entrained into the mixed layer, as well as the contribution of emissions from the tropical vegetation to Aitken mode number densities. The observed increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities is attributed to the combined effect of: the direct emissions of primary biogenic particles from the rain forest and aerosol in-cloud processing by shallow convective clouds. Based on the similarities among the number densities, the size distributions and the composition of the aerosol in the MBL and the nocturnal residual layer we propose that the air originating in the MBL is transported above the nocturnal mixed layer up to 300-400 km inland over the rain forest

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the lowermost troposphere over the Amazonian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, R.; Ström, J.; de Reus, M.; Williams, J.; Fischer, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Hansson, H.-C.

    2005-06-01

    We present measurements of aerosol physico-chemical properties below 5 km altitude over the tropical rain forest and the marine boundary layer (MBL) obtained during the LBA-CLAIRE 1998 project. The MBL aerosol size distribution some 50-100km of the coast of French Guyana and Suriname showed a bi-modal shape typical of aged and cloud processed aerosol. The average particle number density in the MBL was 383cm-3. The daytime mixed layer height over the rain forest for undisturbed conditions was estimated to be between 1200-1500m. During the morning hours the height of the mixed layer increased by 144-180mh-1. The median daytime aerosol number density in the mixed layer increased from 450cm-3 in the morning to almost 800cm-3 in the late afternoon. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution in the daytime mixed layer over the rain forest showed two distinct patterns. Between dawn and midday, the Aitken mode particle concentrations increased, whereas later during the day, a sharp increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities was observed, resulting in a doubling of the morning accumulation mode concentrations from 150cm-3 to 300cm-3. Potential sources of the Aitken mode particles are discussed here including the rapid growth of ultrafine aerosol particles formed aloft and subsequently entrained into the mixed layer, as well as the contribution of emissions from the tropical vegetation to Aitken mode number densities. The observed increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities is attributed to the combined effect of: the direct emissions of primary biogenic particles from the rain forest and aerosol in-cloud processing by shallow convective clouds. Based on the similarities among the number densities, the size distributions and the composition of the aerosol in the MBL and the nocturnal residual layer we propose that the air originating in the MBL is transported above the nocturnal mixed layer up to 300-400km inland over the rain forest by

  12. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  13. A Year-round Observation of Size Distribution of Aerosol Particles at the Cape Ochiishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, K.; Mukai, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    New particle formation by nucleation of gas-phase compounds emitted from marine biogenic sources is very important for climate change. To clarify the mechanism of the formation, size distributions of submicron aerosols have been measured at the Cape Ochiishi, facing the North Western Pacific Ocean where primary productivity is high. A test observation was done from 22nd May to 18th June 2008 and a year-round observation has been performed from 16th October 2009 to 7th September 2010. The size distribution from 10 nm to 487 nm in diameter was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI 3034). Sample air was dried to lower than 40%. Transport of sulfate, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) was estimated with Chemical weather FORecasting System (CFORS), developed by Prof. Uno, Kyushu University, Japan. Existence of inversion layer was estimated with temperature profile measured at surface, 10m, 30m, and 50m in altitude. The burst of the particles smaller than 20nm in diameter continuing longer than 3 hrs was observed ten times until 3rd November 2009. Two were observed in early summer and the other was in autumn. Banana shape was faintly observed five times. Transport of sulfate, OC, and BC was observed 3, 8, 9 times, respectively. Source of air mass was estimated with these elements, weather map, and wind direction. Five air masses were estimated to continental. Clearly nucleation related to marine sources was not observed. The size distribution of burst evens of maritime and continental air mass showed the shift of mode to larger diameter. Strong inversion of temperature was observed once. The value of size distribution did not show high. Minimum value of size distribution was observed in the strong rain on 27th October. Acknowledgments This study was partly supported by the Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (18067005). The observation was

  14. Effect of variable power levels on the yield of total aerosol mass and formation of aldehydes in e-cigarette aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gillman, I G; Kistler, K A; Stewart, E W; Paolantonio, A R

    2016-03-01

    The study objective was to determine the effect of variable power applied to the atomizer of refillable tank based e-cigarette (EC) devices. Five different devices were evaluated, each at four power levels. Aerosol yield results are reported for each set of 25 EC puffs, as mass/puff, and normalized for the power applied to the coil, in mass/watt. The range of aerosol produced on a per puff basis ranged from 1.5 to 28 mg, and, normalized for power applied to the coil, ranged from 0.27 to 1.1 mg/watt. Aerosol samples were also analyzed for the production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein, as DNPH derivatives, at each power level. When reported on mass basis, three of the devices showed an increase in total aldehyde yield with increasing power applied to the coil, while two of the devices showed the opposite trend. The mass of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein produced per gram of total aerosol produced ranged from 0.01 to 7.3 mg/g, 0.006 to 5.8 mg/g, and <0.003 to 0.78 mg/g, respectively. These results were used to estimate daily exposure to formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein from EC aerosols from specific devices, and were compared to estimated exposure from consumption of cigarettes, to occupational and workplace limits, and to previously reported results from other researchers.

  15. Aerosol size distribution characteristics of organosulfates in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Bin Yu; Lin, Peng; Hu, Min; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Organosulfates (OSs) have been detected in various atmospheric environments, but their particle size distribution characteristics are unknown. In this work, we examined their size distributions in ambient aerosols to gain insights into the formation processes. Size-segregated aerosol samples in the range of 0.056-18 μm were collected using a ten-stage impactor at a receptor site in Hong Kong in both summer and winter and in Nansha in the Pearl River Delta in winter. The humic-like substances fraction in the size-segregated samples was isolated and analyzed using electrospray ionization coupled with an Orbitrap Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometer. Through accurate mass measurements, ∼190 CHOS and ∼90 CHONS formulas were tentatively identified to be OS compounds. Among them, OS compounds derived from isoprene, α-/β-pinene, and limonene and alkyl OSs having low double bond equivalents (DBE = 0,1) and 0-2 extra O beyond those in -OSO3 were found with high intensity. The biogenic volatile organic compounds-derived OS formulas share a common characteristic with sulfate in that the droplet mode dominated, peaking in either 0.56-1.0 or 1.0-1.8 μm size bin, reflecting sulfate as their common precursor. Most of these OSs have a minor coarse mode, accounting for 0-45%. The presence of OSs on the coarse particles is hypothesized to be a result of OSs on small particle (<0.32 μm) coagulating with coarse particles, as the abundance ratios of OS to non-sea-salt sulfate present on the coarse particles were similar to those on particles <0.32 μm. Among a few pairs of CHONS and CHOS that could be linked up through hydrolysis of a nitrooxy group in the CHONS form (e.g., m/z 294: C10H16O7NS- vs. m/z 249 C10H17O5S- from α/β-pinene, differing by (+H2O-HNO3)), the CHONS compounds had an enhanced coarse mode presence. This could be interpreted as a result of slower hydrolysis of the CHONS compounds on the alkali coarse particles. The low DBE alkyl OS compounds have a

  16. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-05-13

    Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

  17. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    -salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  18. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Russell, H. R.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Main, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar (M *), gas (M gas), and dark matter (M DM) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular Hα emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r 1.1 expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r 0.67 down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”

  19. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Ma, Yaoming; You, Chao; Zhu, Zhikun

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35°N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  20. Statistical analysis of the spatial-temporal distribution of aerosol extinction retrieved by micro-pulse lidar in Kashgar, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Xu, Chidong; Qian, Xianmei; Wei, Heli

    2013-02-11

    The spatial-temporal distribution of dust aerosol is important in climate model and ecological environment. An observation experiment of the aerosol vertical distribution in the low troposphere was made using the micro-pulse lidar system from Sept. 2008 to Aug. 2009 at the oasis city Kashgar, China, which is near the major dust source area of the Taklimakan desert. The monthly averaged temporal variation of aerosol extinction profiles are given in the paper. The profile of aerosol extinction coefficient suggested that the dust aerosol could be vertically transported from the ground level to the higher altitude of above 5 km around the source region, and the temporal distribution showed that the dust aerosol layer of a few hundred meters thick appeared in the seasons of early spring and summer near the ground surface.

  1. An Investigation of Aerosol Measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment: Validation, Size Distributions, Composition, and Relation to Other Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry; Hervig, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The efforts envisioned within the original proposal (accepted February 1994) and the extension of this proposal (accepted February 1997) included measurement validations, the retrieval of aerosol size distributions and distribution moments, aerosol correction studies, and investigations of polar stratospheric clouds. A majority of the results from this grant have been published. The principal results from this grant are discussed.

  2. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D K; Matsunaga, A; Docherty, K S; Surratt, J D; Seinfeld, J H; Ziemann, P J; Jimenez, J L

    2010-04-13

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as NO(x)+ ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using NO(x)+ fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, HNO(3)+ ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species.

  3. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized âTypicalâ Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-5 to Subpart F of Part... of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-5 Table F-5 to Subpart F of...

  4. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized âTypicalâ Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-5 to Subpart F of Part... of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-5 Table F-5 to Subpart F of...

  5. Aerosol mass spectrometer for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Kyum; Winterer, Markus

    2005-09-01

    We present a modified aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the in situ analysis of chemical vapor synthesis processes in hot wall reactors and describe the transfer function of the velocity and kinetic-energy measurement. The AMS is a combination of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and a particle mass spectrometer (PMS) and enables the in situ analysis of aerosols with high number concentrations up to 1018m-3. Size distributions of ultrafine particles in the range of 104-107u (amu) can be measured in the PMS. Simultaneously, molecular species up to 300u can be detected in the QMS. In the setup described here a furnace was developed to enable measurement directly at the reactor exit. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) was investigated. TMS started to decompose at about 900K and carbosilanes with two [-Si-C-] units were identified as growth species in the synthesis of SiC from TMS. With increasing temperatures particles were formed and grew by coagulation. At higher temperatures sintering of the particles became an important process. Although the particle mass reduced slightly due to a smaller residence time at higher temperatures in the reactor, the particle velocity in the molecular beam of the AMS decreased significantly. A simple model is used to compare the particle velocity in a molecular beam as a function of particle mass. The significant difference in the particle velocity can be explained by a change in the particle shape factor (κp) due to sintering.

  6. A Comprehensive Archive of Aerosol and Trace Gas Spatial Distributions for Model and Satellite Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Meland, B. S.; Axisa, D.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group has assembled measured aerosol size distributions, gaseous concentrations, and atmospheric state variables covering a 30 year time period into one comprehensive archive. Measurements were made during the period 1987-2013 and include data from a total of 21 NASA field campaigns. Measurements were taken from the ground to over 21 km in altitude, from 72 S Latitude to 90 N latitude on over 300 individual flights on NASA Research Aircraft. Aerosol measurements were made with the University of Denver's Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer (NMASS), Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer, and/or a low-pressure Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) depending on the specific campaign. The science payloads varied with the campaign objectives, but the aerosol data were invariably acquired in conjunction with measurements by other investigators placing them in the context of atmospheric composition. The archive includes location and time of the measurements along with the tropopause heights and selected atmospheric composition and state data such as ambient temperatures and pressures, abundances of ozone, N2O, oxides of nitrogen, water vapor, CO2 etc. The data archive is stored in NetCDF format and includes all relevant metadata for measured quantities. This archive will be hosted by NASA and will be available to the public for model validation. The data includes indexing by scientific campaign, date, and spatial coordinates. This will facilitate comparisons across the available range of times, locations and related measurements. This data set has been used for validation of satellite remote sensing data. Coincident measurements of aerosol size distributions were used to calculate extinction profiles which were compared to those retrieved with the SAGE II satellite. Agreement between extinctions derived from the in situ size measurements and those provided by SAGE II was good for the 452, 525, and 1020 nm wavelength channels, but poor for

  7. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was dominated by organics that appeared to be internally mixed with nitrate or sulfate. The sulfate was most likely formed via heterogeneous reactions, because the SOR was constant under dry conditions (RH < 50%) and began to increase when RH > 50%, suggesting an important contribution from heterogeneous reactions with abundant aerosol water under wet conditions. Finally, the correlations between [NO3-]/[SO42 -] and [NH4+]/[SO42 -] suggest that the homogenous reaction between HNO3 and NH3 dominated the formation of nitrate under conditions of

  8. Analysis of charged aerosols in the mesosphere during the MASS/ECOMA rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott Robert

    In the polar summer mesosphere ice particles grow sufficiently large to scatter sunlight, giving rise to visible cloud displays called Noctilucent Clouds (NLC). In August of 2007, two sounding rockets were launched from the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway carrying the newly developed MASS instrument (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) to study NLC. The instrument detects charged aerosols in four different mass ranges on four pairs of biased collector plates, one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. The first sounding rocket was launched into a Polar Mesospheric Summer echo (PMSE) and into a NLC on 3 August. The solar zenith angle was 93 degrees and NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar. NLC were also detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The data from the MASS instrument shows a negatively charged population with radii >3 nm in the 83--89 km altitude range, which is collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Smaller particles, 1--2 nm in radius with both positive and negative polarity were detected between 86--88 km. Positively charged particles <1 nm in radius were detected at the same altitude. This is the first time the charge number densities of positive and negative NLC particles have been measured simultaneously. A charging model is developed to investigate the coexistence of positively and negatively charged aerosols in the NLC environment as measured by the MASS instrument. Natanson's rate equations are used for the attachment of free electrons and ions and the model includes charging by photo-electron emission and photo-detachment. Although the MASS flight occurred during twilight conditions, the solar UV flux was still sufficient to affect the charge state of the aerosols. The calculations are done assuming three types of particles with different photo-electron charging properties: (1) Icy NLC particles, (2) Hematite particles of meteoric origin as

  9. Size-Segregated Aerosol Composition and Mass Loading of Atmospheric Particles as Part of the Pacific Northwest 2001(PNW2001) Air Quality Study In Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disselkamp, R. S.; Barrie, L. A.; Shutthanadan, S.; Cliff, S.; Cahill, T.

    2001-12-01

    In mid-August, 2001, an aircraft-based air-quality study was performed in the Puget Sound, WA, area entitled PNW2001 (http://www.pnl.gov/pnw2001). The objectives of this field campaign were the following: 1. reveal information about the 3-dimensional distribution of ozone, its gaseous precursors and fine particulate matter during weather conditions favoring air pollution; 2. derive information about the accuracy of urban and biogenic emissions inventories that are used to drive the air quality forecast models; and 3. examine the accuracy of modeled ozone concentration with that observed. In support of these efforts, we collected time-averaged ( { ~}10 minute averages), size-segregated, aerosol composition and mass-loading information using ex post facto analysis techniques of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (s-XRF), proton induced x-ray emissions(PIXE), proton elastic scattering (PESA), and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). This is the first time these analysis techniques have been used together on samples collected from aircraft using an optimized 3-stage rotating drum impactor. In our presentation, we will discuss the aerosol components in three aerosol size fractions as identified by statistical analysis of multielemental data (including total mass, H, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Pb) and relate variations in these components to physical aerosol properties, other gaseous trace constituents and to air mass origin.

  10. On numerical simulation of the global distribution of sulfate aerosol produced by a large volcanic eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Pudykiewicz, J.A.; Dastoor, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the Earth`s atmosphere and can significantly perturb the global atmospheric chemistry. The large amount of sulfate aerosol produced by the oxidation of SO{sub 2} injected into the atmosphere during volcanic eruptions also has a relatively big influence on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s climatic system. The submicron particles of the sulfate aerosol reflect solar radiation more effectively than they trap radiation in the infrared range. The effect of this is observed as cooling of the Earth`s surface. The modification of the global radiation budget following volcanic eruption can subsequently cause significant fluctuations of atmospheric variables on a subclimatic scale. The resulting perturbation of weather patterns has been observed and well documented since the eruptions of Mt. Krakatau and Mt. Tambora. The impact of the sulfate aerosol from volcanic eruptions on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s atmosphere was also confirmed by the studies done with Global Circulation Models designed to simulate climate. The objective of the present paper is to present a simple and effective method to estimate the global distribution of the sulfate aerosol produced as a consequence of volcanic eruptions. In this study we will present results of the simulation of global distribution of sulfate aerosol from the eruption of Mt Pinatubo.

  11. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  12. Characterizing the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Aerosol Optical Thickness Over the Atlantic Basin Utilizing GOES-8 Multispectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert; Prins, Elaine Mae; Feltz, Joleen M.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, modeling and analysis efforts have suggested that the direct and indirect radiative effects of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols play a major role in the radiative balance of the earth and are an important factor in climate change calculations. The direct effects of aerosols on radiation and indirect effects on cloud properties are not well understood at this time. In order to improve the characterization of aerosols within climate models it is important to accurately parameterize aerosol forcing mechanisms at the local, regional, and global scales. This includes gaining information on the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, transport regimes and mechanisms, aerosol optical thickness, and size distributions. Although there is an expanding global network of ground measurements of aerosol optical thickness and size distribution at specific locations, satellite data must be utilized to characterize the spatial and temporal extent of aerosols and transport regimes on regional and global scales. This study was part of a collaborative effort to characterize aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic basin associated with the following three major aerosol components in this region: urban/sulfate, Saharan dust, and biomass burning. In-situ ground measurements obtained by a network of sun photometers during the Smoke Clouds and Radiation Experiment in Brazil (SCAR-B) and the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) were utilized to develop, calibrate, and validate a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Regional implementation of the GOES-8 AOT product was used to augment point source measurements to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal distributions of Atlantic basin aerosols during SCAR-B and TARFOX.

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of inhaled organic aerosol particles by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parkhomchuk, E V; Gulevich, D G; Taratayko, A I; Baklanov, A M; Selivanova, A V; Trubitsyna, T A; Voronova, I V; Kalinkin, P N; Okunev, A G; Rastigeev, S A; Reznikov, V A; Semeykina, V S; Sashkina, K A; Parkhomchuk, V V

    2016-09-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was shown to be applicable for studying the penetration of organic aerosols, inhaled by laboratory mice at ultra-low concentration ca. 10(3) cm(-3). We synthesized polystyrene (PS) beads, composed of radiocarbon-labeled styrene, for testing them as model organic aerosols. As a source of radiocarbon we used methyl alcohol with radioactivity. Radiolabeled polystyrene beads were obtained by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of synthesized (14)C-styrene initiated by K2S2O8 in aqueous media. Aerosol particles were produced by pneumatic spraying of diluted (14)C-PS latex. Mice inhaled (14)C-PS aerosol consisting of the mix of 10(3) 225-nm particles per 1 cm(3) and 5·10(3) 25-nm particles per 1 cm(3) for 30 min every day during five days. Several millions of 225-nm particles deposited in the lungs and slowly excreted from them during two weeks of postexposure. Penetration of particles matter was also observed for liver, kidneys and brain, but not for a heart.

  14. Ambient particle characterization by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry in an urban area of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of aerosol particles in Beijing urban area, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from April 22 to May 4, 2011. 510,341 particles out of 2,953,200 sized particles were characterized by SPAMS in combination with the ART-2a neural network algorithm. The particles were classified as rich-K (39.79%), carbonaceous species (32.7%), industry metal (19.2%), dust (5.7%), and rich-Na (1.76%). Industrial emissions related particles, rich-Fe, rich-Pb, and K-nitrate, were the major components of aerosol particles during haze periods, which were mainly from the steel plants and metal smelting processes around Beijing. Under stagnant meterological conditions, these regional emissions have a vital effect on haze formation. Organic carbon (OC) particles were attributed to biomass burning. NaK-EC was likely to come from local traffic emissions. Internally mixed organic and elemental carbon (OCEC) was found to be from possible sources of local traffic emission and biomass burning. It was found that coarse dust particles were mainly composed of four different types of dust particles, dust-Si, dust-Ca, dust-Al, and dust-Ti. It is the first time that SPAMS was used to study a dust storm in Beijing. Our results showed that SPAMS could be a powerful tool in the identification and apportionment of aerosol sources in Beijing, providing useful reference information for environmental control and management.

  15. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  16. In Situ Aerosol-Size Distributions and Clear-Column Radiative Closure During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Oestroem, E.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) during June and July of 1997, aerosol-size distributions were measured on board the CIRPAS Pelican aircraft through the use of a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and 2 Optical Particle Counters (OPCs). During the campaign, the boundary-layer aerosol typically possessed characteristics representative of a background marine aerosol or a continentally influenced aerosol, while the free-tropospheric aerosol was characterized by the presence or absence of a Saharan dust layer. A range of radiative closure comparisons were made using the data obtained during vertical profiles flown on 4 missions. Of particular interest here are the comparisons made between the optical properties as determined through the use of measured aerosol-size distributions and those measured directly by an airborne 14-wavelength sunphotometer and 3 nephelometers. Variations in the relative humidity associated with each of the direct measurements required consideration of the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol for size-distribution-based calculations. Simultaneous comparison with such a wide range of directly-measured optical parameters not only offers evidence of the validity of the physicochemical description of the aerosol when closure is achieved, but also provides insight into potential sources of error when some or all of the comparisons result in disagreement. Agreement between the derived and directly-measured optical properties varied for different measurements and for different cases. Averaged over the 4 case studies, the derived extinction coefficient at 525 nm exceeded that measured by the sunphotometer by 2.5% in the clean boundary layer, but underestimated measurements by 13% during pollution events. For measurements within the free troposphere, the mean derived extinction coefficient was 3.3% and 17% less than that measured by the sunphotometer during dusty and non-dusty conditions, respectively. Likewise

  17. In Situ Aerosol Size Distributions and Clear Column Radiative Closure During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. R.; Johnson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Oestroem, E.; Noone, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Putaud, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) during June and July of 1997, aerosol size distributions were measured on board the CIRPAS Pelican aircraft through the use of a DMA and two OPCS. During the campaign, the boundary layer aerosol typically possessed characteristics representative of a background marine aerosol or a continentally influenced aerosol, while the free tropospheric aerosol was characterized by the presence or absence of a Saharan dust layer. A range of radiative closure comparisons were made using the data obtained during vertical profiles flown on four missions. Of particular interest here are the comparisons made between the optical properties as determined through the use of measured aerosol size distributions and those measured directly by an airborne 14-wavelength sunphotometer and three nephelometers. Variations in the relative humidity associated with each of the direct measurements required consideration of the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol for size distribution based calculations. Simultaneous comparison with such a wide range of directly measured optical parameters not only offers evidence of the validity of the physicochemical description of the aerosol when closure is achieved, but also provides insight into potential sources of error when some or all of the comparisons result in disagreement. Agreement between the derived and directly measured optical properties varied for different measurements and for different cases. Averaged over the four case studies, the derived extinction coefficient at 525 nm exceeded that measured by the sunphotomoter by 2.5% in the clean boundary later, but underestimated measurements by 13% during pollution events. For measurements within the free troposphere, the mean derived extinction coefficient was 3.3% and 17% less than that measured by the sunphotometer during dusty and nondusty conditions, respectively. Likewise, averaged discrepancies between the derived and measured

  18. Spatially resolved measurements of size and velocity distributions of aerosol droplets from a direct injection nebulizer

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, S.C.K.; Johnson, S.K.; Pang, H.M.; Houk, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    Aerosol droplet sizes and velocities from a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) are measured with radial and axial spatial resolution by phase Doppler particle analysis (PDPA). The droplets on the central axis of the spray become finer and their size becomes more uniform when [approx]20% methanol is added to the usual aqueous solvent. This could explain why the analyte signal is a maximum at this solvent composition when the DIN is used for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mean droplet velocities are 12 to 22 m s[sup [minus]1] with standard deviations of [plus minus]4 to [plus minus]7 m s[sup [minus]1]. The outer fringes of the aerosol plume tend to be enriched in large droplets. The Sauter mean diameter (D[sub 3,2]) and velocity of the droplets also vary substantially with axial position in the aerosol plume. 35 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Aerosol Mass Spectrometry via Laser-Induced Incandescence Particle Vaporization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy B. Onasch

    2011-10-20

    We have successfully developed and commercialized a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) instrument to measure mass, size, and chemical information of soot particles in ambient environments. The SP-AMS instrument has been calibrated and extensively tested in the laboratory and during initial field studies. The first instrument paper describing the SP-AMS has been submitted for publication in a peer reviewed journal and there are several related papers covering initial field studies and laboratory studies that are in preparation. We have currently sold 5 SP-AMS instruments (either as complete systems or as SP modules to existing AMS instrument operators).

  20. Chemical Nature Of Titan’s Organic Aerosols Constrained from Spectroscopic and Mass Spectrometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini-Huygens observations greately extend our knowledge about Titan’s organic aerosols. The Cassini INMS and CAPS observations clearly demonstrate the formation of large organic molecules in the ionosphere [1, 2]. The VIMS and CIRS instruments have revealed spectral features of the haze covering the mid-IR and far-IR wavelengths [3, 4, 5, 6]. This study attempts to speculate the possible chemical nature of Titan’s aerosols by comparing the currently available observations with our laboratory study. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiment to investigate the mass spectrometric and spectroscopic properties of laboratory aerosol analogs [7, 8]. Titan tholins and C2H2 plasma polymer are generated with cold plasma irradiations of N2/CH4 and C2H2, respectively. Laser desorption mass spectrum of the C2H2 plasma polymer shows a reasonable match with the CAPS positive ion mass spectrum. Furthermore, spectroscopic features of the the C2H2 plasma polymer in mid-IR and far-IR wavelegths qualitatively show reasonable match with the VIMS and CIRS observations. These results support that the C2H2 plasma polymer is a good candidate material for Titan’s aerosol particles at the altitudes sampled by the observations. We acknowledge funding supports from the NASA Cassini Data Analysis Program, NNX10AF08G, and from the NASA Exobiology Program, NNX09AM95G, and the Cassini Project. [1] Waite et al. (2007) Science 316, 870-875. [2] Crary et al. (2009) Planet. Space Sci. 57, 1847-1856. [3] Bellucci et al. (2009) Icarus 201, 198-216. [4] Anderson and Samuelson (2011) Icarus 212, 762-778. [5] Vinatier et al. (2010) Icarus 210, 852-866. [6] Vinatier et al. (2012) Icarus 219, 5-12. [7] Imanaka et al. (2004) Icarus 168, 344-366. [8] Imanaka et al. (2012) Icarus 218, 247-261.

  1. Asian aerosols in North America: Extracting the chemical composition and mass concentration of the Asian continental aerosol plume from long-term aerosol records in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancuren, Richard A.

    2003-10-01

    Empirical assessment of the frequency and intensity of dust transport from Asia to North America has found that the dust regularly impacts elevated sites in the western United States, revealing a pattern of consistent, frequent transport above the marine boundary layer. Using the dust as a marker for Asian transport, a subset of Asian-influenced samples was identified within a decade of routine aerosol samples from two sites in the western cordillera of North America: Crater Lake, Oregon, and Mount Lassen, California. This subset was used to guide a statistical analysis to isolate Asian aerosol against the "background" of local contaminants. The analysis was then generalized to all samples during the transport season (March-October) for 1989-1999. A mixture of dust and combustion products dominates the Asian aerosol with typical concentration around 5 μg/m3 and mass median diameter between 2 and 3 μm. Major fine particle (<2.5 μm diameter) constituent fractions are ˜30% mineral, 28% organic compounds, 4% elemental carbon, 10% sulfate, <5% nitrate, and <1% sea salt. A second, possibly Asian, component of aged biomass smoke and sea salt is also present, with typical concentration (when present) around 1.5 μg/m3. Averaged over the transport season the dusty Asian aerosol and the smoky aerosol comprise 60 and 6%, respectively, of total particle mass (<10 μm diameter) and 72 and 13% of fine particle mass at these sites. These data indicate that the Asian continental plume is a significant contributor to aerosol loading at remote high-altitude sites across western North America. This implies a significant influence for Asian emissions on free troposphere aerosols over North America and suggests that they need to be explicitly accounted for in aerosol analyses ranging from climate studies to aerosol regulatory programs.

  2. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  3. Size distributions of n-alkanes, fatty acids and fatty alcohols in springtime aerosols from New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mingjie; Fu, Pingqing; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-12-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in New Delhi, India from March 6 to April 6, 2012. Homologous series of n-alkanes (C19C33), n-fatty acids (C12C30) and n-alcohols (C16C32) were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results showed a high-variation in the concentrations and size distributions of these chemicals during non-haze, haze, and dust storm days. In general, n-alkanes, n-fatty acids and n-alcohols presented a bimodal distribution, peaking at 0.7-1.1 μm and 4.7-5.8 μm for fine modes and coarse modes, respectively. Overall, the particulate matter mainly existed in the coarse mode (≥2.1 μm), accounting for 64.8-68.5% of total aerosol mass. During the haze period, large-scale biomass burning emitted substantial fine hydrophilic smoke particles into the atmosphere, which leads to relatively larger GMDs (geometric mean diameter) of n-alkanes in the fine mode than those during the dust storms and non-haze periods. Additionally, the springtime dust storms transported a large quantity of coarse particles from surrounding or local areas into the atmosphere, enhancing organic aerosol concentration and inducing a remarkable size shift towards the coarse mode, which are consistent with the larger GMDs of most organic compounds especially in total and coarse modes. Our results suggest that fossil fuel combustion (e.g., vehicular and industrial exhaust), biomass burning, residential cooking, and microbial activities could be the major sources of lipid compounds in the urban atmosphere in New Delhi.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang; Ahlm, Lars; Day, Douglas A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhao, Yunliang; Gentner, Drew R.; Weber, Robin J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Rubitschun, Caitlin; Surratt, Jason D.; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Scheller, Scott

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), known to form in the atmosphere from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by anthropogenic and biogenic sources, are a poorly understood but substantial component of atmospheric particles. In this study, we examined the chemical and physical properties of SOA at Bakersfield, California, a site influenced by anthropogenic and terrestrial biogenic emissions. Factor analysis was applied to the infrared and mass spectra of fine particles to identify sources and atmospheric processing that contributed to the organic mass (OM). We found that OM accounted for 56% of submicron particle mass, with SOA components contributing 80% to 90% of OM from 15 May to 29 June 2010. SOA formed from alkane and aromatic compounds, the two major classes of vehicle-emitted hydrocarbons, accounted for 65% OM (72% SOA). The alkane and aromatic SOA components were associated with 200 nm to 500 nm accumulation mode particles, likely from condensation of daytime photochemical products of VOCs. In contrast, biogenic SOA likely formed from condensation of secondary organic vapors, produced from NO3radical oxidation reactions during nighttime hours, on 400 nm to 700 nm sized primary particles, and accounted for less than 10% OM. Local petroleum operation emissions contributed 13% to the OM, and the moderate O/C (0.2) of this factor suggested it was largely of secondary origin. Approximately 10% of organic aerosols in submicron particles were identified as either vegetative detritus (10%) or cooking activities (7%), from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic and aerosol mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. While the mass spectra of several linearly independent SOA components were nearly identical and external source markers were needed to separate them, each component had distinct infrared spectrum, likely associated with the source-specific VOCs from which they formed.

  5. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  6. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  7. Characterization of Organic Nitrate Formation in Limonene Secondary Organic Aerosol using High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, Cameron; Hammes, Julia; Peng, Jianfei; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that organic nitrates (RONO2) are prevalent in the boundary layer, and can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Monoterpenes, including limonene, have been shown to be precursors for the formation of these organic nitrates. Limonene has two double bonds, either of which may be oxidized by NO3 or O3. This leads to the generation of products that can subsequently condense or partition into the particle phase, producing secondary organic aerosol. In order to further elucidate the particle and gas phase product distribution of organic nitrates forming from the reactions of limonene and the nitrate radical (NO3), a series of experiments were performed in the Gothenburg Flow Reactor for Oxidation Studies at Low Temperatures (G-FROST), described by previous work. N2O5 was used as the source for NO3 and NO2, and a characterized diffusion source was used to introduce limonene into the flow reactor. All experiments were conducted in the absence of light, and the concentration of limonene was increased step-wise throughout each experiment to modify the ratio of N2O5to limonene. The experiments were conducted such that both limonene- and N2O5-limited regimes were present. Gas and particle phase products were measured using an iodide High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) coupled to a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO, and particle size and SOA mass concentrations were derived using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CIMS measurement techniques have previously been employed for the measurement of organic nitrate products of such compounds using multiple reagent ions. The use of this instrumentation allowed for the identification of chemical formulas for gas and particle phase species. The findings from the experiments will be presented in terms of the relative gas-particle partitioning of major products and the effects of N2O5/limonene ratios on product distributions. Additionally, a

  8. Detection of Free Tropospheric Air Masses With High So2 and Aerosol Concentrations: Evidence For New Aerosol Particle Formation By H2so4/h2o Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katragkou, E.; Wilhelm, S.; Kiendler, A.; Arnold, F.; Minikin, A.; Schlager, H.; van Velthoven, P.

    Sulfur dioxide and aerosol measurements were performed in the free troposphere (FT) and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) above continental Europe. The measure- ments took place on board of the German research aircraft "Falcon" in 18 April 2001 as a part of the SCAVEX campaign. A novel aircraft based CIMS (Chemical Ion- ization Mass Spectrometry) instrument equipped with an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with a low detection limit (50pptv) and a high time resolution (1.3s) operated by MPI-K was used to perform the SO2 measurements. For the aerosol measurements DLR-IPA operated a Condensation Particle Size Analyzer, detecting particles with diameters d > 4, 7, 9 and 20nm and a PCASP-100X aerosol spectrometer probe (d > 100nm). In the measurements made mostly around 5000m altitude SO2 rich air masses were occasionally observed with SO2 VMR of up to 2900pptv. The strong SO2 pollu- tion was due to fast vertical transport of polluted continental PBL air and small-scale deep convection, as indicated by the 5-day backward 3D trajectories. These observa- tions of strong SO2 pollution have interesting implications for aerosol processes, in- cluding efficient formation of gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and new aerosol particles. They also imply fast growth of freshly nucleated aerosol particles, which increases the chance for new particles to grow to the size of a CCN. Our analysis indicates the occurrence of new particle formation by H2SO4/H2O nucleation and fast new particle growth by H2SO4/H2O condensation and self-coagulation in the different air masses encountered during the flight.

  9. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  10. Chemical composition and aerosol size distribution of the middle mountain range in the Nepal Himalayas during the 2009 pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, P.; Barros, A. P.; Khlystov, A.

    2010-12-01

    mountain valley wind mechanisms induced by the topography along with the valley geometry appear to have a strong control in the diurnal cycle of the aerosol size distribution. During the sampling period, the chemical composition of PM2.5 was dominated by organic matter at both sites. Organic carbon (OC) comprised the major fraction (64-68%) of the aerosol concentration followed by ionic species (24-26%, mainly SO42- and NH4+). Elemental Carbon (EC) compromised 7-10% of the total composition and 27% of OC was found to be water soluble at both sites. The day-to-day variability observed in the time series of aerosol composition could be explained by the synoptic scale haze that extended to the sampling region from the Indian Gangetic Plain (IGP), and rainfall occurrence. In the presence of regional scale haze during dry periods, the mean volume aerosol concentration was found to increase and so did the aerosol mass concentrations.

  11. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  12. Comparison of Summer and Winter California Central Valley Aerosol Distributions from Lidar and MODIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Chu, D. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol distributions from two aircraft lidar campaigns conducted in the California Central Valley are compared in order to identify seasonal variations. Aircraft lidar flights were conducted in June 2003 and February 2008. While the PM2.5 concentration is highest in the winter, the aerosol optical depth measured from MODIS is highest in the summer. A seasonal comparison shows that PM2.5 in the winter can exceed summer PM2.5 by 55%, while summer AOD exceeds winter AOD by 43%. Higher temperatures wildfires in the summer produce elevated aerosol layers that are detected by satellite measurements, but not surface particulate matter monitors. Measurements of the boundary layer height from lidar instruments are necessary to incorporate satellite measurements with air quality measurements.

  13. Aerosol formation and distribution in the Arctic during AGASP-II, March-April 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, Russell C.; Kahl, Jonathan D.; Herbert, Gary A.; Bodhaine, B. A.; Bridgman, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    The Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program has undertaken the determination of the distribution, transport, chemistry, aerosol physics, and radiative effects of the 'Arctic haze' air-pollution phenomenon. Attention has been given the April 2-3, 1986 haze zone, with large condensation nuclei, SO2, and soot-carbon concentrations, which appeared near the Barrow Baseline Station. The composite trajectory of the haze zone has been determined, as has its probable source region. After travelling 10,000 km, the haze still had SO2, aerosol black carbon, and condensation nuclei concentrations in excess of those measured off the East Coast of the U.S. in January of the same year.

  14. [Microorganisms distribution in the aerosol of a manned sealed cabin and the effect of artificial air ionization on this process].

    PubMed

    Zaloguev, S N; Anisimov, B V; Viktorov, A N; Gorshkov, V P

    1981-01-01

    In a manned enclosure the distribution of bacterial aerosol with respect to the size of particles is bimodal. Artificial bipolar ionization of the air may decrease the content of relatively large particles of bacterial aerosol, leaving particles with 2.0-0.6/micrometer in diameter in predominance. These properties of the bacterial aerosol structure may be of importance in the prophylaxis of aerogenic infections of cosmonauts.

  15. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-04-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase, despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information to determine potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. As well, bond scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double bond equivalence to carbon ratio (DBE / #C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of poly-carbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the ambient

  16. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-09-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information for determining potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. Additionally, bond-scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double-bond-equivalence-to-carbon ratio (DBE/#C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of polycarbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the

  17. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  18. Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E; Fergenson, David P

    2007-08-15

    Single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was used for the real-time detection of liquid nerve agent simulants. A total of 1000 dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles each of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, diethyl ethyl phosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and diethyl phthalate using laser fluences between 0.58 and 7.83 nJ/microm2, and mass spectral variation with laser fluence was studied. The mass spectra obtained allowed identification of single particles of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants at each laser fluence used although lower laser fluences allowed more facile identification. SPAMS is presented as a promising real-time detection system for the presence of CWAs.

  19. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summertime from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10% larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10% to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. In contrast to this hypothesis, the modest enhancement we observed in the transition layer was not dominated by OA and was not a large fraction of the summertime AOD.

  20. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  1. Aerosol vertical distribution and optical properties over China from long-term satellite and ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pengfei; Cao, Xianjie; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Naixiu; Sun, Lu; Logan, Timothy; Shi, Jinsen; Wang, Yuan; Ji, Yuemeng; Lin, Yun; Huang, Zhongwei; Zhou, Tian; Shi, Yingying; Zhang, Renyi

    2017-02-01

    The seasonal and spatial variations of vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols over China are studied using long-term satellite observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and ground-based lidar observations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. The CALIOP products are validated using the ground-based lidar measurements at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). The Taklamakan Desert and Tibetan Plateau regions exhibit the highest depolarization and color ratios because of the natural dust origin, whereas the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin and Yangtze River Delta show the lowest depolarization and color ratios because of aerosols from secondary formation of the anthropogenic origin. Certain regions, such as the North China Plain in spring and the Loess Plateau in winter, show intermediate depolarization and color ratios because of mixed dust and anthropogenic aerosols. In the Pearl River Delta region, the depolarization and color ratios are similar to but higher than those of the other polluted regions because of combined anthropogenic and marine aerosols. Long-range transport of dust in the middle and upper troposphere in spring is well captured by the CALIOP observations. The seasonal variations in the aerosol vertical distributions reveal efficient transport of aerosols from the atmospheric boundary layer to the free troposphere because of summertime convective mixing. The aerosol extinction lapse rates in autumn and winter are more positive than those in spring and summer, indicating trapped aerosols within the boundary layer because of stabler meteorological conditions. More than 80 % of the column aerosols are distributed within 1.5 km above the ground in winter, when the aerosol extinction lapse rate exhibits a maximum seasonal average in all study regions except for the Tibetan Plateau. The aerosol extinction lapse rates in the polluted regions are higher

  2. Size Distribution and Chemical Characteristic of Aerosols in Northwestern Black Sea Region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztürk, Fatma; Keles, Melek; Halif Ngagine, Soulemane

    2016-04-01

    Size segregated PM samples were collected at the city center of Bolu, which is northwestern part of the Black Sea region of Turkey between 2015 and 2016. A cascade impactor was used for the collection of weekly PM samples on pre-fired quartz filters in eight different size ranges (9.0-10.0 μm, 5.8-9.0 μm, 4.7-5.8 μm, 3.3-4.7 μm, 2.1-3.3 μm, 1.1-2.1 μm, 0.65-1.1 μm, 0.43-0.65 μm). The collected samples were divided in three parts and each part was analyzed with different analytical technique. The first part of the filter was analyzed in terms of major ions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+). A large suit of metals from Li to U were determined in the second fraction of the filter by means of ICPMS. Lastly, the third part of the filter was analyzed in terms of EC and OC. The preliminary results indicated that the PM mass depicted bimodal distribution and the average concentration of PM10 was about 100 μg/m3for a five week period. Both EC and OC showed bi-modal distribution while these two parameters were more enriched on smaller particles. The average concentrations of EC and OC in PM1 were determined as 4.1 and 40.6 μg/m3, respectively, indicating the secondary organic aerosol formation in Bolu ambient air. Among the major ions, SO42- and NH4+ depicted unimodal distribution having significantly higher concentrations in fine particles (< 1 μm) while the rest of the ions present bimodal distribution. Mass closure analysis will be applied to the generated data set and sources will be evaluated by applying PMF. This project was supported financially by Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council (TÜBİTAK) with a project number 114Y429.

  3. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  4. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with continental, urban and marine air masses at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions could be identified in the particle phase. In all

  5. Aerosol Distribution in The Planetary Boundary Layer Aloft a Residential Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Jan; Leoni, Cecilia; Dočekalová, Veronika; Ondráček, Jakub; Zíková, Naděžda

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is an omnipresent component of the Earth atmosphere. Aerosol particle of diameters < 100 nm or > 1 μm defines ultrafine or coarse aerosol particles, respectively. Aerosol particle concentrations within the planetary boundary layer - PBL are measured at the ground level while their vertical profiles in the PBL are usually estimated by modelling. The aim of this study was to construct vertical concentration profiles of ultrafine and coarse aerosol particles from airborne and ground measurements conducted in an urban airshed. Airborne measurements were done by an unmanned airship, remotely controlled with GPS 10 Hz position tracking, and electrically powered with propulsion vectoring, which allows average cruising speed of 6 m.s-1. The airship carried three aerosol monitors and a temperature sensor. The monitors acquired 1 Hz data on mass concentration of coarse and number concentration of ultrafine particles. Four flight sequences were conducted on the 2nd of March 2014 above Plesna village, up-wind suburb of Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region of the Czech Republic. The region is a European air pollution hot-spot. Repeated flights were carried out in several height levels up to 570 m above ground level - a.g.l. Early morning flight revealed a temperature inversion in the PBL up to 70 m a.g.l. This lead to coarse particle concentrations of 50 μgm-3 below the inversion layer and 10 μgm-3 above it. Concurrently, air masses at 90-120 m a.g.l. were enriched with ultrafine particles up to 2.5x104 cm-3, which may indicate a fanning plume from a distant emission source with high emission height. During the course of the day, concentrations of ultrafine and coarse particle gradually decreased. Nevertheless, a sudden increase of ultrafine particle concentrations up to 3.7x104 cm-3 was registered at 400 m a.g.l. at noon and also after a lag of 20 min at the ground. This may indicate formation of new aerosol particles at higher altitudes, which are

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  7. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    DOE PAGES

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; ...

    2015-01-16

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction productsmore » of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4–15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.« less

  8. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    DOE PAGES

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; ...

    2014-07-03

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for several days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (∼50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products ofmore » both aromatics and alkanes. In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.« less

  9. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2014-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for several days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (∼50%) and of shorter duration (1-2 days). The production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes. In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.

  10. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1-2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4-15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.

  11. Mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model and measurement of atmospheric aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Merkulov, V.; Vlasenko, S.; Rose, D.; Pöschl, U.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we derive and apply a mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model for efficient description of concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol particles. The model approach builds on the single hygroscopicity parameter model of Petters and Kreidenweis (2007). We introduce an observable mass-based hygroscopicity parameter κm, which can be deconvoluted into a dilute intrinsic hygroscopicity parameter (κm,∞) and additional self- and cross-interaction parameters describing non-ideal solution behavior and concentration dependencies of single- and multi-component systems. For sodium chloride, the κm-interaction model (KIM) captures the observed concentration and humidity dependence of the hygroscopicity parameter and is in good agreement with an accurate reference model based on the Pitzer ion-interaction approach (Aerosol Inorganic Model, AIM). For atmospheric aerosol samples collected from boreal rural air and from pristine tropical rainforest air (secondary organic aerosol) we present first mass-based measurements of water uptake over a wide range of relative humidity (1-99%) obtained with a new filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) technique. By application of KIM to the measurement data we can distinguish three different regimes of hygroscopicity in the investigated aerosol samples: (I) A quasi-eutonic regime at low relative humidity (~60% RH) where the solutes co-exist in an aqueous and non-aqueous phase; (II) a gradually deliquescent regime at intermediate humidity (~60%-90% RH) where different solutes undergo gradual dissolution in the aqueous phase; and (III) a dilute regime at high humidity (≳90% RH) where the solutes are fully dissolved approaching their dilute intrinsic hygroscopicity. The characteristic features of the three hygroscopicity regimes are similar for both samples, while the RH threshold values vary as expected for samples of different chemical composition. In each regime, the

  12. Air mass modification over Europe: EARLINET aerosol observations from Wales to Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Mattis, Ina; Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; BöSenberg, Jens; Chaikovski, Anatoly; Freudenthaler, Volker; Komguem, Leonce; Linné, Holger; Matthias, Volker; Pelon, Jacques; Sauvage, Laurent; Sobolewski, Piotr; Vaughan, Geraint; Wiegner, Matthias

    2004-12-01

    For the first time, the vertically resolved aerosol optical properties of western and central/eastern European haze are investigated as a function of air mass transport. Special emphasis is put on clean maritime air masses that cross the European continent from the west and become increasingly polluted on their way into the continent. The study is based on observations at seven lidar stations (Aberystwyth, Paris, Hamburg, Munich, Leipzig, Belsk, and Minsk) of the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and on backward trajectory analysis. For the first time, a lidar network monitored continent-scale haze air masses for several years (since 2000). Height profiles of the particle backscatter coefficient and the particle optical depth of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) at 355-nm wavelength are analyzed for the period from May 2000 to November 2002. From the observations at Aberystwyth, Wales, the aerosol reference profile for air entering Europe from pristine environments was determined. A mean 355-nm optical depth of 0.05 and a mean PBL height of 1.5 km was found for clean maritime summer conditions. The particle optical depth and PBL height increased with increasing distance from the North Atlantic. Mean summer PBL heights were 1.9-2.8 km at the continental sites of Leipzig, Belsk, and Minsk. Winter mean PBL heights were mostly between 0.7 and 1.3 km over the seven EARLINET sites. Summer mean 355-nm optical depths increased from 0.17 (Hamburg, northwesterly airflow from the North Sea) and 0.21 (Paris, westerly flow from the Atlantic) over 0.33 (Hamburg, westerly flow) and 0.35 (Leipzig, westerly flow) to 0.59 (Belsk, westerly flow), and decreased again to 0.37 (westerly flow) at Minsk. Winter mean optical depths were, on average, 10-30% lower than the respective summer values. PBL-mean extinction coefficients were of the order of 200 Mm-1 at 355 nm at Hamburg and Leipzig, Germany, and close to 600 Mm-1 at Belsk, Poland, in winter for westerly flows

  13. SO2 photolysis as a source for sulfur mass-independent isotope signatures in stratospehric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, A. R.; Jiang, B.; Guo, H.; Ono, S.

    2015-02-01

    Signatures of sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) have been observed in stratospheric sulfate aerosols deposited in polar ice. The S-MIF signatures are thought to be associated with stratospheric photochemistry following stratospheric volcanic eruptions, but the exact mechanism responsible for the production and preservation of these signatures is debated. In order to identify the origin and the mechanism of preservation for these signatures, a series of laboratory photochemical experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of temperature and added O2 on the S-MIF produced by two absorption band systems of SO2: photolysis in the 190 to 220 nm region and photoexcitation in the 250 to 350 nm region. The SO2 photolysis (SO2 + hν → SO + O) experiments showed S-MIF signals with large 34S/34S fractionations, which increases with decreasing temperature. The overall S-MIF pattern observed for photolysis experiments, including high 34S/34S fractionations, positive mass-independent anomalies in 33S, and negative anomalies in 36S, is consistent with a major contribution from optical isotopologue screening effects and data for stratospheric sulfate aerosols. In contrast, SO2 photoexcitation produced products with positive S-MIF anomalies in both 33S and 36S, which is different from stratospheric sulfate aerosols. SO2 photolysis in the presence of O2 produced SO3 with S-MIF signals, suggesting the transfer of the S-MIF anomalies from SO to SO3 by the SO + O2 + M → SO3 + M reaction. This is supported with energy calculations of stationary points on the SO3 potential energy surfaces, which indicate that this reaction occurs slowly on a single adiabatic surface, but that it can occur more rapidly through intersystem crossing. Based on our experimental results, we estimate a termolecular rate constant on the order of 10-37 cm6 molecule-2 s-1. This rate can explain the preservation of mass independent isotope signatures in stratospheric sulfate

  14. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  15. Spatial and seasonal variations in CCN distribution and the aerosol-CCN relationship over southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Burger, R. P.; Swap, R. J.; Annegarn, H. J.

    2003-07-01

    The sources and transport of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over southern Africa have been investigated using in situ measurements collected during the Aerosol Recirculation and Rainfall Experiment (ARREX) wet season projects and during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000) intensive dry season campaign. CCN concentrations over the subcontinent are generally higher in the dry season than in the wet season and exceed 2000 cm-3 in highly polluted air masses. In the late dry season, CCN concentrations are highest in the northern regions of the subcontinent due to the burning of savanna biomass. Emissions from industries and power plants on the South African Highveld are a prolific year-round source of CCN and are sufficient to account for CCN levels south of 20°S throughout the year. Most CCN are contained within the mixing layer, which extends to an altitude of 3000-4000 m over the plateau and is capped by a temperature inversion. Multiple inversions and absolutely stable layers control the stratification of aerosols and CCN. Biomass burning particles are efficient CCN, and the median diameter of the accumulation mode is large (up to 0.19 μm). Recently emitted industrial aerosols are less soluble and have a smaller median diameter (0.11 μm). Twice as many aerosols act as CCN in the dry season (68%) than in the wet season (34%). The fraction is highest in the dry season over the tropical regions (>80%), where smoke aerosol predominates. Elevated aerosol and CCN concentrations are expected to have implications for direct radiative forcing, especially in the dry season, and for indirect forcing in the wet season.

  16. Spatial distribution of biogenic sulphur compounds in the Arctic aerosol collected during the AREX 2011 and 2012 Oceania ship cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Rugi, Francesco; Becagli, Silvia; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Calzolai, Giulia; Chiari, Massimo; Frosini, Daniele; Ghedini, Costanza; Marconi, Miriam; Grazia Perrone, Maria; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Walczowski, Waldek; Zielinski, Timon

    2013-04-01

    The sea area between Norway and Svalbard Islands (Norwegian and Greenland Seas) is a critical site to study the effects of the climate change on the high-latitude Northern-Hemisphere regions. In particular, changes in extension and/or in the persistence of annual sea-ice, availability of nutrients and trace-elements in the biological-active marine layers and sea surface temperatures could affect the marine primary productivity and the emission into the atmosphere of dimethylsulphide (DMS), produced by phytoplankton metabolic processes. This volatile compound is oxidised in the atmosphere mainly to sulphuric acid and Methanesulphonic acid (MSA), which undergo gas-to-particle processes and form secondary sub-micrometric aerosol particles. In this way, they play a relevant role as cloud concentration nuclei (CCN), therefore controlling the climate through scattering/absorption of solar irradiation and changes in cloud coverage (and so affecting albedo). Here, we report the spatial distribution of MSA and H2SO4 measured on 12-h aerosol samples (PM10) collected during two summer cruises of the Oceania ship (AREX 2011 and 2012 oceanographic cruises). The samples were collected on Teflon filters along several marine transects starting from Tromso (Norway) to Svalbard Island and along the Western side of Svalbard Islands. S-compounds distribution was also compared with the organic carbon (OC) aerosol fraction, determined by a EC/OC thermo-optical analyser, and with the atmospheric concentration of selected carboxylic acids (measured by ion chromatography). Preliminary results on the AREX 2011 aerosol samples show two sharp maxima of non-sea-salt sulphate and MSA in June, in phase one with each other, while lower contribution of biogenic emission are recorded in the filters collected in July. Besides, no clear trend along coastal to open-sea transects is evident. Higher MSA concentrations (up to 120 ng/m3) were measured near the Norwegian coast, along the Tromso

  17. LIDAR Observations of the Vertical Ozone and Aerosol Distribution over Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, V.; Ristori, P.; Taslakov, M.; Dinoev, T.; van den Bergh, H.; Frey, S.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    An international field measurement campaign was held in April - May 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) as part of an effort to understand the complex urban air pollution problems in large cities. Gas phase and aerosol constituents were studied intensively during the campaign. LIDAR played an important role for measuring boundary layer dynamics and photochemical processes by monitoring the vertical distribution of aerosols and ozone. Two elastic DIAL and one Raman DIAL for ozone measurements were operated quasi-simultaneously during the campaign at the CENICA super site. The lidar of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland is an elastic three-wavelength UV DIAL combined with an aerosol lidar at 532 nm with an operational range of 200-6000 m for ozone measurements and 200-10000 m for aerosol measurements. The other elastic system is a commercial, stand alone two-wavelength DIAL produced and operated by ELIGHT Laser Systems GmbH. It performed ozone measurements from 400 to 2000 m. A combined Raman DIAL and aerosol Raman system was on loan from Freie Universität Berlin. This instrument was operated by the MIT team and provided ozone concentration from 350 to 2600 m and multicolor aerosol backscatter, Raman and depolarization. The campaign was designed to cover the height of the annual photochemical season. Rain episodes during the afternoons and the evenings at the beginning of the campaign caused discontinuity in the observation. Improved meteorological conditions from April 25 to May 3 made continuous measurements of all participating Lidars possible. A cloud-topped boundary layer (BL) was the frequently observed in the afternoon during this period. The top of the BL estimated from the aerosol measurements showed steady day-to-day increase, reaching altitudes of up to 4 km, comparable to the altitudes of the surrounding mountains. An obvious detachment of the top of the BL was also observed by the EPFL Lidar during the

  18. Integrated Analyses of Multiple Worldwide Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datasets for Improved Understanding of Aerosol Sources and Processes and for Comparison with Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Jose, Jimenez Luis

    2014-04-28

    composition, concentration, size distribution and (inferred) shape and mixing state in various environments and their regional and seasonal variations within the context of regional and global modeling; and 4) to quantitatively evaluate important processes in various atmospheric environments and during different seasons, focusing on acid-catalyzed SOA formation, new particle growth, and photochemical processes of atmospheric organic aerosols (i.e., SOA production and POA oxidation). We will also examine the correlations and compile the ratios between important pairs of aerosol and gas phase species using region-specific and season-specific correlations and as a function of photochemical age and compare them with the ratios produced by various models. To enable our collaborations with the modelers, we will supply (via a public web interface) AMS data and our analysis results for use in model testing and validation and facilitate the use of the AMS information to constrain calculations of radiative forcing. Model output and AMS measurements and derived parameters will be compared with a focus on regional variability of model/measurement discrepancies and their causes. Finally we will share results, insights and data mining algorithms through peer-reviewed publications, presentations/tutorials at conferences/workshops, and web dissemination of analysis results and in-house developed software packages.

  19. Particle size distribution and inorganic aerosol characterization during DAURE 2009 winter field campaign at Montseny site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranzazu Revuelta, M.; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Plaza, Javier; Coz, Esther; Pey, Jorge; Cusack, Michael; Pandolfi, Marco; Rodríguez-Maroto, Jesús J.; Pujadas, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    During DAURE 2009 winter field campaign, one of the sampling sites was Montseny, a rural background station located 40 km NNE from Barcelona and 25 km W from the Mediterranean Sea. It is a Natural Park and a protected area, thus with low human activity, mainly agriculture. The sampling station was located on a valley with it axis oriented on the direction NW-SE. At this site, a TSI-SMPS (DMA 3071 and CPC 3022) was installed in order to measure the particle number distribution in the size range 15-600 nm during the period March 19-27 with a measurement cycle of 12 minutes The particle mass distribution was measured by a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) using eleven size stages with aluminum substrates and a quartz fiber backup filter. Four samples were taken during the period 13-19 March, two during 24 hours and other two during 48 hours. This impactor has a wider size range allowing to measure from 56 to 18000 nm. The substrates and filters obtained were later analyzed for determining soluble ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and calcium) by IC. There are mainly two different kinds of events measured with the SMPS. When the air masses were coming from SE, which meant that they could come from the park but also from the urban and industrial areas located in the pre-coastal depression, it was characterized by higher particle number concentrations and by size distributions centered on 80 nm. This meant it was an aged aerosol, which had grown up by coagulation, condensation and oxidation processes. When the air masses were coming from NW (the second valley axis side), the particle measured were much smaller, the instrument started to detect particles with 15 nm, but smaller ones could be possible. This meant that new particle nucleation could have occurred in the valley, just before arriving to the sampling point. From MOUDI samplings, two different types of events were also observed. Three of the four samplings coincided with stagnation of air masses or

  20. Meridional Distribution of Aerosol Optical Thickness over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishcha, P.; Silva, Arlindo M.; Starobinets, B.; Long, C. N.; Kalashnikova, O.; Alpert, P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that, over the global ocean, there is hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and no noticeable asymmetry in cloud fraction (CF). In the current study, we focus on the tropical Atlantic (30 Deg N 30 Deg S) which is characterized by significant amounts of Saharan dust dominating other aerosol species over the North Atlantic. We found that, by contrast to the global ocean, over a limited area such as the tropical Atlantic, strong meridional asymmetry in dust aerosols was accompanied by meridional CF asymmetry. During the 10-year study period (July 2002 June 2012), NASA Aerosol Reanalysis (aka MERRAero) showed that, when the meridional asymmetry in dust aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was the most pronounced (particularly in July), dust AOT averaged separately over the tropical North Atlantic was one order of magnitude higher than dust AOT averaged over the tropical South Atlantic. In the presence of such strong meridional asymmetry in dust AOT in July, CF averaged separately over the tropical North Atlantic exceeded CF averaged over the tropical South Atlantic by 20%. Our study showed significant cloud cover, up to 0.8 - 0.9, in July along the Saharan Air Layer which contributed to above-mentioned meridional CF asymmetry. Both Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements and MERRAero data were in agreement on seasonal variations in meridional aerosol asymmetry. Meridional asymmetry in total AOT over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence over the North Atlantic was maximal. In September and October, there was no noticeable meridional asymmetry in total AOT and meridional CF distribution over the tropical Atlantic was almost symmetrical.

  1. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  2. Measuring the temporal evolution of aerosol composition in a remote marine environment influenced by Saharan dust outflow using a new single particle mass spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Flynn, Michael; Taylor, Jonathan; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Refractory material constitutes a significant fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden and has a strong influence on climate through the direct radiative effect and aerosol-cloud interactions, particularly in cold and mixed phase clouds. Composition of refractory aerosols is traditionally measured using off-line analytical techniques such as filter analyses. However, when using off-line techniques the temporal evolution of the data set is lost, meaning the measurements are difficult to relate to atmospheric processes. Recently, single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has proven a useful tool for the on-line study of refractory aerosols with the ability to probe size resolved chemical composition with high temporal resolution on a particle by particle basis. A new Laser Ablation Aerosol Time-of-Flight (LAAP-TOF) SPMS instrument with a modified optical detection system was deployed for ground based measurements at Praia, Cape Verde during the Ice in Cloud - Dust (ICE-D) multi-platform campaign in August 2015. A primary aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of Saharan dust on ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds. The instrument was operated over a 16 day period in which several hundred thousand single particle mass spectra were obtained from air masses with back trajectories traversing the Mid-Atlantic, Sahara Desert and West Africa. The data presented indicate external mixtures of sea salt and silicate mineral dust internally mixed with secondary species that are consistent with long range transport to a remote marine environment. The composition and size distributions measured with the LAAP-TOF are compared with measurements from an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and data from SEM-EDX analysis of filter samples. The particle number fraction identified as silicate mineral from the mass spectra correlates with a fraction of the incandescent particles measured with the SP2. We discuss the suitability of the modified

  3. Size distribution, composition and origin of the submicron aerosol in the marine boundary layer during the eastern Mediterranean "SUB-AERO" experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.; Housiadas, C.; Lazaridis, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mitsakou, C.; Smolík, J.; Ždímal, V.

    A period of intensive physical and chemical aerosol characterisation measurements was held over 5 days during July 2000 as part of the European SUB-AERO experiment.. Concurrent measurements were performed at the Finokalia remote coastal site on the island of Crete (Greece) and onboard the R/V " Aegaeon" which cruised in south part of the Aegean Sea northwards of Crete. The objective of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of microphysical parameters of the submicron aerosol and their dependence on airmass origin and chemical composition. The results reflect the submicron aerosol properties during airmass transport from the north including Europe and the Balkans and are in line with other studies on the aerosol properties of polluted continental air entering the marine boundary layer (MBL). Concentrations of submicron particulate matter (PM) mass were relatively higher at sea (20 μg m -3) compared to the coastal site (16 μg m -3). Concentrations of both organic carbon and sulphate, being the major water soluble component, were also higher at sea than at land. The high concentrations of ammonium and those of the water soluble organics, such as oxalate, can be attributed to emissions from mainland forest fires. The submicron aerosol number size distribution was unimodal with mobility mean diameters ( dg) ranging from 98 to 144 μm and standard deviations ( σg) from 1.56 to 1.9. Aerosol number concentrations at Finokalia were at least 50% lower especially when R/V Aegaeon sampled polluted air, but the modal parameters of the size distribution were very similar ( dg: 111-120, σg: 1.55-1.91). The surface MBL, under these conditions, was an aerosol rich environment where aerosol particles were transported both by the surface wind, advected from higher layers, chemically processed by interactions with gaseous precursors and physically altered by water vapour. The number to volume ratio for the submicrometer aerosol fraction reflected the

  4. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Heterogeneous Particles: Implications for Applications to Complex Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longin, T.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Wingen, L. M.; Lyster, K.; Anderson, C.; Kumbhani, S.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a direct, real time technique for obtaining mass spectra of gases, liquid droplets, solid particles, and aerosols with little sample processing. EESI-MS involves the interaction of charged electrospray droplets with a separate spray containing the analyte of interest, but the exact mechanism by which the solvent droplets extract analyte from the sample is unclear. Possible mechanisms include complete coalescence of the sample particle with the solvent droplet in which all of the analyte is incorporated into the solvent or a more temporary interaction such that only some of the analyte is transferred to the solvent. Previous studies of the mechanism of EESI-MS on homogeneous particles indicate that both mechanisms are possible. We studied the behavior of EESI-MS toward heterogeneous particles created by coating NaCl particles with various thicknesses of organic diacids. Our results indicate that the signal strength depends on the solubility of the organic acid in the electrospray solvent, in agreement with previous studies, and also that the outer 10-15 nm of the particles are most susceptible to extraction into the electrospray droplets. Our results combined with those of previous studies suggest that the mass spectra obtained with EESI will not necessarily reflect the overall particle composition, especially for particles that are spatially inhomogeneous, and hence caution in interpretation of the data is advised for application to complex atmospheric aerosol.

  5. Global View of Aerosol Vertical Distributions from CALIPSO Lidar Measurements and GOCART Simulations: Regional and Seasonal Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Winker, David M.; Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Kittaka, Chieko; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study examines seasonal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosols through a statistical analysis of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar observations from June 2006 to November 2007. A data-screening scheme is developed to attain good quality data in cloud-free conditions, and the polarization measurement is used to separate dust from non-dust aerosol. The CALIPSO aerosol observations are compared with aerosol simulations from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The CALIPSO observations of geographical patterns and seasonal variations of AOD are generally consistent with GOCART simulations and MODIS retrievals especially near source regions, while the magnitude of AOD shows large discrepancies in most regions. Both the CALIPSO observation and GOCART model show that the aerosol extinction scale heights in major dust and smoke source regions are generally higher than that in industrial pollution source regions. The CALIPSO aerosol lidar ratio also generally agrees with GOCART model within 30% on regional scales. Major differences between satellite observations and GOCART model are identified, including (1) an underestimate of aerosol extinction by GOCART over the Indian sub-continent, (2) much larger aerosol extinction calculated by GOCART than observed by CALIPSO in dust source regions, (3) much weaker in magnitude and more concentrated aerosol in the lower atmosphere in CALIPSO observation than GOCART model over transported areas in midlatitudes, and (4) consistently lower aerosol scale height by CALIPSO observation than GOCART model. Possible factors contributing to these differences are discussed.

  6. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant Chandrakar, Kamal; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-01

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc<τtτc<τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc>τtτc>τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τcτc is the phase-relaxation time and τtτt is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs1=τc1+τt

  7. The link between organic aerosol mass loading and degree of oxygenation: an α-pinene photooxidation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenberger, L.; Barmet, P.; Slowik, J. G.; Praplan, A. P.; Dommen, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-09-01

    A series of smog chamber (SC) experiments was conducted to identify driving factors responsible for the discrepancy between ambient and SC aerosol degree of oxygenation. An Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer is used to compare mass spectra from α-pinene photooxidation with ambient aerosol. Composition is compared in terms of the fraction of organic mass measured at m/z 44 (f44), a surrogate for carboxylic/organic acids as well as the atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C), vs. f43, a surrogate for aldehydes, alcohols and ketones. Low (near-ambient) organic mass concentrations were found to be necessary to obtain oxygenation levels similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) commonly identified in ambient measurements. The effects of organic mass loading and OH (hydroxyl radical) exposure were decoupled by inter-experiment comparisons at the same integrated OH concentration. On average, an OH exposure of 2.9 ± 1.3 × 107 cm-3 h is needed to increase f44 by 1% during aerosol aging. For the first time, LV-OOA-like aerosol from the abundant biogenic precursor α-pinene was produced in a smog chamber by oxidation at typical atmospheric OH concentrations. Significant correlation between measured secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and reference LV-OOA mass spectra is shown by Pearson's R2 values larger than 0.90 for experiments with low organic mass concentrations between 1.5 and 15 μg m-3 at an OH exposure of 4 × 107 cm-3 h, corresponding to about two days oxidation time in the atmosphere, based on a global mean OH concentration of ∼1 × 106 cm-3. Not only is the α-pinene SOA more oxygenated at low organic mass loadings, but the functional dependence of oxygenation on mass loading is enhanced at atmospherically-relevant precursor concentrations. Since the degree of oxygenation influences the chemical, volatility and hygroscopic properties of ambient aerosol, smog chamber studies must be performed at near

  8. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large‐scale precipitation change

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol‐induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol‐cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data. PMID:27134319

  9. Number-size distribution of aerosol particles and new particle formation events in tropical and subtropical Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Miura, K.; Kawata, R.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Omori, Y.; Tanimoto, H.

    2016-10-01

    Number-size distributions of aerosol particles with diameters of 10-500 nm in the marine boundary layer were observed continually onboard the R/V Hakuho Maru over the equatorial and subtropical North Pacific and South Pacific during December 2011-March 2012. Number-size distributions over each area were parameterized using a sum of up to three lognormal functions. Bi-modal size distributions with peak diameters at 30-80 nm (Aitken mode) and 100-200 nm (accumulation mode) were observed frequently. Larger peak diameters of Aitken and accumulation modes were observed over the eastern equator, where 5-day backward trajectories showed that the air masses had derived from high-chlorophyll oceanic regions without precipitation. Smaller peak diameters and low concentrations were often observed over the North Pacific. The trajectories show that such air mass originated from oceanic regions with less chlorophyll, exhibiting high precipitation frequency. New particle formation (NPF) events have often been observed over the mid-latitude eastern South Pacific with a low condensation sink (CS) and some dimethyl sulfide, although none was observed over the equator, where CS was higher. The lesser CS condition at NPF events was mostly correlated with local precipitation or precipitation along the trajectories within 1 day. These results suggest that differences of the number-size distribution and occasions of NPF events among sea areas most closely accord with precipitation along the trajectories.

  10. Characterization of Ambient Aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 Campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Results from the CENICA Supersite

    SciTech Connect

    Salcedo, D; Onasch, Timothy B; Dzepina, K; Canagaratna, M R; Zhang, Q; Huffman, A J; DeCarlo, Peter; Jayne, J T; Mortimer, P; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kolb, C E; Johnson, Kirsten S; Zuberi, Bilal M; Marr, L; Volkamer, Rainer M; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J; Cardenas, B; Bernabe, R; Marquez, C; Gaffney, Jeffrey S; Marley, Nancy A; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V; Xie, YuLong; Brune, W H; Lesher, R; Shirley, T; Jiminez, J L

    2006-03-24

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite, while another was deployed in the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from March 29-May 4, 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. This is the first of a series of papers reporting the AMS results from this campaign. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 μm (NR PM1) with high time and size resolution. For the first time, we report field results from a beam width probe, which was used to study the shape and mixing state of the particles and to quantify potential losses of irregular particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS. Data from this probe show that no significant amount of irregular particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening. A comparison of the CENICA and AML AMSs measurements is presented, being the first published intercomparison between two quadrupole AMSs. The speciation, and mass concentrations reported by the two AMSs compared well. In order to account for the refractory material in the aerosol, we also present measurements of Black Carbon (BC) using an aethalometer and an estimate of the aerosol soil component obtained from PIXE analysis of filters. Comparisons of (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration with other collocated particle instruments (a LASAIR Optical Particle Counter, a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) and a DustTrack Aerosol Monitor) are also presented. The comparisons show that the (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration during MCMC-2003 is a good approximation to the total PM₂.₅ mass concentration.

  11. Comparative analysis of urban atmospheric aerosol by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS).

    PubMed

    Johnson, K S; Laskin, A; Jimenez, J L; Shutthanandan, V; Molina, L T; Salcedo, D; Dzepina, K; Molina, M J

    2008-09-01

    A multifaceted approach to atmospheric aerosol analysis is often desirable in field studies where an understanding of technical comparability among different measurement techniques is essential. Herein, we report quantitative intercomparisons of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), performed of fline under a vacuum, with analysis by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) carried out in real-time during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Good agreement was observed for mass concentrations of PIXE-measured sulfur (assuming it was dominated by SO4(2-)) and AMS-measured sulfate during most of the campaign. PESA-measured hydrogen mass was separated into sulfate H and organic H mass fractions, assuming the only major contributions were (NH4)2SO4 and organic compounds. Comparison of the organic H mass with AMS organic aerosol measurements indicates that about 75% of the mass of these species evaporated under a vacuum. However approximately 25% of the organics does remain under a vacuum, which is only possible with low-vapor-pressure compounds, and which supports the presence of high-molecular-weight or highly oxidized organics consistent with atmospheric aging. Approximately 10% of the chloride detected by AMS was measured by PIXE, possibly in the form of metal-chloride complexes, while the majority of Cl was likely present as more volatile species including NH4Cl. This is the first comparison of PIXE/PESA and AMS and, to our knowledge, also the first report of PESA hydrogen measurements for urban organic aerosols.

  12. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  13. Characteristics of Aerosol Volume Distributions Measured at Meppen, W. Germany.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    shown in Fig. 3-1 have been identified previously by Typically, size distribution data has been presented Whitby (1978), who termed the mode in the...3-2(a) for 4 November, the middle mode appears out by Whitby et al. (1972), Shettle (1975) and demon- with a coarse particle mode and in Fig. 3-2(b...123 999. 0275, NTIS No. ADA 114 637. Whitby , K.T., R.B. Husar and B.Y.H. Liu (1972), "The p . Johnson, R.W. and W.S. Hering (1981), "An Analysis of

  14. Asian aerosols: current and year 2030 distributions and implications to human health and regional climate change.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Gregory R; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Kulkarni, Sarika; D'Allura, Alessio; Tang, Youhua; Streets, David; Zhang, Qiang; Bond, Tami C; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Jamroensan, Aditsuda; Marrapu, Pallavi

    2009-08-01

    Aerosol distributions in Asia calculated over a 4-year period and constrained by satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are presented. Vast regions in Asia that include > 80% of the population have PM2.5 concentrations that exceed on an annual basis the WHO guideline of 10 microg/m3, often by factors of 2 to 4. These high aerosol loadings also have important radiative effects, causing a significant dimming at the surface, and mask approximately 45% of the warming by greenhouse gases. Black carbon (BC) concentrations are high throughout Asia, representing 5-10% of the total AOD, and contributing significantly to atmospheric warming (its warming potential is approximately 55% of that due to CO2). PM levels and AODs in year 2030, estimated based on simulations that consider future changes in emissions, are used to explore opportunities for win-win strategies built upon addressing air quality and climate change together. It is found that in 2030 the PM2.5 levels in significant parts of Asia will increase and exacerbate health impacts; but the aerosols will have a larger masking effect on radiative forcing, due to a decrease in BC and an increase in SO2 emissions.

  15. Aerosol characterization over the southeastern United States using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: spatial and seasonal variation of aerosol composition and sources with a focus on organic nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-07-01

    on the HR-ToF-AMS measurements, we estimate that the nitrate functionality from organic nitrates contributes 63-100 % to the total measured nitrates in summer. Furthermore, the contribution of organic nitrates to total OA is estimated to be 5-12 % in summer, suggesting that organic nitrates are important components in the ambient aerosol in the southeastern USA. The spatial distribution of OA is investigated by comparing simultaneous HR-ToF-AMS measurements with ACSM measurements at two different sampling sites. OA is found to be spatially homogeneous in summer due possibly to stagnant air mass and a dominant amount of regional secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the southeastern USA. The homogeneity is less in winter, which is likely due to spatial variation of primary emissions. We observe that the seasonality of OA concentration shows a clear urban/rural contrast. While OA exhibits weak seasonal variation in the urban sites, its concentration is higher in summer than winter for rural sites. This observation from our year-long measurements is consistent with 14 years of organic carbon (OC) data from the SouthEastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network. The comparison between short-term measurements with advanced instruments and long-term measurements of basic air quality indicators not only tests the robustness of the short-term measurements but also provides insights in interpreting long-term measurements. We find that OA factors resolved from PMF analysis on HR-ToF-AMS measurements have distinctly different diurnal variations. The compensation of OA factors with different diurnal trends is one possible reason for the repeatedly observed, relatively flat OA diurnal profile in the southeastern USA. In addition, analysis of long-term measurements shows that the correlation between OC and sulfate is substantially stronger in summer than winter. This seasonality could be partly due to the effects of sulfate on isoprene SOA formation as revealed by

  16. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  17. SO2 photolysis as a source for sulfur mass-independent isotope signatures in stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, A. R.; Jiang, B.; Guo, H.; Ono, S.

    2014-09-01

    Signatures of sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) have been observed in stratospheric sulfate aerosols deposited in polar ice. The S-MIF signatures are associated with stratospheric photochemistry following stratospheric volcanic eruptions, but the exact mechanism responsible for the production and preservation of these signatures is debated. In order to identify the origin and the mechanism of preservation for these signatures, a series of laboratory photochemical experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of temperature and added O2 on S-MIF produced by the two absorption band systems of SO2 photolysis in the 190 to 220 nm region and photoexcitation in the 250 to 350 nm region. The SO2 photolysis (SO2 + hν → SO + O) experiments showed S-MIF signals with large 34S / 32S fractionation, which increases with decreasing temperature. The overall S-MIF pattern observed for photolysis experiments, including high 34S / 32S fractionations, positive mass-independent anomalies in 33S, and negative anomalies in 36S, is consistent with a major contribution from optical isotopologue screening effects and measurements for stratospheric sulfate aerosols. SO2 photoexicitation produced products with positive MIF anomalies in both 33S and 36S that is different from stratospheric aerosols. SO2 photolysis in the presence of O2 produced SO3 with S-MIF signals, suggesting the transfer of the MIF signals of SO to SO3 by the SO + O2 + M → SO3 + M reaction. This is supported with energy calculations of stationary points on the SO3 potential energy surfaces, which indicate that this reaction occurs slowly on a single adiabatic surface, but that it can occur more rapidly through intersystem crossing. The results from our experiments constrain the termolecular reaction rate to between 1.0 × 10-37 cm6 molecule-2 s-1 and 1.0 × 10-36 cm6 molecule-2 s-1. This rate can explain the preservation of mass independent isotope signatures in stratospheric sulfate

  18. The impact of air mass advection on aerosol optical properties over Gotland (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdun, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Anna; Kratzer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, measurements of aerosol optical properties from the Gotland station of the AERONET network, combined with a two-stage cluster analysis of back trajectories of air masses moving over Gotland, were used to identify the main paths of air mass advection to the Baltic Sea and to relate them to aerosol optical properties, i.e. the aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength λ = 500 nm, AOT (500) and the Ångström exponent for the spectral range from 440 to 870 nm, α(440,870). One- to six-day long back trajectories ending at 300, 500 and 3000 m above the station were computed using the HYSPLIT model. The study shows that in the Gotland region, variability in aerosol optical thickness AOT(500) is more strongly related to advections in the boundary layer than to those in the free troposphere. The observed variability in AOT(500) was best explained by the advection speeds and directions given by clustering of 4-day backward trajectories of air arriving in the boundary layer at 500 m above the station. 17 clusters of 4-day trajectories arriving at altitude 500 m above the Gotland station (sea level) derived using two-stage cluster analysis differ from each other with respect to trajectory length, the speed of air mass movement and the direction of advection. They also show different cluster means of AOT(500) and α(440,870). The cluster mean AOT(500) ranges from 0.342 ± 0.012 for the continental clusters M2 (east-southeast advection with moderate speed) and 0.294 ± 0.025 for S5 (slow south-southeast advection) to 0.064 ± 0.002 and 0.069 ± 0.002 for the respective marine clusters L3 (fast west-northwest advection) and M3 (north-northwest advection with moderate speed). The cluster mean α(440,870) varies from 1.65-1.70 for the short-trajectory clusters to 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.06 ± 0.03 for the Arctic marine cluster L4 (fast inflow from the north) and marine cluster L5 (fast inflow from the west) respectively.

  19. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini v. Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas-liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D3,2) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D3,2), within a span of 0.07-0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined.

  20. Aged boreal biomass-burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number-size distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellite) measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in northwestern Ontario. The composite median size distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter) and σ = 1.5, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.09-0.17 μg m-3 ppbv-1 (parts per billion by volume) with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA (organic aerosol) production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period (plume age: 1-2 days), though it does not preclude OA production/loss at earlier stages. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We

  1. Constraining aerosol optical models using ground-based, collocated particle size and mass measurements in variable air mass regimes during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2013-10-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment (λ = 550 nm) for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Achieving full optical closure is hampered by limitations in accounting for the role of water vapor in the system, uncertainties in the instruments and the need for further knowledge in the source apportionment of the model's major chemical components. Nonetheless, our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulfate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an

  2. Constraining Aerosol Optical Models Using Ground-Based, Collocated Particle Size and Mass Measurements in Variable Air Mass Regimes During the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulphate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulphate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Extinctive features at significantly smaller time scales than the one-day sample period of IMPROVE are more difficult to reproduce, as this requires further knowledge concerning the source apportionment of major chemical components in the model. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an important link for advancing remote

  3. In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties and number size distributions in a coastal region of Norway during the summer of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lopez, J. F.; Montilla, E.; Torres, B.; Rodríguez, E.; Bennouna, Y.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2012-07-01

    (StD = 4251 cm-3), respectively, and the modal correlations were also investigated. The optical and microphysical parameters, as well as their relationship with each other, are reported. σs correlated strongly with the number concentration of accumulation mode particles and more strongly with the micrometer fraction of particles, but weak correlations were observed for the Aitken and nucleation modes. The origins and pathways of the air masses were examined, and based on sector classification, a relationship between the air mass origin, the optical parameters and the size distributions was established. The low values of the optical and microphysical parameters indicate that the predominant regional aerosol is mostly clean and the shape of the size distribution is characterized by bimodal median size distributions. However, the relationships between the air mass origins and the parameters studied allow us to describe two characteristic situations: the one of the northern and western air masses, which were predominantly composed of marine aerosols and presented the lowest optical and microphysical values observed, indicating predominantly non-absorbent and coarser particles; and the one of the eastern and southern air masses, in which continental aerosols were predominant and exhibited higher values for all parameters, indicating the presence of smaller absorbent particles. The north-northeastern air masses presented the strongest Aitken mode, indicating more recently formed particles, and the southeastern air masses presented the strongest accumulation mode (however, the southeastern air masses were the least common, accounting for only 3% of occurrences).

  4. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low.

  5. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  6. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. These vertical profiles were collected over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summer of 2013 as part of two separate field studies: the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study and the Study of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10 % larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10 % to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary aerosol aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. The first study attributes the layer aloft to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) while

  7. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  8. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  9. Impact of maritime air mass trajectories on the Western European coast urban aerosol.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S M; Silva, A I; Freitas, M C; Dzung, H M; Caseiro, A; Pio, C A

    2013-01-01

    Lisbon is the largest urban area in the Western European coast. Due to this geographical position the Atlantic Ocean serves as an important source of particles and plays an important role in many atmospheric processes. The main objectives of this study were to (1) perform a chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM2.5) sampled in Lisbon, (2) identify the main sources of particles, (3) determine PM contribution to this urban area, and (4) assess the impact of maritime air mass trajectories on concentration and composition of respirable PM sampled in Lisbon. During 2007, PM2.5 was collected on a daily basis in the center of Lisbon with a Partisol sampler. The exposed Teflon filters were measured by gravimetry and cut into two parts: one for analysis by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and the other by ion chromatography (IC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and multilinear regression analysis (MLRA) were used to identify possible sources of PM2.5 and determine mass contribution. Five main groups of sources were identified: secondary aerosols, traffic, calcium, soil, and sea. Four-day backtracking trajectories ending in Lisbon at the starting sampling time were calculated using the HYSPLIT model. Results showed that maritime transport scenarios were frequent. These episodes were characterized by a significant decrease of anthropogenic aerosol concentrations and exerted a significant role on air quality in this urban area.

  10. Analysis of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, A.; Smith, J. S.; Laskin, J.

    2009-05-01

    Chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols presents a serious analytical challenge because of the complexity of particulate matter analyte composed of a large number of compounds with a wide range of molecular structures, physico-chemical properties, and reactivity. In this study the chemical composition of the nitrogen containing organic (NOC) constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples is characterized by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA may play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region. Atmospheric processing and chemical transformations of alkaloids in the particulate phase will be discussed.

  11. The Effect of Solvent on the Analysis of Secondary Organic Aerosol Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Walser, Maggie L.; Dessiaterik, Yury; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

    2008-08-29

    Solvent-analyte reactions in organic aerosol (OA) extracts prepared for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) were examined. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by ozonation of d-limonene as well as several test organic chemicals with functional groups typical for OA constituents were dissolved and stored in methanol, d3-methanol, acetonitrile, and d3-acetonitrile to investigate the extent and relative rates of reactions between analyte and solvent. High resolution ESI-MS showed that reactions of carbonyls with methanol produce significant amounts of hemiacetals and acetals on time scales ranging from several minutes to several days, with the reaction rates increasing in acidified solutions. Carboxylic acid groups were observed to react with methanol resulting in the formation of esters. In contrast, acetonitrile extracts showed no evidence of reactions with analyte molecules, suggesting that acetonitrile is the preferred solvent for SOA extraction. The use of solvent-analyte reactivity as an analytical chemistry tool for the improved characterization of functional groups in complex organic mixtures was also demonstrated. Direct comparison between ESI mass spectra of the same SOA samples extracted in reactive (methanol) versus non-reactive (acetonitrile) solvents was used to estimate the relative fractions of ketones (≥38%), aldehydes (≥6%), and carboxylic acids (≥55%) in d-limonene SOA.

  12. Distribution of sulfur aerosol precursors in the SPCZ released by continuous volcanic degassing at Ambrym, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Menkes, Christophe; Bani, Philipson; Marchesiello, Patrick; Curci, Gabriele; Grell, Georg A.; Frouin, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The Melanesian Volcanic Arc (MVA) emits about 12 kT d- 1 of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the atmosphere from continuous passive (non-explosive) volcanic degassing, which contributes 20% of the global SO2 emission from volcanoes. Here we assess, from up-to-date and long-term observations, the SO2 emission of the Ambrym volcano, one of the dominant volcanoes in the MVA, and we investigate its role as sulfate precursor on the regional distribution of aerosols, using both satellite observations and model results at 1° × 1° spatial resolution from WRF-Chem/GOCART. Without considering aerosol forcing on clouds, our model parameterizations for convection, vertical mixing and cloud properties provide a reliable chemical weather representation, making possible a cross-examination of model solution and observations. This preliminary work enables the identification of biases and limitations affecting both the model (missing sources) and satellite sensors and algorithms (for aerosol detection and classification) and leads to the implementation of improved transport and aerosol processes in the modeling system. On the one hand, the model confirms a 50% underestimation of SO2 emissions due to satellite swath sampling of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), consistent with field studies. The OMI irregular sampling also produces a level of noise that impairs its monitoring capacity during short-term volcanic events. On the other hand, the model reveals a large sensitivity on aerosol composition and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) due to choices of both the source function in WRF-Chem and size parameters for sea-salt in FlexAOD, the post-processor used to compute offline the simulated AOD. We then proceed to diagnosing the role of SO2 volcanic emission in the regional aerosol composition. The model shows that both dynamics and cloud properties associated with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) have a large influence on the oxidation of SO2 and on the transport pathways of

  13. The link between organic aerosol mass loading and degree of oxygenation: an α-pinene photooxidation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenberger, L.; Barmet, P.; Slowik, J. G.; Praplan, A. P.; Dommen, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2013-07-01

    A series of smog chamber (SC) experiments was conducted to identify factors responsible for the discrepancy between ambient and SC aerosol degree of oxygenation. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer is used to compare mass spectra from α-pinene photooxidation with ambient aerosol. Composition is compared in terms of the fraction of particulate CO2+, a surrogate for carboxylic acids, vs. the fraction of C2H3O+, a surrogate for aldehydes, alcohols and ketones, as well as in the Van Krevelen space, where the evolution of the atomic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio (H : C) vs. the atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C) is investigated. Low (near-ambient) organic mass concentrations were found to be necessary to obtain oxygenation levels similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) commonly identified in ambient measurements. The effects of organic mass loading and OH (hydroxyl radical) exposure were decoupled by inter-experiment comparisons at the same integrated OH concentration. An OH exposure between 3 and 25 × 107 cm-3 h is needed to increase O : C by 0.05 during aerosol aging. For the first time, LV-OOA-like aerosol from the abundant biogenic precursor α-pinene was produced in a smog chamber by oxidation at typical atmospheric OH concentrations. Significant correlation between measured secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and reference LV-OOA mass spectra is shown by Pearson's R2 values larger than 0.90 for experiments with low organic mass concentrations between 1.2 and 18 μg m-3 at an OH exposure of 4 × 107 cm-3 h, corresponding to about two days of oxidation time in the atmosphere, based on a global mean OH concentration of ~ 1 × 106 cm-3. α-Pinene SOA is more oxygenated at low organic mass loadings. Because the degree of oxygenation influences the chemical, volatility and hygroscopic properties of ambient aerosol, smog chamber studies must be performed at near-ambient concentrations to accurately simulate

  14. MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Serra, Ana Laura E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: serra@to.infn.it

    2013-02-10

    Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

  15. Evaluating the impact of assimilating CALIOP-derived aerosol extinction profiles on a global mass transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianglong; Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Baker, Nancy L.; Campbell, William F.; Hyer, Edward J.

    2011-07-01

    Coupled two/three-dimensional variational (2D/3DVAR) assimilation of aerosol physical properties retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite-borne instruments is described for the U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) global aerosol mass transport model. Coupled 2D/3DVAR assimilation for NAAPS is evaluated for 48-hr forecast cycles, computed four times daily in six-hour intervals, versus stand-alone 2DVAR assimilation of MODIS and MISR aerosol optical depths (AOD). Both systems are validated against AERONET ground-based sun photometer measurements of AOD. Despite a narrow nadir viewing swath and more than 2700 km of equatorial separation between orbits, satellite lidar data assimilation elicits a positive model response. Improvements in analysis and forecast AOD absolute errors are found over both land and maritime AERONET sites. The primary impact to the model from 3DVAR assimilation is the redistribution of aerosol mass into the boundary layer, though the process is sensitive to parameterization of vertical error correlation lengths.

  16. Sources and atmospheric processing of winter aerosols in Seoul, Korea: insights from real-time measurements using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Zhang, Qi; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Kim, Jin Young; Bok Lee, Seung

    2017-02-01

    Highly time-resolved chemical characterization of nonrefractory submicrometer particulate matter (NR-PM1) was conducted in Seoul, the capital and largest metropolis of Korea, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The measurements were performed during winter, when elevated particulate matter (PM) pollution events are often observed. This is the first time that detailed real-time aerosol measurement results have been reported from Seoul, Korea, and they reveal valuable insights into the sources and atmospheric processes that contribute to PM pollution in this region. The average concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1 = NR-PM1+ black carbon (BC)) was 27.5 µg m-3, and the total mass was dominated by organics (44 %), followed by nitrate (24 %) and sulfate (10 %). The average atomic ratios of oxygen to carbon (O / C), hydr