Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol mass spectrometers

  1. Aerosol propellant interference with clinical mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, E D; Sivarajan, M

    1991-04-01

    Metered dose inhalers containing halogenated propellants may interfere with mass spectrometer quantitation of halogenated inhalation anesthetics. We identify the propellant(s) in a commercially available metered dose inhaler that caused erroneous mass spectrometer readings. In addition, we identify the causes of different types of interference in different mass spectrometers. PMID:2072131

  2. Studies of Ambient and Chamber Aerosol Composition using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Jill Suzanne

    This thesis presents composition measurements for atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosol from laboratory and ambient measurements using the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer. Studies include the oxidation of dodecane in the Caltech environmental chambers, and several aircraft- and ground-based field studies, which include the quantification of wildfire emissions off the coast of California, and Los Angeles urban emissions. The oxidation of dodecane by OH under low NO conditions and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was explored using a gas-phase chemical model, gas-phase CIMS measurements, and high molecular weight ion traces from particlephase HR-TOF-AMS mass spectra. The combination of these measurements support the hypothesis that particle-phase chemistry leading to peroxyhemiacetal formation is important. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the AMS mass spectra which revealed three factors representing a combination of gas-particle partitioning, chemical conversion in the aerosol, and wall deposition. Airborne measurements of biomass burning emissions from a chaparral fire on the central Californian coast were carried out in November 2009. Physical and chemical changes were reported for smoke ages 0--4 h old. CO 2 normalized ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate increased, whereas the normalized OA decreased sharply in the first 1.5--2 h, and then slowly increased for the remaining 2 h (net decrease in normalized OA). Comparison to wildfire samples from the Yucatan revealed that factors such as relative humidity, incident UV radiation, age of smoke, and concentration of emissions are important for wildfire evolution. Ground-based aerosol composition is reported for Pasadena, CA during the sumix mer of 2009. The OA component, which dominated the submicron aerosol mass, was deconvolved into hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semi-volatile oxidized organic aerosol (SVOOA), and low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol

  3. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  4. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  5. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Smog Chamber Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, P. L.; Hunter, J. F.; Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Cross, E. S.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal vaporization-electron impact ionization (TV-EI) mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for understanding the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and atmospheric aging. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and recently developed Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are two instruments that utilize the same TV-EI technique. The ACSM trades the particle sizing capability, sensitivity, speed, and resolution of the AMS for simplicity, affordability, and ease of operation - enabling stand-alone continuous sampling for extended periods of time. Here we present results of an intercomparison between a high-resolution AMS and an ACSM. Three well-studied SOA formation chamber experiments were conducted: isoprene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, m-xylene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, and α-pinene ozonolysis under low NOx conditions. Comparisons between time-series and mass spectra from these experiments, along with positive matrix factorization analysis results demonstrate that the ACSM, while it does not provide the same level of detail as an AMS, is a suitable tool for exploring the chemistry of SOA formation in chamber studies.

  7. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment

  8. Factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Yang, T.; Ng, N. L.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-09-01

    Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the merged high resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements to investigate the sources and evolution processes of submicron aerosols in New York City in summer 2009. This new approach is able to study the distribution of organic and inorganic species in different types of aerosols, the acidity of organic aerosol (OA) factors, and the fragment ion patterns related to photochemical processing. In this study, PMF analysis of the unified AMS spectral matrix resolved 8 factors. The hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) factors contain negligible amounts of inorganic species. The two factors that are primarily ammonium sulfate (SO4-OA) and ammonium nitrate (NO3-OA), respectively, are overall neutralized. Among all OA factors the organic fraction of SO4-OA shows the highest degree of oxidation (O/C = 0.69). Two semi-volatile oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, i.e., a less oxidized (LO-OOA) and a more oxidized (MO-OOA), were also identified. MO-OOA represents local photochemical products with a diurnal profile exhibiting a pronounced noon peak, consistent with those of formaldehyde (HCHO) and Ox(= O3 + NO2). The NO+/NO2+ ion ratio in MO-OOA is much higher than that in NO3-OA and in pure ammonium nitrate, indicating the formation of organic nitrates. The nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor contains ~25% of acidic inorganic salts, suggesting the formation of secondary OA via acid-base reactions of amines. The size distributions of OA factors derived from the size-resolved mass spectra show distinct diurnal evolving behaviors but overall a progressing evolution from smaller to larger particle mode as the oxidation degree of OA increases. Our results demonstrate that PMF analysis of the unified aerosol mass spectral matrix which contains both inorganic and organic aerosol signals may enable the deconvolution of more OA factors and gain more insights into the

  9. Aerosol Size Distribution, Composition, and Hygroscopicity Measurements During CSTRIPE Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Varutbangkul, V.; Conant, W. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Buzorius, G.; Jonsson, H. H.

    2003-12-01

    During July 2003, the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was deployed in the CSTRIPE (Coastal STRatocumulus Imposed Perturbation Experiment) field experiment in order to quantify the effects of aerosols on the microphysics and dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds. In order to characterize the effects of different aerosol types on stratocumulus clouds, various air masses were sampled, including local fire plumes, pollution over the San Joaquin valley, unperturbed marine stratocumulus clouds, and stratocumulus clouds perturbed by seeding flares. Some research flights were also dedicated to characterize the seeding flares in the clear sky. Measurements of aerosol mass distribution and composition, using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), and size distribution and hygroscopic behavior, using a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer (Dual DMA) with one column at dry conditions and another at a relative humidity of approximately 70 percent, will be presented here. During a number of in-cloud sampling periods, the Counter-flow Virtual Impactor (CVI) was used to select and dry cloud droplets, which were then analyzed by the AMS and the Dual DMA. The AMS composition measurements showed that sulfate and organics comprised most of the mass of the non-refractory components of the aerosol. The DMA showed a mixture of unimodal and bimodal size distributions in most types of air masses. The air mass over the San Joaquin valley, however, showed strong evidence of freshly nucleated particles, with aerosol number concentrations often above 80,000 cm-3.

  10. Mesospheric aerosol sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kohnert, Rick

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument has been launched on two sounding rockets in August, 2007 from Andoya, Norway to detect charged sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. The MASS instrument is designed to collect charged aerosols, cluster ions, and electrons on four pairs of graphite electrodes, three of which are biased with increasing voltage. The design of the MASS instrument was complicated by the short mean free path in the mesosphere. The opening to MASS was deliberately built to increase the mean free path and to reduce the shock wave within the instrument. The design procedure began with aerodynamics simulations of the flow through the instrument using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in 3-D. The electric fields within the instrument were calculated using a Laplace solver in 3-D. With the aerodynamic and electric field simulations completed, an algorithm was created to find the trajectories of charged aerosols including collisions within MASS. Using this algorithm the collection efficiencies for each electrode was calculated as a function of the charge to mass ratio of the incoming particle. The simulation results have been confirmed experimentally using an Argon RF ion beam. The data from the August launches have been analyzed and the initial results show the MASS instrument operated as expected. Additional studies are underway to determine if there were effects from payload charging or spurious charge generation within the instrument. This project is supported by NASA.

  11. Elemental Composition of Primary Aerosols Emitted from Burning of 21 Biomass Fuels Measured by Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desyaterik, Y.; Mack, L.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important contributor to regional aerosol loading and have a large impact of on air quality, visibility, and radiative forcing. However, the detailed chemical composition of the aerosols emitted during biomass burning is largely unknown. In order to gain a better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these emissions, 92 burns were undertaken in the combustion chamber of the USDA/FS Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana, in well-defined laboratory conditions. A set of 21 different fuels was tested that represents biomass burned annually in the western and southeastern U.S. The chemical composition of the resulting biomass smoke aerosols was analyzed with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CO concentrations allowed flaming and smoldering fire regimes to be distinguished. The elemental composition of the organic portion of the aerosols was extracted from the AMS measurements. Here we present the variation of O/C, H/C and organic mass to organic carbon ratios (OM/OC) versus fire regime and fuel type. We also discuss the influence on the organic aerosol chemical composition of various factors such as fuel moisture content and total aerosol loading, as well as the approach used to account for water vapor ions derived from water originally present in sampled particles versus water vapor ions produced by electron impact fragmentation of organic molecules.

  12. Preliminary Results of Aerosol Chemical Composition Measurements in the Gulf of Maine with an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    The New England Air Quality Study is a multi-institutional research project to improve understanding of the atmospheric processes that control the production and distribution of air pollutants in the New England region. During July-August, 2002 a large, collaborative, intensive period of atmospheric measurement and model comparisons took place. As part of this study, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed aboard the NOAA ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Gulf of Maine. The AMS measures semi-volatile components of aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between roughly 40 and 1500 nm. During this study, the AMS collected 2-minute averaged particle mass spectra as well as speciated organic, sulfate, and nitrate size distributions. Sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium nitrate components of the aerosol, which are relatively non-volatile at the AMS heater temperature, were not detected with the AMS. A wide variety of air masses were sampled during the intensive period, including clean marine, clean continental, and polluted continental air masses. In general, the volatile particle composition was mostly organic and sulfate with lesser amounts of nitrate. Furthermore, particle mass loadings typically peaked around 400-600 nm in aerodynamic diameter. Several events with high aerosol organic, sulfate, and/or nitrate mass loadings were observed and the atmospheric processes that cause them will be discussed.

  13. Development and characterization of an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Mayer, Joseph E; Holecek, John C; Moffet, Ryan C; Sanchez, Rene O; Rebotier, Thomas P; Furutani, Hiroshi; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Su, Yongxuan; Guazzotti, Sergio; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of atmospheric aerosols are necessary for understanding the impact of air pollution on regional and global climate. To gain further insight into the size-resolved chemistry of individual atmospheric particles, a smaller aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) with increased data acquisition capabilities was developed for aircraft-based studies. Compared to previous ATOFMS systems, the new instrument has a faster data acquisition rate with improved ion transmission and mass resolution, as well as reduced physical size and power consumption, all required advances for use in aircraft studies. In addition, real-time source apportionment software allows the immediate identification and classification of individual particles to guide sampling decisions while in the field. The aircraft (A)-ATOFMS was field-tested on the ground during the Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) and aboard an aircraft during the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L). Initial results from ICE-L represent the first reported aircraft-based single-particle dual-polarity mass spectrometry measurements and provide an increased understanding of particle mixing state as a function of altitude. Improved ion transmission allows for the first single-particle detection of species out to approximately m/z 2000, an important mass range for the detection of biological aerosols and oligomeric species. In addition, high time resolution measurements of single-particle mixing state are demonstrated and shown to be important for airborne studies where particle concentrations and chemistry vary rapidly.

  14. Effect of Vaporizer Temperature on Ambient Non-Refractory Submicron Aerosol Composition and Mass Spectra Measured by the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) are routinely operated with a constant vaporizer temperature (Tvap) of 600oC in order to facilitate quantitative detection of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) species. By analogy with other thermal desorption instrument...

  15. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D K; Matsunaga, A; Docherty, K S; Surratt, J D; Seinfeld, J H; Ziemann, P J; Jimenez, J L

    2010-04-13

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as NO(x)+ ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using NO(x)+ fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, HNO(3)+ ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species.

  16. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  17. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  18. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM(sub l)) was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA) species dominate the NR-PM(sub l) mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA) and biomass burning (BB) are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 microg/cubic m (STP) ppm(exp -1). This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006) and Kleinman et al. (2008). The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance of nitrate decreases with distance from the city

  19. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  20. Demonstration of a VUV lamp photoionization source for improvedorganic speciation in an aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Toohey, D.W.; Canagaratna, M.R.; Trimborn, A.; Akiyama, K-I.; Shimono, A.; Jimenez, J.L.; DeCarlo, P.F.; Wilson, K.R.; Worsnop, D.R.

    2007-10-03

    In recent years, the Aerodyne AerosolMass Spectrometer(AMS) has become a widely used tool for determining aerosol sizedistributions and chemical composition for non-refractory inorganic andorganic aerosol. The current version of the AMS uses a combination offlash thermal vaporization and 70 eV electron impact (EI) ionization.However, EI causes extensive fragmentation and mass spectra of organicaerosols are difficult to deconvolute because they are composites of theoverlapping fragmentation patterns of all species present. Previous AMSstudies have been limited to classifying organics in broad categoriessuch as oxidized and hydrocarbon-like." In this manuscript we present newefforts to gain more information about organic aerosol composition byemploying the softer technique of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization ina Time-of-Flight AMS (ToF-AMS). In our novel design a VUV lamp is placedin direct proximity of the ionization region of the AMS, with only awindow separating the lamp and the ionizer. This design allows foralternation of photoionization and electron impact ionization within thesame instrument on the timescale of minutes. Thus, the EI-basedquantification capability of the AMS is retained while improved spectralinterpretation is made possible by combined analysis of the complementaryVUV and EI ionization spectra. Photoionization and electron impactionization spectra are compared for a number of compounds including oleicacid, long chain hydrocarbons, and cigarette smoke. In general, the VUVspectra contain much less fragmentation than the EI spectra and for manycompounds the parent ion is the dominant ion in the VUV spectrum. As anexample of the usefulness of the integration of PI within the fullcapability of the ToF-AMS, size distributions and size-segregated massspectra are examined for the cigarette smoke analysis. As a finalevaluation of the new VUV module, spectra for oleic acid are compared tosimilar experiments conducted using the tunable VUV radiation

  1. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  2. On the Interpretation of Oxygenated Organic Aerosols (and their Subtypes) Arising from Factor Analysis of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Zhang, Q.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kroll, J.; Mohr, C.; Allan, J. D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Zhang et al. (ES&T 2005; ACP 2005) first performed factor analysis (FA) of Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) complete organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra. This study showed that an oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factor accounted for 2/3 of the OA mass at an urban site in Pittsburgh and strongly linked OOA to secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Many subsequent studies and the application of more powerful solution algorithms such as Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to the same FA problem have demonstrated the importance of OOA at most locations (e.g. Volkamer et al., GRL, 2006; Zhang et al., GRL, 2007; Lanz et al., ACP, 2007 and ES&T, 2008; Ulbrich et al., ACPD, 2008). Multiple studies have also identified several subtypes of OOA (e.g. OOA-1 and OOA-2). This type of analysis offers new insights because it provides some chemical resolution on the total OA mass with high time and size resolution, and bypasses the limitations of techniques that only analyze tracers and which may favor more reduced species. However the chemical resolution is limited and careful interpretation of the FA output is required, including the use of database spectra, time series of external tracers, tracer ratios, back-trajectory analyses, size- distribution analyses, etc. This presentation will address the interpretation of total OOA and its subfactors across a large range of locations in urban, suburban, rural, remote, and forested areas, and will compare with the results of other source apportionment techniques. Based on data from multiple datasets we conclude that (1) anthropogenic SOA in and downwind of urban areas is an important source of OOA; (2) motor vehicles, meat cooking, and trash burning are unlikely to be sources of primary OOA; (3) SOA from biogenic and biomass burning precursors are also clear sources of OOA; (4) primary biomass burning OA (P-BBOA) typically shows significant differences with ambient OOA factors; (5) heterogeneous oxidation of urban POA may give rise to

  3. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  4. Mass-analysis of Charged Aerosol Particles in a PMSE/NLC Layer by a Rocket-borne Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Knappmiller, Scott; Horanyi, Mihaly; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Baumgarten, Gerd; Latteck, Ralph; Rapp, Markus; Holzworth, Robert; Shimogawa, Michael; Gumbel, Jorg; Megner, Ms Linda; Friedrich, Martin

    Two "MASS" rockets (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) were launched from the Andoya Rocket Range (Norway) the first week of August 2007. The payloads carried an electrostatic mass analyzer for the charged fraction of the aerosol particles, electric field booms, a photometer for cloud brightness, and Faraday rotation antennas for electron density. Aerosol particles with different ranges of charge-to-mass ratio were collected within the instrument housing on two sets of four biased collector plates, with one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. The first rocket was launched into PMSE and NLC on 3 August. The sun was 4 degrees below the horizon and NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar. NLC were detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The charged aerosol data shows the density of negative particles with radius greater than 3 nm rising sharply at 83 km and continuing to 89 km, collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Particles with 1-2 nm radii with both signs of charge and particles with less than 1 nm radius charged positively were detected at 86-88 km. The occurrence of the positive particles in the smallest size range in the region of lowest temperature suggests that their origin is nucleation and growth on ions. Initial charge-density estimates are several thousands per cubic centimeter for each of these size ranges. The second launch was 6 August into PMSE without NLC. The 1-2 nm particles were seen from 85.4 to 87.4 km, again with both signs of charge. Larger sizes were nearly absent.

  5. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Bi, X.; Qiu, N.; Han, B.; Lin, Q.; Peng, L.; Chen, D.; Wang, X.; Peng, P.; Sheng, G.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols are essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper first presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during fall of 2012 in Guangzhou. On the basis of Mie theory, n and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and metal rich, respectively. Results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shape for majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross section vs. sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), while metal rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve vs. size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shape particles. Overall, the results on detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future researches on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  6. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions (N = 293), with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. OA mass spectra measured for HD truck exhaust plumes show cycloalkanes are predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in OA and BC emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. This finding indicates a large fraction of OA in gasoline exhaust is lubricant-derived as well. The similarity in OA and BC mass spectra for gasoline and diesel engine exhaust is likely to confound ambient source apportionment efforts to determine contributions to air pollution from these two important sources.

  7. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  8. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a.

  9. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

  10. Characterization of particulate matter emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Worton, D. R.; Fortner, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Franklin, J. P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured in July 2010 from on-road motor vehicles driving through a highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. A soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was used to measure the chemical composition of PM emitted by gasoline and diesel vehicles at high time resolution. Organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were measured during various time periods that had different levels of diesel influence, as well as directly in the exhaust plumes of individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks. BC emission factor distributions for HD trucks were more skewed than OA distributions, with the highest 10% of trucks accounting for 56 and 42% of total measured BC and OA emissions, respectively. A comparison of measured OA and BC mass spectra across various sampling periods revealed a high degree of similarity in BC and OA emitted by gasoline and diesel engines. Cycloalkanes predominate in exhaust OA emissions relative to saturated alkanes (i.e., normal and iso-paraffins), suggesting that lubricating oil rather than fuel is the dominant source of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions in diesel vehicle exhaust. This finding is supported by the detection of trace elements such as zinc and phosphorus in the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. Trace elements were emitted relative to total OA at levels that are consistent with typical weight fractions of commonly used additives present in lubricating oil. The presence of trace elements in vehicle exhaust raises the concern that ash deposits may accumulate over time in diesel particle filter systems, and may eventually lead to performance problems that require servicing.

  11. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 20 m from the US 95 freeway in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26 % of the OM, and it made up nearly half of the OM when the monitoring site was downwind of US 95 during morning rush hour. LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26 % of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12 % of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining

  12. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 18 m from the US 95 freeway soundwall in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US~Environmental Protection Agency's~(EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26% of the OM, while LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26% of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12% of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining third of the OM. Use of the pulling techniques available in EPA PMF and ME-2 suggested that the four

  13. [Aging and mixing state of particulate matter during aerosol pollution episode in autumn Shanghai using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS)].

    PubMed

    Mu, Ying-Ying; Lou, Sheng-Rong; Chen, Chang-Hong; Zhou, Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Zhen; Qiao, Li-Ping; Huang, Cheng; Li, Mei; Li, Li; Wang, Qian; Huang, Hai-Ying; Zou, Lan-Jun

    2013-06-01

    A single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was applied to characterize the size distribution (200 nm-2.0 microm) and chemical compositions of ambient particles during a polluted event from 11th to 18th, November 2011. OCEC, METAL, EC, SECONDARY and K-Na types of particulates were the dominant groups observed in hazy day period, which were 27.4%, 3.4%, 7.3% , 45.6% and 5.4% of the overall measured particles, respectively. The observed five types of particles contained the secondary composition such as 18NH4(+), 80SO3(-), 96SO4(-), 97HSO4(-), 46NO2(-), 62NO3(-) and 125H (NO3) -, showing that they probably went through different aging processes, and the increasing of the SECONDARY particles during the event clearly indicated a secondary aerosol pollution. Heterogeneous reactions of SO2 and particles could be the reason of strong 97HSO4(-) signals in the mass spectrums of OCEC type particles while the existence of organic compounds might have an important influence on the aerosol formation with the gas-phase sulfuric acid. Fresh EC particles in the environment tended to be aging with above-mentioned secondary ions by the analysis of particle size distribution and eventually lead to a particle type conversion from EC to SECONDARY. Organic amine in marine environment was brought to the land by the warm, moist marine air mass that dramatically removed atmospheric SECONDARY and OCEC particles from the air with a heavy rain and leading to the observation of amine particles in the clean day period. PMID:23947016

  14. [Aging and mixing state of particulate matter during aerosol pollution episode in autumn Shanghai using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS)].

    PubMed

    Mu, Ying-Ying; Lou, Sheng-Rong; Chen, Chang-Hong; Zhou, Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Zhen; Qiao, Li-Ping; Huang, Cheng; Li, Mei; Li, Li; Wang, Qian; Huang, Hai-Ying; Zou, Lan-Jun

    2013-06-01

    A single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was applied to characterize the size distribution (200 nm-2.0 microm) and chemical compositions of ambient particles during a polluted event from 11th to 18th, November 2011. OCEC, METAL, EC, SECONDARY and K-Na types of particulates were the dominant groups observed in hazy day period, which were 27.4%, 3.4%, 7.3% , 45.6% and 5.4% of the overall measured particles, respectively. The observed five types of particles contained the secondary composition such as 18NH4(+), 80SO3(-), 96SO4(-), 97HSO4(-), 46NO2(-), 62NO3(-) and 125H (NO3) -, showing that they probably went through different aging processes, and the increasing of the SECONDARY particles during the event clearly indicated a secondary aerosol pollution. Heterogeneous reactions of SO2 and particles could be the reason of strong 97HSO4(-) signals in the mass spectrums of OCEC type particles while the existence of organic compounds might have an important influence on the aerosol formation with the gas-phase sulfuric acid. Fresh EC particles in the environment tended to be aging with above-mentioned secondary ions by the analysis of particle size distribution and eventually lead to a particle type conversion from EC to SECONDARY. Organic amine in marine environment was brought to the land by the warm, moist marine air mass that dramatically removed atmospheric SECONDARY and OCEC particles from the air with a heavy rain and leading to the observation of amine particles in the clean day period.

  15. Aerosol and trace gas vehicle emission factors measured in a tunnel using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and other on-line instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Roberto; Prevot, Andre S. H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Heringa, Maarten F.; Richter, Rene; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2011-04-01

    In this study we present measurements of gas and aerosol phase composition for a mixed vehicle fleet in the Gubrist tunnel (Switzerland) in June 2008. PM 1 composition measurements were made with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). Gas-phase measurements of CO, CO 2, NO x and total hydrocarbons (THC) were performed with standard instrumentation. Weekdays had a characteristic diurnal pattern with 2 peaks in concentrations for all traffic related species corresponding to high vehicle density (˜300 ± 30 vehicles per 5 min) in the morning rush hour between 06:00 and 09:00 and in the afternoon rush hours from approximately 15:30 to 18:30. The emission factors (EF) of OA were heavily influenced by the OA mass loading. To exclude this partitioning effect, only organic aerosol mass concentrations from 60 μg m -3 to 90 μg m -3 were considered and for these conditions the EF(OA) value for HDV was 33.7 ± 2.3 mg km -1 for a temperature inside the tunnel of 20-25 °C. This value is not directly applicable to ambient conditions because it is derived from OA mass concentrations that are roughly a factor of 10 higher than typical ambient concentrations. An even higher EF(OA) HDV value of 47.4 ± 1.6 mg km -1 was obtained when the linear fit was applied to all data points including OA concentrations up to 120 μg m -3. Similar to the increasing EF, the OA/BC ratio in the tunnel was also affected by the organic loading and it increased by a factor of ˜3 over the OA range 10-120 μg m -3. This means that also the OA emission factors at ambient concentrations of around 5-10 μg m -3 would be 2-3 times lower than the emission factor given above. For OA concentrations lower than 40 μg m -3 the OA/BC mass ratio was below 1, while at an OA concentration of 100-120 μg m -3 the OA/BC ratio was ˜1.5. The AMS mass spectra (MS) acquired in the tunnel were highly correlated with the primary organic aerosol

  16. Origin and impact of particle-to-particle variations in composition measurements with the nano-aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Johnston, Murray V

    2013-09-01

    In the nano-aerosol mass spectrometer, individual particles in the 10-30 nm size range are trapped and irradiated with a high pulse energy laser beam. The laser pulse generates a plasma that disintegrates the particle into atomic ions, from which the elemental composition is determined. Particle-to-particle variations among the mass spectra are shown to arise from plasma energetics: Low ionization energy species are enhanced in some spectra while high ionization energy species are enhanced in others. These variations also limit the accuracy and precision of elemental analysis, with higher deviations generally observed when low ionization energy species are dominant in the mass spectrum. For standard datasets generated from nominally identical particles, it is shown that that the error associated with composition measurement is random and that averaging the spectra from a few tens of particles is sufficient for measuring the mole fractions of common elements to within about 10% of the expected value. Averaging a greater number of particles offers limited improvement of the measurement precision but has the deleterious effect of degrading the measurement time-resolution, which is given by the time needed to obtain the required number of particle spectra for averaging. An internally mixed ambient particle dataset was found to give a similar result to the standard datasets, that is, the measured elemental composition converged to the average value after a few tens of particles were averaged.

  17. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Bi, Xinhui; Qiu, Ning; Han, Bingxue; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge on the microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light-scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during the fall of 2012. On the basis of Mie theory, n at a wavelength of 532 nm and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and Metal-rich. The results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shapes for the majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross-section versus sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). The OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), and the Metal-rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve versus size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shaped particles. Overall, the results on the detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future research on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  18. Preliminary Observations of organic gas-particle partitioning from biomass combustion smoke using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Sullivan, A. P.; Carrico, C. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Malm, W. C.; Lincoln, E.; Wold, C. E.; Hao, W.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play important roles in adverse health effects, indirect and direct forcing of Earth’s climate, and visibility degradation. Biomass burning emissions from wild and prescribed fires can make a significant contribution to ambient aerosol mass in many locations and seasons. In order to better understand the chemical properties of particles produced by combustion of wild land fuels, an experiment was conducted in 2009 at the U.S. Forest Service/United States Department of Agriculture (USFS/USDA) Fire Science Laboratory (FSL) located in Missoula, Montana, to measure volatility of open biomass burning emissions for a variety of fuel types. Both isothermal and temperature-dependent volatilization were studied, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) coupled with thermal denuder. Small quantities (200-800g) of various fuel types, primarily from the U.S., were burned in a large combustion chamber and diluted in two stages in continuous-flow residence chambers. The partitioning of particulate organic mass concentrations by the HR-ToF-AMS was evaluated for each fuel type using nominal dilution ratios characterized both by measuring flow rates in continuous-flow residence chambers and from the concentrations of several conserved tracers. The volatility of biomass burning smoke was found to vary across fuel types. Up to ~60% volatile loss of organic matter was observed as a result of dilution for some smoke samples (e.g., Lodgepole pine and Ponderosa pine). We will investigate relationships between volatility and several parameters such as the absolute mass concentration and chemical composition. We will also examine the behavior of biomass burning tracers, such as AMS m/z 60, under dilution conditions. Previous studies (e.g. Lee et al., AS&T 2010 and Aiken et al., ACP 2009) have observed a strong relationship between OA and AMS m/z 60 in fresh biomass burning smoke. We will examine whether this relationship is altered

  19. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  20. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  1. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, J.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first single particle results obtained using an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS). The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The instrument was operated as a standard AMS from 12-30 March, acquiring average chemical composition and size distributions for the ambient aerosol, and in single particle mode from 27-30 March. Over a 75-h sampling period, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically triggered, saved, and analyzed. The correlated optical and chemical detection allowed detailed examination of single particle collection and quantification within the LS-ToF-AMS. The single particle data enabled the mixing states of the ambient aerosol to be characterized within the context of the size-resolved ensemble chemical information. The particulate mixing states were examined as a function of sampling time and most of the particles were found to be internal mixtures containing many of the organic and inorganic species identified in the ensemble analysis. The single particle mass spectra were deconvolved, using techniques developed for ensemble AMS data analysis, into HOA, OOA, NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4Cl fractions. Average single particle mass and chemistry measurements are shown to be in agreement with ensemble MS and PTOF measurements. While a significant fraction of ambient particles were internal mixtures of varying degrees, single particle measurements of chemical composition allowed the identification of time periods during which the ambient ensemble was externally mixed. In some cases the chemical composition of the particles suggested a likely source. Throughout the full sampling period, the ambient ensemble was an external mixture of combustion-generated HOA particles from local sources (e.g. traffic), with number concentrations peaking

  2. Size-resolved aerosol chemistry on Whistler Mountain, Canada with a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during INTEX-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.; MacDonald, A. M.; Hayden, K.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Liu, P. S. K.; Anlauf, K. G.; Leaitch, W. R.; Cubison, M.; Worsnop, D.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.

    2008-12-01

    An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the peak of Whistler Mountain (elevation 2182 m-MSL), British Columbia, from 19 April to 16 May 2006, as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron particle (NR-PM1) species (i.e., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and organics) were measured in situ every 5 min. The HR-ToF-AMS results agreed well with collocated measurements. The average concentration of non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1; 1.9 μg m-3) is similar to those observed at other remote, high elevation sites in North America. Episodes of enhanced aerosol loadings were observed, due to influences of regional and trans-Pacific transport of air pollution. Organics and sulfate were the dominant species, on average accounting for 55% and 30%, respectively, of the NR-PM1 mass. The average size distributions of sulfate and ammonium both showed a~large accumulation mode peaking around 500-600 nm in Dva while those of organic aerosol (OA) and nitrate peaked at ~300 nm. The size differences suggest that sulfate and OA were mostly present in external mixtures from different source origins. We also quantitatively determined the elemental composition of OA using the high resolution mass spectra. Overall, OA at Whistler Peak was highly oxygenated, with an average organic-mass-to-organic-carbon ratio (OM/OC) of 2.28±0.23 and an atomic ratio of oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) of 0.83±0.17. The nominal formula for OA was C1H1.66N0.03O0.83 for the entire study. Two significant trans-Pacific dust events originated from Asia were observed at Whistler Peak during this study. While both events were characterized with significant enhancements of coarse mode particles and mineral contents, the composition and characteristics of NR-PM1 were significantly different between them. One trans-Pacific event

  3. Characterization of the sources and processes of organic and inorganic aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.-L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Demerjian, K. L.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Hogrefe, O.; Frank, B.; Rattigan, O. V.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2010-10-01

    Submicron aerosol particles (PM1) were measured in-situ using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) during the summer 2009 Field Intensive Study at Queens College in New York City. Organic aerosol (OA) and sulfate are the two dominant species, accounting for 54% and 24%, respectively, of total PM1 mass on average. The average mass size distribution of OA presents a small mode peaking at ~150 nm (Dva) in addition to an accumulation mode (~550 nm) that is internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium. The diurnal cycles of sulfate and OA both show pronounced peaks between 01:00-02:00 p.m. EST due to photochemical production. The average (±1σ) oxygen-to-carbon (O/C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) ratios of OA in NYC are 0.36 (±0.09), 1.49 (±0.08), and 0.012(±0.005), respectively, corresponding to an average organic mass-to-carbon (OM/OC) ratio of 1.62(±0.11). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high resolution mass spectra identified five OA components: a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), two types of oxygenated OA (OOA) including a low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA) and a semi-volatile OOA (SV-OOA), a cooking-emission related OA (COA), and a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA). HOA appears to represent primary OA (POA) from urban traffic emissions. It comprises primarily of reduced species (H/C=1.83; O/C=0.06) and shows a mass spectral pattern very similar to those of POA from fossil fuel combustion, and correlates tightly with traffic emission tracers including elemental carbon and NOx. LV-OOA, which is highly oxidized (O/C=0.63) and correlates well with sulfate, appears to be representative for regional, aged secondary OA (SOA). SV-OOA, which is less oxidized (O/C=0.38) and correlates well with non-refractory chloride, likely represents less photo-chemically aged, semi-volatile SOA. COA shows a similar spectral pattern to the reference spectra of POA from cooking emissions and a distinct diurnal pattern

  4. AUTOMATIC MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, M.L.; Tabor, C.D. Jr.

    1961-12-01

    A mass spectrometer for analyzing the components of a gas is designed which is capable of continuous automatic operation such as analysis of samples of process gas from a continuous production system where the gas content may be changing. (AEC)

  5. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g., HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. The particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with highest traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations - with minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA being the major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ~120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  6. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; McKinney, K.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Alexander, M. L.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accounted by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12-40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect

  7. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accountedmore » by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown

  8. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam-laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements are used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam-particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.

  9. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12-40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from

  10. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making itmore » the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA

  11. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  12. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  13. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  14. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  15. Rapid scanning mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.; Boeckmann, M.D.

    1996-11-25

    Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

  16. In-Flight Chemical Composition Observations of Aircraft Emissions using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial aircraft are an important source of aerosols to the upper troposphere. The microphysical and chemical properties of these emitted aerosols govern their ability to act as ice nuclei, both in near-field contrails and for cirrus formation downstream. During the ACCESS-II (Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions) campaign, NASA DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engine emissions were sampled systematically at a range of cruise-relevant thrust levels and at several altitudes. Sampling was done aboard the NASA HU-25 Falcon aircraft, which was equipped with a suite of aerosol and gas-phase instruments focused on assessing the effects of burning different fuel mixtures on aerosol properties and their associated contrails. Here we present in-flight measurements of particle chemical composition made by a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The AMS was able to sufficiently resolve near-field (within 100m) aircraft emissions plumes. Low-sulfur HEFA (hydro-processed esters and fatty-acids) and JetA fuels yielded particles that contained 11 and 8% sulfate, respectively, compared to 30% sulfate contribution for traditional JetA fuel. Each of the fuels produced organic aerosol with similarly low oxygen content. Lubrication oils, which are not a combustion product but result from leaks in the engine, were likely a dominant fraction of the measured organic mass based on mass-spectral marker analysis. These results are compared to similar engine conditions from ground-based testing.

  17. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  18. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  19. A method for measuring vapor pressures of low-volatility organic aerosol compounds using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S; Tobias, H J; Ziemann, P J

    2001-08-15

    A temperature-programmed thermal desorption method for measuring vapor pressures of low-volatility organic aerosol compounds has been developed. The technique employs a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer we have recently developed for real-time composition analysis of organic aerosols. Particles are size selected using a differential mobility analyzer, sampled into a high-vacuum chamber as an aerodynamically focused beam, collected by impaction on a cryogenically cooled surface, slowly vaporized by resistive heating, and analyzed in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A simple evaporation model developed from the kinetic theory of gases is used to calculate compound vapor pressures over the temperature range of evaporation. The data are fit to a Clausius-Clapeyron equation to obtain a relationship between vapor pressure and temperature and to determine the heat of vaporization. The technique has been evaluated using C13-C18 monocarboxylic and C6-C8 dicarboxylic acids, which have vapor pressures at 25 degrees C of approximately 10(-4) - 10(-6) Pa, but less volatile compounds can also be analyzed. The method is relatively simple and rapid and yields vapor pressures and heats of vaporization that are in good agreement with literature values. The technique will be used to generate a new database of vapor pressures for low-volatility atmospheric organic compounds.

  20. MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK

    DOEpatents

    Shields, W.R.

    1960-10-18

    An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

  1. Gas Chromatic Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen

    1995-01-01

    Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) used to measure and identify combustion species present in trace concentration. Advanced extractive diagnostic method measures to parts per billion (PPB), as well as differentiates between different types of hydrocarbons. Applicable for petrochemical, waste incinerator, diesel transporation, and electric utility companies in accurately monitoring types of hydrocarbon emissions generated by fuel combustion, in order to meet stricter environmental requirements. Other potential applications include manufacturing processes requiring precise detection of toxic gaseous chemicals, biomedical applications requiring precise identification of accumulative gaseous species, and gas utility operations requiring high-sensitivity leak detection.

  2. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  3. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  4. Electrical aerosol spectrometer of Tartu University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Mirme, A.; Tamm, E.

    The electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS) of the parallel measuring principle at Tartu University is an efficient instrument for rapid measurement of the unstable size spectrum of aerosol particles. The measuring range from 10 nm to 10 μm is achieved by simultaneously using a pair of differential mobility analyzers with two different particle chargers. The particle spectrum is calculated and measurement errors are estimated in real time by using a least-squares method. Experimental calibration ensures reliability of measurement. The instrument is well suited for continuous monitoring of atmospheric aerosol.

  5. Analysis of organic aerosols using a micro-orifice volatilization impactor coupled to an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Martin; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    We present the development and characterization of a combination of a micro-orifice volatilization impactor (MOVI) and an ion trap mass spectrometer (IT/MS) with an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. The MOVI is a multi-jet impactor with 100 nozzles, allowing the collection of aerosol particles by inertial impaction on a deposition plate. The pressure drop behind the nozzles is approximately 5%, resulting in a pressure of 96kPa on the collection surface for ambient pressures of 101.3 kPa. The cut-point diameter (diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 0.13 microm for a sampling flow rate of 10 L min(-1). After the collection step, aerosol particles are evaporated by heating the impaction surface and transferred into the APCI-IT/MS for detection of the analytes. APCI was used in the negative ion mode to detect predominantly mono- and dicarboxylic acids, which are major oxidation products of biogenic terpenes. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS instrument was used for the analysis of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which was generated by ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in a 100 L continuous-flow reactor under dark and dry conditions. The combination of the MOVI with an APCI-IT/MS improved the detection Limits for small dicarboxylic acids, such as pinic acid, compared to online measurements by APCI-IT/MS. The Limits of detection and quantification for pinic acid were determined by external calibration to 4.4 ng and 13.2 ng, respectively. During a field campaign in the southern Rocky Mountains (USA) in summer 2011 (BEACHON-RoMBAS), the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was applied for the analysis of ambient organic aerosols and the quantification of individual biogenic SOA marker compounds. Based on a measurement frequency of approximately 5 h, a diurnal cycle for pinic acid in the sampled aerosol particles was found with maximum concentrations at night (median: 10.1 ngm(-3)) and minimum concentrations during the day (median: 8.2 ng m(-3)), which is likely

  6. Multi-channel electric aerosol spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, A.; Noppel, M.; Peil, I.; Salm, J.; Tamm, E.; Tammet, H.

    Multi-channel electric mobility spectrometry is a most efficient technique for the rapid measurement of an unstable aerosol particle size spectrum. The measuring range of the spectrometer from 10 microns to 10 microns is achieved by applying diffusional and field charging mechanisms simultaneously. On-line data processing is carried out with a microcomputer. Experimental calibration ensures correctness of measurement.

  7. A field measurement based scaling approach for quantification of major ions, organic carbon, and elemental carbon using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Huang, X. H. Hilda; Griffith, Stephen M.; Li, Mei; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Cheng; Meng, Junwang; Chan, Chak K.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (SPAMS) have been increasingly deployed for aerosol studies in Asia. To date, SPAMS is most often used to provide unscaled information for both the size and chemical composition of individual particles. The instrument's lack of accuracy is primarily due to only a fraction of particles being detected after collection, and the instrumental sensitivity is un-calibrated for various chemical species in mixed ambient aerosols. During a campaign from January to April 2013 at a coastal site in Hong Kong, the particle number information and ion intensity of major PM2.5 components collected by SPAMS were scaled by comparing with collocated bulk PM2.5 measurements of hourly or higher resolution. The bulk measurements include PM2.5 mass by a SHARP 5030 Monitor, major ions by a Monitor for Aerosols & Gases in ambient Air (MARGA), and organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a Sunset OCEC analyzer. During the data processing, both transmission efficiency (scaled with the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) and hit efficiency conversion were considered, and component ion intensities quantified as peak area (PA) and relative peak area (RPA) were analyzed to track the performance. The comparison between the scaled particle mass assuming a particle density of 1.9 g cm-3 from SPAMS and PM2.5 concentration showed good correlation (R2 = 0.81) with a slope of 0.814 ± 0.004. Regression analysis results suggest an improved scaling performance using RPA compared with PA for most of the major PM2.5 components, including sulfate, nitrate, potassium, ammonium, OC and EC. Thus, we recommend preferentially scaling these species using the RPA. For periods of high K+ concentrations (>1.5 μg m-3), under-estimation of K+ by SPAMS was observed due to exceeding the dynamic range of the acquisition board. When only applying the hit efficiency correction, data for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium and OC were in reasonably good correlation (R2 = 0

  8. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Canagaratna, Manjula; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, Joel; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Davidovits, Paul

    2009-10-01

    To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.

  9. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  10. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  11. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  12. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface.

  13. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface. PMID:27548937

  14. Integrated Analyses of Multiple Worldwide Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datasets for Improved Understanding of Aerosol Sources and Processes and for Comparison with Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Jose, Jimenez Luis

    2014-04-28

    The AMS is the only current instrument that provides real-time, quantitative, and size-resolved data on submicron non-refractory aerosol species with a time resolution of a few minutes or better. The AMS field data are multidimensional and massive, containing extremely rich information on aerosol chemistry, microphysics and dynamics—basic information that is required to evaluate and quantify the radiative climate forcing of atmospheric aerosols. The high time resolution of the AMS data also reveals details of aerosol dynamic variations that are vital to understanding the physico-chemical processes of atmospheric aerosols that govern aerosol properties relevant to the climate. There are two primary objectives of this 3-year project. Our first objective is to perform highly integrated analysis of dozens of AMS datasets acquired from various urban, forested, coastal, marine, mountain peak, and rural/remote locations around the world and synthesize and inter-compare results with a focus on the sources and the physico-chemical processes that govern aerosol properties relevant to aerosol climate forcing. Our second objective is to support our collaboration with global aerosol modelers, in which we will supply the size-resolved aerosol composition and temporal variation data (via a public web interface) and our analysis results for use in model testing and validation and for translation of the rich AMS database into model constraints that can improve climate forcing simulations. Several prominent global aerosol modelers have expressed enthusiastic support for this collaboration. The specific tasks that we propose to accomplish include 1) to develop, validate, and apply multivariate analysis techniques for improved characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosols; 2) to evaluate aerosol source regions and relative contributions based on back-trajectory integration (PSCF method); 3) to summarize and synthesize submicron aerosol information, including

  15. Chemical Characteristics of Particulate Matter from Vehicle emission using High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, T.; Lee, T.; Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Son, J.; Yoo, H. M.; Kim, K.; Park, G.

    2015-12-01

    Car emissions are major contributors of particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and effects of air pollution, climate change, and human activities. By increasing of interest in research of car emission for assessment of the PM control, it became require to understand the chemical composition and characteristics of the car exhaust gases and particulate matter. To understand car emission characteristics of PM, we will study PM of car emissions for five driving modes (National Institute Environmental Research (NIER)-5, NIER-9, NIER-12, NIER-14) and three fixed speed driving modes (30km/h, 70km/h, 110km/h) using different fuel types (gasoline, diesel, and LPG) at Transportation Pollution Research Center (TPRC) of NIER in Incheon, South Korea. PM chemical composition of car emission was measured for concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, PAHs, oxidation states and size distribution using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) on real-time. In the study, organics concentration was dominated for all cases of driving modes and the concentration of organics was increased in 110km/h fixed speed mode for gasoline and diesel. The presentation will provide an overview of the chemical composition of PM in the car emissions.

  16. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  17. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOEpatents

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  18. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  19. A cometary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Simpson, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flight suitable analyzer units for that part of the GIOTTO Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) experiment designated the High Energy Range Spectrometer (HERS) is discussed. Topics covered include: design of the total ion-optical system for the HERS analyzer; the preparation of the design of analyzing magnet; the evaluation of microchannel plate detectors and associated two-dimensional anode arrays; and the fabrication and evaluation of two flight-suitable units of the complete ion-optical analyzer system including two-dimensional imaging detectors and associated image encoding electronics.

  20. [Characteristics and Formation Mechanism of a Multi-Day Haze in the Winter of Shijiazhuang Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-bo; Ren, Yi-bin; Hong, Gang; Lu, Na; Li, Zhi-guo; Li, Lei; Li, Hui-lai; Jin, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A multi-day haze episode occurred in Shijiazhuang during November 18-26, 2014. The characteristics were studied based on the data collected by the single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) located in the automatic monitoring station (20 meters) of Shijiazhuang. In accordance with the source spectral library of atmospheric pollutant emissions in Shijiazhuang, the main sources were distinguished and analyzed. The mass concentration of particulate matters and meteorological conditions being taken in account, the causes of haze in winter were also studied. It turned out that fine particulate matters in the Shijiazhuang air were mainly from 7 different sources: the tracer ion of coal source was Al; the tracer ions of industry sources were OC, Fe, and Pb; the tracer ion of motor vehicle tail gas source was EC; the tracer ions of dust source were Al, Ca and Si; the tracer ions of biomass burning source were K and levoglucosan; the tracer ions of pure secondary inorganic source were SO4-, NO2-, and NO3-, and the tracer ion of dining source was HOC. Of the above mentioned, OC, HOC, EC, HEC, ECOC, rich potassium particles minerals and heavy metals were 8 dominant polluting groups in hazy days. OC and ECOC particles were the majority, which accounted for more than 50% and 20% of the overall measured particles. OC particles were mainly discharged from coal combustion and industrial processes, and ECOC particles were mainly from coal combustion and vehicle exhaust emissions. When haze occurred in Shijiazhuang the proportion of pollutant particles of NH4+, SO4- , NO2- and NO3- increased, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. The mixed degree between EC, OC and NH4+, So4-, NO3- in the haze was higher than usual, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. In the static and stable weather gaseous (SO2, NO(x), NH3, VOCs) pollutants and particles were difficult to spread and accumulated rapidly, which were discharged from coal combustion, the process of the medical

  1. [Characteristics and Formation Mechanism of a Multi-Day Haze in the Winter of Shijiazhuang Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-bo; Ren, Yi-bin; Hong, Gang; Lu, Na; Li, Zhi-guo; Li, Lei; Li, Hui-lai; Jin, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A multi-day haze episode occurred in Shijiazhuang during November 18-26, 2014. The characteristics were studied based on the data collected by the single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) located in the automatic monitoring station (20 meters) of Shijiazhuang. In accordance with the source spectral library of atmospheric pollutant emissions in Shijiazhuang, the main sources were distinguished and analyzed. The mass concentration of particulate matters and meteorological conditions being taken in account, the causes of haze in winter were also studied. It turned out that fine particulate matters in the Shijiazhuang air were mainly from 7 different sources: the tracer ion of coal source was Al; the tracer ions of industry sources were OC, Fe, and Pb; the tracer ion of motor vehicle tail gas source was EC; the tracer ions of dust source were Al, Ca and Si; the tracer ions of biomass burning source were K and levoglucosan; the tracer ions of pure secondary inorganic source were SO4-, NO2-, and NO3-, and the tracer ion of dining source was HOC. Of the above mentioned, OC, HOC, EC, HEC, ECOC, rich potassium particles minerals and heavy metals were 8 dominant polluting groups in hazy days. OC and ECOC particles were the majority, which accounted for more than 50% and 20% of the overall measured particles. OC particles were mainly discharged from coal combustion and industrial processes, and ECOC particles were mainly from coal combustion and vehicle exhaust emissions. When haze occurred in Shijiazhuang the proportion of pollutant particles of NH4+, SO4- , NO2- and NO3- increased, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. The mixed degree between EC, OC and NH4+, So4-, NO3- in the haze was higher than usual, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. In the static and stable weather gaseous (SO2, NO(x), NH3, VOCs) pollutants and particles were difficult to spread and accumulated rapidly, which were discharged from coal combustion, the process of the medical

  2. Measuring the temporal evolution of aerosol composition in a remote marine environment influenced by Saharan dust outflow using a new single particle mass spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Flynn, Michael; Taylor, Jonathan; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Refractory material constitutes a significant fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden and has a strong influence on climate through the direct radiative effect and aerosol-cloud interactions, particularly in cold and mixed phase clouds. Composition of refractory aerosols is traditionally measured using off-line analytical techniques such as filter analyses. However, when using off-line techniques the temporal evolution of the data set is lost, meaning the measurements are difficult to relate to atmospheric processes. Recently, single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has proven a useful tool for the on-line study of refractory aerosols with the ability to probe size resolved chemical composition with high temporal resolution on a particle by particle basis. A new Laser Ablation Aerosol Time-of-Flight (LAAP-TOF) SPMS instrument with a modified optical detection system was deployed for ground based measurements at Praia, Cape Verde during the Ice in Cloud - Dust (ICE-D) multi-platform campaign in August 2015. A primary aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of Saharan dust on ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds. The instrument was operated over a 16 day period in which several hundred thousand single particle mass spectra were obtained from air masses with back trajectories traversing the Mid-Atlantic, Sahara Desert and West Africa. The data presented indicate external mixtures of sea salt and silicate mineral dust internally mixed with secondary species that are consistent with long range transport to a remote marine environment. The composition and size distributions measured with the LAAP-TOF are compared with measurements from an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and data from SEM-EDX analysis of filter samples. The particle number fraction identified as silicate mineral from the mass spectra correlates with a fraction of the incandescent particles measured with the SP2. We discuss the suitability of the modified

  3. Lunar mass spectrometer test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torney, F. L.; Dobrott, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures are described along with results obtained in a test program conducted to demonstrate the performance of a candidate lunar mass spectrometer. The instrument was designed to sample and measure gases believed to exist in the lunar atmosphere at the surface. The subject instrument consists of a cold cathode ion source, a small quadrupole mass analyzer and an off axis electron multiplier ion counting detector. The major program emphasis was placed on demonstrating instrument resolution, sensitivity and S/N ratio over the mass range 0-150 amu and over a partial pressure range from 10 to the minus 9th power to 10 to the minus 13th power torr. Ultrahigh vacuum tests were conducted and the minimum detectable partial pressure for neon, argon, krypton and xenon was successfully determined for the spectrometer using isotopes of these gases. With the exception of neon, the minimum detectable partial pressure is approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 14th power torr for the above gases.

  4. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  5. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter. PMID:23035870

  6. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter.

  7. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  8. Development of a new corona discharge based ion source for high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to measure gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Dongsen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong; Cheng, Jin; Li, Shizheng; Wang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A new corona discharge (CD) based ion source was developed for a commercial high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) (Aerodyne Research Inc.) to measure both gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and aerosol sulfate after thermal desorption. Nitrate core ions (NO3-) were used as reagent ions and were generated by a negative discharge in zero air followed by addition of excess nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to convert primary ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH) into NO3- ions and nitric acid (HNO3). The CD-HRToF-CIMS showed no detectable interference from hundreds parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Unlike the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) ToF-CIMS, the CD ion source was integrated onto the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) chamber and which made it possible to measure aerosol sulfate by coupling to a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO). Moreover, compared with a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer, the desired HSO4- signal was detected by its exact mass of m/z 96.960, which was well resolved from the potential interferences of HCO3-ṡ(H2O)2 (m/z 97.014) and O-ṡH2OṡHNO3 (m/z 97.002). In this work, using laboratory-generated standards the CD-HRToF-CIMS was demonstrated to be able to detect as low as 3.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 gaseous H2SO4 and 0.5 μg m-3 ammonium sulfate based on 10-s integration time and two times of the baseline noise. The CD ion source had the advantages of low cost and a simple but robust structure. Since the system was non-radioactive and did not require corrosive HNO3 gas, it can be readily field deployed. The CD-HRToF-CIMS can be a powerful tool for both field and laboratory studies of aerosol formation mechanism and the chemical processes that were critical to understand the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  9. Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

  10. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result,…

  11. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  12. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  13. Characterization of the organic matter in submicron urban aerosols using a Thermo-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-TOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Christian Mark; Ho, T.-T.; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.

    2016-09-01

    Organic matter is the most complicated and unresolved major component of atmospheric aerosol particles. Its sources and global budget are still highly uncertain and thereby necessitate further research efforts with state-of-the-art instrument. This study employed a Thermo-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-TOF-MS) for characterization of ambient organic aerosols. First, five authentic standard substances, which include phthalic acid, levoglucosan, arabitol, cis-pinonic acid and glutaric acid, were utilized to examine the response of the instrument. The results demonstrated the linearity of the TD-PTR-TOF-MS signals against a range of mass loading of specific species on filters. However, it was found that significant fragmentation happened to those challenging compounds, although the proton-transfer-reaction (PTR) was recognized as a soft ionization technique. Consequently, quantitative characterization of aerosols with the TD-PTR-TOF-MS depended on the availability of the fragmentation pattern in mass spectra and the recovery rate with the quantification ion peak(s). The instrument was further deployed to analyze a subset of submicron aerosol samples collected at the TARO (Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory) in Taipei, Taiwan during August 2013. The results were compared with the measurements from a conventional DRI thermo-optical carbon analyzer. The inter-comparison indicated that the TD-PTR-TOF-MS underestimated the mass of total organic matter (TOM) in aerosol samples by 27%. The underestimation was most likely due to the thermo-decomposition during desorption processes and fragmentation in PTR drift tube, where undetectable fragments were formed. Besides, condensation loss of low vapor pressure species in the transfer components was also responsible for the underestimation to a certain degree. Nevertheless, it was showed that the sum of the mass concentrations of the major detected ion peaks correlated strongly

  14. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  16. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  17. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and

  18. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka, Deborah E; Austin, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS)The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.3 AcronymsIMSion mobility spectrometryMAAMaterial Access AreaMSmass spectrometryoaTOForthogonal acceleration time

  20. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  1. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Various mass analyzer systems were evaluated. Several systems show promise, including the Stanford Research Systems RGA-100, Inficon XPR-2, the University of Florida's Ion Trap, and the Compact Double Focus Mass Spectrometer. Areas that need improvement are the response time, recovery time, system volume, and system weight. Future work will investigate techniques to improve systems and will evaluate engineering challenges.

  2. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  3. Pump Effects in Planetary Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Harpold, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Mass spectrometers provide a useful tool in solar system exploration since fundamental questions of Solar System formation and evolution may be constrained by models based on the chemical and isotopic data provided by these instruments. For example, comparison of such data between the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets enables an understanding of mechanisms of atmospheric loss to space and production sources such as from planetary outgassing and from infall from objects such as comets. Over the past 25 years, mass spectrometers have been sent to Mars, Venus, Comet Halley, and Jupiter and are presently in transit to the Saturnian system to sample the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. The quality of data derived from a very small, lightweight, and rugged instrument is constrained not only by the mass analyzer itself, but also by the performance of its gas sampling and pumping systems. A comparison of several planetary mass spectrometer experiments is provided with a focus on the demands placed on the gas processing and pumping systems. For example, the figure below is a mass spectrum from deep in the atmosphere of Jupiter obtained from a quadrupole mass spectrometer developed in the early 1980's for the Galileo Probe (Niemann et al., Space Sci. Rev., 60, 111-142 (1992)). Measurements of Jovian noble gases and other species with this system is described.

  4. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  5. Mass measurements with a Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-21

    Penning trap mass measurements on radioactive isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended. The most recent measurements were carried out on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. An accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  6. Machined electrostatic sector for mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An electrostatic sector device for a mass spectrometer is formed from a single piece of machinable ceramic. The machined ceramic is coated with a nickel coating, and a notch is etched in the nickel coating to form two separated portions. The sector can be covered by a cover formed from a separate piece of machined ceramic.

  7. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  8. Autonomously Calibrating a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program autonomously manages the calibration of a quadrupole ion mass spectrometer intended for use in monitoring concentrations and changes in concentrations of organic chemicals in the cabin air of the International Space Station. The instrument parameters calibrated include the voltage on a channel electron multiplier, a discriminator threshold, and an ionizer current. Calibration is achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum obtained while sweeping the parameter ranges in a heuristic procedure, developed by mass spectrometer experts, that involves detection of changes in signal trends that humans can easily recognize but cannot necessarily be straightforwardly codified in an algorithm. The procedure includes calculation of signal-to-noise ratios, signal-increase rates, and background-noise-increase rates; finding signal peaks; and identifying peak patterns. The software provides for several recovery-from-error scenarios and error-handling schemes. The software detects trace amounts of contaminant gases in the mass spectrometer and notifies associated command- and-data-handling software to schedule a cleaning. Furthermore, the software autonomously analyzes the mass spectrum to determine whether the parameters of a radio-frequency ramp waveform are set properly so that the peaks of the mass spectrum are at expected locations.

  9. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  10. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  11. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  12. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  13. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  14. Mass Spectrometers in Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Niemann, Hasso; Harpold, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been included in the payloads of several deep space missions over the past three decades. Our laboratory has designed and developed mass spectrometers for the Galileo Probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter, the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, the Cassini Orbiter Mission to Saturn, the Cassini/Huygens Probe Mission to Saturn's moon Titan, the Nozomi Mission to Mars, and most recently the CONTOUR comet nucleus flyby mission. Each mission has required attention to miniaturization, autonomous sampling, and consideration of the special hazards and measurement requirements of the target environment. Development ongoing in our laboratory includes further miniaturization, improved performance in the areas of sensitivity and precision for the important isotope measurements, and adaptation for the unusual environments to be encountered in locations such as the surface or subsurface of Europa or Mars. Various aspects of both the technical implementation of these delivered and planned experiments and the science drivers will be described.

  15. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result, it is not possible for instructors to take full advantage of this equipment. Therefore, to facilitate accessibility to this tool, we have developed a realistic computer-based simulator. Using this software, students are able to practice their ability to identify the components of the original gas, thereby gaining a better understanding of the underlying physical laws. The software is available as a free download.

  16. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.

    1982-01-01

    The deuterium hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the minus two power. It was found that the 100 fold enrichment of deuterium means that Venus outgassed at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean and possibly more.

  17. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  18. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  19. Chemical characterization of particle emissions from controlled burns of biomass fuels using a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Hosseini, S.; Jung, H.; Yokelson, B.; Weise, D.; Cocker, D., III; Huang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    A total of forty-nine burns were conducted at the Missoula Fire Sciences Lab consisting of nine fuel types; i.e., chamise scrub oak, ceanothus, maritime chaparral, coastal sage scrub, California sage brush, Manzanita, oak savanna, oak woodland and masticated mesquite. This paper focuses on the chemical characterization of fine particle emissions collected for flaming, mixed and smoldering phases using a HR ToF-AMS. The evolution of OM/OC, H/C, O/C and N/C from fire ignition to extinction was measured to capture the transient and integrated chemical composition of the non-refractory portion of bulk particles. Real time elemental ratios and empirical formulas derived with respect to modified combustion efficiency (MCE) are reported. For each fuel, the hydrogen fragment ions dominate the unit mass resolution (UMR) mass spectra with no specific fragment ions attributable to an individual ecological combination. An interference ion in the UMR m/z 73, a fragment normally attributed to levoglucosan, is noted. Therefore, the results imply that C2H4O2+ (m/z 60.021) plus C3H5O2+ (m/z 73.029) are more sufficient to estimate the contribution of levoglucosan. The results did not show significant variations of levoglucosan content in the organic particle with the overall average contribution fraction ranging from 0.74% for coastal sage to 1.93% for chamise.

  20. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  1. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R.; Duerksen, K. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer (LNMS) uses a single focusing magnetic sector field mass analyzer with mass range of 1-208 amu, resolution sufficient to separate the mercury isotopes, and sensitivity sufficient to detect minor constituents in the 1 ppm range relative to the CO2 in the Venus atmosphere. A combination of ion and chemical pumping is used to maintain a vacuum in the mass analyzer and to remove the atmosphere gases which enter the ion source chamber through a special leak. A microprocessor controls the operation of the instrument through a highly efficient peak stepping and data compression program, permitting acquisition of a complete mass spectrum roughly once each minute.

  2. Non-Refractory Submicron Aerosol Mass Loadings during NEAQS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Matthew, B. M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Quinn, P. K.; Degouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, E. J.; McKeen, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    During the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) in July-August 2002, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed aboard the NOAA ship RONALD H. BROWN and collected 2-minute averaged data. The AMS, which measures non-refractory components of aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between roughly 40 and 1500 nm, produced particle mass spectra as well as aerosol organic, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate mass distributions. A wide variety of air masses were sampled, including clean marine, clean continental, and polluted continental air masses. In general, the volatile particle composition was mostly organic and sulfate with lesser amounts of ammonium and nitrate and the mass loadings typically peaked around 400-600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. Although the AMS sulfate and ammonium concentrations were highly correlated with the sulfate and ammonium concentrations from the Particle into Liquid (PILS) instrument also deployed on the ship, the AMS and PILS nitrate concentrations were not correlated and at times anti-correlated. In contrast, the AMS nitrate and organic concentrations as well as the AMS nitrate and gas phase alkyl nitrate concentrations were highly correlated. These results suggest that organic nitrate was present in the submicron aerosol phase. The AMS organic concentrations were generally higher than the AMS sulfate concentrations, consistent with other shipboard measurements. Whenever the sulfate concentration increased, the organic concentration also increased, indicating that sulfate and organic aerosol growth are influenced by the same processes or that sulfate may play a role in organic aerosol growth. The exception to this pattern occurred during a sea fog event where the sulfate concentration increased and the organic concentration decreased, probably due to rapid aqueous phase sulfur oxidation and relatively less oxidation of organic compounds. Furthermore, the organic concentration often increased without concurrent increases in

  3. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  4. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  5. Silicon Microleaks for Inlets of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan; Hasso, Niemann; Jamieson, Brian G.; Lynch, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microleaks for inlets of mass spectrometers used to analyze atmospheric gases can be fabricated in silicon wafers by means of photolithography, etching, and other techniques that are commonly used in the manufacture of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems. The microleaks serve to limit the flows of the gases into the mass-spectrometer vacuums to specified very small flow rates consistent with the capacities of the spectrometer vacuum pumps. There is a need to be able to precisely tailor the dimensions of each microleak so as to tailor its conductance to a precise low value. (As used here, "conductance" signifies the ratio between the rate of flow in the leak and the pressure drop from the upstream to the downstream end of the leak.) To date, microleaks have been made, variously, of crimped metal tubes, pulled glass tubes, or frits. Crimped-metal and pulled-glass-tube microleaks cannot readily be fabricated repeatably to precise dimensions and are susceptible to clogging with droplets or particles. Frits tend to be differentially chemically reactive with various gas constituents and, hence, to distort the gas mixtures to be analyzed. The present approach involving microfabrication in silicon largely overcomes the disadvantages of the prior approaches.

  6. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  7. Calculations for Calibration of a Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations to calibrate a quadrupole mass spectrometer in an instrumentation system for identifying trace amounts of organic chemicals in air. In the operation of the mass spectrometer, the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of ions being counted at a given instant of time is a function of the instantaneous value of a repeating ramp voltage waveform applied to electrodes. The count rate as a function of time can be converted to an m/z spectrum (equivalent to a mass spectrum for singly charged ions), provided that a calibration of m/z is available. The present computer program can perform the calibration in either or both of two ways: (1) Following a data-based approach, it can utilize the count-rate peaks and the times thereof measured when fed with air containing known organic compounds. (2) It can utilize a theoretical proportionality between the instantaneous m/z and the instantaneous value of an oscillating applied voltage. The program can also estimate the error of the calibration performed by the data-based approach. If calibrations are performed in both ways, then the results can be compared to obtain further estimates of errors.

  8. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  9. Aerosol Analysis via Electrostatic Precipitation-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Siqin; Li, Lin; Duan, Hongxu; Naqwi, Amir; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the preferred mode of ion generation for mass analysis of many organic species, as alternative ionization techniques can lead to appreciable analyte fragmentation. For this reason, ESI is an ideal method for the analysis of species within aerosol particles. However, because of their low concentrations (∼10 μg/m(3)) in most environments, ESI has been applied sparingly in aerosol particle analysis; aerosol mass spectrometers typically employ analyte volatilization followed by electron ionization or chemical ionization, which can lead to a considerable degree of analyte fragmentation. Here, we describe an approach to apply ESI to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles, which utilizes unipolar ionization to charge particles, electrostatic precipitation to collect particles on the tip of a Tungsten rod, and subsequently, by flowing liquid over the rod, ESI and mass analysis of the species composing collected particles. This technique, which we term electrostatic precipitation-ESI-MS (EP-ESI-MS), is shown to enable analysis of nanogram quantities of collected particles (from aerosol phase concentrations as low as 10(2) ng m(-3)) composed of cesium iodide, levoglucosan, and levoglucosan within a carbon nanoparticle matrix. With EP-ESI-MS, the integrated mass spectrometric signals are found to be a monotonic function of the mass concentration of analyte in the aerosol phase. We additionally show that EP-ESI-MS has a dynamic range of close to 5 orders of magnitude in mass, making it suitable for molecular analysis of aerosol particles in laboratory settings with upstream particle size classification, as well as analysis of PM 2.5 particles in ambient air. PMID:26024017

  10. Investigating Types and Sources of Organic Aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS) focuses on identifying pathways and sources of nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Past work has combined measurements from a range of instrumentation such as annular denuders, PILS-IC, Hi-Vol samplers, and trace gas analyzers. Limited information from early RoMANS campaigns is available regarding organic aerosol. While prior measurements have produced a measure of total organic carbon mass, high time resolution measures of organic aerosol concentration and speciation are lacking. One area of particular interest is characterizing the types, sources, and amounts of organic nitrogen aerosol. Organic nitrogen measurements in RMNP wet deposition reveal a substantial contribution to the total reactive nitrogen deposition budget. In this study an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in summer 2010 at RMNP to investigate organic aerosol composition and its temporal variability. The species timeline and diurnal species variations are combined with meteorological data to investigate local transport events and chemistry; transport from the Colorado Front Range urban corridor appears to be more significant for inorganic species than for the overall organic aerosol mass. Considerable variation in organic aerosol concentration is observed (0.5 to 20 μg/m3), with high concentration episodes lasting between hours and two days. High resolution AMS data are analyzed for organic aerosol, including organic nitrogen species that might be expected from local biogenic emissions, agricultural activities, and secondary reaction products of combustion emissions. Positive matrix factorization reveals that semi-volatile oxidized OA, low-volatility oxidized OA, and biomass burning OA comprise most organic mass; the diurnal profile of biomass burning OA peaks at four and nine pm and may arise from local camp fires, while constant concentrations of

  11. AFE ion mass spectrometer design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Willie

    1989-01-01

    This final technical report covers the activities engaged in by the University of Texas at Dallas, Center for Space Sciences in conjunction with the NASA Langley Research Center, Systems Engineering Division in design studies directed towards defining a suitable ion mass spectrometer to determine the plasma parameter around the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment vehicle during passage through the earth's upper atmosphere. Additional studies relate to the use of a Langmuir probe to measure windward ion/electron concentrations and temperatures. Selected instrument inlet subsystems were tested in the NASA Ames Arc-Jet Facility.

  12. Water Mass Map from Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 8, 2003

    This map shows the estimated lower limit of the water content of the upper meter of Martian soil. The estimates are derived from the hydrogen abundance measured by the neutron spectrometer component of the gamma ray spectrometer suite on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    The highest water-mass fractions, exceeding 30 percent to well over 60 percent, are in the polar regions, beyond about 60 degrees latitude north or south. Farther from the poles, significant concentrations are in the area bound in longitude by minus 10 degrees to 50 degrees and in latitude by 30 degrees south to 40 degrees north, and in an area to the south and west of Olympus Mons (30 degrees to 0 degrees south latitude and minus 135 degrees to 110 degrees longitude).

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for the NASA Office of Space Science in Washington. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL.

  13. A smog chamber study coupling a photoionization aerosol electron/ion spectrometer to VUV synchrotron radiation: organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Romero, María Teresa; Gaie-Levrel, Francois; Mahjoub, Ahmed; López-Arza, Vicente; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A reaction chamber was coupled to a photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electron/ion coincidence scheme and applied for on-line analysis of organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosols using synchrotron tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as the ionization source. In this proof of principle study, both aerosol and gas phase were detected simultaneously but could be differentiated. Present results and perspectives for improvement for this set-up are shown in the study of ozonolysis ([O3] = 0.13-3 ppm) of α-pinene (2-3 ppm), and the uptake of glyoxal upon ammonium sulphate. In this work the ozone concentration was monitored in real time, together with the particle size distributions and chemical composition, the latter taking advantage of the coincidence spectrometer and the tuneability of the synchrotron radiation as a soft VUV ionization source.

  14. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  15. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  16. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, Gerald W.; Bushman, John F.; Alger, Terry W.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  17. Application of a mass spectrometer as a capnograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elokhin, V. A.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Elizarov, A. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    The feasibility of using a mass spectrometer for monitoring the carbon dioxide and inhalational anesthetic concentrations in the breathing circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia are demonstrated. Mass-spectrometric data for the CO2 and inhalational anesthetic concentrations are compared with related optical data. The advantages of the mass spectrometer as a capnograph over the optical spectrometer are indicated. The variation of the inhalational anesthetic content in expired air is shown to depend on the muscle relaxation efficiency.

  18. Rapid discrimination of bacteria using a miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Wei, Pu; Snyder, Dalton T; Wang, Xiao; Ouyang, Zheng; Pielak, Rafal M; Graham Cooks, R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria colonies were analyzed using paper spray ionization coupled with a portable mass spectrometer. The spectra were averaged and processed using multivariate analysis to discriminate between different species of bacteria based on their unique phospholipid profiles. Full scan mass spectra and product ion MS/MS data were compared to those recorded using a benchtop linear ion trap mass spectrometer. PMID:26844973

  19. The Hohenpeissenberg aerosol characterization experiment (HAZE2002): Aerosol composition derived from mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Berresheim, H.; Borrmann, S.; Poeschl, U.; Roempp, A.; Schneider, J.

    2003-04-01

    The HAZE Experiment was conducted between 17.05.2002 and 31.05.2002, at the meteorological observatory of the Deutsche Wetterdienst (DWD) at Hohenpeissenberg (47^o48'N,11^o02'E, 985m). The objective was to make essential progress in understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the atmospheric aerosol, in particular relating to the Gas-To-Particle-Conversion and the interaction with meteorological processes. The measurements included online mass spectrometric analysis using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), filter samples with GC analyses of organic compounds, particle size distribution (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), SMPS, OPC), as well as the total particle concentration (CPC). Additionally, several gas-phase substances were measured (e.g. Benzene, Acetone). The measurements obtained with the AMS show a strong variability of the aerosol composition. The non-refractory aerosol composition was dominated by nitrate, sulphate, and organics, whereas ammonium was surprisingly low. High number concentration of up to 14000 particles/cm^3 were observed. These particles mostly had diameters between 200 nm and 400 nm and were mainly composed of ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate. Various meteorological conditions allowed to study their influence on the aerosol. For example, on rainy days the concentrations of ammonium sulphate particles decreased, whereas the concentrations of ammonium nitrate particles increased.

  20. Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Measurements from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W.; Cravens, T.; Luhmann, J.; McNutt, R.; Ip, W.-H.; Gell, D.; Muller-Wordag, I. C. F.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) aboard the Cassini orbiter has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in its first flyby of Titan. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon s upper atmosphere do not appear to be changed since the Voyager flyby in 1979. However, the more sensitive techniques provided by modern in-situ mass spectrometry also give evidence for large-spatial-scale large-amplitude atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and for a plethora of stable carbon-nitrile compounds above 1174 km. Furthermore, they allow the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which provide interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The atmosphere was first accreted as ammonia and ammonia ices from the Saturn sub-nebula. Subsequent photochemistry likely converted the atmosphere into molecular nitrogen. The early atmosphere was 1.5 to 5 times more substantial and was lost via escape over the intervening 4.5 billion years due to the reduced gravity associated with the relatively small mass of Titan. Carbon in the form of methane has continued to outgas over time from the interior with much of it being deposited in the form of complex hydrocarbons on the surface and some of it also being lost to space.

  1. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  2. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  3. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  4. Calibration correction of an active scattering spectrometer probe to account for refractive index of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Overbeck, V. R.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Ferry, G. V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the active scattering spectrometer probe (ASAS-X) to measure sulfuric acid aerosols on U-2 and ER-2 research aircraft has yielded results that are at times ambiguous due to the dependence of particles' optical signatures on refractive index as well as physical dimensions. The calibration correction of the ASAS-X optical spectrometer probe for stratospheric aerosol studies is validated through an independent and simultaneous sampling of the particles with impactors; sizing and counting of particles on SEM images yields total particle areas and volumes. Upon correction of calibration in light of these data, spectrometer results averaged over four size distributions are found to agree with similarly averaged impactor results to within a few percent: indicating that the optical properties or chemical composition of the sample aerosol must be known in order to achieve accurate optical aerosol spectrometer size analysis.

  5. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.K.; Lewis, T.M.; Beeson, M.D.; Russell, D.H. )

    1994-05-15

    We report the application of aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The aerosol MALDI experiment uses aerosol liquid introduction in conjunction with pulsed UV laser ionization to form ions from large biomolecules in solution. Mass analysis is achieved in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the LC/MALDI-MS experiment, the matrix solution is combined with the column effluent in a mixing tee, LC/MALDI-MS is demonstrated for the separation of bradykinin, gramicidin S, and myoglobin. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Quadrupole mass spectrometer driver with higher signal levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Driving a quadrapole mass spectrometer includes obtaining an air core transformer with a primary and a secondary, matching the secondary to the mass spectrometer, and driving the primary based on first and second voltage levels. Driving of the primary is via an isolating stage that minimizes low level drive signal coupling.

  7. Driving a quadrupole mass spectrometer via an isolating stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Driving a quadrupole mass spectrometer includes obtaining an air core transformer with a primary and a secondary, matching the secondary to the mass spectrometer, and driving the primary based on first and second voltage levels. Driving of the primary is via an isolating stage that minimizes low level drive signal coupling.

  8. SoFi, an IGOR-based interface for the efficient use of the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) for the source apportionment: ME-2 application to aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonaco, F.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Source apportionment using the bilinear model through a multilinear engine (ME-2) was successfully applied to non-refractory organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra collected during the winter of 2011 and 2012 in Zurich, Switzerland using the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). Five factors were identified: low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking OA (COA) and biomass burning OA (BBOA). A graphical user interface SoFi (Source Finder) was developed at PSI in order to facilitate the testing of different rotational techniques available within the ME-2 engine by providing a priori factor profiles for some or all of the expected factors. ME-2 was used to test the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model, the fully constrained chemical mass balance (CMB) model, and partially constrained models utilizing a values and pulling equations. Within the set of model solutions determined to be environmentally reasonable, BBOA and SV-OOA factor mass spectra and time series showed the greatest variability. This variability represents the uncertainty in the model solution and indicates that analysis of model rotations provides a useful approach for assessing the uncertainty of bilinear source apportionment models.

  9. Open-split interface for mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Diehl, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An open-split interface includes a connector body having four leg members projecting therefrom within a single plane, the first and third legs being coaxial and the second and fourth legs being coaxial. A tubular aperture extends through the first and third legs and a second tubular aperture extends through the second and fourth legs, connecting at a juncture within the center of the connector body. A fifth leg projects from the connector body and has a third tubular aperture extending therethrough to the juncture of the first and second tubular apertures. A capillary column extends from a gas chromatograph into the third leg with its end adjacent the juncture. A flow restrictor tube extends from a mass spectrometer through the first tubular aperture in the first and third legs and into the capillary columnm end, so as to project beyond the end of the third leg within the capillary column. An annular gap between the tube and column allows excess effluent to pass to the juncture. A pair of short capillary columns extend from separate detectors into the second tubular aperture in the second and fourth legs, and are oriented with their ends spaced slightly from the first capillary column end. A sweep flow tube is mounted in the fifth leg so as to supply a helium sweep flow to the juncture.

  10. Radiation Design of Ion Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Ed; Cooper, John; Christian, Eric; Moore, Tom; Sturner, Steve; Paschalidis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    In the harsh radiation environment of Jupiter and with the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE) mission including two Europa flybys where local intensities are approx. 150 krad/month behind 100 mils of Al shielding, so background from penetrating radiation can be a serious issue for detectors inside an Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS). This can especially be important for minor ion detection designs. Detectors of choice for time-of-flight (TOF) designs are microchannel plates (MCP) and some designs may include solid state detectors (SSD). The standard approach is to use shielding designs so background event rates are low enough that the detector max rates and lifetimes are first not exceeded and then the more stringent requirement that the desired measurement can successfully be made (i.e., desired signal is sufficiently greater than background noise after background subtraction is made). GEANT codes are typically used along with various electronic techniques, but such designs need to know how the detectors will respond to the simulated primary and secondary radiations produced within the instrument. We will be presenting some preliminary measurements made on the response of MCPs to energetic electrons (20 ke V to 1400 ke V) using a Miniature TOF (MTOF) device and the High Energy Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center which has a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  11. THOR Ion Mass Spectrometer instrument - IMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro; Kucharek, Harald; Saito, Yoshifumi; Fraenz, Markus; Verdeil, Christophe; Leblanc, Frederic; Techer, Jean-Denis; Jeandet, Alexis; Macri, John; Gaidos, John; Granoff, Mark; Yokota, Shoichiro; Fontaine, Dominique; Berthomier, Matthieu; Delcourt, Dominique; Kistler, Lynn; Galvin, Antoniette; Kasahara, Satoshi; Kronberg, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. Specifically, THOR will study how turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales heat and accelerate particles in different turbulent environments within the near-Earth space. To achieve this goal, THOR payload is being designed to measure electromagnetic fields and particle distribution functions with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Here we present the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) instrument that will measure the full three-dimensional distribution functions of near-Earth main ion species (H+, He+, He++ and O+) at high time resolution (~ 150 ms for H+ , ~ 300 ms for He++) with energy resolution down to ~ 10% in the range 10 eV/q to 30 keV/q and angular resolution ~ 10°. Such high time resolution is achieved by mounting multiple sensors around the spacecraft body, in similar fashion to the MMS/FPI instrument. Each sensor combines a top-hat electrostatic analyzer with deflectors at the entrance together with a time-of-flight section to perform mass selection. IMS electronics includes a fast sweeping high voltage board that is required to make measurements at high cadence. Ion detection includes Micro Channel Plates (MCP) combined with Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for charge amplification, discrimination and time-to-digital conversion (TDC). IMS is being designed to address many of THOR science requirements, in particular ion heating and acceleration by turbulent fluctuations in foreshock, shock and magnetosheath regions. The IMS instrument is being designed and will be built by an international consortium of scientific institutes with main hardware contributions from France, USA, Japan and Germany.

  12. Aerosol chemical composition in cloud events by high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liqing; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kortelainen, Aki; Jaatinen, Antti; Portin, Harri; Miettinen, Pasi; Komppula, Mika; Leskinen, Ari; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N; Sueper, Donna; Worsnop, Douglas R; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari

    2013-03-19

    This study presents results of direct observations of aerosol chemical composition in clouds. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was used to make measurements of cloud interstitial particles (INT) and mixed cloud interstitial and droplet residual particles (TOT). The differences between these two are the cloud droplet residuals (RES). Positive matrix factorization analysis of high-resolution mass spectral data sets and theoretical calculations were performed to yield distributions of chemical composition of the INT and RES particles. We observed that less oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA) were mainly distributed into the INT particles, whereas more oxidized low-volatile oxygenated OA (LVOOA) mainly in the RES particles. Nitrates existed as organic nitrate and in chemical form of NH(4)NO(3). Organic nitrates accounted for 45% of total nitrates in the INT particles, in clear contrast to 26% in the RES particles. Meanwhile, sulfates coexist in forms of acidic NH(4)HSO(4) and neutralized (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Acidic sulfate made up 64.8% of total sulfates in the INT particles, much higher than 10.7% in the RES particles. The results indicate a possible joint effect of activation ability of aerosol particles, cloud processing, and particle size effects on cloud formation.

  13. Organic aerosol mixing observed by single-particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2013-12-27

    We present direct measurements of mixing between separately prepared organic aerosol populations in a smog chamber using single-particle mass spectra from the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Docosane and docosane-d46 (22 carbon linear solid alkane) did not show any signs of mixing, but squalane and squalane-d62 (30 carbon branched liquid alkane) mixed on the time scale expected from a condensational-mixing model. Docosane and docosane-d46 were driven to mix when the chamber temperature was elevated above the melting point for docosane. Docosane vapors were shown to mix into squalane-d62, but not the other way around. These results are consistent with low diffusivity in the solid phase of docosane particles. We performed mixing experiments on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogate systems finding that SOA derived from toluene-d8 (a surrogate for anthropogenic SOA (aSOA)) does not mix into squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA)) but does mix into SOA derived from α-pinene (biogenic SOA (bSOA) surrogate). For the aSOA/POA, the volatility of either aerosol does not limit gas-phase diffusion, indicating that the two particle populations do not mix simply because they are immiscible. In the aSOA/bSOA system, the presence of toluene-d8-derived SOA molecules in the α-pinene-derived SOA provides evidence that the diffusion coefficient in α-pinene-derived SOA is high enough for mixing on the time scale of 1 min. The observations from all of these mixing experiments are generally invisible to bulk aerosol composition measurements but are made possible with single-particle composition data.

  14. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This work is aimed at understanding the aspects of designing a miniature mass spectrometer (MS) system. A multitude of commercial and government sectors, such as the military, environmental agencies and industrial manufacturers of semiconductors, refrigerants, and petroleum products, would find a small, portable, rugged and reliable MS system beneficial. Several types of small MS systems are evaluated and discussed, including linear quadrupole, quadrupole ion trap, time of flight and sector. The performance of each system in terms of accuracy, precision, limits of detection, response time, recovery time, scan rate, volume and weight is assessed. A performance scale is setup to rank each systems and an overall performance score is given to each system. All experiments involved the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in a nitrogen background with the concentrations of the components of interest ranging from 0-5000 part-per-million (ppm). The relative accuracies of the systems vary from < 1% to approx. 40% with an average below 10%. Relative precisions varied from 1% to 20%, with an average below 5%. The detection limits had a large distribution, ranging from 0.2 to 170 ppm. The systems had a diverse response time ranging from 4 s to 210 s as did the recovery time with a 6 s to 210 s distribution. Most instruments had scan times near, 1 s, however one instrument exceeded 13 s. System weights varied from 9 to 52 kg and sizes from 15 x 10(exp 3)cu cm to 110 x 10(exp 3) cu cm.

  15. Characterization of a Photoacoustic Aerosol Absorption Spectrometer for Aircraft-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. J.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Brock, C. A.; Murphy, D. M.; Adler, G.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol directly impacts the Earth's climate through extinction of incoming and outgoing radiation. The optical extinction is due to both scattering and absorption. In situ measurements of aerosol extinction and scattering are well established and have uncertainties less than 5%. However measurements of aerosol absorption typically have uncertainties of 20-30%. Development and characterization of more accurate and precise instrumentation for measurement of aerosol absorption will enable a deeper understand of significance and spatial distribution of black and brown carbon aerosol, the effect of atmospheric processes on aerosol optical properties, and influence of aerosol optical properties on direct radiative forcing. Here, we present a detailed characterization of a photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer designed for deployment aboard research aircraft. The spectrometer operates at three colors across the visible spectrum and is calibrated in the field using ozone. The field calibration is validated in the laboratory using synthetic aerosol and simultaneous measurements of extinction and scattering. In addition, the sensitivity of the instrument is characterized under conditions typically encountered during aircraft sampling e.g. as a function of changing pressure. We will apply this instrument characterization to ambient aerosol absorption data collected during the SENEX and SEAC4RS aircraft based field campaigns.

  16. Light extinction by secondary organic aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-11-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace-gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulfate particles, the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  17. Light extinction by Secondary Organic Aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulphate particles the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  18. Validation studies using multiwavelength Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) observations of stratospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Bailey, Paul L.; Lyjak, Lawrence V.; Craig, Cheryl A.; Cavanaugh, Charles P.; Mergenthaler, John L.; Roche, Aidan E.; Kumer, John B.; Lambert, Alyn; Grainger, Roy G.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Taylor, Frederic W.; Russell, James M.; Park, Jae H.; Deshler, Terry; Hervig, Mark E.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Waters, Joe W.; Lahoz, William A.

    1996-04-01

    Validation studies of multiwavelength Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) observations of stratospheric aerosol are discussed. An error analysis of the CLAES aerosol extinction data is presented. Aerosol extinction precision values are estimated at latitudes and times at which consecutive Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) orbits overlap. Comparisons of CLAES aerosol data with theoretical Mie calculations, based upon in situ particle size measurements at Laramie, Wyoming, are presented. CLAES aerosol data are also compared to scaled aerosol extinction measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiments. Observed and calculated extinction spectra, from CLAES, Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS), and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) data, are compared. CLAES extinction data have precisions between 10 and 25%, instrumental biases near 30%, and accuracies between 33 and 43%.

  19. Inficon Transpector MPH Mass Spectrometer Random Vibration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Bond, Jo; Captain, Janine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this test report is to summarize results from the vibration testing of the INFICON Transpector MPH100M model Mass Spectrometer. It also identifies requirements satisfied, and procedures used in the test. As a payload of Resource Prospector, it is necessary to determine the survivability of the mass spectrometer to proto-qualification level random vibration. Changes in sensitivity of the mass spectrometer can be interpreted as a change in alignment of the instrument. The results of this test will be used to determine any necessary design changes as the team moves forward with flight design.

  20. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  1. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  2. Developments of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) and the retrieval accuracy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Ahn, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). By taking the advantage, the OMI UV aerosol algorithm has provided information on the absorbing aerosol (Torres et al., 2007; Ahn et al., 2008). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To obtain the retrieval accuracy, the error of the look-up table method occurred by the interpolation of pre-calculated radiances is estimated by using the reference dataset, and the uncertainties about aerosol type and height are evaluated. Also, the GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with measured normalized radiance from OMI, a provisional data set for GEMS measurement, and the results are compared with the values from AERONET measurements over Asia. Additionally, the method for simultaneous retrieve of the AOD and aerosol height is discussed.

  3. Mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.

    2000-07-25

    A mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus is provided. The sample presentation apparatus has a complex bound to the surface of the sample presentation apparatus. This complex includes a molecule which may chemically modify a biomolecule.

  4. Detection, identification, and estimation of biological aerosols and vapors with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Ren, Hsuan

    2003-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The purpose of the first experiment was to detect and identify Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger (BG) bioaerosol spores and kaolin dust in an open-air release for which the thermal contrast between the aerosol temperature and background brightness temperature is small. The second experiment estimated the concentration of a small amount of triethyl phosphate (TEP) vapor in a closed chamber in which an external blackbody radiation source was used and where the thermal contrast was large. The deduced BG (TEP) extinction spectrum (identification) showed an excellent match to the library BG (TEP) extinction spectrum. Analysis of the time sequence of the measurements coincided well with the presence (detection) of the BG during the measurements, and the estimated concentration of time-dependent TEP vapor was excellent. The data were analyzed with hyperspectral detection, identification, and estimation algorithms. The algorithms were based on radiative transfer theory and statistical signal-processing methods. A subspace orthogonal projection operator was used to statistically subtract the large thermal background contribution to the measurements, and a robust maximum-likelihood solution was used to deduce the target (aerosol or vapor cloud) spectrum and estimate its mass-column concentration. A Gaussian-mixture probability model for the deduced mass-column concentration was computed with an expectation-maximization algorithm to produce the detection threshold, the probability of detection, and the probability of false alarm. The results of this study are encouraging, as they suggest for the first time to the authors' knowledge the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors.

  5. Detection, identification, and estimation of biological aerosols and vapors with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Ren, Hsuan

    2003-08-20

    Two experiments were conducted with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The purpose of the first experiment was to detect and identify Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger (BG) bioaerosol spores and kaolin dust in an open-air release for which the thermal contrast between the aerosol temperature and background brightness temperature is small. The second experiment estimated the concentration of a small amount of triethyl phosphate (TEP) vapor in a closed chamber in which an external blackbody radiation source was used and where the thermal contrast was large. The deduced BG (TEP) extinction spectrum (identification) showed an excellent match to the library BG (TEP) extinction spectrum. Analysis of the time sequence of the measurements coincided well with the presence (detection) of the BG during the measurements, and the estimated concentration of time-dependent TEP vapor was excellent. The data were analyzed with hyperspectral detection, identification, and estimation algorithms. The algorithms were based on radiative transfer theory and statistical signal-processing methods. A subspace orthogonal projection operator was used to statistically subtract the large thermal background contribution to the measurements, and a robust maximum-likelihood solution was used to deduce the target (aerosol or vapor cloud) spectrum and estimate its mass-column concentration. A Gaussian-mixture probability model for the deduced mass-column concentration was computed with an expectation-maximization algorithm to produce the detection threshold, the probability of detection, and the probability of false alarm. The results of this study are encouraging, as they suggest for the first time to the authors' knowledge the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors. PMID:12952336

  6. Direct measurements of mass-specific optical cross sections of single-component aerosol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Ma, Xiaofei; Gillis, Keith A; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols vary widely, being dependent upon particle composition, morphology, and mixing state. This diversity and complexity of aerosols motivates measurement techniques that can discriminate and quantify a variety of single- and multicomponent aerosols that are both internally and externally mixed. Here, we present a new combination of techniques to directly measure the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections of laboratory-generated aerosols that are relevant to atmospheric studies. Our approach employs a tandem differential mobility analyzer, an aerosol particle mass analyzer, cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectrometers, and a condensation particle counter. This suite of instruments enables measurement of aerosol particle size, mass, extinction and absorption coefficients, and aerosol number density, respectively. Taken together, these observables yield the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections without the need to model particle morphology or account for sample collection artifacts. Here we demonstrate the technique in a set of case studies which involve complete separation of aerosol by charge, separation of an external mixture by mass, and discrimination between particle types by effective density and single-scattering albedo. PMID:23875772

  7. Development of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Sang Seo; Jeong, Ukkyo; Ahn, Changwoo; Bhartia, Pawan. K.; Torres, Omar; Song, Chang-Keun; Han, Jin-Seok

    2014-05-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table (LUT) with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To calculate LUT, aerosol optical properties over Asia [70°E-145°E, 0°N-50°N] are obtained from AERONET inversion data (level 2.0) at 46 AERONET sites, and are applied to VLIDORT (spur, 2006). Because the backscattering radiance in UV-Visible range has significant sensitivity to radiance absorptivity and size distribution of loading aerosol, aerosol types are classified from AERONET inversion data by using aerosol classification method suggested in Lee et al. (2010). Then the LUTs are calculated with average optical properties for each aerosol type. The GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with OMI level-1B dataset, a provisional data for GEMS measurement. The aerosol types for each measured scene are selected by using both of UVAI and VISAI, and AOD and SSA are simultaneously retrieved by comparing simulated radiance with selected aerosol type and the measured value. The AOD and SSA retrieved from GEMS aerosol algorithm are well matched with OMI products, although the retrieved AOD is slightly higher than OMI value. To detect cloud pixel, spatial standard deviation test of radiance is applied in the

  8. Characterization of ice-nucleating bacteria using on-line electron impact ionization aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R; Slowik, J G; Schaupp, C; Amato, P; Saathoff, H; Möhler, O; Prévôt, A S H; Baltensperger, U

    2015-04-01

    The mass spectral signatures of airborne bacteria were measured and analyzed in cloud simulation experiments at the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) facility. Suspensions of cultured cells in pure water were sprayed into the aerosol and cloud chambers forming an aerosol which consisted of intact cells, cell fragments and residual particles from the agar medium in which the bacteria were cultured. The aerosol particles were analyzed with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer equipped with a newly developed PM2.5 aerodynamic lens. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) using the multilinear engine (ME-2) source apportionment was applied to deconvolve the bacteria and agar mass spectral signatures. The bacteria mass fraction contributed between 75 and 95% depending on the aerosol generation, with the remaining mass attributed to agar. We present mass spectra of Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria typical for ice-nucleation active bacteria in the atmosphere to facilitate the distinction of airborne bacteria from other constituents in ambient aerosol, e.g. by PMF/ME-2 source apportionment analyses. Nitrogen-containing ions were the most salient feature of the bacteria mass spectra, and a combination of C4 H8 N(+) (m/z 70) and C5 H12 N(+) (m/z 86) may be used as marker ions. PMID:26149110

  9. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  10. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  11. Mass spectrometry investigation of Titan aerosols analogs formed with traces of aromatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa; Sebree, Joshua; Li, Xiang; Pinnick, Veronica; Getty, Stephanie; Brinckerhoff, Will

    2016-06-01

    The detection of benzene at ppm levels in Titan's atmosphere [1] by Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) supports the idea that aromatic and heteroaromatic reaction pathways may play an important role in Titan's aerosols formation. In laboratory studies it has been shown that these aromatic molecules are easily dissociated by ultraviolet radiation and can therefore contribute significantly to aerosol formation [2] and be used to dope the production of aerosol analogs [3]. In this work we investigate the effect on the aerosol composition and growth pattern of the chemical nature of the aromatic reactant used to produce aerosol. Analysis are performed using Laser Desorption-Time of Flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Infrared analysis of our samples shows that inclusion of aromatic compounds as trace precursors allows to better fit laboratory data to Titan aerosol spectra observed by Cassini [3,4]. The improvement is especially visible on the far infrared (˜200 cm‑1) bands observed by CIRS [5]. LDMS results show that the aerosol growth patterns depend both on the number of rings and on the nitrogen content of the trace precursor used. We also perform MS/MS analysis on some prominent peaks of aerosol mass spectra. This MS/MS approach allows us to identify some of the key compounds in the aerosol growth processes.

  12. Mass spectrometry investigation of Titan aerosols analogs formed with traces of aromatic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa; Sebree, Joshua; Li, Xiang; Pinnick, Veronica; Getty, Stephanie; Brinckerhoff, Will

    2016-06-01

    The detection of benzene at ppm levels in Titan's atmosphere [1] by Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) supports the idea that aromatic and heteroaromatic reaction pathways may play an important role in Titan's aerosols formation. In laboratory studies it has been shown that these aromatic molecules are easily dissociated by ultraviolet radiation and can therefore contribute significantly to aerosol formation [2] and be used to dope the production of aerosol analogs [3]. In this work we investigate the effect on the aerosol composition and growth pattern of the chemical nature of the aromatic reactant used to produce aerosol. Analysis are performed using Laser Desorption-Time of Flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Infrared analysis of our samples shows that inclusion of aromatic compounds as trace precursors allows to better fit laboratory data to Titan aerosol spectra observed by Cassini [3,4]. The improvement is especially visible on the far infrared (˜200 cm-1) bands observed by CIRS [5]. LDMS results show that the aerosol growth patterns depend both on the number of rings and on the nitrogen content of the trace precursor used. We also perform MS/MS analysis on some prominent peaks of aerosol mass spectra. This MS/MS approach allows us to identify some of the key compounds in the aerosol growth processes.

  13. Spacecraft Applications of Compact Optical and Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davinic, N. M.; Nagel, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical spectrometers, and mass spectrometers to a lesser extent, have a long and rich history of use aboard spacecraft. Space mission applications include deep space science spacecraft, earth orbiting satellites, atmospheric probes, and surface landers, rovers, and penetrators. The large size of capable instruments limited their use to large, expensive spacecraft. Because of the novel application of micro-fabrication technologies, compact optical and mass spectrometers are now available. The new compact devices are especially attractive for spacecraft because of their small mass and volume, as well as their low power consumption. Dispersive optical multi-channel analyzers which cover the 0.4-1.1 micrometer wavelength are now commercially available in packages as small as 3 x 6 x 18 mm exclusive of drive and recording electronics. Mass spectrometers as small as 3 x 3 mm, again without electronics, are under development. A variety of compact optical and mass spectrometers are reviewed in this paper. A number of past space applications are described, along with some upcoming opportunities that are likely candidate missions to fly this new class of compact spectrometers.

  14. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  15. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  16. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  17. Final Technical Report [Toward Simultaneous Single-Particle Chemical and Optical Characterization: Development of a Multi-Angle Optical Scattering Module for the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Steven

    2013-10-22

    This project was an initial effort to investigate the feasibility of an instrument combining real-time atmospheric particle composition measurements using an ATOFMS (Atmospheric Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer) such as those performed by Prather’s group at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) with multi-wavelength scattering measurements of the type investigated by Sorensen et al., of Kansas State University (KSU). In this Phase I effort we proposed to investigate near-angle scattering and the possibility of integration of a multi-wavelength scattering instrument into the UCSD ATOFMS. After an initial optical design and calculations, we discovered issues with the theory of measurement and with mechanical integration. Evidence emerged that the method of multi-wavelength scattering is only efficacious for spherical particles, while most atmospheric particles are non-spherical fractal aggregates. We also determined that the integration of the detector into existing ATOFMS instruments would be severely limited by volume constraints, and additional volume would require prohibitive additional pumping compared with the existing ATOFMS systems. Based on this evidence, we decided not to pursue a Phase II effort.

  18. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9% and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/z 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ~10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  19. Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-07-01

    The environmental impacts of atmospheric particles are highlighted in remote areas where visibility and ecosystem health can be degraded by even relatively low particle concentrations. Submicron particle size, composition, and source apportionment were explored at Rocky Mountain National Park using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. This summer campaign found low average, but variable, particulate mass (PM) concentrations (max = 93.1 μg m-3, avg. = 5.13 ± 2.72 μg m-3) of which 75.2 ± 11.1% is organic. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LV-OOA, 39.3% of PM1 on average) identified using Positive Matrix Factorization appears to be mixed with ammonium sulfate (3.9 and 16.6% of mass, respectively), while semi-volatile OOA (27.6%) is correlated with ammonium nitrate (nitrate: 4.3%); concentrations of these mixtures are enhanced with upslope (SE) surface winds from the densely populated Front Range area, indicating the importance of transport. A local biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA, 8.4%) source is suggested by mass spectral cellulose combustion markers (m/zs 60 and 73) limited to brief, high-concentration, polydisperse events (suggesting fresh combustion), a diurnal maximum at 22:00 local standard time (LST) when campfires were set at adjacent summer camps, and association with surface winds consistent with local campfire locations. The particle characteristics determined here represent typical summertime conditions at the Rocky Mountain site based on comparison to ∼10 years of meteorological, particle composition, and fire data.

  20. Mass Analysis of Charged Aerosol Particles During the MASS/ECOMA Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, S.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2008-12-01

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument was launched on two sounding rockets in August 2007 from Andoya, Norway to find the masses of charged aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere in NLC/PMSE conditions (3 August) and PMSE conditions alone (6 August). We compare and contrast the four data sets from the uplegs and downlegs. The MASS instrument collected ions, cluster ions, and charged nanometer-sized particles on four pairs of electrically-biased graphite plates that collect positive and negative particles separately. Electron collection was prevented by the negative potential on the rocket body. For the 3 August upleg, the data show charged particle collection on all channels with number densities of order several thousand per cubic centimeter in the four size ranges < 0.5 nm, 0.5-1 nm, 1-2 nm, and > 3 nm. The occurrence of positively charged aerosol particles in the smallest sizes suggests positive ions as the nucleation sites because the smallest particles have negligible probability of charging by photoionization. The signals were smaller on the 3 August downleg as a consequence of the spatial variability of the cloud. For the 6 August upleg into PMSE alone, only smaller particles (< 2 nm) were detected and these were both positive and negative with number densities of several thousand per cubic centimeter. On the downleg, 1-2 nm negatively charged particles were detected, but there were no positive particles in this mass range.

  1. EXTENDING THE USEFUL LIFE OF OLDER MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.; Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Jones, V.

    2010-06-17

    Thermal ionization and gas mass spectrometers are widely used across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and contractor laboratories. These instruments support critical missions, where high reliability and low measurement uncertainty are essential. A growing number of these mass spectrometers are significantly older than their original design life. The reality is that manufacturers have declared many of the instrument models obsolete, with direct replacement parts and service no longer available. Some of these obsolete models do not have a next generation, commercially available replacement. Today's budget conscious economy demands for the use of creative funds management. Therefore, the ability to refurbish (or upgrade) these valuable analytical tools and extending their useful life is a cost effective option. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the proven expertise to breathe new life into older mass spectrometers, at a significant cost savings compared to the purchase and installation of new instruments. A twenty-seven year old Finnigan MAT-261{trademark} Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), located at the SRS F/H Area Production Support Laboratory, has been successfully refurbished. Engineers from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated and installed the new electronics. These engineers also provide continued instrument maintenance services. With electronic component drawings being DOE Property, other DOE Complex laboratories have the option to extend the life of their aged Mass Spectrometers.

  2. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  3. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  4. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  5. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  6. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  7. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  8. Microfabricated quadrupole ion trap for mass spectrometer applications.

    PubMed

    Pau, S; Pai, C S; Low, Y L; Moxom, J; Reilly, P T A; Whitten, W B; Ramsey, J M

    2006-03-31

    An array of miniaturized cylindrical quadrupole ion traps, with a radius of 20 microm, is fabricated using silicon micromachining using phosphorus doped polysilicon and silicon dioxide for the purpose of creating a mass spectrometer on a chip. We have operated the array for mass-selective ion ejection and mass analysis using Xe ions at a pressure of 10(-4). The scaling rules for the ion trap in relation to operating pressure, voltage, and frequency are examined. PMID:16605890

  9. A retarding ion mass spectrometer for the Dynamics Explorer-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W.

    1985-01-01

    The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) for Dynamics Explorer-1 is an instrument designed to measure the details of the thermal plasma distribution. It combines the ion temperature determining capability of the retarding potential analyzer with the compositional capabilities of the mass spectrometer and adds multiple sensor heads to sample all directions relative to the spacecraft ram direction. This manual provides a functional description of the RIMS, the instrument calibration, and a description of the commands which can be stored in the instrument logic to control its operation.

  10. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and other co-located instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-07-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall-early winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025) and were found to be of 9, 15, 19, 28 and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate and ammonium respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented as well as a discussion of some recommendations

  11. Miniature Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotopic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2003-05-29

    As part of the Defense Programs Plant Directed Research and Development Program, the Savannah River Technology Center investigated the emerging area of miniature mass sensors for hydrogen and hydrogen isotope analysis. New sensors from Ferran Scientific and a beta prototype sensor from Mass Sensors, Inc. were purchased. A small pumping platform was designed and assembled. Components for miniature ion traps were investigated based on design information from Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The systems were compared to a conventional residual gas analyzer based on a Stanford Research RGA 300. Each of the sensors investigated had distinct advantages for particular applications. The Ferran system was the least expensive and the smallest, but it had low resolution for hydrogen and deuterium mixtures. The Mass Sensor unit used a new ExB design which achieved excellent resolution of the hydrogen isotopes in a small package. One limitation with the current design was the small 3 to 4 order dynamic range and another was a need for a variable sampling rate to speed analysis over a wider mass range.

  12. An Airborne A-Band Spectrometer for Remote Sensing Of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Poole, Lamont; Holden, Carl; Rault, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric remote sensing with the O2 A-band has a relatively long history, but most of these studies were attempting to estimate surface pressure or cloud-top pressure. Recent conceptual studies have demonstrated the potential of spaceborne high spectral resolution O2 A-band spectrometers for retrieval of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The physical rationale of this new approach is that information on the scattering properties of the atmosphere is embedded in the detailed line structure of the O2 A-band reflected radiance spectrum. The key to extracting this information is to measure the radiance spectrum at very high spectral resolution. Instrument performance requirement studies indicate that, in addition to high spectral resolution, the successful retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties from A-band radiance spectra will also require high radiometric accuracy, instrument stability, and high signal-to-noise measurements. To experimentally assess the capabilities of this promising new remote sensing application, the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an airborne high spectral resolution A-band spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a plane holographic grating with a folded Littrow geometry to achieve high spectral resolution (0.5 cm-1) and low stray light in a compact package. This instrument will be flown in a series of field campaigns beginning in 2001 to evaluate the overall feasibility of this new technique. Results from these campaigns should be particularly valuable for future spaceborne applications of A-band spectrometers for aerosol and cloud retrievals.

  13. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  14. The History of Planetary Exploration Using Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    At the Planetary Probe Workshop Dr. Paul Mahaffy will give a tutorial on the history of planetary exploration using mass spectrometers. He will give an introduction to the problems and solutions that arise in making in situ measurements at planetary targets using this instrument class.

  15. Dual Source Mass Spectrometer and Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cornish, T. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Harpold, D. N.; Gorevan, S. P.; Rafeek, S.; Yucht, D.

    2002-01-01

    We present details of a miniature integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer and sample handling system under development to address some of the needs for in situ sample analysis on landed missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Room-temperature ultrasensitive mass spectrometer via dynamical decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Yin, Zhang-qi

    2014-10-01

    We propose an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer based on a coupled quantum-bit-oscillator system. Under dynamical decoupling control of the quantum bit (qubit), the qubit coherence exhibits a comb structure in the time domain. The time-comb structure enables high-precision measurements of oscillator frequency, which can be used as an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. We show that, in the ideal case, the sensitivity η of the proposed mass spectrometer has better performance at higher temperature and scales with the temperature T as η ˜T-1 /2 . While taking into account qubit and oscillator decay, the optimal sensitivity reaches a universal value independent of environmental temperature T . The measurement sensitivity η also shows an improved dependence on the control-pulse number N as η ˜N-3 /2 , in comparison with the N-1 /2 scaling in previous magnetometry studies. With the present technology on solid-state spin qubit and high-quality optomechanical system, our proposal is feasible to realize an ultrasensitive room-temperature mass spectrometer.

  17. Design and development of a fast ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Two Fast Ion Mass Spectrometers (FIMS A and FIMS B) were developed. The design, development, construction, calibration, integration, and flight of these instruments, along with early results from the data analysis efforts are summarized. A medium energy ion mass spectrometer that covers mass velocity space with significantly higher time resolution, improved mass resolution, (particularly for heavier ions), and wider energy range than existing instruments had achieved was completed. The initial design consisted of a dual channel cylindrical electrostatic analyzer followed by a dual channel cylindrical velocity filter. The gain versus count rate characteristics of the high current channel electron multipliers (CEM's), which were chosen for ion detection, revealed a systematic behavior that can be used as a criterion for selection of CEM's for long counting lifetimes.

  18. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment.

  19. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  20. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  1. The PNL high-transmission three-stage mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.; Bond, L. A.; Freedman, P. A.; Tattersall, B. N.; Lagergren, C. R.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed a three-stage isotope-ratio mass spectrometer of unique ion-optical design that achieves high ion transmission efficiency and high abundance sensitivity. The spectrometer has tandem 90 deg deflection magnets with boundaries 18 deg off normal. The magnet drift lengths are 1.48 times the 27-cm radius of deflection. This extended geometry gives a mass dispersion equivalent to a 40-cm-radius magnet with normal boundaries. The first magnet renders the ion beam parallel in the vertical plane and provides a focus in the horizontal plane of mass dispersion. The second magnet brings the beam to a stigmatic focus. This novel ion-optical design gives 100 percent transmission without the need for intermediate focusing lenses. It also provides a 16 percent increase in mass resolution over the traditional tandem geometry with normal magnet boundaries. Complete transmission of ions is maintained through a third-stage cylindrical electric sector of 38-cm radius, which provides increased isotope-abundance sensitivity. The isotope-abundance sensitivity of the new mass spectrometer is an order of magnitude better than similar instruments with normal magnet boundaries. This is because the vertical focusing of the ion beam prevents ion scattering from the top and bottom of the flight tube. The measured values of the isotope-abundance sensitivity one-half mass unit away from the rhenium ion peaks at masses 185 and 187 are M - 1/2 = (6.5 +/- 0.5)(10)(exp -10) and M + 1/2 = (3.1 +/- 0.8)(10)(exp -10). By extrapolation, the uranium isotope-abundance sensitivity is M - 1 = 1(10)(exp -10). Construction of the instrument was facilitated by using standard commercial mass spectrometer components.

  2. A Segmented Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Iga, I.; Rao, M. V. V. S.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper describes the design of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) in which the single flight tube of a conventional TOFMS has been replaced by several cylindrical electrostatic lenses in tandem. By a judicious choice of voltages on these lenses, an improved TOFMS has been realized which has a superior mass and energy resolution, shorter flight lengths, excellent signal-to-noise ratio and less stringent requirements on the bias voltages.

  3. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Wright, W. W.; Blevins, V. A.; Duerksen, K. D.; Brooks, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    A neutral gas mass spectrometer was flown to Venus as part of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe to measure the composition of its lower atmosphere. The instrument, mounted in the Sounder Probe, was activated after the probe entered the top of the atmosphere, and it obtained data during the descent from 62 km to the surface. Atmospheric gases were sampled through a pair of microleaks, the effluent from which was pumped by a combination of ion and getter pumping. A pneumatically operated valve, controlled by the ambient atmospheric pressure, maintained the ion source pressure at a nearly constant value during descent while the atmospheric pressure varied by three orders of magnitude. A single focusing magnetic sector field mass spectrometer with mass resolution sufficient to reasonably separate argon from C3H4 at 40 amu provided the mass analysis and relative abundance measurements. A microprocessor controlled the operation of the mass spectrometer through a highly efficient peak-tip stepping routine and data compression algorithm that effected a scan of the mass spectrum from 1 to 208 amu in 64 sec while requiring an information rate of only 40 bits/sec to return the data to earth. A subscale height altitude resolution was thus obtained. Weight, size, and power requirements were minimized to be consistent with interplanetary flight contraints.

  4. Miniature mass spectrometer for chemical sensing in homeland defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Houseman, John

    2003-07-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with an array detector has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spectrometer has a focal plane geometry, and an array detector that can measure the intensities of different masses simultaneously after their separation along the focal plane. In the past, the large mass, size and the lack of an array detector with high gain (such as an electron multiplier) did not allow the application of focal plane mass spectrometer to the measurement that required high sensitivity and portability. In the JPL developed-MMS, miniaturization has been accomplished by using rare earth magnet material and novelties in the design of the magnetic and electric sectors. A new ion detector was developed for the measurement of the intensities of different mass ions. The array detector is based on the conversion sequence of ions into electrons into photons and their final measurement by a photon array detector. MMS possesses high sensitivity, specificity, and fast response time and can be used as a universal chemical analyzer. It will find application in a variety of Home Defense tasks. MMS is presently being applied for the detection of propellants (hydrazine and its derivatives). The instrument will have a mass of 1-2 kg and consume a power of 2-4 W for operation

  5. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  6. Secondary Aerosol Formation in the planetary boundary layer observed by aerosol mass spectrometry on a Zeppelin NT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubach, Florian; Trimborn, Achim; Mentel, Thomas; Wahner, Andreas; Zeppelin Pegasos-Team 2012

    2014-05-01

    The airship Zeppelin NT is an airborne platform capable of flying at low speed throughout the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL). In combination with the high scientific payload of more than 1 ton, the Zeppelin is an ideal platform to study regional processes in the lowest layers of the atmosphere with high spatial resolution. Atmospheric aerosol as a medium long lived tracer substance is of particular interest due to its influence on the global radiation budget. Due its lifetime of up to several days secondaray aerosol at a certain location can result from local production or from transport processes. For aerosol measurements on a Zeppelin, a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass spectrometer (DeCarlo et al, 2006) was adapted to the requirements posed by an airborne platform. A weight reduction of over 20 % compared to the commercial instrument was achieved, while space occupation and footprint were each reduced by over 25 %. Within the PEGASOS project, the instrument was part of 10 measurement flight days over the course of seven weeks. Three flights were starting from Rotterdam, NL, seven flights were starting from Ozzano in the Po Valley, IT. Flight patterns included vertical profiles to study the dynamics of the PBL and cross sections through regions of interest to shed light on local production and transport processes. Analysis of data from transects between the Apennin and San Pietro Capofiume in terms of "residence time of air masses in the Po valley" indicates that aerosol nitrate has only local sources while aerosol sulfate is dominated by transport. The organic aerosol component has significant contributions of both processes. The local prodcution yields are commensurable with imultaneously observed precursor concentrations and oxidant levels. The PEGASOS project is funded by the European Commission under the Framework Programme 7 (FP7-ENV-2010-265148). DeCarlo, P.F. et al (2006), Anal. Chem., 78, 8281-8289.

  7. Micro mass spectrometer on a chip.

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Dolores Y.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Fleming, James Grant

    2005-11-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, electrical characterization and testing analysis of a microfabricated a cylindrical ion trap ({mu}CIT) array is presented. Several versions of microfabricated cylindrical ion traps were designed and fabricated. The final design of the individual trap array element consisted of two end cap electrodes, one ring electrode, and a detector plate, fabricated in seven tungsten metal layers by molding tungsten around silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) features. Each layer of tungsten is then polished back in damascene fashion. The SiO{sub 2} was removed using a standard release processes to realize a free-hung structure. Five different sized traps were fabricated with inner radii of 1, 1.5, 2, 5 and 10 {micro}m and heights ranging from 3-24 {micro}m. Simulations examined the effects of ion and neutral temperature, the pressure and nature of cooling gas, ion mass, trap voltage and frequency, space-charge, fabrication defects, and other parameters on the ability of micrometer-sized traps to store ions. The electrical characteristics of the ion trap arrays were determined. The capacitance was 2-500 pF for the various sized traps and arrays. The resistance was in the order of 1-2 {Omega}. The inductance of the arrays was calculated to be 10-1500 pH, depending on the trap and array sizes. The ion traps' field emission characteristics were assessed. It was determined that the traps could be operated up to 125 V while maintaining field emission currents below 1 x 10{sup -15} A. The testing focused on using the 5-{micro}m CITs to trap toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}). Ion ejection from the traps was induced by termination of the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode and current measured on the collector electrode suggested trapping of ions in 1-10% of the traps. Improvements to the to the design of the traps were defined to minimize voltage drop to the substrate, thereby increasing trapping voltage applied to the ring electrode, and to allow

  8. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  9. Development of an Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS) was purchased from EXTREL Mass Spectrometry, Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA). Our research objectives were to adapt this instrument and develop techniques for real-time determinations of the concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. The prototype instrument is capable of making high frequency measurements with no sample preconcentrations. Isotopically labeled standards are used as an internal standard to obtain high precision and to compensate for changes in instrument sensitivity and analyte losses in the sampling manifold as described by Bandy and coworkers. The prototype instrument is capable of being deployed on NASA C130, Electra, P3, and DC8 aircraft. After purchasing and taking delivery by June 1994, we assembled the mass spectrometer, data acquisition, and manifold flow control instrumentation in electronic racks and performed tests.

  10. Simulating data processing for an Advanced Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Clowers, Brian H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2007-11-03

    We have designed and implemented a Cray XD-1-based sim- ulation of data capture and signal processing for an ad- vanced Ion Mobility mass spectrometer (Hadamard trans- form Ion Mobility). Our simulation is a hybrid application that uses both an FPGA component and a CPU-based soft- ware component to simulate Ion Mobility mass spectrome- try data processing. The FPGA component includes data capture and accumulation, as well as a more sophisticated deconvolution algorithm based on a PNNL-developed en- hancement to standard Hadamard transform Ion Mobility spectrometry. The software portion is in charge of stream- ing data to the FPGA and collecting results. We expect the computational and memory addressing logic of the FPGA component to be portable to an instrument-attached FPGA board that can be interfaced with a Hadamard transform Ion Mobility mass spectrometer.

  11. Dual-aureole and sun spectrometer system for airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Paul; Ruhtz, Thomas; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2007-12-10

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct sun irradiance and the aureole radiance in two different solid angles. The high-resolution spectral radiation measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. Combined measurements in two solid angles provide better information about the aerosol type without additional and elaborate measuring geometries. It is even possible to discriminate between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol types. Furthermore, they allow to apply additional calibration methods and simplify the detection of contaminated data (e.g., by thin cirrus clouds). For the characterization of the detected aerosol type a new index is introduced that is the slope of the aerosol phase function in the forward scattering region. The instrumentation is a flexible modular setup, which has already been successfully applied in airborne and ground-based field campaigns. We describe the setup as well as the calibration of the instrument. In addition, example vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties--including the aureole measurements--are shown and discussed.

  12. A gated atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometer-time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Heptner, Andre; Reinecke, Tobias; Langejuergen, Jens; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2014-08-22

    Identifying the compounds of an unknown gas mixture by using an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) is a difficult task, because several ion species can be generated in the ionization process. One method to analyze the occurring peaks in an IMS spectrum is coupling an IMS to a mass spectrometer (MS). In our setup we coupled a (3)H drift tube IMS to a Bruker micrOTOF II. Therefore, the detector plate of the IMS is pierced and a transfer capillary is inserted. The ions are transferred via gas flow and electric fields into the MS. The transmission of the ions through the transfer capillary can be shuttered very precisely by increasing the electric potential of the detector generating a repulsive electric field. Thus, it is possible to transfer single ion clouds of generated IMS spectra into the mass spectrometer where a corresponding mass spectrum is generated. In this work we analyze the positive and negative IMS spectra of single analytes as well as gas mixtures and characterize the occurring ion species. PMID:25015244

  13. A gated atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometer-time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Heptner, Andre; Reinecke, Tobias; Langejuergen, Jens; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2014-08-22

    Identifying the compounds of an unknown gas mixture by using an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) is a difficult task, because several ion species can be generated in the ionization process. One method to analyze the occurring peaks in an IMS spectrum is coupling an IMS to a mass spectrometer (MS). In our setup we coupled a (3)H drift tube IMS to a Bruker micrOTOF II. Therefore, the detector plate of the IMS is pierced and a transfer capillary is inserted. The ions are transferred via gas flow and electric fields into the MS. The transmission of the ions through the transfer capillary can be shuttered very precisely by increasing the electric potential of the detector generating a repulsive electric field. Thus, it is possible to transfer single ion clouds of generated IMS spectra into the mass spectrometer where a corresponding mass spectrum is generated. In this work we analyze the positive and negative IMS spectra of single analytes as well as gas mixtures and characterize the occurring ion species.

  14. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric characterization of organic aerosol from European and Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Huang, Ru-Jin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol constitutes a substantial fraction (20-90%) of submicrometer aerosol mass, playing an important role in air quality and human health. Over the past few years, ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) has been applied to elucidate the chemical composition of ambient aerosols. However, most of the UHRMS studies used direct infusion without prior separation by liquid chromatography, which may cause the loss of individual compound information and interference problems. In the present study, urban ambient aerosol with particle diameter < 2.5 μm was collected in Mainz, Germany and Beijing, China, respectively. Two pretreatment procedures were applied to extract the organic compounds from the filter samples: One method uses a mixture of acetonitrile and water, the other uses pure water and prepared for the extraction of humic-like substances. The extracts were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with an Orbitrap mass spectrometer in both negative and the positive modes. The effects of pretreatment procedures on the characterization of organic aerosol and the city-wise difference in chemical composition of organic aerosol will be discussed in detail.

  15. Aerosol Composition in the Los Angeles Basin Studied by High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hu, W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Allan, J. D.; Taylor, J.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Massoli, P.; Zhang, X.; Weber, R.; Zhao, Y.; Cliff, S. S.; Wexler, A. S.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact climate and health, but their sources and composition are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and complementary instrumentation were deployed during the 2010 CalNex campaign to characterize aerosol composition in the Los Angeles (LA) area. Total mass concentrations as well as the species concentrations measured by the AMS compare well with most other instruments. Nitrate dominates in the mornings, but its concentration is reduced in the afternoon when organic aerosols (OA) increase and dominate. The diurnal variations in concentrations are strongly influenced by emission transport from the source-rich western basin. The average OA to enhanced CO ratio increases with photochemical age from 25 to 80 μg m-3 ppm-1, which indicates significant secondary OA (SOA) production and that a large majority of OA is secondary in aged air. The ratio values are similar to those from Mexico City as well as New England and the Mid-Atlantic States. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) is used to assess the concentrations of different OA components. The major OA classes are oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for total SOA), and hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary combustion OA). Several subclasses of OA are identified as well including diesel-influenced HOA (DI-HOA) and non-diesel HOA. DI-HOA exhibits low concentrations on Sundays consistent with the well-known weekday/weekend effect in LA. PMF analysis finds that OOA is 67% of the total OA concentration. A strong correlation between OOA and Ox (O3 + NO2) concentrations is observed with a slope of 0.15 that suggests the production of fresh SOA in Pasadena. Plotting the OA elemental ratios in a Van Krevelen diagram (H:C vs. O:C) yields a slope of -0.6, which is less steep than that observed in Riverside during the SOAR-2005 campaign. The difference in slopes may be attributed to the highly oxidized HOA present in Pasadena that is

  16. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Meijer, Jan

    2013-09-15

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E×B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  17. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Meijer, Jan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D

    2013-09-01

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E × B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10(6)-10(7) clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  18. Mass spectrometric airborne measurements of submicron aerosol and cloud residual composition in tropic deep convection during ACRIDICON-CHUVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Christiane; Schneider, Johannes; Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; Fütterer, Daniel; Walser, Adrian; Borrmann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Airborne measurements of submicron aerosol and cloud particles were conducted in the region of Manaus (Amazonas, Brazil) during the ACRIDICON-CHUVA campaign in September 2014. ACRIDICON-CHUVA aimed at the investigation of convective cloud systems in order to get a better understanding and quantification of aerosol-cloud-interactions and radiative effects of convective clouds. For that, data from airborne measurements within convective cloud systems are combined with satellite and ground-based data. We used a C-ToF-AMS (Compact-Time-of-Flight-Aerosol-Mass-Spectrometer) to obtain information on aerosol composition and vertical profiles of different aerosol species, like organics, sulphate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride. The instrument was operated behind two different inlets: The HASI (HALO Aerosol Submicrometer Inlet) samples aerosol particles, whereas the CVI (Counterflow Virtual Impactor) samples cloud droplets and ice particles during in-cloud measurements, such that cloud residual particles can be analyzed. Differences in aerosol composition inside and outside of clouds and cloud properties over forested or deforested region were investigated. Additionally, the in- and outflow of convective clouds was sampled on dedicated cloud missions in order to study the evolution of the clouds and the processing of aerosol particles. First results show high organic aerosol mass concentrations (typically 15 μg/m3 and during one flight up to 25 μg/m3). Although high amounts of organic aerosol in tropic air over rainforest regions were expected, such high mass concentrations were not anticipated. Next to that, high sulphate aerosol mass concentrations (about 4 μg/m3) were measured at low altitudes (up to 5 km). During some flights organic and nitrate aerosol was observed with higher mass concentrations at high altitudes (10-12 km) than at lower altitudes, indicating redistribution of boundary layer particles by convection. The cloud residuals measured during in

  19. Delta-Doped CCDs as Detector Arrays in Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, Todd; Jewell, April; Sinha, Mahadeva

    2007-01-01

    In a conventional mass spectrometer, charged particles (ions) are dispersed through a magnetic sector onto an MCP at an output (focal) plane. In the MCP, the impinging charged particles excite electron cascades that afford signal gain. Electrons leaving the MCP can be read out by any of a variety of means; most commonly, they are post-accelerated onto a solid-state detector array, wherein the electron pulses are converted to photons, which, in turn, are converted to measurable electric-current pulses by photodetectors. Each step in the conversion from the impinging charged particles to the output 26 NASA Tech Briefs, February 2007 current pulses reduces spatial resolution and increases noise, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity and performance of the mass spectrometer. Hence, it would be preferable to make a direct measurement of the spatial distribution of charged particles impinging on the focal plane. The utility of delta-doped CCDs as detectors of charged particles was reported in two articles in NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 1998): "Delta-Doped CCDs as Low-Energy-Particle Detectors" (NPO-20178) on page 48 and "Delta- Doped CCDs for Measuring Energies of Positive Ions" (NPO-20253) on page 50. In the present developmental miniature mass spectrometers, the above mentioned miniaturization and performance advantages contributed by the use of delta-doped CCDs are combined with the advantages afforded by the Mattauch-Herzog design. The Mattauch- Herzog design is a double-focusing spectrometer design involving an electric and a magnetic sector, where the ions of different masses are spatially separated along the focal plane of magnetic sector. A delta-doped CCD at the focal plane measures the signals of all the charged-particle species simultaneously at high sensitivity and high resolution, thereby nearly instantaneously providing a complete, high-quality mass spectrum. The simultaneous nature of the measurement of ions stands in contrast to that of a

  20. Pioneer Venus Orbiter neutral gas mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Booth, J. R.; Cooley, J. E.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Spencer, N. W.; Way, S. H.; Hunten, D. M.; Carignan, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter Neutral Mass Spectrometer (ONMS) is designed to measure the vertical and horizontal density variations of the major neutral constituents in the upper atmosphere of Venus. The mass spectrometer sensor includes a retarding potential ion source, hyperbolic quadrupole rod analyzer, and electron multiplier detector. The supporting electronic system consists of hybrid integrated circuits to reduce weight and power. The ONMS instrument was launched aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter on May 20, 1978, and turned on in orbit around Venus on December 4, 1978. It has operated flawlessly for over a Venus year (243 earth days) and has returned data of the composition of the major constituents in the Venus atmosphere between the altitudes of 150 and 350 km.

  1. Preliminary results from LADEE's Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul; Hodges, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission is a high sensitivity quadrupole mass spectrometer designed to measure the composition and variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere. The instrument has been observing the lunar exosphere since 10/17/2013, initially from a near circular 250 km altitude orbit and since 11/11/2013 from an elliptical orbit that reaches to 30-60 km altitude near the sunrise terminator. During its first four months in orbit, the NMS instrument successfully detected exospheric helium, argon and neon and mapped their spatial and temporal variability. Furthermore, the NMS instrument was able to establish new upper limits for many other exospheric species either sputtered or thermally evolved from the lunar surface. This talk will summarize these preliminary results from the NMS measurements.

  2. AI mass spectrometers for space shuttle health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, F. W.

    1991-03-01

    The facility Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is a mass spectrometer based gas analyzer. Two instruments make up the HGDS, which is installed in a prime/backup arrangement, with the option of using both analyzers on the same sample line, or on two different lines simultaneously. It is used for monitoring the Shuttle during fuel loading, countdown, and drainback, if necessary. The use of complex instruments, operated over many shifts, has caused problems in tracking the status of the ground support equipment (GSE) and the vehicle. A requirement for overall system reliability has been a major force in the development of Shuttle GSE, and is the ultimate driver in the choice to pursue artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for Shuttle and Advanced Launch System (ALS) mass spectrometer systems. Shuttle applications of AI are detailed.

  3. Characterization of a turbomolecular-pumped magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1988-01-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200, turbomolecular-pumped, magnetic sector, multiple gas analyzer mass spectrometer with modified inlet for fast response was characterized for the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases. This instrument was specially modified for the Vanderberg AFB SLC-6 Hydrogen Disposal Test Program, as a part of the Hydrogen Sampling System (H2S2). Linearity, precision, drift, detection limits and accuracy among other analytical parameters for each of the background gas were studied to evaluate the performance of the instrument. The result demonstrates that H2S2 mass spectrometer is a stable instrument and can be utilized for the quantitative analytical determination of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases.

  4. Non-destructive ion trap mass spectrometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Frankevich, Vladimir E.; Soni, Manish H.; Nappi, Mario; Santini, Robert E.; Amy, Jonathan W.; Cooks, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to an ion trap mass spectrometer of the type having an ion trapping volume defined by spaced end caps and a ring electrode. The ion trap includes a small sensing electrode which senses characteristic motion of ions trapped in said trapping volume and provides an image current. Ions are excited into characteristic motion by application of an excitation pulse to the trapped ions. The invention also relates to a method of operating such an ion trap.

  5. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Positive metallic ions have been measured in the earth's atmosphere between 85 and 120 km, during the period of the beta Taurids meteor shower, which is associated with Comet Encke. The ions originate during and following ablation of extraterrestrial debris by the earth's atmosphere. The enhancement of metal ion density during meteor showers is primary evidence for their extraterrestrial origin. The present results were obtained from a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer.

  6. High-efficiency electron ionizer for a mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved electron ionizer for use in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The improved electron ionizer includes a repeller plate that ejects sample atoms or molecules, an ionizer chamber, a cathode that emits an electron beam into the ionizer chamber, an exit opening for excess electrons to escape, at least one shim plate to collimate said electron beam, extraction apertures, and a plurality of lens elements for focusing the extracted ions onto entrance apertures.

  7. Augmenting Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Using a Frequency Modulated Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kelsey A; Siems, William F; Clowers, Brian H

    2016-03-15

    Historically, high pressure ion mobility drift tubes have suffered from low ion duty cycles and this problem is magnified when such instrumentation is coupled with ion trap mass spectrometers. To significantly alleviate these issues, we outline the result from coupling an atmospheric pressure, dual-gate drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LIT-MS) via modulation of the ion beam with a linear frequency chirp. The time-domain ion current, once Fourier transformed, reveals a standard ion mobility drift spectrum that corresponds to the standard mode of mobility analysis. By multiplexing the ion beam, it is possible to successfully obtain drift time spectra for an assortment of simple peptide and protein mixtures using an LIT-MS while showing improved signal intensity versus the more common signal averaging technique. Explored here are the effects of maximum injection time, solution concentration, total experiment time, and frequency swept on signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolving power. Increased inject time, concentration, and experiment time all generally led to an improvement in SNR, while a greater frequency swept increases the resolving power at the expense of SNR. Overall, chirp multiplexing of a dual-gate IMS system coupled to an LIT-MS improves ion transmission, lowers analyte detection limits, and improves spectral quality. PMID:26854901

  8. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  9. Detection of brake wear aerosols by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Dall'Osto, M.; Olatunbosun, O. A.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-03-01

    Brake dust particles were characterised using an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) operated using two inlet configurations, namely the aerodynamic lens (AFL) inlet and countersunk nozzle inlet. Laboratory studies show that dust particles are characterised by mass spectra containing ions deriving from Fe and Ba and although highly correlated to each other, the Fe and Ba signals were mostly detected using the nozzle inlet with relatively high laser desorption energies. When using the AFL, only [56Fe] and [-88FeO2] ions were observed in brake dust spectra generated using lower laser desorption pulse energies, and only above 0.75 mJ was the [138Ba] ion detected. When used with the preferred nozzle inlet configuration, the [-88FeO2] peak was considered to be the more reliable tracer peak, because it is not present in other types of dust (mineral, tyre, Saharan etc). As shown by the comparison with ambient data from a number of locations, the aerodynamic lens is not as efficient in detecting brake wear particles, with less than 1% of sampled particles attributed to brake wear. Five field campaigns within Birmingham (background, roadside (3) and road tunnel) used the nozzle inlet and showed that dust particles (crustal and road) accounted for between 3.1 and 65.9% of the particles detected, with the remaining particles being made up from varying percentages of other constituents.

  10. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  11. A Remote Laser Mass Spectrometer for Lunar Resource Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Williams, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of lasers as a source of excitation for surface mass spectroscopy has been investigated for some time. Since the laser can be focused to a small spot with intensity, it can vaporize and accelerate atoms of material. Using this phenomenon with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer allows a surface elemental mass analysis of a small region with each laser pulse. While the technique has been well developed for Earth applications, space applications are less developed. NASA Langley recently began a research program to investigate the use of a laser to create ions from the lunar surface and to analyze the ions at an orbiting spacecraft. A multijoule, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser would be focused to a small spot on the lunar surface, creating a dense plasma. This plasma would eject high-energy ions, as well as neutrals, electrons, and photons. An experiment is being set up to determine the characteristics of such a laser mass spectrometer at long flight distances. This experiment will determine the character of a future flight instrument for lunar resource assessment.

  12. The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, C. R.; Fields, S. A.; Baugher, C. R.; Hoffman, J. H.; Hanson, W. B.; Wright, W. W.; Hammack, H. D.; Carignan, G. R.; Nagy, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal component of the magnetospheric plasma plays a key role in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes, acting as a strong influence on ionospheric structure at low altitudes and as a source and modifier of the hotter plasma population at high altitudes. The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) instrument on Dynamics Explorer-A is designed to measure this important thermal plasma component. Using a combination of retarding potential analysis and magnetic ion mass spectrometer techniques, the RIMS instrument will measure the bulk plasma parameters of ion density (0.1 to 1,000,000 ions/cu cm), temperature (0-45 eV), and bulk flow (greater than 0.5 km/sec) in the inner plasmasphere and ionosphere, and the specific ion pitch angle and energy spectral characteristics in the outer plasmasphere and plasma trough for a mass range of 1-32 amu. The energy and mass spectral step sequences, as well as the multiplexing of the resultant data, can be tailored to accomplish a variety of thermal ion measurements throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  13. Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 1: Fine Particle Composition and Organic Source Apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, Allison; Salcedo, D.; Cubison, Michael J.; Huffman, J.; DeCarlo, Peter; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Sueper, D. T.; Kimmel, Joel; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Trimborn, Achim; Northway, Megan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Schauer, James J.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Fortner, Edward; de Foy, B.; Wang, Jian; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, Junsheng; Zhang, Renyi; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.; Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe L.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, Luisa T.; Sosa, G.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2009-09-11

    Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Mass concentrations, diurnal cycles, and size distributions of inorganic and organic species are similar to results from the CENICA supersite in April 2003 with organic aerosol (OA) comprising about half of the fine PM mass. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution OA spectra identifies three major components: chemically-reduced urban primary emissions (hydrocarbon-like OA, HOA), oxygenated OA (OOA, mostly secondary OA or SOA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA) that correlates with levoglucosan and acetonitrile. BBOA includes several very large plumes from regional fires and likely also some refuse burning.

  14. Real-time measurement of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of particle analysis by mass spectrometry has been applied to the quantitative measurement of sodium chloride in individual particles on a real-time basis. Particles of known masses are individually introduced, in the form of a beam, into a miniature Knudsen cell oven (1600 K). The oven is fabricated from rhenium metal sheet (0.018 mm thick) and is situated in the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A particle once inside the oven is trapped and completely volatilized; this overcomes the problem of partial volatilization due to particles bouncing from the filament surface. Individual particles are thermally volatilized and ionized inside the rhenium oven, and produce discrete sodium ion pulses whose intensities are measured with the quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion pulse width of several milliseconds (4-12 ms) is found for particles in the mass range 1.3 x 10 to the -13th to 5.4 x 10 to the -11th g. The sodium ion intensity is found to be proportional to the particle mass to the 0.86-power. The intensity distribution for monodisperse aerosol particles possesses a geometric standard deviation of 1.09, showing that the method can be used for the determination of the mass distribution function with good resolution in a polydisperse aerosol.

  15. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol, and water vapor properties from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Tanre, Didier D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning spectrometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micron. They review the various methods being developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical, and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles from spectral reflection and thermal emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be used for determining the total precipitable water vapor and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products are described, together with an example of their application to aircraft and/or satellite measurements.

  16. Study of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinchan; Zhang Xiaobing; Mao Fuming; Xiao Mei; Cui Yunkang; Engelsen, Daniel den; Lei Wei

    2008-03-15

    The design of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer (MCQMS) having a small total volume of only 20 cm{sup 3}, including Faraday cup ion detector and ion source, is described. This MCQMS can resist a vacuum baking temperature of 400-500 deg. C. The quadrupole elements with a hyperbolic surface are made of a ceramic material and coated with a thin metal layer. The quadrupole mass filter has a field radius of 3 mm and a length of 100 mm. Prototypes of this new MCQMS can detect a minimum partial pressure of 10{sup -8} Pa, have a peak width of {delta}M=1 at 10% peak height from mass number 1 to 60, and show an excellent long-term stability. The new MCQMS is intended to be used in residual gas analyses of electron devices during a mutual pumping and baking process.

  17. Correcting peak deformation in Rosetta's ROSINA/DFMS mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keyser, Johan; Dhooghe, Frederik; Gibbons, Andrew; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Cessateur, Gaël; Equeter, Eddy; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Gunell, Herbert; Hässig, Myrttha; Le Roy, Léna; Maggiolo, Romain; Neefs, Eddy; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS), part of the ROSINA instrument package aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft visiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, experiences minor deformation of the mass peaks in the high resolution spectra acquired for m/Z = 16, 17, and to a lesser extent 18. A numerical deconvolution technique has been developed with a two-fold purpose. A first goal is to verify whether the most likely cause of the issue, a lack of stability of one of the electric potentials in the electrostatic analyser, can indeed be held responsible for it. The second goal is to correct for the deformation, in view of the important species located around these masses, and to allow a standard further treatment of the spectra in the automated DFMS data processing chain.

  18. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  19. Aerosol Mass Spectrometry via Laser-Induced Incandescence Particle Vaporization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy B. Onasch

    2011-10-20

    We have successfully developed and commercialized a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) instrument to measure mass, size, and chemical information of soot particles in ambient environments. The SP-AMS instrument has been calibrated and extensively tested in the laboratory and during initial field studies. The first instrument paper describing the SP-AMS has been submitted for publication in a peer reviewed journal and there are several related papers covering initial field studies and laboratory studies that are in preparation. We have currently sold 5 SP-AMS instruments (either as complete systems or as SP modules to existing AMS instrument operators).

  20. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  1. Characterization of Organic Nitrogen in the Atmosphere Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts on characterizing organic nitrogen (ON) compounds in atmospheric aerosols and aqueous droplets, knowledge of ON chemistry is still limited, mainly due to its chemical complexity and lack of highly time-resolved measurements. This work is aimed at optimizing the method of using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) to characterize ON compounds in atmospheric aerosols. Seventy-five pure nitrogen-containing organic compounds covering a variety of functional groups were analyzed with the HR-AMS. Our results show that ON compounds commonly produce NHx+, NOx+, which are usually attributed to inorganic N species such as ammonium and nitrate, and CH2N+ at m/z = 28, which is rarely quantified in ambient aerosol due to large interference from N2+ in the air signal. As a result, using the nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) calibration factor proposed by Aiken et al. (2008) on average leads to ~ 20% underestimation of N/C in ambient organic aerosol. A new calibration factor of 0.79 is proposed for determining the average N/C in organics. The relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) of different ON species, on average, are found to be consistent with the default RIE value (1.4) for the total organics. The AMS mass spectral features of various types of ON species (amines, amides, amino acids, etc.) are examined and used for characterizing ON composition in ambient aerosols. Our results indicate that submicron organic aerosol measured during wintertime in Fresno, CA contains significant amounts of amino-compounds whereas more diversified ON species, including N-containing aromatic heterocycle (e.g., imidazoles), are observed in fog waters collected simultaneously. Our findings have important implications for understanding atmospheric ON behaviors via the widespread HR-AMS measurements of ambient aerosols and droplets.

  2. Continuous time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2004-10-19

    A continuous time-of-flight mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating an electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the electric field. A source of continuous ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between arrival of a secondary electron out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a first predetermined location and arrival of a sample ion out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a second predetermined location.

  3. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  4. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  5. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  6. Ion mass spectrometer experiment for ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1987-01-01

    The International Satellite for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program of NASA was the longest duration program in NASA history. A number of satellites were flown under this program, the last being called ISIS-2, which was launched on April 1, 1971 and operated successfully for over 13 years. An experiment called the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) was flown on the ISIS-2 spacecraft. It operated for 10 years providing a large data base of positive ion composition and ion flow velocities along the orbit of the satellite, the latter being circular at 1400 km with a 90 degree inclination. The data were processed and reside in the National Space Sciences Data Center.

  7. Alfred Nier and the sector field mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John; Kurz, Mark D

    2006-07-01

    Science and technology are intimately related, and advances in science often become possible with the availability of new instrumentation. This has certainly been the case in mass spectrometry, which is used in so many scientific disciplines. Originally developed as an instrument for research in physics it was used in the discovery of isotopes, their recognition as the fundamental species comprising the elements, and the investigation of elemental isotopic composition. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry is a metrological technique of the highest order, and has been widely used in chemical, biochemical, cosmochemical, environmental, geological, physical, and nuclear research. Mass spectrometry presently plays a key role not only in scientific research, but also in industrial operations. This paper highlights the role that Alfred Otto Carl Nier played in bringing mass spectrometry into the mainstream of science. Nier's career spanned a remarkable period in science, and he made crucial contributions to atomic weights, geochronology, isotope geochemistry, nuclear physics, and space science. He is widely viewed as the 'father of modern mass spectrometry', because of his genius with instrumentation, his innovations, and the generosity with which he shared his ideas and designs. It is timely to remember his fundamental work in mass spectrometry, particularly the development of the sector field mass spectrometer, which is still the instrument of choice for many isotope scientists some 66 years after its first appearance in 1940. PMID:16810642

  8. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  9. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  10. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples. PMID:27396834

  11. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples.

  12. Composition measurements of the topside ionosphere using a magnetic mass spectrometer, ion mass spectrometer on ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The ion mass spectrometer (IMS) on the ISIS-II satellite is described; it measures the composition and distribution of positive ions in the earth's ionosphere in the mass range of 1 to 64 atomic mass units. Significant data were received which show a wide variation in ion composition at night near the equator and in the daytime poleward of the plasmapause. It was found that these data enable further study of the polar wind and that the experiment produced timely data during the August, 1972 magnetic storm to show the development of a unique ionosphere above the plasmapause during the period of the storm. The scientific objectives and results of the experiment, the technical description of the instrument, a bibliography with sample papers attached, and a summary of recommendations for further study are presented.

  13. Cassini Orbiter Ion and Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer (INMS) Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.; Yelle, R.; Cravens, T. E.; Luhmann, J.; McNutt, R.; Ip, W.; Robertson, I. P.; Ledvina, S.; Niemann, H. B.; Fletcher, G.; Thorpe, R.; Gell, D.; Magee, B.

    The Cassini Orbiter Ion and Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer was built by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. After the spacecraft's launch, data analysis and operations are being conducted by a facility science team. The instrument measures in-situ neutral gas and positive thermal energy ions in the upper atmosphere of Titan, in the vicinity of the icy satellites and rings, and in the magnetosphere of Saturn, wherever the signal is above the detection threshold. The instrument was opened to the environment of Saturn immediately after the completion of the Saturn orbit capture burn.The Cassini Orbiter Ion and Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer was built by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. After the spacecraft's launch, data analysis and operations are being conducted by a facility science team. The instrument measures in-situ neutral gas and positive thermal energy ions in the upper atmosphere of Titan, in the vicinity of the icy satellites and rings, and in the magnetosphere of Saturn, wherever the signal is above the detection threshold. The instrument was opened to the environment of Saturn immediately after the completion of the Saturn orbit capture burn.

  14. Modeling Transport of Secondary Ion Fragments into a Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmenhoven, J.; Demarche, J.; Palitsin, V.; Kirkby, K. J.; Webb, R. P.

    The Surrey Ion Beam Centre was awarded the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant for "Promoting Cross Disciplinary Research: Engineering and Physical Sciences and Social Sciences" allowing continued research into the characteristics of desorption of secondary ions by the impact of fast primary ions in the ambient pressure at the sub-micron scale. To carry out this research a new beamline has been constructed consisting of a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer combined with the current 2MV Tandem accelerator. This research has already returned many significant results such as the first simultaneous SIMS, PIXE and RBS measurement preformed on an organic sample in vacuum. However, further optimization and validation of the new beamline is still being worked on. This work focuses on the optimization of the end station geometry to allow for high sensitivity ambient pressure measurements. It is concluded that a common geometry can be adopted for a wide variety of smooth samples to ensure optimum sensitivity provided a hard edge of the sample can be found to place the mass spectrometer capillary near.

  15. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  16. Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony D. Appelhans

    2008-07-01

    A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

  17. Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer -- Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony D; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G; Ward, Michael B.; Dahl, David A.

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the operational testing of a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used to measure each isotope beam. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at loadings of 2.4 and 12 fg on resin beads and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples. The measured limit of detection (3s) for 240Pu was 3.4 attograms for SRM 996. The limit of quantitation (LOQ), defined as 10 s, was 11.2 attograms. The measured concentration of 239Pu in the CRS standard was 152 ± 6 fg/g.

  18. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  19. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1999-01-15

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  20. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  1. [Application of on-line single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) for studying major components in fine particulate matter].

    PubMed

    Fu, Huai-yu; Yan, Cai-qing; Zheng, Mei; Cai, Jing; Li, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Yan-jun; Zhou Zhen; Fu, Zhong; Li, Mei; Li, Lei; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    2014-11-01

    Based on preliminary studies by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), typical methods for identifying the number of particles (or particle count) for five major components including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) in China and abroad were summarized. In this study, combined with the characteristics of single particle mass spectrum by SPAMS, an optimized method is proposed. With field measurement using SPAMS during January 2013 in Beijing, particle counts of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, OC, and EC determined by different methods were compared. The comparison with results of off-line filter analyses for these five components proved that the method proposed in this study is comparable and optimized. We also suggest factors needed to be considered in future application of SPAMS and other areas that require in-depth research. PMID:25639078

  2. [Application of on-line single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) for studying major components in fine particulate matter].

    PubMed

    Fu, Huai-yu; Yan, Cai-qing; Zheng, Mei; Cai, Jing; Li, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Yan-jun; Zhou Zhen; Fu, Zhong; Li, Mei; Li, Lei; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    2014-11-01

    Based on preliminary studies by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), typical methods for identifying the number of particles (or particle count) for five major components including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) in China and abroad were summarized. In this study, combined with the characteristics of single particle mass spectrum by SPAMS, an optimized method is proposed. With field measurement using SPAMS during January 2013 in Beijing, particle counts of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, OC, and EC determined by different methods were compared. The comparison with results of off-line filter analyses for these five components proved that the method proposed in this study is comparable and optimized. We also suggest factors needed to be considered in future application of SPAMS and other areas that require in-depth research.

  3. Urban increments of gaseous and aerosol pollutants and their sources using mobile aerosol mass spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, Miriam; Bozzetti, Carlo; El-Haddad, Imad; Maasikmets, Marek; Teinemaa, Erik; Richter, Rene; Wolf, Robert; Slowik, Jay G.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-06-01

    Air pollution is one of the main environmental concerns in urban areas, where anthropogenic emissions strongly affect air quality. This work presents the first spatially resolved detailed characterization of PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameter daero ≤ 2.5 µm) in two major Estonian cities, Tallinn and Tartu. The measurements were performed in March 2014 using a mobile platform. In both cities, the non-refractory (NR)-PM2.5 was characterized by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) using a recently developed lens which increases the transmission of super-micron particles. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) and several trace gases including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were also measured. The chemical composition of PM2.5 was found to be very similar in the two cities. Organic aerosol (OA) constituted the largest fraction, explaining on average about 52 to 60 % of the PM2.5 mass. Four sources of OA were identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF): hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, from traffic emissions), biomass burning OA (BBOA, from biomass combustion), residential influenced OA (RIOA, probably mostly from cooking processes with possible contributions from waste and coal burning), and oxygenated OA (OOA, related to secondary aerosol formation). OOA was the major OA source during nighttime, explaining on average half of the OA mass, while during daytime mobile measurements the OA was affected by point sources and dominated by the primary fraction. A strong increase in the secondary organic and inorganic components was observed during periods with transport of air masses from northern Germany, while the primary local emissions accumulated during periods with temperature inversions. Mobile measurements offered the identification of different source regions within the urban areas and the assessment of the extent to which pollutants concentrations exceeded regional background

  4. Development of an atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometer-mass spectrometer with an orthogonal acceleration electrostatic sector TOF mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S; Karpov, Alexander V; Fomin, Oleg I; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2013-10-01

    Recently developed ion mobility mass spectrometer is described. The instrument is based on a drift tube ion mobility spectrometer and an orthogonal acceleration electrostatic sector time-of-flight mass analyzer. Data collection is performed using a specially developed fast ADC-based recorder that allows real-time data integration in an interval between 3 and 100 s. Primary tests were done with positive ion electrospray. The tests have shown obtaining 100 ion mobility resolving power and 2000 mass resolving power. Obtained for 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine in electrosprayed liquid samples during 100 s analysis and full IMS/MS data collection mode were 4 nM relative limits of detection and a 1 pg absolute limit of detection (S/N=3). Characteristic ion mobility/mass distributions were recorded for selected antibiotics, including amoxicillin, ampicillin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. At studied conditions, lomefloxacin forms only a protonated molecule-producing reduced ion mobility peak at 1.082 cm(2)/(V s). Both amoxicillin and ampicillin produce [M + H](+), [M + CH3OH + H](+), and [M + CH3CN + H](+). Amoxicillin shows two peaks at 0.909 cm(2)/(V s) and 0.905 cm(2)/(V s). Ampicillin shows one peak at 0.945 cm(2)/(V s). Intensity of protonated methanol containing cluster for both ampicillin and amoxicillin has a clear tendency to rise with sample keeping time. Ofloxacin produces two peaks in the ion mobility distribution. A lower ion mobility peak at 1.051 cm(2)/(V s) is shown to be formed by [M + H](+) ions. A higher ion mobility peak appearing for samples kept more than 48 h is shown to be formed by both [M + H](+) ion and a component identified as the [M + 2H + M](+2) cluster. The cluster probably partly dissociates in the interface producing the [M + H](+) ion.

  5. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  6. Higher order parametric excitation modes for spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system. When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  7. Mass spectrometer experiments for the European space probe Giotto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G.

    The Particulate Impact Analyzer (PIA) and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) experiments to be carried on board the Giotto cometary probe are presented. The NMS is designed to determine the chemical composition of gases and ions in the coma of Halley's Comet based on the ue of two spectrometers: an electrostatic parallel-plate analyzer, and a similar analyzer coupled with a magnetic analyzer with double-focusing geometry. The sensor structure consists of a monolithic multi-rib milled body with integral fixation points, with provisions for electromagnetic and thermal isolation, and dust protection. The PIA is intended for the measurement of the physical and chemical characteristics of cometary dust particles. It is based on an instrument comprising an entrance baffle and shutter unit, a target unit at which the dust is ionized, a light flash detector marking the flash of ionization, an acceleration grid sending the ions into the time-of-flight unit, and a multiplier unit for recording the time of flight spectrum. A microprocessor-based electronics system housed in a separate case next to the sensor performs tasks of power supply, signal processing, data processing and flow control.

  8. Aerosol Charge Model Consistent with Flight Data from the ECOMA/MASS Rocket Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, S.; Robertson, S. H.; Rapp, M.; Gumbel, J.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Friedrich, M.; Baumgarten, G.; Latteck, R.

    2009-12-01

    In August of 2007 two sounding rockets were launched from the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway carrying the MASS instrument (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer). The instrument detects charged aerosols in four different mass ranges on four pairs of biased collector plates, one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. The first sounding rocket was launched into PMSE and NLC on 3 August. The solar zenith angle was 93 degrees and NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar. NLC were also detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The data from the MASS instrument shows a negatively charged population with radii >3 nm in the 83-89 km altitude range, which is collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Smaller particles, 1-2 nm in radius with both positive and negative polarity were detected between 86-88 km. Positively charged particles <1 nm in radius were detected at the same altitude. A charging model is developed to investigate the coexistence of positively and negatively charged aerosols in the NLC environment. Natanson’s rate equations are used for the attachment of free electrons and ions and the model includes charging by photo-electron emission and photo-detachment. Although the MASS flight occurred during night time conditions, the solar flux was still significant to affect the charge state of the aerosols. The calculations are done assuming three types of particles with different photo-electron charging properties: 1) Icy NLC particles, 2) Hematite particles of meteoric origin as condensation nuclei, and 3) Hematite particles coated with ice. The charge model results are consistent with the MASS rocket data, displaying both positively and negatively charged aerosols for small radii and only negatively charged particles for large radii.

  9. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  10. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes, this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various non-refractory ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic or marine sources of semi-refractory aerosols, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be incorrectly interpreted if not carefully analyzed for unique ions, isotope patterns, and potential slow vaporization associated with semi-refractory species. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components - i.e., components that vaporize but do not flash-vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g., chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) - can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g., NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, under certain conditions their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in thresholded measurements. Chemical reactions with oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g., organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g., WO2Cl2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer, with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are

  11. Expected trace gas and aerosol retrieval accuracy of the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Liu, X.; Lee, K. H.; Chance, K.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The predicted accuracy of the trace gases and aerosol retrievals from the geostationary environment monitoring spectrometer (GEMS) was investigated. The GEMS is one of the first sensors to monitor NO2, SO2, HCHO, O3, and aerosols onboard geostationary earth orbit (GEO) over Asia. Since the GEMS is not launched yet, the simulated measurements and its precision were used in this study. The random and systematic component of the measurement error was estimated based on the instrument design. The atmospheric profiles were obtained from Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) simulations and surface reflectances were obtained from climatology of OMI Lambertian equivalent reflectance. The uncertainties of the GEMS trace gas and aerosol products were estimated based on the OE method using the atmospheric profile and surface reflectance. Most of the estimated uncertainties of NO2, HCHO, stratospheric and total O3 products satisfied the user's requirements with sufficient margin. However, about 26% of the estimated uncertainties of SO2 and about 30% of the estimated uncertainties of tropospheric O3 do not meet the required precision. Particularly the estimated uncertainty of SO2 is high in winter, when the emission is strong in East Asia. Further efforts are necessary in order to improve the retrieval accuracy of SO2 and tropospheric O3 in order to reach the scientific goal of GEMS. Random measurement error of GEMS was important for the NO2, SO2, and HCHO retrieval, while both the random and systematic measurement errors were important for the O3 retrievals. The degree of freedom for signal of tropospheric O3 was 0.8 ± 0.2 and that for stratospheric O3 was 2.9 ± 0.5. The estimated uncertainties of the aerosol retrieval from GEMS measurements were predicted to be lower than the required precision for the SZA range of the trace gas retrievals.

  12. Molecular beam facility for studying mass spectrometer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballenthin, J. O.; Nier, A. O.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus which produces neutral gas beams in the velocity range from thermal to 6 km/s makes possible studies simulating the motion of instruments through tenuous atmospheres. Use of the apparatus in studying the response of an open-source mass spectrometer is examined. Experiments performed include responses when the instrument is in a normal mode of operation, when the ion source potentials are adjusted to reject striking gas particles, when the beam is restricted so that portions of the ion source are struck, and when the beam strikes at angles other than normal incidence. Results indicate specular radiation of particles out of the source and stagnation ratios close to unity for normal operation. Retarding potential studies dropped the sensitivity by a factor of about 10, and as angles of attack are varied, the effect was found to depend upon beam velocity and the way the ions are initially accelerated.

  13. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.

    2010-08-24

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  14. Ion Mass Spectrometer for Sporadic-E Rocket Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Earle, G. D.; Pfaff, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA grant NAG5-5086 provided funding for the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to design, fabricate, calibrate, and ultimately fly two ion mass spectrometer instruments on a pair of sounding rocket payloads. Drs. R.A. Heelis and G.D. Earle from UTD were co-investigators on the project. The principal investigator for both rocket experiments was Dr. Robert Pfaff of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall project title was "Rocket/Radar Investigation of Lower Ionospheric Electrodynamics Associated with Intense Mid-Latitude Sporadic-E Layers". This report describes the overall objectives of the project, summarizes the instrument design and flight experiment details, and presents representative data obtained during the flights.

  15. Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) Results from Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Waite, J. H.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; McNutt, R. L.; Ip, W.; Gell, D.; de La Haye, V.; Müller-Wordag, I.; Ledvina, S. L.; Robertson, I. P.; Borggren, N.

    2005-05-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) onboard the Cassini Orbiter measured the neutral composition and structure of the upper atmosphere of Titan during the first flyby (Ta) of this satellite. The INMS detected N2, CH4, and H2, the noble gas argon, and a host of more complex hydrocarbon and nitrile species. INMS also made neutral measurements during the Tb flyby. During the T5 Titan flyby, which took place in April 2005, the INMS measured both the neutral and the ion composition of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. These measurements will be summarized in this talk. The implications of these measurements for our current understanding of the photochemistry, dynamics, and energetics of Titan's upper atmosphere and ionosphere will also be discussed.

  16. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  17. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  18. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  19. Development of an advanced spacecraft tandem mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Russell C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to apply current advanced technology in electronics and materials to the development of a miniaturized Tandem Mass Spectrometer that would have the potential for future development into a package suitable for spacecraft use. The mass spectrometer to be used as a basis for the tandem instrument would be a magnetic sector instrument, of Nier-Johnson configuration, as used on the Viking Mars Lander mission. This instrument configuration would then be matched with a suitable second stage MS to provide the benefits of tandem MS operation for rapid identification of unknown organic compounds. This tandem instrument is configured with a newly designed GC system to aid in separation of complex mixtures prior to MS analysis. A number of important results were achieved in the course of this project. Among them were the development of a miniaturized GC subsystem, with a unique desorber-injector, fully temperature feedback controlled oven with powered cooling for rapid reset to ambient conditions, a unique combination inlet system to the MS that provides for both membrane sampling and direct capillary column sample transfer, a compact and ruggedized alignment configuration for the MS, an improved ion source design for increased sensitivity, and a simple, rugged tandem MS configuration that is particularly adaptable to spacecraft use because of its low power and low vacuum pumping requirements. The potential applications of this research include use in manned spacecraft like the space station as a real-time detection and warning device for the presence of potentially harmful trace contaminants of the spacecraft atmosphere, use as an analytical device for evaluating samples collected on the Moon or a planetary surface, or even use in connection with monitoring potentially hazardous conditions that may exist in terrestrial locations such as launch pads, environmental test chambers or other sensitive areas. Commercial development of the technology

  20. New characteristics of submicron aerosols and factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra during winter in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. K.; Ji, D. S.; Liu, Z. R.; Hu, B.; Wang, L. L.; Huang, X. J.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, an increasing amount of attention has been paid to heavy haze pollution in Beijing, China. In addition to Beijing's population of approximately 20 million and its 5 million vehicles, nearby cities and provinces are host to hundreds of heavily polluting industries. In this study, a comparison between observations in January 2013 and January 2014 showed that non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) pollution was weaker in January 2014, which was primarily caused by variations in meteorological conditions. For the first time, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the merged high-resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements in Beijing, and the sources and evolution of NR-PM1 in January 2014 were investigated. The two factors, NO3-OA1 and NO3-OA2, were primarily composed of ammonium nitrate, and each showed a different degree of oxidation and diurnal variation. The organic fraction of SO4-OA showed the highest degree of oxidation of all PMF factors. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (OA) and cooking OA factors contained negligible amounts of inorganic species. The coal combustion OA factor contained a high contribution from chloride in its mass spectrum. The NR-PM1 composition showed significant variations in January 2014, in which the contribution of nitrate clearly increased during heavy pollution events. The most effective way to control fine particle pollution in Beijing is through joint prevention and control measures at the regional level, rather than a focus on an individual city, especially for severe haze events.

  1. 10 K Ring Electrode Trap - Tandem Mass Spectrometer for Infrared Spectroscopy of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebbert, Daniel J.; Meijer, Gerard; Asmis, Knut R.

    2009-03-17

    A novel instrumental setup for measuring infrared photodissociation spectra of buffer gas cooled, mass-selected ions is described and tested. It combines a cryogenically cooled, linear radio frequency ion trap with a tandem mass spectrometer, optimally coupling continuous ion sources to pulsed laser experiments. The use of six independently adjustable DC potentials superimposed over the trapping radio frequency field provides control over the ion distribution within, as well as the kinetic energy distribution of the ions extracted from the ion trap. The scheme allows focusing the ions in space and time, such that they can be optimally irradiated by a pulsed, widely tunable infrared photodissociation laser. Ion intensities are monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer mounted orthogonally to the ion trap axis.

  2. Development of a continuous aerosol mass concentration measurement device.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Thomas, D; Contal, P; Subra, I

    2003-08-01

    A dynamic aerosol mass concentration measurement device has been developed for personal sampling. Its principle consists in sampling the aerosol on a filter and monitoring the change of pressure drop over time (Delta P). Ensuring that the linearity of the Delta P = f(mass of particles per unit area of filter) relationship has been well established, the change of concentration can be deduced. The response of the system was validated in the laboratory with a 3.5 microm alumina aerosol (mass median diameter) generated inside a 1-m(3) ventilated enclosure. As the theory predicted that the mass sensitivity of the system would vary inversely with the square of the particle diameter, only sufficiently fine aerosols were able to be measured. The system was tested in the field in a mechanical workshop in the vicinity of an arc-welding station. The aerosol produced by welding is indeed particularly well-adapted due to the sub-micronic size of the particles. The device developed, despite this limitation, has numerous advantages over other techniques: robustness, compactness, reliability of calibration, and ease of use.

  3. Rotary turret and reusable specimen holder for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Banar, Joseph C.; Perrin, Richard E.; Ostrenga, Raymond A.

    1988-01-01

    A sample holder for use in a mass spectrometer is provided for heating a sample to discharge ions through an electrostatic field which focuses and accelerates the ions for analysis. Individual specimen holders form a plurality of filaments for heating the sample materials for ion emission. Mounting devices hold the plurality of filaments at regular spaced apart angles in a closed configuration adjacent the electrostatic field elements. A substantially solid ceramic turret is provided with a plurality of electrical contacts which engage the individual holder means for energizing the filaments and forming a corresponding plurality of radially facing, axially extending first conductive surfaces. A substantially solid stationary turret bearing member is mounted about the rotating turret with a plurality of radially biased second electrical conductive surfaces, mounted to electrically contact facing ones of the plurality of radially facing first conductive surfaces. The assembly provides a large thermal mass for thermal stability and large electrical contact areas for repeatable, stable power input for heating the sample materials. An improved sample holder is also provided having a ceramic body portion for removably engaging conductive wires. The conductive wires are compatible with a selected filament element and the sample material to be analyzed.

  4. Using a portable mass spectrometer to measure surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, H.; Meltzer, M.; Lindsey, J.; Edberg, H.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major sources of hazardous waste and VOC air emissions throughout manufacturing industry is parts and equipment cleaning operations. Modification of the cleaning process to use non-hazardous cleaning agents may be the best way to these sources, but some operations still require the use of hazardous solvents. Monitoring the contamination levels during cleaning operations can provide useful feedback for reducing waste generation and air emissions due to over- or under-cleaning. Near real-time evaluation of cleaning operations can help reduce pollution in a wide variety of industries, including aerospace, electronics, and metal finishing industries. The authors have developed a mass spectrometry based analyzer that has similar or better sensitivity than ellipsometry or FTIR and is more tolerant of surface conditions and composition. In addition, the instrument is relatively portable and can be used to help identify unknown surface contamination. This method uses vacuum and thermal desorption to remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from the surface. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to identify and measure the contamination. A bench-scale model of this {open_quotes}contamination analysis unit{close_quotes} employs a residual gas analyzer (RGA) mated to a small, internally heated inlet that samples a surface.

  5. Reflectron Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (REMAS) Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; McEntire, R. W.; Cheng, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    The restricted mass and power budgets of landed science missions present a challenge to obtaining detailed analyses of planetary bodies. In situ studies, whether alone or as reconnaissance for sample return, must rely on highly miniaturized and autonomous instrumentation. Such devices must still produce useful data sets from a minimum of measurements. The great desire to understand the surfaces and interiors of planets, moons, and small bodies had driven the development of small, robotic techniques with ever-increasing capabilities. One of the most important goals on a surface mission is to study composition in many geological contexts. The mineralogical, molecular, elemental, and isotopic content of near-surface materials (regolith, rocks, soils, dust, etc.) at a variety of sites can complement broader imaging to describe the makeup and formative history of the body in question. Instruments that perform this site-to-site analysis must be highly transportable and work as a suite. For instance, a camera, microscope, spectrophotometer, and mass spectrometer can share several components and operate under a parallel command structure. Efficient use of multiple systems on a small rover has been demonstrated on the Mars Pathfinder mission.

  6. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  7. Quadrupole Ion Mass Spectrometer for Masses of 2 to 50 Da

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, William; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew; Harrison, Willard

    2005-01-01

    A customized quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer (QITMS) has been built to satisfy a need for a compact, rugged instrument for measuring small concentrations of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon in a nitrogen atmosphere. This QITMS can also be used to perform quantitative analyses of other gases within its molecular-mass range, which is 2 to 50 daltons (Da). (More precisely, it can be used to perform quantitative analysis of gases that, when ionized, are characterized by m/Z ratios between 2 and 50, where m is the mass of an ion in daltons and Z is the number of fundamental electric charges on the ion.

  8. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Results: Mars Atmospheric Thermal Structure and Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are well suited for retrieval of the thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols in the Martian atmosphere. Combined nadir- and limb-viewing spectra allow global monitoring of the atmosphere up to 0.01 mbar (65 km). We report here on the atmospheric thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols as observed thus far during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Zonal and temporal mean cross sections are used to examine the seasonal evolution of atmospheric temperatures and zonal winds during a period extending from northern hemisphere mid-summer through vernal equinox (L(sub s) = 104-360 deg). Temperature maps at selected pressure levels provide a characterization of planetary-scale waves. Retrieved atmospheric infrared dust opacity maps show the formation and evolution of regional dust storms during southern hemisphere summer. Response of the atmospheric thermal structure to the changing dust loading is observed. Maps of water-ice clouds as viewed in the thermal infrared are presented along with seasonal trends of infrared water-ice opacity. Uses of these observations for diagnostic studies of the dynamics of the atmosphere are discussed.

  9. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically-resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocity for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon was 2.05 ± 0.04 mm/s. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm/s and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  10. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocities for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon were 2.05 ± 0.04 mm s-1. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm s-1 and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  11. Calibrations and Comparisons of Aerosol Spectrometers linking Ground and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C.; Brock, C. A.; Erdesz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (NMASS), a fast-time response instrument measuring aerosol size distributions between 5 and 60nm, is to sample in the boundary layer and free troposphere on NASA's Atmospheric Tomography mission (ATom), providing contiguous data with global coverage in all four seasons. In preparation for this the NMASS is calibrated for the expected flight conditions and compatibility studies are made with ground-based instrumentation. The NMASS is comprised of 5 parallel condensation particle counters (CPCs) using perfluoro-tributylamine as a working fluid. Understanding the variation of CPC counting efficiencies with respect to the chemical composition of the sample is important for accurate data analysis and can be used to give indirect information about sample chemical composition. This variation is strongly dependent on the working fluid. The absolute responses and associated variations of the NMASS to ammonium sulfate and limonene ozonolysis products, compounds pertinent to the composition of particles nucleated in the free troposphere and boundary later, are compared to those of butanol, diethylene-glycol and water based CPCs, which are more commonly used in ground-based measurements. While fast time-response is key to measuring aerosol size distributions on flights, high size-resolution is often prioritized for ground-based measurements, and so a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is commonly used. Inter-comparison between NMASS and SMPS data is non-trivial because of the different working principles and resolutions of the instruments and yet it is vital, for example, for understanding the sources of particles observed during flights and the global relevance of phenomena observed from field stations and in chambers. We report compatibility studies on inversions of data from the SMPS and NMASS, evaluating temporal and spatial resolution and sources of uncertainty.

  12. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations of increases in Asian aerosol in winter from 1979 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, Steven T.; Torres, O.; Smith, Steven J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories indicate that the largest increases in SO{sub 2} emissions have occurred in Asia during the last 20 years. By inference, largest increases in aerosol, produced primarily by the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate, should have occurred in Asia during the same time period. Decadal changes in regional aerosol optical depths are calculated by analyzing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) vertical aerosol optical depths (converted to 550 nm) from 1979 to 2000 on a 1{sup o} by 1{sup o} global grid. The anthropogenic component of the TOMS aerosol record is maximized by examining the seasonal cycles of desert dust and Boreal fire smoke, and identifying the months of the year for which the desert dust and Boreal fire smoke are least conspicuous. Gobi and Taklimakan desert dust in Asia is prevalent in the TOMS record during spring, and eastern Siberian smoke from Boreal forest fires is prevalent during summer. Aerosol trends are calculated on a regional basis during winter (November-February) to maximize the anthropogenic component of the aerosol record. Large increases in aerosol optical depths between 1979 and 2000 are present over the China coastal plain and the Ganges river basin in India. Aerosol increased by 17% per decade during winter over the China coastal plain, while SO{sub 2} emissions over the same geographical region increased by 33% per decade.

  13. High-precision masses of neutron-deficient rubidium isotopes using a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerbauer, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; Herlert, A.; Schweikhard, L.

    2007-10-15

    The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient radioactive rubidium isotopes {sup 74-77,79,80,83}Rb have been measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. Using the time-of-flight cyclotron resonance technique, relative mass uncertainties ranging from 1.6x10{sup -8} to 5.6x10{sup -8} were achieved. In all cases, the mass precision was significantly improved as compared with the prior Atomic-Mass Evaluation; no significant deviations from the literature values were observed. The exotic nuclide {sup 74}Rb, with a half-life of only 65 ms, is the shortest-lived nuclide on which a high-precision mass measurement in a Penning trap has been carried out. The significance of these measurements for a check of the conserved-vector-current hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is discussed.

  14. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  15. Mass spectra deconvolution of low, medium, and high volatility biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Engelhart, Gabriella J; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Pandis, Spyros N

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) consists of compounds with a wide range of volatilities and its ambient concentration is sensitive to this volatility distribution. Recent field studies have shown that the typical mass spectrum of ambient oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is quite different from the SOA mass spectra reported in smog chamber experiments. Part of this discrepancy is due to the dependence of SOA composition on the organic aerosol concentration. High precursor concentrations lead to higher concentrations of the more volatile species in the produced SOA while at lower concentrations the less volatile compounds dominate the SOA composition. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, and beta-caryophyllene ozonolysis experiments were performed at moderate concentration levels. Using a thermodenuder the more volatile SOA species were removed achieving even lower SOA concentration. The less volatile fraction was then chemically characterized by an AMS. The signal fraction of m/z44, and thus the concentration of C02+, is significantly higher for the less volatile SOA. High NO(x) conditions result in less oxidized SOA than low NO(x) conditions, while increasing relative humidity levels results in more oxidized products for limonene but has little effect on alpha-and beta-pinene SOA. Combining a smog chamber with a thermodenuder model employing the volatility basis-set framework, the AMS SOA mass spectrum for each experiment and for each precursor is deconvoluted into low, medium, and high volatility component mass spectra. The spectrum of the surrogate component with the lower volatility is quite similar to that of ambient OOA.

  16. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  17. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  18. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks. PMID:27733773

  19. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  20. Apparatus and method for characterizing the transmission efficiency of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivasytava, Santash (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An electron/ion coincidence technique is employed to characterize the absolute mass dependent transmission efficiency of mass spectrometers. The technique is not dependent upon the partial pressure of the sample beam or the ionization cross sections of calibrant gases.

  1. A study of aerosol optical properties using a lightweight optical particle spectrometer and sun photometer from an unmanned aerial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Gao, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized printed optical particle spectrometer (POPS) and sun photometer (miniSASP) have been developed recently for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and balloon applications. Here we present the first scientific data recorded by the POPS and miniSASP from a Manta UAS during a field campaign on Svalbard, Norway, in April 2015. As part of a payload composed of five different aerosol instruments (absorption photometer, condensation particle counter, filter sampler, miniSASP and POPS) we collected particle size distributions, the optical depth (OD) and the sky brightness from 0 to 3000 m altitude. The complementary measurement approaches of the miniSASP and POPS allow us to calculate aerosol optical properties such as the aerosol optical depth and the angstrom exponent or the asymmetry parameter independently. We discuss deviation between results with respect to aerosol properties, e.g. hygroscopicity and absorption, as well as instrumental limitations.

  2. The on-line analysis of aerosol-delivered pharmaceuticals via single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Morrical, Bradley D; Balaxi, Maria; Fergenson, David

    2015-07-15

    The use of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated for the analysis of inhaled pharmaceuticals to determine the mass distribution of the individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in both single ingredient and combination drug products. SPAMS is an analytical technique where the individual aerodynamic diameters and chemical compositions of many aerosol particles are determined in real-time. The analysis was performed using a Livermore Instruments SPAMS 3.0, which allowed the efficient analysis of aerosol particles with broad size distributions and can acquire data even under a very large particle load. Data similar to what would normally require roughly three days of experimentation and analysis was collected in a five minute period and analyzed automatically. The results were computed to be comparable to those returned by a typical Next Generation Impactor (NGI) particle size distribution experiment.

  3. Sensitivity of spectral reflectance to aerosol optical properties in UV and visible wavelength range: Preparatory study for aerosol retrieval from Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asia, with its rapid increase in industrialization and population, has been receiving great attention as one of important source regions of pollutants including aerosols and trace gases. Since the spatio-temporal distribution of the pollutants varies rapidly, demands to monitor air quality in a geostationary satellite have increased recently. In these perspectives, the Ministry of Environment of Korea initiated a geostationary satellite mission to launch the Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT in 2017-2018 timeframe. From the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements, it has been found that the low surface reflectance and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering in UV wavelength range can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and optical type (or single scattering albedo), over the source regions as well as ocean areas. In addition, GEMS is expected to have finer spatial resolution compared to OMI (13 x 24 km2 at nadir), thereby less affected by sub-pixel clouds. In this study, we present sensitivity of spectral reflectance to aerosol optical properties in ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength range for a purpose to retrieve aerosol optical properties from GEMS. The so called UV-VIS algorithm plans to use spectral reflectance in 350-650 nm. The algorithm retrieves AOT and aerosol type using an inversion method, which adopts pre-calculated lookup table (LUT) for a set of assumed aerosol models. For the aerosol models optimized in Asia areas, the inversion data of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in the target areas are selectively used to archive aerosol optical properties. As a result, major aerosol types representing dust, polluted dust, and absorbing/non-absorbing anthropogenic aerosols are constructed and used for the LUT calculations. We analyze the effect of cloud contamination on the retrieved AOT by

  4. A new approach to mass spectrometer measurements of thermospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Brock, F. J.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The gas sampling problem in satellite and high velocity probes was investigated by applying the theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. A lens system using a free stream ion source was developed and experimentally evaluated over the pressure range of 0.00001 to 0.01 N/m sq (approx. 10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0001 torr). The source has high beam transparency, which minimizes gas-surface collisions within, or near, the ionization volume. It is shown that for high ion energy (60 eV), the extracted ion beam has an on-axis energy spread of less than 4 eV, and that 90 percent of the ions are within 2.5 deg of the beam axis. It is concluded that the molecular beam mass spectrometer concept, developed for gas density measurements in the upper atmosphere, substantially reduces gas-surface scattering and gas-surface reactions in the sample, and preserves the integrity of the gas sample during the analysis process. Studies show that both the Scout and Delta launch vehicles have adequate volume, control, velocity, and data acquisition capability necessary to obtain thermospheric number density in real time.

  5. "Fast excitation" CID in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J; Despeyroux, D; Lammert, S A; Stephenson, J L; Goeringer, D E

    2003-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. "Fast excitation" CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a(4)/b(4) ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with "fast excitation" CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for "fast excitation" CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H)(17+) of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of "fast excitation" CID to proteins.

  6. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  7. The Galileo probe mass spectrometer: composition of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Way, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    The composition of the jovian atmosphere from 0.5 to 21 bars along the descent trajectory was determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Galileo probe. The mixing ratio of He (helium) to H2 (hydrogen), 0.156, is close to the solar ratio. The abundances of methane, water, argon, neon, and hydrogen sulfide were measured; krypton and xenon were detected. As measured in the jovian atmosphere, the amount of carbon is 2.9 times the solar abundance relative to H2, the amount of sulfur is greater than the solar abundance, and the amount of oxygen is much less than the solar abundance. The neon abundance compared with that of hydrogen is about an order of magnitude less than the solar abundance. Isotopic ratios of carbon and the noble gases are consistent with solar values. The measured ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) of (5 +/- 2) x 10(-5) indicates that this ratio is greater in solar-system hydrogen than in local interstellar hydrogen, and the 3He/4He ratio of (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) provides a new value for protosolar (solar nebula) helium isotopes. Together, the D/H and 3He/4He ratios are consistent with conversion in the sun of protosolar deuterium to present-day 3He.

  8. SCAPS, a two-dimensional ion detector for mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Faraday Cup (FC) and electron multiplier (EM) are of the most popular ion detector for mass spectrometer. FC is used for high-count-rate ion measurements and EM can detect from single ion. However, FC is difficult to detect lower intensities less than kilo-cps, and EM loses ion counts higher than Mega-cps. Thus, FC and EM are used complementary each other, but they both belong to zero-dimensional detector. On the other hand, micro channel plate (MCP) is a popular ion signal amplifier with two-dimensional capability, but additional detection system must be attached to detect the amplified signals. Two-dimensional readout for the MCP signals, however, have not achieve the level of FC and EM systems. A stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) has been developed to detect two-dimensional ion variations for a spatial area using semiconductor technology [1-8]. The SCAPS is an integrated type multi-detector, which is different from EM and FC, and is composed of more than 500×500 pixels (micro-detectors) for imaging of cm-area with a pixel of less than 20 µm in square. The SCAPS can be detected from single ion to 100 kilo-count ions per one pixel. Thus, SCAPS can be accumulated up to several giga-count ions for total pixels, i.e. for total imaging area. The SCAPS has been applied to stigmatic ion optics of secondary ion mass spectrometer, as a detector of isotope microscope [9]. The isotope microscope has capabilities of quantitative isotope images of hundred-micrometer area on a sample with sub-micrometer resolution and permil precision, and of two-dimensional mass spectrum on cm-scale of mass dispersion plane of a sector magnet with ten-micrometer resolution. The performance has been applied to two-dimensional isotope spatial distribution for mainly hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen of natural (extra-terrestrial and terrestrial) samples and samples simulated natural processes [e.g. 10-17]. References: [1] Matsumoto, K., et al. (1993) IEEE Trans. Electron Dev. 40

  9. Mass measurements near the r-process path using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Fallis, J.; Greene, J. P.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Sun, T.; Zabransky, B. J.

    2012-04-01

    The masses of 40 neutron-rich nuclides from Z=51 to 64 were measured at an average precision of δm/m=10-7 using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. The measurements, of fission fragments from a 252Cf spontaneous fission source in a helium gas catcher, approach the predicted path of the astrophysical r process. Where overlap exists, this data set is largely consistent with previous measurements from Penning traps, storage rings, and reaction energetics, but large systematic deviations are apparent in β-endpoint measurements. Differences in mass excess from the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation of up to 400 keV are seen, as well as systematic disagreement with various mass models.

  10. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Typically, in real-time aerosol mass spectrometry (RTAMS), individual airborne particles
    are ablated and ionized with a single focused laser pulse. This technique yields information that
    permits bulk characterization of the particle, but information about the particle's sur...

  11. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  12. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic sources or in marine environments, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be misinterpreted. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components, i.e. components that vaporize but do not flash vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g. chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g. NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in the measurements. Chemical reactions with water vapor and oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g. NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g. WO2C2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are presented and are discussed together with field results showing that measurements of typical continental or urban aerosols are not significantly affected while laboratory

  13. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  14. Submicron particles at Thompson Farm during ICARTT measured using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Laura D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zhang, Qi; Ulbrich, Ingrid; Ziemba, Luke D.; Beckman, Pieter J.; Sive, Barkley C.; Talbot, Robert W.

    2008-04-01

    The composition and size of aerosols were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer at Thompson Farm in Durham, NH, during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation campaign during summer 2004. Submicron, non-refractory aerosol was dominated by organic matter and sulfate (averages of 5.7 μg m-3 and 3.6 μg m-3, respectively), with smaller contributions from nitrate and ammonium (averages of 0.3 μg m-3 and 1.02 μg m-3, respectively). Organic aerosol (OA) mass correlates well with anthropogenic tracers such as carbon monoxide (CO, R2 = 0.58) and black carbon (R2 = 0.59), but multiple analyses indicate possible contributions from primary, secondary, anthropogenic, and biogenic OA. Multivariate statistical analysis of the OA mass spectra indicates the presence of two types of oxygenated OA (OOA) and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) component that also contains contributions from biomass burning OA (BBOA). On average, the HOA/BBOA component accounts for 21% of the total OA mass while the two OOA components account for 24% and 55%, respectively, of the OA burden. Observed nitrate correlates well with OA (R2 = 0.67), suggesting interference, the presence of organic nitrates, processing/uptake of nitric acid by OA, or other temporally coincident processes because of the ammonia-poor environment with respect to sulfate. The relative increase of OA with respect to background compared to that of CO (average of 72.7 μg m-3 ppmv-1) indicates values that are higher than those based on previous measurements in New England.

  15. Characterization of primary organic aerosol emissions from meat cooking, trash burning, and motor vehicles with high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and comparison with ambient and chamber observations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Claudia; Huffman, Alex; Cubison, Michael J; Aiken, Allison C; Docherty, Kenneth S; Kimmel, Joel R; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; Hannigan, Michael; Jimenez, Jose L

    2009-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emissions from motor vehicles, meat-cooking and trash burning are analyzed here using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). High resolution data show that aerosols emitted by combustion engines and plastic burning are dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic compounds. Meat cooking and especially paper burning emissions contain significant fractions of oxygenated organic compounds; however, their unit-resolution mass spectral signatures are very similar to those from ambient hydrocarbon-like OA, and very different from the mass spectra of ambient secondary or oxygenated OA (OOA). Thus, primary OA from these sources is unlikelyto be a significant direct source of ambient OOA. There are significant differences in high-resolution tracer m/zs that may be useful for differentiating some of these sources. Unlike in most ambient spectra, all of these sources have low total m/z 44 and this signal is not dominated by the CO2+ ion. All sources have high m/z 57, which is low during high OOA ambient periods. Spectra from paper burning are similar to some types of biomass burning OA, with elevated m/z 60. Meat cooking aerosols also have slightly elevated m/z 60, whereas motor vehicle emissions have very low signal at this m/z.

  16. Optimisation of the design parameters of a reflection geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, M.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    Optimisation of the design parameters for a reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) has been done by a simplex optimisation method based on a Nelder-Mead Algorithm. The space and energy resolutions obtained are 6100 and 7400, respectively, for mass 200 amu. The resolution is quite adequate for all the applications of RIMS. A high resolution reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) for resonance ionisation mass spectrometer (RIMS) is being fabricated, based on these optimised design parameters. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is an Earth-viewing sensor being developed as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) to be launched in the late 1990s. MODIS consists of two separate instruments that scan a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. Of primary interest for studies of atmospheric physics is the MODIS-N (nadir) instrument which will provide images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resoulutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean and atmosperhic processes. The intent of this lecture is to describe the current status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning radiometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micrometers, and to describe the physical principles behind the development of MODIS for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties. Primary emphasis will be placed on the main atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles form spectral-reflection and thermal-emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be utilized for the determination of the total precipitable water vapor over land and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described herein.

  18. Mass spectroscopy of single aerosols from field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.S.; Murphy, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    We are developing an aircraft instrument for the chemical analysis of individual ambient aerosols in real time. In order to test the laboratory version of this instrument, we participated in a field campaign near the continental divide in Colorado in September, 1993. During this campaign, over 5000 mass spectra of ambient aerosols were collected. Analysis of the negative ion spectra shows that sulfate was the most commonly seen component of smaller particles, while nitrate was more common in larger particles. Organic compounds are present in most particles, and we believe we can distinguish inorganic carbon in some particles. Although numerous distinct classes of particles were observed, indicating external mixtures, almost all of these particle types were themselves mixtures of several compounds. Finally, we note that although the field site experienced distinct polluted and unpolluted episodes, aerosol composition did not correlate with gas phase chemistry.

  19. In Situ Analysis of Organics with a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soparawalla, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial life starts at home. In order to find life on other planets, we start by examining life processes we understand on the earth. Though it may not be possible to see the life in the form of macroscopic organisms, telltale signs of life can exist in the form of small organic molecules such as peptides and amino acids. Our overall goal is to test a portable mass spectrometer (MS) system, the Mini 10.5, for astrobiological applications including in situ hydrocarbon analysis and sediments analysis using an additional automated sample processing system (ASPS). The collaborative research focuses on two current projects in the field of astrobiology. Both projects are geared towards examining organics distributed in extreme environments. One portion of study attempts to qualitatively analyze the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by diesel exhaust on lichens growing in the desert. This requires measurements to be taken by bringing the instrument to the Mojave Desert and monitoring atmospheric composition of VOCs in situ. The second project is to evaluate the miniature MS system as a detector for the ASPS extraction system. A major obstacle of any chemometric in situ analysis is the suppression of analyte signal by concomitant signal from the surrounding environment. The ASPS extraction device has been developed at JPL to extract amino acids from sediment samples and elute them in solution. The solution is eluted at a high pH and needs to be conditioned to a more neutral pH so that dissolved amino acids can be readily protonated and subsequently analyzed by electrospray MS.

  20. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than

  1. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  2. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  3. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station.

  4. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station. PMID:21141836

  5. Three-dimensional factorization of size-resolved organic aerosol mass spectra from Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, I. M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Cubison, M. J.; Zhang, Q.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    A size-resolved submicron organic aerosol composition dataset from a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) collected in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006 is analyzed using 3-dimensional (3-D) factorization models. A method for estimating the precision of the size-resolved composition data for use with the factorization models is presented here for the first time. Two 3-D models are applied to the dataset. One model is a 3-vector decomposition (PARAFAC model), which assumes that each chemical component has a constant size distribution over all time steps. The second model is a vector-matrix decomposition (Tucker 1 model) that allows a chemical component to have a size distribution that varies in time. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an application of 3-D factorization models to data from fast aerosol instrumentation; it is also the first application of this vector-matrix model to any ambient aerosol dataset. A larger number of degrees of freedom in the vector-matrix model enable fitting real variations in factor size distributions, but also make the model susceptible to fitting noise in the dataset, giving some unphysical results. For this dataset and model, more physical results were obtained by partially constraining the factor mass spectra using a priori information and a new regularization method. We find four factors with each model: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), biomass-burning organic aerosol (BBOA), oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and a locally occurring organic aerosol (LOA). These four factors have previously been reported from 2-dimensional factor analysis of the high-resolution mass spectral dataset from this study. The size distributions of these four factors are consistent with previous reports for these particle types. Both 3-D models produce useful results, but the vector-matrix model captures real variability in the size distributions that cannot be captured by the 3-vector model. A

  6. Three-dimensional factorization of size-resolved organic aerosol mass spectra from Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, I. M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Cubison, M. J.; Zhang, Q.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    A size-resolved submicron organic aerosol composition dataset from a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) collected in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006 is analyzed using 3-dimensional (3-D) factorization models. A method for estimating the precision of the size-resolved composition data for use with the factorization models is presented here for the first time. Two 3-D models are applied to the dataset. One model is a 3-vector decomposition (PARAFAC model), which assumes that each chemical component has a constant size distribution over all time steps. The second model is a vector-matrix decomposition (Tucker 1 model) that allows a chemical component to have a size distribution that varies in time. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an application of 3-D factorization models to data from fast aerosol instrumentation, and the first application of this vector-matrix model to any ambient aerosol dataset. A larger number of degrees of freedom in the vector-matrix model enable fitting real variations in factor size distributions, but also make the model susceptible to fitting noise in the dataset, giving some unphysical results. For this dataset and model, more physically meaningful results were obtained by partially constraining the factor mass spectra using a priori information and a new regularization method. We find four factors with each model: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), biomass-burning organic aerosol (BBOA), oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and a locally occurring organic aerosol (LOA). These four factors have previously been reported from 2-dimensional factor analysis of the high-resolution mass spectral dataset from this study. The size distributions of these four factors are consistent with previous reports for these particle types. Both 3-D models produce useful results, but the vector-matrix model captures real variability in the size distributions that cannot be captured by the 3-vector

  7. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  8. Organic Aerosols in Rural and Remote Atmospheric Environments: Insights from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Ulbrich, I.; Dunlea, E.; Decarlo, P.; Huffman, A.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Alfarra, R.; Canagaratna, M.; Onasch, T.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D.; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Shimono, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Drewnick, F.; Schneider, J.; Middlebrook, A.; Bahreini, R.; Cotrell, L.; Griffin, R.; Leaitch, R.; Li, S.; Hayden, K.; Rautiainen, J.

    2006-12-01

    Organic matter usually accounts for a large fraction of the fine particle mass in rural and remote atmospheres. However, little is known about the sources and properties of this material. Here we report findings on the characteristics and the major types of organic aerosols (OA) in urban downwind, high elevation, forested, and marine atmospheres based on analyses of more than 20 highly time resolved AMS datasets sampled from various locations in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere. Organic aerosol components are extracted from these datasets using a custom multiple component mass spectral analysis technique and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method. These components are evaluated according to their extracted mass spectra and correlations to aerosol species, such as sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon, and gas-phase tracer compounds, such as CO and NOx. We have identified a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations. We have also identified several oxygenated OA (OOA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen to carbon ratios in their mass spectra. Two OOA components a highly oxygenated that has mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid (a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment) and a less oxygenated OOA component, whose spectrum is dominated with ions that are mainly associated with carbonyls and alcohols, are very frequently observed at various rural/remote sites. The oxygenated OOA component is more prevalent at downwind sites influenced by urban transport and the less oxygenated shows correlation to biogenic chamber OA at some locations. Compared to the total OOA concentration, HOA is generally very small and accounts for < 10% of the total OA mass at rural/remote sites. The comparisons between the concentrations of HOA and primary OA (POA) that would be predicted according to inert

  9. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.; Salt, K.; Nordmeyer, T.; Fergenson, D.; Morrical, B.

    1995-12-31

    Particulate pollution is an area of growing concern in light of recent studies which suggest a link between high concentrations of ambient PM{sub 10} (particles with diameters equal to or less than 10 {mu}m) and adverse health effects ranging from respiratory ailments to premature death. However, analytical chemistry techniques aimed at sampling and analysis of atmospheric aerosols are extremely limited in comparison to the number of methods that exist for studying gas phase smog components. As a result, current government regulations for levels of ambient particulates are necessarily general, lacking any chemical specificity. The authors have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. In one of the aerosol studies performed in this laboratory, this instrument is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. To date, the authors have observed very distinct size/composition correlations for organic and inorganic particles.

  10. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  11. Improvement of filament-protection circuitry in a Finnigan model 251 mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildman, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    As delivered from Finnigan MAT, the emission current of the Leybold-Heraeus model IM210 ionization vacuum gage on a model 251 isotope ratio mass spectrometer can turn on as soon as the ' PUMP ON ' switch is depressed, before a good vacuum in the mass spectrometer is attained. The filament in the source of the mass spectrometer may turn on at the same time, thereby shortening its life or burning it out if the vacuum is poor. This design flaw can be corrected by a simple modification of the electronic circuitry. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  13. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  14. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  15. Aerosol Particle Size Retrievals from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    During the extended mission of the Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter, the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has made periodic limb-viewing geometry observations of the Martian atmosphere. Sufficient radiance is typically available to produce a vertical distribution of dust and water ice aerosols from the surface to approximately 50 km altitude. Radiative transfer modeling is conducted to achieve a best fit between the observed and modeled spectrum. The spherical geometry of the limb-viewing geometry is handled using a pseudo-spherical approximation that is computationally efficient and accurate to within a few percent of a Monte Carlo method for the geometries observed. Different particle sizes of dust and water ice have unique extinction coefficients across the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum observed by CRISM. We use a wide range of wavelengths across the CRISM spectrum to conduct the retrieval. Here we provide initial results on the retrieval of dust and water ice particle sizes over the duration of the CRISM limb-viewing observations.

  16. Development of a miniature mass spectrometer with continuous atmospheric pressure interface.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Feng, Yan; Wei, Yongzheng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xu, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The demand for on-the-spot analysis is met by a miniature mass spectrometer which is preferred to be robust, stable, as small as possible and capable of analyzing different samples by coupling with various ionization methods. However, largely constrained by the atmospheric pressure interface (API), these aspects are difficult to be realized in one system. Herein, we describe the development of a new miniature mass spectrometer with balanced performance. The miniature mass spectrometer is small in size (30 × 30 × 18 cm) but has a continuous API, which was achieved by high-pressure ion trap operation and maximized ion transfer efficiency with the utilization of a differential pumping system. The miniature mass spectrometer was characterized and optimized in terms of stability, sensitivity, mass range, mass resolution and scan speed. Rapid analysis of mixtures was demonstrated by coupling the miniature mass spectrometer with the ambient ionization technique of paper spray. This is the smallest miniature mass spectrometer to date, which has a continuous API.

  17. Aerosol characterization over the southeastern United States using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: spatial and seasonal variation of aerosol composition, sources, and organic nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    We deployed a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) to characterize the chemical composition of submicron non-refractory particles (NR-PM1) in the southeastern US. Measurements were performed in both rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area, GA and Centreville, AL for approximately one year, as part of Southeastern Center of Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE) and Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Organic aerosol (OA) accounts for more than half of NR1 mass concentration regardless of sampling sites and seasons. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of HR-ToF-AMS measurements identified various OA sources, depending on location and season. Hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) have important but not dominant contributions to total OA in urban sites. Biomass burning OA (BBOA) concentration shows a distinct seasonal variation with a larger enhancement in winter than summer. We find a good correlation between BBOA and brown carbon, indicating biomass burning is an important source for brown carbon, although an additional, unidentified brown carbon source is likely present at the rural Yorkville site. Isoprene-derived OA (Isoprene-OA) is only deconvolved in warmer months and contributes 18-36% of total OA. The presence of Isoprene-OA factor in urban sites is more likely from local production in the presence of NOx than transport from rural sites. More-oxidized and less-oxidized oxygenated organic aerosol (MO-OOA and LO-OOA, respectively) are dominant fractions (47-79%) of OA in all sites. MO-OOA correlates well with ozone in summer, but not in winter, indicating MO-OOA sources may vary with seasons. LO-OOA, which reaches a daily maximum at night, correlates better with estimated nitrate functionality from organic nitrates than total nitrates. Based on the HR-ToF-AMS measurements, we estimate that the nitrate functionality from organic nitrates

  18. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  19. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  20. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m3/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m3 (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m3 (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources. PMID:26644919

  1. Extensive aerosol optical properties and aerosol mass related measurements during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 - Implications for PM compliance and planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Monica E.; Atkinson, Dean B.; Ziemba, Luke; Griffin, Robert; Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Perna, Ryan; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Luke, Winston; Kelley, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Extensive aerosol optical properties, particle size distributions, and Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer measurements collected during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 were examined in light of collocated meteorological and chemical measurements. Much of the evident variability in the observed aerosol-related air quality is due to changing synoptic meteorological situations that direct emissions from various sources to the TRAMP site near the center of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) metropolitan area. In this study, five distinct long-term periods have been identified. During each of these periods, observed aerosol properties have implications that are of interest to environmental quality management agencies. During three of the periods, long range transport (LRT), both intra-continental and intercontinental, appears to have played an important role in producing the observed aerosol. During late August 2006, southerly winds brought super-micron Saharan dust and sea salt to the HGB area, adding mass to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) measurements, but apparently not affecting secondary particle growth or gas-phase air pollution. A second type of LRT was associated with northerly winds in early September 2006 and with increased ozone and sub-micron particulate matter in the HGB area. Later in the study, LRT of emissions from wildfires appeared to increase the abundance of absorbing aerosols (and carbon monoxide and other chemical tracers) in the HGB area. However, the greatest impacts on Houston PM 2.5 air quality are caused by periods with low-wind-speed sea breeze circulation or winds that directly transport pollutants from major industrial areas, i.e., the Houston Ship Channel, into the city center.

  2. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  3. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, S.; Demick-Monelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of mlz from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  4. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Demick-Montelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  5. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Whitten, William B.

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  6. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  7. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  8. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and aligrnent for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  9. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  10. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  11. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  12. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of proteins in a modified commercial mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalassinos, K.; Slade, S. E.; Jennings, K. R.; Scrivens, J. H.; Giles, K.; Wildgoose, J.; Hoyes, J.; Bateman, R. H.; Bowers, M. T.

    2004-08-01

    Ion mobility has emerged as an important technique for determining biopolymer conformations in solvent free environments. These experiments have been nearly exclusively performed on home built systems. In this paper we describe modifications to a commercial high performance mass spectrometer, the Waters UK "Ultima" Q-Tof, that allows high sensitivity measurement of peptide and protein cross sections. Arrival time distributions are obtained for a series of peptides (bradykinin, LHRH, substance P, bombesin) and proteins (bovine and equine cytochrome c, myoglobin, [alpha]-lactalbumin) with good agreement found with literature cross sections where available. In complex ATD's, mass spectra can be obtained for each feature confirming assignments. The increased sensitivity of the commercial instrument is retained along with the convenience of the data system, crucial features for analysis of protein misfolding systems.

  13. Quantitative proteomics using the high resolution accurate mass capabilities of the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    High resolution/accurate mass hybrid mass spectrometers have considerably advanced shotgun proteomics and the recent introduction of fast sequencing capabilities has expanded its use for targeted approaches. More specifically, the quadrupole-orbitrap instrument has a unique configuration and its new features enable a wide range of experiments. An overview of the analytical capabilities of this instrument is presented, with a focus on its application to quantitative analyses. The high resolution, the trapping capability and the versatility of the instrument have allowed quantitative proteomic workflows to be redefined and new data acquisition schemes to be developed. The initial proteomic applications have shown an improvement of the analytical performance. However, as quantification relies on ion trapping, instead of ion beam, further refinement of the technique can be expected.

  14. In-Situ Characterization of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Interstitial, and background Particles using Single Particle Mass Spectrometer, SPLAT II

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Earle, Michael; Easter, Richard C.; Korolev, Alexei; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter; Macdonald, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Strapp, Walter

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol indirect effect remains the most uncertain aspect of climate change modeling because proper test requires knowledge of individual particles sizes and compositions with high spatial and temporal resolution. We present the first deployment of a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) that is operated in a dual data acquisition mode to measure all the required individual particle properties with sufficient temporal resolution to definitively resolve the aerosol-cloud interaction in this exemplary case. We measured particle number concentrations, asphericity, and individual particle size, composition, and density with better than 60 seconds resolution. SPLAT II measured particle number concentrations between 70 particles cm-3and 300 particles cm-3, an average particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Found that most particles are composed of oxygenated organics, many of which are mixed with sulfates. Biomass burn particles some with sulfates were prevalent, particularly at higher altitudes, and processed sea-salt was observed over the ocean. Analysis of cloud residuals shows that with time cloud droplets acquire sulfate by the reaction of peroxide with SO2. Based on the particle mass spectra and densities we find that the compositions of cloud condensation nuclei are similar to those of background aerosol but, contain on average ~7% more sulfate, and do not include dust and metallic particles. A comparison between the size distributions of background, activated, and interstitial particles shows that while nearly none of the activated particles is smaller than 115 nm, more than 80% of interstitial particles are smaller than 115 nm. We conclude that for this cloud the most important difference between CCN and background aerosol is particle size although having more sulfate also helps.

  15. Comparison of the Grimm 1.108 and 1.109 portable aerosol spectrometer to the TSI 3321 aerodynamic particle sizer for dry particles.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Ott, Darrin; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T

    2006-11-01

    This study compared the response of two optical particle counters with that of an aerodynamic particle sizer. The optical particle counters rely on the amount of incident light scattered at 90 degrees by a particle to measure particle number concentration by optical particle size. Two models of optical particle counters from Grimm Technologies were used: the portable aerosol spectrometer (PAS) 1.108 (0.3-20 microm in 15 channels); and the PAS 1.109 (0.2-20 microm in 30 size channels). With a substantially different operating principle from that employed by the optical particle counters, the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) model 3321 (TSI, Inc., St Paul, MN, USA) sizes particles according to their behavior in an accelerating flow to provide particle number concentration by aerodynamic size over a slightly narrower size range (0.5-20 microm) in 52 channels. The responses of these instruments were compared for three sizes of monodisperse solid aerosols composed of polystyrene latex spheres and a polydisperse aerosol composed of Arizona test dust. The PASs provided similar results to those from the APS. However, there were systematic differences among instruments in number and mass concentration measurement that depended upon particle size. PMID:17041244

  16. Iterative and function-continuation Fourier deconvolution methods for enhancing mass spectrometer resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J. W.; Ioup, G. E.; Rayborn, G. H., Jr.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    Mass spectrometer data in the form of ion current versus mass-to-charge ratio often include overlapping mass peaks, especially in low- and medium-resolution instruments. Numerical deconvolution of such data effectively enhances the resolution by decreasing the overlap of mass peaks. In this paper two approaches to deconvolution are presented: a function-domain iterative technique and a Fourier transform method which uses transform-domain function-continuation. Both techniques include data smoothing to reduce the sensitivity of the deconvolution to noise. The efficacy of these methods is demonstrated through application to representative mass spectrometer data and the deconvolved results are discussed and compared to data obtained from a spectrometer with sufficient resolution to achieve separation of the mass peaks studied. A case for which the deconvolution is seriously affected by Gibbs oscillations is analyzed.

  17. Characterization of Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions from Meat Cooking, Trash Burning, and Combustion Engines with High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry and Comparison with Ambient and Chamber Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Huffman, J. A.; Cubison, M. J.; Aiken, A. C.; Docherty, K. S.; Kimmel, J. R.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Hannigan, M.; Garcia, J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emissions from motor vehicles, meat-cooking and trash burning are analyzed here using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and supporting instrumentation. A semi-quantitative comparison of emission factors highlights the potential importance of meat cooking as an OA source. GC-MS and AMS mass spectra are compared for the first time and show high similarity, but with more fragmentation in the AMS due to higher vaporization temperatures. High resolution data show that aerosols emitted by combustion engines and plastic burning are dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic compounds. Meat cooking and especially paper burning contain significant fractions of oxygenated organic compounds; however, their unit-resolution mass spectral signatures are very similar to mass spectral signatures from hydrocarbon-like OA or primary OA, and very different from the mass spectra of ambient secondary or oxygenated OA (OOA). Thus, primary OA from any of these sources is very unlikely to be a significant direct source of ambient OOA. There are significant differences in high-resolution tracer m/z's that may be useful for differentiating these sources from each other. Unlike in most ambient spectra, all of these sources have low total m/z 44 and this signal is not dominated by the CO2+ ion. All sources have high m/z 57, which is low during high OOA ambient periods. Spectra from paper burning are similar to some types of biomass burning OA, with elevated m/z 60. Meat cooking aerosols also have slightly elevated m/z 60, while motor vehicle emissions have very low signal at this m/z.

  18. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  19. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blase, Ryan C. Miller, Greg; Brockwell, Tim; Waite, J. Hunter; Westlake, Joseph; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H.

    2015-10-15

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a “perfect focus” mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (∼10.7 in.{sup 3}) and weight (∼2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups.

  20. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Blase, Ryan C; Miller, Greg; Westlake, Joseph; Brockwell, Tim; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H; Waite, J Hunter

    2015-10-01

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a "perfect focus" mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (∼10.7 in.(3)) and weight (∼2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups.

  1. Gaseous composition measured by a chemical ionization mass spectrometer in fresh and aged ship plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, Cameron; Psichoudaki, Magda; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Hallquist, Åsa; Thomson, Erik; Pettersson, Jan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    The port of Gothenburg is the largest port of the Nordic countries with numerous ships calling the port daily. The ship exhausts contain numerous pollutants including gases such as SO2 and NOx as well as particulate matter and soot. The exhaust also contains numerous organic compounds, a large fraction of which are unidentified. These organics are oxidized in the atmosphere producing more oxygenated and potentially less volatile compounds that may contribute to the secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This work focuses on the characterization of fresh gaseous species present in the exhaust plumes of the passing ships and also on their photochemical aging. Between 26 September and 12 November 2014 measurements were conducted at a sampling site located on a small peninsula at the entrance of Gothenburg's port. The campaign was divided in two periods. During the first period, the fresh plumes of the passing ships were measured through a main inlet. During the second period, the sample passed through the same inlet and was then introduced into a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) reactor. The PAM reactor uses UV lamps and high concentrations of oxidants (OH radicals and O3) to oxidize the organic species present in the plumes. The oxidation that takes place within the reactor can be equivalent to up to one week of atmospheric oxidation. Preliminary tests showed that the oxidation employed in the current camping corresponded to 3.4 days in the atmosphere. A Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) was employed to monitor the concentration of different organic species present in the fresh and aged plumes. Water (positive) and iodide (negative) ionization methods were employed were water was primarily used for fresh plumes (large fraction of non-polar compounds) while iodide was used for the aged plumes (primarily oxidised products). The H2O, O3 and SO2 concentrations inside the PAM chamber were monitored, and an organic tracer for OH exposure determination

  2. Performance of an improved monodisperse aerosol generation interface for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P.C.; Perkins, D.D.; Williams, W.K.; Browner, R.F.

    1988-03-01

    An improved monodisperse aerosol generation interface for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry interfacing (MAG-IC-LC/MS) is described. The interface has an aerodynamically superior momentum separator, which results in decreased analyte loss in passing through the interface. The interface is shown to perform well with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, in addition to earlier studies with a magnetic sector instrument. A new method of forming aerosol has been developed, which reduces the dead volume significantly over earlier designs. The performance of the interface has been evaluated by studying its capabilities for (1) generating electron impact spectra of searchable quality for selected compounds of interest, (2) operating with typical liquid chromatographic separation conditions, including reverse phase and gradient elution, and (3) providing low detection limits for both full scan and selective ion monitoring detection of a range of compounds. Studies include identification of the components of a mixture of cis and trans isomers of the thermally labile compound retinol (vitamin A) acetate. Full scan (m/z 80-350) electron impact spectra were readily obtained with 50-ng injection on-column. Detection limits for this compound were 10 ng full scan and 1 ng with selected ion monitoring. Identification of a free (nonderivatized) fatty acid mixture was also readily obtained, using a reversed-phase separation in gradient mode.

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Aerosol: 1 nanometer to 1 micron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, D. R.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles remains the largest uncertainty in quantitatively assessing past, current and future climate change. The principal reason for that uncertainty arises from the need to characterize and model composition and size dependent aerosol processes, ranging from nanometer to micron scales. Aerosol mass spectrometry results have shown that about half the sub-micron aerosol composition is composed of highly oxygenated organics that are not well understood in terms of photochemical reaction mechanisms (Jimenez et al, 2009). This work has included application of high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) in order to determine elemental and functional group composition of complex organic components. Recently, we have applied similar ToFMS to determine the composition of ambient ions, molecules and clusters, potentially involved in formation and growth of nano-particles (Junninen et al, 2010). Observed organic anions (molecular weight range 200-500 Th) have similar chemical composition as the least volatile secondary organics observed in fine particles; while organic cations are dominated by amines and pyridines. During nucleation events, anions are dominated by sulphuric acid cluster ions (Ehn et al, 2010). In both nanometer and micrometer size ranges, the goal to elucidate the roles of inorganic and organic species, particularly how particle evolution and physical properties depend on mixed compositions. Recent results will be discussed, including ambient and experimental chamber observations. Ehn et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 14897-14946, 2010 Jimenez et al, Science, 326, 1525-1529, 2009 Junninen et al, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 1039-1053, 2010

  4. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  5. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Wan, X.; Jin, D. Z.; Tan, X. H.; Huang, Z. X.; Tan, G. B.

    2015-03-15

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters.

  6. Retrieval of trace gases from aerosol-influenced infrared transmission spectra observed by low-spectral-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Nobuyuki; Kuriki, Satoshi; Nobuta, Koji; Yokota, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideaki; Sugita, Takafumi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    2005-01-20

    A method for the simultaneous retrieval of gas concentrations and an extinction spectrum of aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds from infrared transmission spectra observed in the solar occultation geometry is described. It is particularly suited to measurements by Fourier-transform spectrometers with relatively low spectral resolution (0.1-1 cm(-1)). The method does not require a priori assumptions on aerosol properties; it utilizes only the fact that the wave-number dependence of aerosol extinction is much weaker than that of gas absorption. In this method, an aerosol extinction spectrum is approximated by a straight line within a relatively wide spectral range defined as mediumwindow.

  7. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-10-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra in the m/z range 12-250 showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the different SOA types after 5 h of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxidized OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O : C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first 5 h of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O : C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions based on their carbon number revealed that the SOA source with the highest O : C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. Fragment ions containing up to 3 carbon atoms accounted for 66%, 68%, 72% and 76% of the organic spectrum of the SOA produced by the diesel car, wood burner, α-pinene and

  8. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-02-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the four different SOA types after five hours of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O:C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first five hours of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O:C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions revealed that the SOA source with the highest O:C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. The HR data of the four sources could be clustered and separated using principal component analysis (PCA). The model showed a significant separation of the four SOA types and clustering of the duplicate

  9. Interfacing an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Stairs, Jason R; Cho, Inho; Harper, Jason D; Lukow, Stefan R; Lareau, Richard T; DeBono, Reno; Kuja, Frank

    2011-11-15

    Hardware from a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) based explosive trace detector (ETD) has been interfaced to an AB/SCIEX API 2000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. To interface the COTS IMS based ETD to the API 2000, the faraday plate of the IMS instrument and the curtain plate of the mass spectrometer were removed from their respective systems and replaced by a custom faraday plate, which was fabricated with a hole for passing the ion beam to the mass spectrometer, and a custom interface flange, which was designed to attach the IMS instrument onto the mass spectrometer. Additionally, the mass spectrometer was modified to increase the electric field strength and decrease the pressure in the differentially pumped interface, causing a decrease in the effect of collisional focusing and permitting a mobility spectrum to be measured using the mass spectrometer. The utility of the COTS-ETD/API 2000 configuration for the characterization of the gas phase ion chemistry of COTS-ETD equipment was established by obtaining mass and tandem mass spectra in the continuous ion flow and selected mobility monitoring operating modes and by obtaining mass-selected ion mobility spectra for the explosive standard 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT). This analysis confirmed that the product ion for TNT is [TNT - H](-), the predominant collision-induced dissociation pathway for [TNT- H](-) is the loss of NO and NO(2), and the reduced mobility value for [TNT - H](-) is 1.54 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1). Moreover, this analysis was attained for sample amounts of 1 ng and with a resolving power of 37. The objective of the research is to advance the operational effectiveness of COTS IMS based ETD equipment by developing a platform that can facilitate the understanding of the ion chemistry intrinsic to the equipment.

  10. A computer controlled mass spectrometer system for investigating the decomposition of non-metallic materials under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A PDP 11/23 quadrupole mass spectrometer system was coupled to a nondiscriminating gas inlet system permitting gases at atmospheric pressure to be admitted into a high vacuum chamber containing the ion source of the mass spectrometer without separation of the gaseous components. The resolution of related software problems has resulted in a convenient computer-mass spectrometer system capable of generating masses, relative intensities and related data on the gaseous products resulting from the atmospheric thermal decomposition of nonmetallic materials.

  11. High-throughput mass-directed parallel purification incorporating a multiplexed single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rongda; Wang, Tao; Isbell, John; Cai, Zhe; Sykes, Christopher; Brailsford, Andrew; Kassel, Daniel B

    2002-07-01

    We report on the development of a parallel HPLC/MS purification system incorporating an indexed (i.e., multiplexed) ion source. In the method described, each of the flow streams from a parallel array of HPLC columns is directed toward the multiplexed (MUX) ion source and sampled in a time-dependent, parallel manner. A visual basic application has been developed and monitors in real-time the extracted ion current from each sprayer channel. Mass-directed fraction collection is initiated into a parallel array of fraction collectors specific for each of the spray channels. In the first embodiment of this technique, we report on a four-column semipreparative parallel LC/MS system incorporating MUX detection. In this parallel LC/MS application (in which sample loads between 1 and 10 mg on-column are typically made), no cross talk was observed. Ion signals from each of the channels were found reproducible over 192 injections, with interchannel signal variations between 11 and 17%. The visual basic fraction collection application permits preset individual start collection and end collection thresholds for each channel, thereby compensating for the slight variation in signal between sprayers. By incorporating postfraction collector UV detection, we have been able to optimize the valve-triggering delay time with precut transfer tubing between the mass spectrometer and fraction collectors and achieve recoveries greater than 80%. Examples of the MUX-guided, mass-directed fraction purification of both standards and real library reaction mixtures are presented within.

  12. High-throughput mass-directed parallel purification incorporating a multiplexed single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rongda; Wang, Tao; Isbell, John; Cai, Zhe; Sykes, Christopher; Brailsford, Andrew; Kassel, Daniel B

    2002-07-01

    We report on the development of a parallel HPLC/MS purification system incorporating an indexed (i.e., multiplexed) ion source. In the method described, each of the flow streams from a parallel array of HPLC columns is directed toward the multiplexed (MUX) ion source and sampled in a time-dependent, parallel manner. A visual basic application has been developed and monitors in real-time the extracted ion current from each sprayer channel. Mass-directed fraction collection is initiated into a parallel array of fraction collectors specific for each of the spray channels. In the first embodiment of this technique, we report on a four-column semipreparative parallel LC/MS system incorporating MUX detection. In this parallel LC/MS application (in which sample loads between 1 and 10 mg on-column are typically made), no cross talk was observed. Ion signals from each of the channels were found reproducible over 192 injections, with interchannel signal variations between 11 and 17%. The visual basic fraction collection application permits preset individual start collection and end collection thresholds for each channel, thereby compensating for the slight variation in signal between sprayers. By incorporating postfraction collector UV detection, we have been able to optimize the valve-triggering delay time with precut transfer tubing between the mass spectrometer and fraction collectors and achieve recoveries greater than 80%. Examples of the MUX-guided, mass-directed fraction purification of both standards and real library reaction mixtures are presented within. PMID:12141664

  13. A broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer for measuring the extinction of aerosols at blue and near-UV wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Dean; Fullam, Donovan; Hoa Le, Phuoc; Chen, Jun; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for sensitive extinction measurements of aerosols. The instrument is distinguished by its broad and continuous spectral coverage from the near-UV to blue wavelengths (ca. 320 to 450 nm). The short wavelength region has been little explored compared to visible wavelengths, but is important because (1) brown carbon (BrC) absorbs strongly in this wavelength region, and (2) absorption of near-UV radiation in the atmosphere alters the photolysis rate of the key atmospheric species O3, NO2, and HONO, with implications for air quality and atmospheric oxidation capacity. The instrument performance and the effect of a switchable in-line filter are characterised. Early results using the instrument in the TROPOS atmospheric simulation chamber are presented. These experiments include studies of secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA), and biomass burning experiments of rice and wheat straw, followed by experiments simulating particle aging under daytime and nighttime conditions.

  14. Measuring the masses of the charged hadrons using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.; Engelfried, Jurgen; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2010-08-01

    The Selex experiment measured several billion charged hadron tracks with a high precision magnetic momentum spectrometer and high precision RICH velocity spectrometer. We have analyzed these data to simultaneously measure the masses of all the long lived charged hadrons and anti-hadrons from the {pi} to the {Omega} using the same detector and technique. The statistical precision achievable with this data sample is more than adequate for 0.1% mass measurements. We have used these measurements to develop and understand the systematic effects in using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer with the goal of measuring 10 masses with precision ranging from 100 KeV for the lightest to 1000 KeV for the heaviest. This requires controlling the radius measurement of RICH rings to the {approx} 10{sup -4} level. Progress in the mass measurements and the required RICH analysis techniques developed are discussed.

  15. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  16. A mass spectrometer with a membrane interface for oil concentration monitoring in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatskii, V. V.; Elokhin, V. A.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Ershov, T. D.; Elizarov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    An immersion mass spectrometer with a membrane interface was used for oil detection and oil concentration measurements in seawater by measuring in situ the concentrations of three hydrocarbons: benzene, toluene, and xylene in the region of the specialized Primorsk oil loading seaport in the Gulf of Finland. The recorded mass spectra demonstrated the possibility of measuring the oil concentration in seawater and determining the grade of oil products. The use of a mass spectrometer with a membrane separator interface allows measurements of hydrocarbon concentration with high accuracy, which is currently not provided in commercially available monitors.

  17. Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

    2014-11-19

    We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  18. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is

  19. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  20. Performance of the High Resolution, Multi-collector Helix MC Plus Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer at the Australian National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Honda, Masahiko; Hamilton, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Performance of the Helix MC Plus noble gas mass spectrometer installed at the Australian National University (ANU) is reported. Results for sensitivity, mass discrimination and their linearity against partial pressure of noble gases, and mass resolution of the mass spectrometer are presented, and the results are compared with those of conventional noble gas mass spectrometers. The application of the five detectors on the Helix MC Plus in measuring various noble gas isotopes in multi-collector modes and the integration of the software drivers of peripheral hardware devices into the controlling program Qtegra of the mass spectrometer are discussed. High mass resolution (>1800) and mass resolving power (>8000) make this mass spectrometer unique in noble gas cosmo-geochemistry. It provides the capability to measure isobaric interference-free noble gas isotopes in multi-collector mode, significantly improves the accuracy to determine isotopic ratios, and greatly increases the efficiency of data acquisition.

  1. Highly time-resolved urban aerosol characteristics during springtime in Yangtze River Delta, China: insights from soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Yanfang; Shen, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Xu, Jianzhong; Ge, Shun; Yu, Huan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Aerodyne soot particle - aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed for the first time during the spring of 2015 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, for online characterization of the submicron aerosols (PM1). The SP-AMS enables real-time and fast quantification of refractory black carbon (rBC) simultaneously with other non-refractory species (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and organics). The average PM1 concentration was found to be 28.2 µg m-3, with organics (45 %) as the most abundant component, following by sulfate (19.3 %), nitrate (13.6 %), ammonium (11.1 %), rBC (9.7 %), and chloride (1.3 %). These PM1 species together can reconstruct ˜ 44 % of the light extinction during this campaign based on the IMPROVE method. Chemically resolved mass-based size distributions revealed that small particles especially ultrafine ones (< 100 nm vacuum aerodynamic diameter) were dominated by organics and rBC, while large particles had significant contributions from secondary inorganic species. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) yielded four OA subcomponents, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Overall, secondary organic aerosol (SOA, equal to the sum of SV-OOA and LV-OOA) dominated the total OA mass (55.5 %), but primary organic aerosol (POA, equal to the sum of HOA and COA) can outweigh SOA in the early morning and evening due to enhanced human activities. High OA concentrations were often associated with high mass fractions of POA and rBC, indicating the important role of anthropogenic emissions during heavy pollution events. The diurnal cycles of nitrate, chloride, and SV-OOA both showed good anti-correlations with air temperatures, suggesting their variations were likely driven by thermodynamic equilibria and gas-to-particle partitioning. On the other hand, in contrast to other species

  2. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  3. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (P(D2)) and helium partial pressure (P(He)) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if P(D2) > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if P(He)/P(D2) > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  4. Mexico City aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 1: Fine particle composition and organic source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; Salcedo, D.; Cubison, M. J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Docherty, K. S.; Sueper, D.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.; Northway, M.; Stone, E. A.; Schauer, J. J.; Volkamer, R. M.; Fortner, E.; de Foy, B.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Gaffney, J.; Marley, N. A.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-09-01

    Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Mass concentrations, diurnal cycles, and size distributions of inorganic and organic species are similar to results from the CENICA supersite in April 2003 with organic aerosol (OA) comprising about half of the fine PM mass. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution OA spectra identified three major components: chemically-reduced urban primary emissions (hydrocarbon-like OA, HOA), oxygenated OA (OOA, mostly secondary OA or SOA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA) that correlates with levoglucosan and acetonitrile. BBOA includes several very large plumes from regional fires and likely also some refuse burning. A fourth OA component is a small local nitrogen-containing reduced OA component (LOA) which accounts for 9% of the OA mass but one third of the organic nitrogen, likely as amines. OOA accounts for almost half of the OA on average, consistent with previous observations. OA apportionment results from PMF-AMS are compared to the PM{sub 2.5} chemical mass balance of organic molecular markers (CMB-OMM, from GC/MS analysis of filters). Results from both methods are overall consistent. Both assign the major components of OA to primary urban, biomass burning/woodsmoke, and secondary sources at similar magnitudes. The 2006 Mexico City emissions inventory underestimates the urban primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions by a factor of {approx}4, and it is {approx}16 times lower than afternoon concentrations when secondary species are included. Additionally, the forest fire contribution is at least an order-of-magnitude larger than in the inventory.

  5. Bio-Aerosol Detection Using Mass Spectrometry: Public Health Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ludvigson, Laura D.

    2004-01-01

    I recently spent a summer as an intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I worked on a project involving the real-time, reagentless, single cell detection of aerosolized pathogens using a novel mass spectrometry approach called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS). Based upon preliminary results showing the differentiation capabilities of BAMS, I would like to explore the development and use of this novel detection system in the context of both environmental and clinical sample pathogen detection. I would also like to explore the broader public health applications that a system such as BAMS might have in terms of infectious disease prevention and control. In order to appreciate the potential of this instrument, I will demonstrate the need for better pathogen detection methods, and outline the instrumentation, data analysis and preliminary results that lead me toward a desire to explore this technology further. I will also discuss potential experiments for the future along with possible problems that may be encountered along the way.

  6. Airborne single particle mass spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and new software for data visualization and analysis in a geo-spatial context.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles-two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol's optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present our aircraft-compatible single particle mass spectrometers, SPLAT II and its new, miniaturized version, miniSPLAT that measure in-situ and in real-time the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. Although miniSPLAT's size, weight, and power consumption are significantly smaller, its performance is on par with SPLAT II. Both instruments operate in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle compositions and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  7. The complex refractive index of atmospheric and model humic-like substances (HULIS) retrieved by a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS).

    PubMed

    Dinar, E; Riziq, A Abo; Spindler, C; Erlick, C; Kiss, G; Rudich, Y

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols absorb and reflect solar radiation causing surface cooling and heating of the atmosphere. The interaction between aerosols and radiation depends on their complex index of refraction, which is related to the particles' chemical composition. The contribution of light absorbing organic compounds, such as HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS) to aerosol scattering and absorption is among the largest uncertainties in assessing the direct effect of aerosols on climate. Using a Cavity Ring Down Aerosol Spectrometer (CRD-AS), the complex index of refraction of aerosols containing HULIS extracted from pollution, smoke, and rural continental aerosols, and molecular weight-fractionated fulvic acid was measured at 390 nm and 532 nm. The imaginary part of the refractive index (absorption) substantially increases towards the UV range with increasing molecular weight and aromaticity. At both wavelengths, HULIS extracted from pollution and smoke particles absorb more than HULIS from the rural aerosol. Sensitivity calculations for a pollution-type aerosol containing ammonium sulfate, organic carbon (HULIS), and soot suggests that accounting for absorption by HULIS leads in most cases to a significant decrease in the single scattering albedo and to a significant increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency, towards more atmospheric absorption and heating. This indicates that HULIS in biomass smoke and pollution aerosols, in addition to black carbon, can contribute significantly to light absorption in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions.

  8. Size-exclusion chromatography with organic carbon detection using a mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Warton, Ben; Heitz, Anna; Allpike, Bradley; Kagi, Robert

    2008-10-17

    A novel organic carbon detector for size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is described. The instrument uses the conventional UV-persulfate oxidation method to convert organic carbon to CO(2), which is then detected using a mass spectrometer. This system, using the mass spectrometer, had lower limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) than a previously described system using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy 'lightpipe' detector (i.e. when quantification was based on calibration using phthalate standards). When used to analyse natural organic matter (NOM) in water, it also had a superior signal-to-noise ratio to the previously described system. The use of a mass spectrometer to detect organic carbon (as CO(2)) enables the possibility of further characterisation of NOM by measuring the stable carbon isotope ratios of the various molecular size fractions of organic carbon, as obtained by SEC.

  9. Improved performance of a quadrupole based glow discharge mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Valiga, R.E.; Duckworth, D.C.; Smith, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) has experienced most of its commercial success in trace multi-element analysis using sector-based mass spectrometry. In most cases, the mass resolution available with these instruments allows elements of interest to be analyzed, even in the presence of polyatomic interferences (e.g., ArC+, ArN+, ArO+). Because quadrupole mass filters have little more than unit resolution, background equivalent concentrations (BEC`s) for many elements can be quite high (1-100 ppm). Because of this, many have discounted quadrupole GDMS as a useful trace analysis technique. In this work, the authors have explored methods of reducing the polyatomic interferences.

  10. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.; Koenig, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. ); Moore, R.B.; Rouleau, G. ); Audi, G. )

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on [sup 78]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] and [sup 84]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  11. Product ion scanning using a Q-q-Q linear ion trap (Q TRAP) mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hager, James W; Yves Le Blanc, J C

    2003-01-01

    The use of a Q-q-Q(linear ion trap) instrument to obtain product ion spectra is described. The instrument is based on the ion path of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with Q3 operable as either a conventional RF/DC quadrupole mass filter or a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with axial ion ejection. This unique ion optical arrangement allows de-coupling of precursor ion isolation and fragmentation from the ion trap itself. The result is a high sensitivity tandem mass spectrometer with triple quadrupole fragmentation patterns and no inherent low mass cut-off. The use of the entrance RF-only section of the instrument as accumulation ion trap while the linear ion trap mass spectrometer is scanning enhances duty cycles and results in increased sensitivities by as much as a factor of 20. The instrument is also capable of all of the triple quadrupole scans including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) as well as precursor and constant neutral loss scanning. The high product ion scanning sensitivity allows the recording of useful product ion spectra near the MRM limit of quantitation.

  12. Number size distribution of aerosols at Mt. Huang and Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Effects of air masses and characteristics of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; An, Junlin; Yin, Yan; Kang, Hanqing

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol number spectra in the range of 10 nm-10 μm were observed at Mt. Huang (Aug. 15-Sep. 15) and Nanjing (Oct. 13-Nov. 15) by a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) in 2011. Based on the backward trajectories obtained using the HYSPLIT model, the transport pathways of observed air masses during the study periods were classified into the following four groups: maritime air mass, continental air mass, marine-continental mixed air mass and local air mass. The variations in the aerosol number spectrum and the new particle formation (NPF) events for various types of air masses were discussed, along with meteorological data. The results showed that the average number concentration was 12,540 cm- 3 at Nanjing and only 2791 cm- 3 at Mt. Huang. The aerosol number concentration in Nanjing was 3-7 times higher than that in Mt. Huang; the large discrepancy was in the range of 10-100 nm. Different types of air masses had different effects on number concentration distribution. The number concentration of aerosols was higher in marine air masses, continental air masses and continental-marine mixed air masses at 10-50 nm, 100-500 nm and 50-200 nm, respectively. Under the four types of air masses, the aerosol size spectra had bimodal distributions in Nanjing and unimodal distributions in Mt. Huang (except under continental air masses: HT1). The effects of the diverse air masses on aerosol size segments of the concentration peak in Mt. Huang were stronger than those in Nanjing. The local air masses were dominant at these two sites and accounted for 44% of the total air masses. However, the aerosol number concentration was the lowest in Mt. Huang and the highest in Nanjing when local air masses were present. The number concentrations for foreign air masses increased at Mt. Huang and decreased at Nanjing. Different types of air masses had greater effects on the aerosol spectrum distribution at Mt. Huang than at Nanjing. During the NPF events, the particle growth rates at Mt

  13. Instrument manual for the retarding ion mass spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Hammack, H. D.; Wright, W. W.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The retarding ion mass spectrometer (RIMS) for Dynamics Explorer-1 is an instrument designed to measure the details of the thermal plasma distribution. It combines the ion temperature determining capability of the retarding potential analyzer with the compositional capabilities of the mass spectrometer and adds multiple sensor heads to sample all directions relative to the spacecraft ram direction. This manual provides a functional description of the RIMS, the instrument calibration, and a description of the commands which can be stored in the instrument logic to control its operation.

  14. A cheap and compact mass spectrometer for radioactive ions based on a Wien filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, C.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Tuske, O.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents simulations of a mass spectrometer composed of one or two Wien filters. The ion source used is MONO1000 ECRIS. This ion source can produce singly charged ions with high efficiency, especially for gaseous materials. After extraction, the ions are mass selected and can be injected either into a beam line towards an experiment area or in an N+ charge booster. Due to its compactness and simplicity the proposed spectrometer is well adapted for preparing and analyzing radioactive beams. The simulations are based on the SIMION 3D [www.simion.com/] software.

  15. Initial results of the commissioning of the HRIBF recoil mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.J.; Akovali, Y.A.; Brinkman, M.J.; Mas, J.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Shapira, D.; Ginter, T.N.; James, A.N.

    1996-10-01

    The recoil mass spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility is currently undergoing commissioning tests. This new spectrometer is designed to transmit ions with rigidities of K = 100 resulting from fusion-evaporation reactions using inverse-kinematics. The device consists of two sections: a momentum separator to provide beam rejection and a mass separator for product identification. Using normal-kinematic and symmetric reactions, the commissioning tests have shown that the A/Q acceptance is almost {+-}5%, the energy acceptance is approximately {+-}12%, and there has been little, if any, primary beam observed on the focal plane. Commissioning tests are presently underway with reactions using inverse-kinematics.

  16. Study of Odor Approximation by Using Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masashi; Nihei, Yasunori; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2011-09-01

    Since a set of odor components to cover wide range of smells has not been revealed yet, we studied the selection of odor components using essential-oil mass spectrum database. Basis vectors were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization method1 and then non-negative least squares method was used to determine the recipe. The odor approximations of three typical essential oils were confirmed by the sensory test. It was found that the mass spectrum data were correlated with the sensory test result. Moreover, this correlation was remarkable in the high m/z region.

  17. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  18. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  19. New engineering design, instrument modeling, and data analysis techniques for spaceborne mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.

    This work describes technological innovations that can be used to improve upon space-borne mass spectrometers (MS), enabling breakthrough science and the development of the next-generation of sensors. Emphasis is placed on the two classes of MS with the strongest spaceflight heritage: quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MS). For the QMS, higher order auxiliary excitation techniques are modeled and implemented for the first time for both commercial and spaceflight-like sensors. These techniques, through modest modification of instrument electronics, are shown to significantly improve upon the maximum attainable mass resolution, sensitivity, ion rejection efficiency, and stability of measured mass spectra. For the TOF-MS, a complete analysis of instrument noise sources is conducted, and a mathematical framework for instrument measurements is developed. Such a framework results in an end-to-end forward modeling of instrument noise, dataset signal-to-noise estimation, and noise event removal algorithms. The developed noise processing techniques are applied to the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) instrument on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to enable the first ever mapping of the spatial distribution of heavy ions at Mercury, the first in situ measurements of solar wind heavy ion non-thermal properties in the inner heliosphere, as well as the first in situ measurements made inside of Earth's orbit of ionized helium originating from interstellar space.

  20. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs.

  1. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  2. High Energy Collisions on Tandem Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    Long before the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), Orbitraps, and any of the other tools that are now used ubiquitously for proteomics and metabolomics, the highest performance mass spectrometers were sector instruments, providing high resolution mass measurements by combining an electrostatic energy analyzer (E) with a high field magnet (B). In its heyday, the four sector mass spectrometer (or EBEB) was the crown jewel, providing the highest performance tandem mass spectrometry using single, high energy collisions to induce fragmentation. During a time in which quadrupole and tandem triple quadrupole instruments were also enjoying increased usage and popularity, there were, nonetheless, some clear advantages for sectors over their low collision energy counterparts. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers are high voltage, high vacuum instruments that have much in common with sectors and have inspired the development of tandem instruments exploiting single high energy collisions. In this retrospective, we recount our own journey to produce high performance TOFs and tandem TOFs, describing the basic theory, problems, and the advantages for such instruments. An experiment testing impulse collision theory (ICT) underscores the similarities with sector mass spectrometers where this concept was first developed. Applications provide examples of more extensive fragmentation, side chain cleavages, and charge-remote fragmentation, also characteristic of high energy sector mass spectrometers. Moreover, the so-called curved-field reflectron has enabled the design of instruments that are simpler, collect and focus all of the ions, and may provide the future technology for the clinic, for tissue imaging, and the characterization of microorganisms.

  3. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  4. Development of accelerator mass spectrometer based on a compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-W.; Kim, D.-G.

    2011-07-01

    A small cyclotron has been designed for accelerator mass spectrometry, and the injection beam line is constructed as part of prototyping. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is estimated to be around 4000. The design of the cyclotron was performed with orbit-tracking computations using 3D magnetic and electric fields, and beam optics of the injection line was calculated using the codes such as IGUN and TRANSPORT. The radial injection scheme is chosen to place a beam on equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection line includes an ion source, Einzel lens, rf buncher, 90° dipole magnet, and quadrupole triplet magnet. A carbon beam was extracted from the front part of the injection line. An rf cavity system for the cyclotron was built and tested. A multi channel plates (MCP) detector to measure low-current ion beams was also tested. Design considerations are given to analyzing a few different radioisotopes in form of positive ions as well as negative ions.

  5. Mass spectrometer for real-time metabolism monitoring during anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    Mass-spectrometric monitoring of metabolism (CO2/O2) in the inspiration-expiration regime is used to estimate the anesthetic protection of the patient against surgical stimulation during combined anesthesia. A correlation between the anesthetic protection of the patient and the metabolic rate is demonstrated, and the periodic variation of the metabolic rate with time is found. The sevoflurane metabolism products and intravenous analgesic fentanyl are found in the blowing air of the patient during anesthesia.

  6. Recipe Estimation Using Mass Spectrometer and Large-Scale Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, Al; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    An odor recorder is an instrument capable of determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of the target smell (e.g. apple), so called odor recipe. A variety of smells can be generated by blending multiple odor components; an odor recorder can reproduce smells as well as record them so that the sensor array output pattern of the blended odor can match that of the target odor. Although the range of smell to be recorded has been so far limited, this work enhances that range using mass spectrometry without GC. We previously proposed the algorithm to select appropriate odor components among huge number of candidates. Here we applied this proposed algorithm experimentally for reproducing different eight fruit flavors using odor components selected from our laboratory database, composed of recorded mass patterns of 190 components. The blended and target smells were compared using sensory test (triangle test). Sensory test revealed that the smell blended according to the estimated recipe using our proposed method was almost the same as the target one. Moreover, even if the less contributed components in mass spectra are eliminated from the estimated recipe, the flavor remains almost similar to that of the target one.

  7. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in northwest China: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 11 July-7 August 2012. The average (PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory (PM1 (NR-(PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105 μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. Organic aerosol (OA) on average consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns, both with peak at ~ 07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8), corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking-emission related OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ~ 07:00 and 15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak between ~ 08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon maximum in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by downward mixing of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during nighttime. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA was

  8. Rapid scanning mass spectrometer. Final CRADA report for CRADA Number Y-1295-0394

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.; Boeckmann, M.D.

    1997-02-24

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was used to modify Vacuum Technology`s AERO VAC computer/mass spectrometer interface and electronics to allow the mass spectrometer to acquire rapid scans. The computer interface sends signals from the PC to the mass spectrometer, controlling its filament, giving scan instructions, and selecting the proper electrometer range, and detector. It then receives the detector output in the form of amplified digital signals from the electrometer. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface and electronics. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will have replaced. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AERO VAC mass spectrometer. The new firmware allows digital signals to be transmitted considerably faster to and from the mass spectrometer than the old firmware. The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesign allowed obsolete electronics in the regulator circuitry to be replaced with more efficient circuitry. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. Figure 4 shows a picture of the prototype voltage regulator circuit. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer in SOLVE II: Comparisons to SAGE III, POAM III and Airborne Spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S.; Yee, J-H.; Swartz, W.; Shetter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) measured solar-beam transmission on the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). This paper presents AATS-14 results for multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (AOD), including its spatial structure and comparisons to results from two satellite sensors and another DC-8 instrument. These are the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) and the Direct beam Irradiance Airborne Spectrometer (DIAS).

  10. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  11. Systems, methods, and apparatus of a low conductance silicon micro-leak for mass spectrometer inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan N. (Inventor); Niemann, Hasso B. (Inventor); Jamieson, Brian G. (Inventor); Lynch, Bernard A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments a mass spectrometer micro-leak includes a number of channels fabricated by semiconductor processing tools and that includes a number of inlet holes that provide access to the channels.

  12. Development of a high vacuum sample preparation system for helium mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Das, N. K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    A high vacuum sample preparation system for the 3He/4He ratio mass spectrometer (Helix SFT) has been developed to remove all the gaseous constituents excluding helium from the field gases. The sample preparation system comprises of turbo molecular pump, ion pump, zirconium getter, pipettes and vacuum gauges with controller. All these are fitted with cylindrical SS chamber using all metal valves. The field samples are initially treated with activated charcoal trap immersed in liquid nitrogen to cutoff major impurities and moisture present in the sample gas. A sample of 5 ml is collected out of this stage at a pressure of 10-2 mbar. This sample is subsequently purified at a reduced pressure of 10-7 mbar before it is injected into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. The sample pressure was maintained below 10-7 mbar with turbo molecular vacuum pumps and ion pumps. The sample gas passes through several getter elements and a cold finger with the help of manual high vacuum valves before it is fed to the mass spectrometer. Thus the high vacuum sample preparation system introduces completely clean, dry and refined helium sample to the mass spectrometer for best possible analysis of isotopic ratio of helium.

  13. A Miniature Mass Spectrometer for High-Flux Cosmic Dust Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, D. E.; Manning, H. L. K.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2007-03-01

    We designed a novel mass spectrometer for in situ characterization of micro-particulates in regions of high concentration, such as a comet fly-by, planetary ring, or impact-generated plume. This device is based on novel ion optics that allow high performa

  14. MEMS Fabrication of Micro Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for CubeSats Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate arrays of micro Cylindrical Ion Traps (μCIT) which are integrated into a miniaturized mass spectrometer (MS). The micro μCITs are built from silicon wafers and requires high machining precision, smooth surface, and high dimensional uniformity across the array for optimum mass spectrometer performance. In order to build these 3D miniature structures several MEMS processing techniques were explored and a process was developed and tested. By using the developed MEMS process, the required μCIT 4 x 4 arrays were fabricated. This included a chip design variation in which mechanical locking pits and posts were machined in the Ring Electrode (RE) chip and End Plate (EP) chips respectively, for self-assembly. The size of the assembled μCIT is only 12 mm x 12 mm x 1.5 mm. It is a key component for the miniature mass spectrometer. The micro cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer has the advantages of low-power operation, simpler electronics and less-stringent vacuum system requirements. The MEMS batch production capabilities will also greatly lower the cost. It is a promising candidate for CubeSat and nanoSats applications for exploration of chemical distributions in space.

  15. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  16. Systems, Methods, and Apparatus of a Low Conductance Silicon Micro-Leak for Mass Spectrometer Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, Dan N. (Inventor); Niemann, Hasso B. (Inventor); Jamieson, Brian G. (Inventor); Lynch, Bernard A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments a mass spectrometer micro-leak includes a number of channels fabricated by semiconductor processing tools and that includes a number of inlet holes that provide access to the channels.

  17. An ion mobility mass spectrometer for investigating photoisomerization and photodissociation of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, B. D.; Coughlan, N. J. A.; Markworth, P. B.; Bieske, E. J.; Continetti, R. E.

    2014-12-15

    An ion mobility mass spectrometry apparatus for investigating the photoisomerization and photodissociation of electrosprayed molecular ions in the gas phase is described. The device consists of a drift tube mobility spectrometer, with access for a laser beam that intercepts the drifting ion packet either coaxially or transversely, followed by a quadrupole mass filter. An ion gate halfway along the drift region allows the instrument to be used as a tandem ion mobility spectrometer, enabling mobility selection of ions prior to irradiation, with the photoisomer ions being separated over the second half of the drift tube. The utility of the device is illustrated with photoisomerization and photodissociation action spectra of carbocyanine molecular cations. The mobility resolution of the device for singly charged ions is typically 80 and it has a mass range of 100-440 Da, with the lower limit determined by the drive frequency for the ion funnels, and the upper limit by the quadrupole mass filter.

  18. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  19. Recovering Long-term Aerosol Optical Depth Series (1976-2012) from an Astronomical Potassium-based Resonance Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, A.; Cuevas, E.; Pallé, P.; Romero, P. M.; Almansa, F.; Wehrli, C.

    2014-04-01

    A 37 year long-term series of monochromatic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which presents a long-term stability and high precision in comparison to other instruments based on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapor cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirrors arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun-laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some inconveniences when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed that calibration errors associated to the quasi-continuous Langley technique are not dependent on aerosol load, provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the day, assuring the validity of this technique for those periods with relatively high aerosol content required to calibrate the scattered component. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD dataset from Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from Cimel AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 11 year and 12 year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET/Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear relationship between instruments, proving that recovered AOD data series from Mark-I can be used together PFR and AERONET AOD

  20. Recovering long-term aerosol optical depth series (1976-2012) from an astronomical potassium-based resonance scattering spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, A.; Cuevas, E.; Pallé, P.; Romero, P. M.; Guirado, C.; Wehrli, C. J.; Almansa, F.

    2014-12-01

    A 37-year long-term series of monochromatic aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which affords wavelength absolute reference and stability (long-term stability and high precision) in comparison to other instruments based purely on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapour cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirror arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun-laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some important inconveniences to overcome when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed similar calibration errors retrieved by means of this quasi-continuous Langley technique applied in different aerosol load events (from 0.04 to 0.3), provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the calibration interval. It assures the validity of this technique when it is applied in those periods with relatively high aerosol content. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD data set from the Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from the Cimel-AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 10- and 12-year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET and Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear relationship

  1. Retrievals of Extensive and Intensive Aerosol Parameters from Vertical Profiles of Extinction Coefficient Acquired by the MAESTRO Occultation Spectrometer: Case Study of Sarychev Volcano Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; O'Neill, N. T.; McElroy, C. T.; Sioris, C.; Zou, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Canadian MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) instrument aboard the SCISAT-1 Satellite is an aerosol profiling occultation device that is part of the ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission. This spectrometer produces spectra of aerosol extinction profiles above the upper troposphere. The extinction coefficient spectra permit the discrimination of sub-micron (fine mode) and super-micron (coarse mode) contributions and, in principle, the retrieval of fine mode effective radius. Retrievals applied to lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosol plumes resulting from the eruption of the Sarychev-peak volcano in June of 2009 are presented. Preliminary results indicate that the fine and coarse mode discrimination and the particle sizing capability are coherent with available information on Sarychev aerosols.

  2. On-line Monitoring of Continuous Flow Chemical Synthesis Using a Portable, Small Footprint Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Tony W. T.; Ray, Andrew D.; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed.

  3. On-line monitoring of continuous flow chemical synthesis using a portable, small footprint mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony W T; Ray, Andrew D; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed. PMID:25106707

  4. Detection of meteoric smoke particles in the mesosphere by a rocket-borne mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Dickson, Shannon; Horányi, Mihaly; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Friedrich, Martin; Janches, Diego; Megner, Linda; Williams, Bifford

    2014-10-01

    their number density is also reduced, perhaps as a consequence of photodetachment. Modeling of the charge state of the MSPs shows that the total number density of MSPs, charged and uncharged, is approximately 20,000 cm-3 below the ledge and the model reproduces the absence of positive MSPs above the ledge. An aerosol mass spectrometer was flown on 2 sounding rockets (day and night, 2011). Charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs)were detected at altitudes of 63-94 km. The detected MSPs have radii less than 1.2 nm (8000 amu). MSPs above ~80 km are all negatively charged; both charge states occur below 80 km. MSP charge densities are lower during the daytime than nighttime.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol formation from in-use motor vehicle emissions using a potential aerosol mass reactor.

    PubMed

    Tkacik, Daniel S; Lambe, Andrew T; Jathar, Shantanu; Li, Xiang; Presto, Albert A; Zhao, Yunliang; Blake, Donald; Meinardi, Simone; Jayne, John T; Croteau, Philip L; Robinson, Allen L

    2014-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from in-use vehicle emissions was investigated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor deployed in a highway tunnel in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Experiments consisted of passing exhaust-dominated tunnel air through a PAM reactor over integrated hydroxyl radical (OH) exposures ranging from ∼ 0.3 to 9.3 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Experiments were performed during heavy traffic periods when the fleet was at least 80% light-duty gasoline vehicles on a fuel-consumption basis. The peak SOA production occurred after 2-3 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Additional OH exposure decreased the SOA production presumably due to a shift from functionalization to fragmentation dominated reaction mechanisms. Photo-oxidation also produced substantial ammonium nitrate, often exceeding the mass of SOA. Analysis with an SOA model highlight that unspeciated organics (i.e., unresolved complex mixture) are a very important class of precursors and that multigenerational processing of both gases and particles is important at longer time scales. The chemical evolution of the organic aerosol inside the PAM reactor appears to be similar to that observed in the atmosphere. The mass spectrum of the unoxidized primary organic aerosol closely resembles ambient hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA). After aging the exhaust equivalent to a few hours of atmospheric oxidation, the organic aerosol most closely resembles semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA) and then low-volatility organic aerosol (LV-OOA) at higher OH exposures. Scaling the data suggests that mobile sources contribute ∼ 2.9 ± 1.6 Tg SOA yr(-1) in the United States, which is a factor of 6 greater than all mobile source particulate matter emissions reported by the National Emissions Inventory. This highlights the important contribution of SOA formation from vehicle exhaust to ambient particulate matter concentrations in urban areas.

  6. Calibration of a Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer with an Atmospheric Argon Standard (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, V.; Grove, M.

    2009-12-01

    Like other mass spectrometers, gas source instruments are very good at precisely measuring isotopic ratios but need to be calibrated with a standard to be accurate. The need for calibration arises due to the complicated ionization process which inefficiently and differentially creates ions from the various isotopes that make up the elemental gas. Calibration of the ionization process requires materials with well understood isotopic compositions as standards. Our project goal was to calibrate a noble gas (Noblesse) mass spectrometer with a purified air sample. Our sample obtained from Ocean Beach in San Francisco was under known temperature, pressure, volume, humidity. We corrected the pressure for humidity and used the ideal gas law to calculate the number of moles of argon gas. We then removed all active gasses using specialized equipment designed for this purpose at the United States Geological Survey. At the same time, we measured the volume ratios of various parts of the gas extraction line system associated with the Noblesse mass spectrometer. Using this data, we calculated how much Ar was transferred to the reservoir from the vacuum-sealed vial that contained the purified gas standard. Using similar measurements, we also calculated how much Ar was introduced into the extraction line from a pipette system and how much of this Ar was ultimately expanded into the Noblesse mass spectrometer. Based upon this information, it was possible to calibrate the argon sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. From a knowledge of the isotopic composition of air, it was also possible to characterize how ionized argon isotopes were fractionated during analysis. By repeatedly analyzing our standard we measured a 40Ar Sensitivity of 2.05 amps/bar and a 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 309.2 on the Faraday detector. In contrast, measurements carried out by ion counting using electron multipliers yield a value (296.8) which is much closer to the actual atmospheric 40Ar/36Ar value of 295.5.

  7. Airborne Single Particle Mass Spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and New Software for Data Visualization and Analysis in a Geo-Spatial Context

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles - two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol’s optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present miniSPLAT, our new aircraft compatible single particle mass spectrometer, that measures in-situ and in real-time size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. miniSPLAT operates in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. When compared to our previous instrument, SPLAT II, miniSPLAT has been significantly reduced in size, weight, and power consumption without loss in performance. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle composition and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  8. Design of An Improved Miniature Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminathan, Viji K.; Alig, Roger C.

    1997-01-01

    The ion optics of NASA's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) sensor was simulated with three dimensional models of the open source, the quadrupole deflector, the exit lens system and the quadrupole mass analyzer to design more compact models with lower weight. Comparison of calculated transmission with experimental results shows good agreement. Transmission analyses with varying geometrical parameters and voltages throw light on possible ways of reducing the size of the sensor. Trajectories of ions of mass 1-99 amu were simulated to analyze and optimize transmission. Analysis of open source transmission with varying angle of attack shows that the angular acceptance can be considerably increased by programming the voltages on the ion trap/ collimator. Analysis of transmission sensitivity to voltages and misalignments of the quadrupole deflector rods indicate that increased transmission is possible with a geometrically asymmetrical deflector and a deflector can be designed with much lower sensitivities of transmission. Bringing the disks closer together can decrease the size of the quadrupole deflector and also increase transmission. The exit lens system can be redesigned to be smaller by eliminating at least one electrode entirely without loss of transmission. Ceramic materials were investigated to find suitable candidates for use in the construction of lighter weight mass spectrometer. A high-sensitivity, high-resolution portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer with a mass range of 2-700 amu has been built and will be commercialized in Phase 3.

  9. MISR Aerosol Air Mass Type Mapping over Mega-City: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Most aerosol air-quality monitoring in mega-city environments is done from scattered ground stations having detailed chemical and optical sampling capabilities. Satellite instruments such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) can retrieve total-column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), along with some information about particle microphysical properties. Although the particle property information from MISR is much less detailed than that obtained from the ground sampling stations, the coverage is extensive, making it possible to put individual surface observations into the context of regional aerosol air mass types. This paper presents an analysis of MISR aerosol observations made coincident with aircraft and ground-based instruments during the INTEX-B field campaign. These detailed comparisons of satellite aerosol property retrievals against dedicated field measurements provide the opportunity to validate the retrievals quantitatively at a regional level, and help to improve aerosol representation in retrieval algorithms. Validation of MISR retrieved AOD and other aerosol properties over the INTEX-B study region in and around Mexico City will be presented. MISR’s ability to distinguish among aerosol air mass types will be discussed. The goal of this effort is to use the MISR aerosol property retrievals for mapping both aerosol air mass type and AOD gradients in mega-city environments over the decade-plus that MISR has made global observations.

  10. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

    2009-11-27

    Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

  11. Volcanic Gas Emissions Mapping Using a Mass Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of hazardous gaseous emissions at volcanoes using in-situ mass spectrometry (MS) is a key step towards a better comprehension of the geophysical phenomena surrounding eruptive activity. In-Situ gas data consisting of helium, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and other gas species, were acquired with an MS system. MS and global position system (GPS) data were plotted on ground imagery, topography, and remote sensing data collected by a host of instruments during the second Costa Rica Airborne Research and Technology Applications (CARTA) mission This combination of gas and imaging data allowed 3-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the volcanic plume end the mapping of gas concentration at several volcanic structures and urban areas This combined set of data has demonstrated a better tool to assess hazardous conditions by visualizing and modeling of possible scenarios of volcanic activity. The MS system is used for in-situ measurement of three-dimensional gas concentrations at different volcanic locations with three different transportation platforms, aircraft, auto, and hand carried. The demonstration for urban contamination mapping is also presented as another possible use for the MS system.

  12. Mass- and energy-analyses of ions from plasma by means of a miniature Thomson spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, M. J.; Czaus, K.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zebrowski, J.

    2009-05-15

    The paper presents an improved version of a miniature mass-spectrometer of the Thomson-type, which has been adopted for ion analysis near the dense plasma region inside a vacuum chamber. Problems connected with the separation of ions from plasma streams are considered. Input diaphragms and pumping systems, needed to ensure good vacuum inside the analyzing region, are described. The application of the miniature Thomson-type analyzer is illustrated by ion parabolas recorded in plasma-focus facility and rod plasma injector experiment. A quantitative analysis of the recorded ion parabolas is presented. Factors influencing accuracy of the ion analysis are discussed and methods of the spectrometer calibration are described.

  13. Analysis of ion dynamics and peak shapes for delayed extraction time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, V. M.; Ponciano, C. R.; Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2004-06-01

    The dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) peak shapes on time-dependent extraction electric fields is studied theoretically. Conditions for time focusing are analyzed both analytically and numerically for double-acceleration-region TOF spectrometers. Expressions for the spectrometer mass resolution and for the critical delay time are deduced. Effects due to a leakage field in the first acceleration region are shown to be relevant under certain conditions. TOF peak shape simulations for the delayed extraction method are performed for emitted ions presenting a Maxwellian initial energy distribution. Calculations are compared to experimental results of Cs+ emission due to CsI laser ablation.

  14. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry with a radial opposed migration ion and aerosol classifier (ROMIAC).

    PubMed

    Mui, Wilton; Thomas, Daniel A; Downard, Andrew J; Beauchamp, Jesse L; Seinfeld, John H; Flagan, Richard C

    2013-07-01

    The first application of a novel differential mobility analyzer, the radial opposed migration ion and aerosol classifier (ROMIAC), is demonstrated. The ROMIAC uses antiparallel forces from an electric field and a cross-flow gas to both scan ion mobilities and continuously transmit target mobility ions with 100% duty cycle. In the ROMIAC, diffusive losses are minimized, and resolution of ions, with collisional cross-sections of 200-2000 Å(2), is achieved near the nondispersive resolution of ~20. Higher resolution is theoretically possible with greater cross-flow rates. The ROMIAC was coupled to a linear trap quadrupole mass spectrometer and used to classify electrosprayed C2-C12 tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, bradykinin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, bovine ubiquitin, and two pairs of model peptide isomers. Instrument and mobility calibrations of the ROMIAC show that it exhibits linear responses to changes in electrode potential, making the ROMIAC suitable for mobility and cross-section measurements. The high resolution of the ROMIAC facilitates separation of isobaric isomeric peptides. Monitoring distinct dissociation pathways associated with peptide isomers fully resolves overlapping peaks in the ion mobility data. The ability of the ROMIAC to operate at atmospheric pressure and serve as a front-end analyzer to continuously transmit ions with a particular mobility facilitates extensive studies of target molecules using a variety of mass spectrometric methods. PMID:23730869

  15. Iodine-xenon studies and the relax mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Ash, R. D.; Lyon, I. C.; Johnston, W. A.; Hutchison, R.; Bridges, J. C.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-01

    RELAX combines a resonance ionization ion source with a cryogenic sample concentrator to achieve ultrasensitivity. Gas is extracted from samples using either a continuous wave laser microprobe based on an argon-ion laser or a filament microfurnace. Recent refinements in the operating procedure have resulted in optimum sensitivities such that detection rates of 1 cps are achieved from fewer than 500 atoms. A Xe-128 spike reservoir has also been added and characterized, allowing accurate determinations of absolute amounts of gas. We have completed a preliminary study of the iodine-xenon system in samples from the Bjurbole and Parnallee meteorites. Bjurbole chondrules ranging in mass from 5.45 mg to 260 micrograms were analyzed by laser microprobe. The results from these samples are consistent with an effectively uniform formation age, suggesting that the use of Bjurbole chondrules for calibration of this chronometer can be extended to samples in this size range. Samples from two chondrules from the Parnallee meteorite have been analyzed to date. An alpha-cristobalite-bearing chondrule (designated CB1) was found to have a formation age 4.62 +/- 0.44 Ma after Bjurboele, while a porphyritic olivine macrochondrule appears to have been reset after the decay of I-129(t1/2 17 Ma). Consideration of these results alongside Ar-Ar data from the macrochondrule and whole rock samples suggests that Parnallee has a complex history: The macrochondrule underwent an early postcrystallization degassing event but appears to have been essentially unaffected by the later (1.9 Ga) partial resetting of the bulk meteorite.

  16. Development Of A Supercontinuum Based Photoacoustic Aerosol Light Absorption And Albedo Spectrometer (PALAAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ian J.

    Aerosols are a major contributor to the global radiation budget because they modify the planetary albedo with their optical properties. These optical properties need to be measured and understood, ideally at multiple wavelengths. This thesis describes the ongoing development of a supercontinuum based multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument to measure the light absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosols. Collimation techniques for supercontinuum sources using lens-based and off-axis parabolic mirror-based collimators were evaluated and it was determined that the off-axis mirror had superior collimation abilities for multi-spectral beams. A proof of concept supercontinuum-based photoacoustic instrument was developed using sequential measurements at multiple wavelengths. The instrument data were in good agreement with those from a commercial 3-wavelength photoacoustic instrument and the novel instrument had minimum detectable absorption and scattering coefficients of better than 4 Mm-1 and 21 Mm-1, respectively. The instrument however suffered from poor temporal resolution due to the sequential measurement and required the development of an aerosol delivery system to deliver a slowly varying aerosol concentration. In response, a spectral modulator has been developed to frequency encode different wavelength bands for simultaneous measurement with a photoacoustic instrumen.

  17. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  18. Quality, compatibility, and synergy analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing

    2005-05-01

    A number of global aerosol products of varying quality, strengths, and weaknesses have been generated. Presented here are synthetic analyses with regard to the quality, compatibility, and synergy of two long-term global (1983-2000) aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Four essential aerosol parameters, namely, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from AVHRR under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), TOMS AOT, Ångström exponent (AE) from AVHRR, and TOMS aerosol index (AI) are analyzed together with various ancillary data sets on meteorological fields, ocean color, and ground-based AOT measurements. While the two satellite products reveal some common features, significant discrepancies exist. Reflectances measured at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from the two sensors are incompatible in terms of the magnitude of AE computed from AOT derived from the two channels. The spatial distributions of the aerosol products from AVHRR and TOMS are complimentary in revealing different aspects of aerosol characteristics. In-depth analyses were carried out over several regions under the influence of different types of aerosols such as biomass burning, dust, sea salt, air pollution, and their mixtures. A classification algorithm was developed to identify dominant types of aerosols around the globe using aerosol products from the two instruments. Aerosol type information is used to develop and apply relationships between the AVHRR AOT and the TOMS AOT. The latter was used to extend the AOT at 0.55 μm over land around the globe. Comparisons of monthly mean AOTs with AERONET monthly mean AOTs showed a general agreement to within an estimated error range of ±0.08 ± 0.20τ. Finally, a comparison between the estimated AOT with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOT over land showed good agreement in terms of magnitude and seasonality, suggesting a means of

  19. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I.; Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O.

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

  20. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T; Jensen, R; Christensen, M K; Pedersen, T; Hansen, O; Chorkendorff, I

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/Δm > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH(3).

  1. Planar differential mobility spectrometer as a pre-filter for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Coy, Stephen L; Krylov, Evgeny V; Nazarov, Erkinjon G

    2010-12-01

    Ion filters based on planar DMS can be integrated with the inlet configuration of most mass spectrometers, and are able to enhance the quality of mass analysis and quantitative accuracy by reducing chemical noise, and by pre-separating ions of similar mass. This paper is the first in a series of three papers describing the optimization of DMS / MS instrumentation. In this paper the important physical parameters of a planar DMS-MS interface including analyzer geometry, analyzer coupling to a mass spectrometer, and transport gas flow control are considered. The goal is to optimize ion transmission and transport efficiency, provide optimal and adjustable resolution, and produce stable operation under conditions of high sample contamination. We discuss the principles of DMS separations and highlight the theoretical underpinnings. The main differences between planar and cylindrical geometries are presented, including a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of RF ion focusing. In addition, we present a description of optimization of the frequency and amplitude of the DMS fields for resolution and ion transmission, and a discussion of the influence and importance of ion residence time in DMS. We have constructed a mass spectrometer interface for planar geometries that takes advantage of atmospheric pressure gas dynamic principles, rather than ion focusing, to minimize ion losses from diffusion in the analyzer and to maximize total ion transport into the mass spectrometer. A variety of experimental results has been obtained that illustrate the performance of this type of interface, including tests of resistance to high contamination levels, and the separation of stereoisomers. In a subsequent publication the control of the chemical interactions that drive the separation process of a DMS / MS system will be considered. In a third publication we describe novel electronics designed to provide the high voltages asymmetric waveform fields (SV) required for these

  2. Contribution of isoprene-derived organosulfates to free tropospheric aerosol mass

    PubMed Central

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, S. M.; Murphy, D. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Eddingsaas, N. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2010-01-01

    Recent laboratory studies have demonstrated that isoprene oxidation products can partition to atmospheric aerosols by reacting with condensed phase sulfuric acid, forming low-volatility organosulfate compounds. We have identified organosulfate compounds in free tropospheric aerosols by single particle mass spectrometry during several airborne field campaigns. One of these organosulfates is identified as the sulfate ester of IEPOX, a second generation oxidation product of isoprene. The patterns of IEPOX sulfate ester in ambient data generally followed the aerosol acidity and NOx dependence established by laboratory studies. Detection of the IEPOX sulfate ester was most sensitive using reduced ionization laser power, when it was observed in up to 80% of particles in the tropical free troposphere. Based on laboratory mass calibrations, IEPOX added > 0.4% to tropospheric aerosol mass in the remote tropics and up to 20% in regions downwind of isoprene sources. In the southeastern United States, when acidic aerosol was exposed to fresh isoprene emissions, accumulation of IEPOX increased aerosol mass by up to 3%. The IEPOX sulfate ester is therefore one of the most abundant single organic compounds measured in atmospheric aerosol. Our data show that acidity-dependent IEPOX uptake is a mechanism by which anthropogenic SO2 and marine dimethyl sulfide emissions generate secondary biogenic aerosol mass throughout the troposphere. PMID:21098310

  3. Airborne nanoparticle characterization with a digital ion trap-reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenyi; Johnston, Murray V.

    2006-12-01

    A digital ion trap-reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer is described for airborne nanoparticle characterization. Charged particles sampled into this nanoaerosol mass spectrometer (NAMS) are captured in the ion trap and ablated with a high fluence laser pulse to reach the "complete ionization limit". Atomic ions produced from the trapped particle(s) are mass analyzed by time of flight, and the elemental composition is determined from the relative signal intensities in the mass spectrum. The particle size range captured in the ion trap is selected by the frequency applied to the ring electrode. Size selection is based on the mass normalized particle diameter, defined as the diameter of a spherical particle with unit density that has the same mass as the particle being analyzed. For the current instrument configuration, ring electrode frequencies between 5 and 140 kHz allow selective trapping of particles with a mass normalized diameter between 7 and 25 nm with a geometric standard deviation of about 1.1. The particle detection efficiency, defined as the fraction of charged particles entering the mass spectrometer that are subsequently captured and analyzed, is between l x l0-4 and 3 x l0-4 over this size range. The effective particle density can be determined from simultaneous measurement of the mobility and mass normalized diameters. Test nanoparticles composed of sucrose, polyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate and copper(II) chloride are investigated. In most cases, the measured elemental compositions match the expected elemental compositions within +/-5% or less and the measured compositions do not change with particle size. The one exception is copper chloride, which does not yield a well-developed plasma when it is irradiated by the laser pulse.

  4. Note: A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer for photoelectron imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Zhengbo; Wu Xia; Tang Zichao

    2013-06-15

    A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer (D-TOFMS) has been designed to select anions in the photoelectron imaging measurements. In this instrument, the radiation laser can be triggered precisely to overlap with the selected ion cloud at the first-order space focusing plane. Compared with that of the conventional single channel TOFMS, the in situ mass selection performance of D-TOFMS is significantly improved. Preliminary experiment results are presented for the mass-selected photodetachment spectrum of F{sup -} to demonstrate the capability of the instrument.

  5. High sensitivity pulse-counting mass spectrometer system for noble gas analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse-counting mass spectrometer is described which is comprised of a new ion source of cylindrical geometry, with exceptional optical properties (the Baur source), a dual focal plane externally adjustable collector slits, and a 17-stage Allen-type electron multiplier, all housed in a metal 21 cm radius, 90 deg magnetic sector flight tube. Mass discrimination of the instrument is less than 1 per mil per mass unit; the optical transmission is more than 90%; the source sensitivity (Faraday collection) is 4 ma/torr at 250 micron emission; and the abundance sensitivity is 30,000.

  6. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  7. Study and evaluation of impulse mass spectrometers for ion analysis in the D and E regions of the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical analyses were made of planar, cylindrical and spherical electrode time-of-flight mass spectrometers in order to optimize their operating conditions. A numerical analysis of potential barrier gating in time-of-flight spectrometers was also made. The results were used in the design of several small mass spectrometers. These were constructed and tested in a laboratory space simulator. Detailed experimental studies of a miniature cylindrical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer and of a miniature hemispherical electrode time of flight mass spectrometer were made. The extremely high sensitivity of these instruments and their ability to operate at D region pressures with an open source make them ideal instruments for D region ion composition measurements.

  8. The Development and Calibration of a New Mass Spectrometer for Upper Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Heidi Lynn Kennedy

    1995-01-01

    Outgassing from satellites has been a concern since the beginning of space exploration. Gases emitted from the spacecraft in earth orbit can collide with ambient gases and may be reflected towards the spacecraft, potentially influencing the operations of on-board instruments. Theoretical models exist to predict the return flux of released particles; the models, however, only have limited experimental testing and thus carry large uncertainties. An experiment has recently been designed to provide atmospheric data on the return flux. A mixture of argon and krypton is released from a Space Shuttle sub-satellite which also carries a unique mass spectrometer. A combination of an energy and mass analyzer is used to determine both the densities and energies of the returned gases. In addition, densities and temperatures of directly entering ambient particles such as O, N_2, and O _2, can be measured, discriminating from those which have accommodated and reacted on ion source walls. Extensive calibrations of the mass spectrometer have been performed on two independent systems. A high -speed beam facility has been employed to calibrate the instrument for high-speed gases. Calibrations of the mass spectrometer's absolute sensitivity have been obtained on a molecular flow calibration system constructed specifically for this experiment. The calibration results show that the instrument has an absolute sensitivity about 7.4 times10^{-6} amp/torr for Ar which is within the design goals. All launch testing and requirements have been met for an anticipated November, 1995 launch.

  9. An aerodynamic assisted miniature mass spectrometer for enhanced volatile sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Jiang, Ting; Huang, Guangyan; Wei, Yongzheng; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-21

    Previously, we have reported the development of a miniature mass spectrometer with a continuous atmospheric pressure interface (CAPI), and the use of it for non-volatile sample analysis, such as drugs, peptides and proteins. However due to the diffusion effects in the CAPI, especially stronger for light ions, the instrument shows low detection sensitivities for volatile samples when coupling with an atmosphere pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source (>ppmv). In this study, an in-vacuum plasma ionization source was designed and integrated into the system. By performing ionization in the first vacuum stage, ion transfer loss through the CAPI was minimized and tens of ppbv level detection sensitivities were achieved for volatile samples. Due to its improved sensitivity, chemical source tracing was demonstrated in an indoor environment as a simple proof-of-concept example. Furthermore, an aerodynamic sampling method was developed to facilitate directional sample transfer towards the miniature mass spectrometer in an open environment. By coupling this aerodynamic method with the miniature mass spectrometer, remote chemical source sensing could be achieved at a distance of more than two meters. This aerodynamic sampling method could also be applied to other mass spectrometry instruments for enhanced sample sampling in open environments.

  10. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  11. Developments of multiplexed and miniature two-dimensional quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott A.

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT MS) is a powerful and commonly-employed method for the specific analysis of mass, composition, and structure of gas-phase ionic chemical species. Useful for a wide variety of tasks, applications of ion traps include environmental monitoring, surface analysis (including depth profiling and imaging), ion thermochemical property elucidation, protein and DNA sequencing, and high-resolution chemical separations (through ion soft-landing). Though the principles of QIT MS have been known for over half a century, innovations in instrumentation and applications continue. As new needs for specific and sensitive chemical analysis arise, so also do new and more efficient analytical devices and methods of analysis. Such a trend is exemplified through the construction of a dual-source QIT mass spectrometer (described herein) capable of multi-source chemical analyses for the purposes of enhanced proteomic sequence coverage and for the strictly-controlled comparison of the structural differences in ion populations generated by different ionization techniques. Furthermore, as mass spectrometry becomes increasingly commonplace outside the bounds of the analytical laboratory, demand for capable researcher equipment is also increasing. Advances in instrument performance, such as can be had through enhanced power efficiency and the enabling of chemical analysis of high mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) species (e.g., proteins), will open new doors to in situ chemical analysis hand-portable mass spectrometers. Hence, research into new mass analyzer designs and methods of fabrication using stereolithography apparatus (SLA) for the purpose of creating enhanced-performance mass spectrometers are accordingly described in the text of this dissertation.

  12. Toward a Micro Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, D. V.; Eyre, F. B.; Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Garkarian, V.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature mass filters (e.g., quadrupoles, ion traps) have been the subject of several miniaturization efforts. A project is currently in progress at JPL to develop a miniaturized Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) system, incorporating and/or developing miniature system components including turbomolecular pumps, scroll type roughing pump, quadrupole mass filter, gas chromatograph, precision power supply and other electronic components. The preponderance of the system elements will be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The quadrupole mass filter will be fabricated using an X-ray lithography technique producing high precision, 5x5 arrays of quadrupoles with pole lengths of about 3 mm and a total volume of 27 cubic mm. The miniature scroll pump will also be fabricated using X-ray lithography producing arrays of scroll stages about 3 mm in diameter. The target detection range for the mass spectrometer is 1 to 300 atomic mass units (AMU) with are solution of 0.5 AMU. This resolution will allow isotopic characterization for geochronology, atmospheric studies and other science efforts dependant on the understanding of isotope ratios of chemical species. This paper will discuss the design approach, the current state-of-the art regarding the system components and the progress toward development of key elements. The full system is anticipated to be small enough in mass, volume and power consumption to allow in situ chemical analysis on highly miniaturized science craft for geochronology, atmospheric characterization and detection of life experiments applicable to outer planet roadmap missions.

  13. Photoacoustic spectrometer with a calculable cell constant for measurements of gases and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Havey, Daniel K; Bueno, Pedro A; Gillis, Keith A; Hodges, Joseph T; Mulholland, George W; van Zee, Roger D; Zachariah, Michael R

    2010-10-01

    We benchmark the performance of a photoacoustic spectrometer with a calculable cell constant in applications related to climate change measurements. As presently implemented, this spectrometer has a detection limit of 3.1 × 10(-9) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for absorption by a gas and 1.5 × 10(-8) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for soot particles. Nonstatistical uncertainty limited the accuracy of the instrument to ∼1%, and measurements of the concentration of CO(2) in laboratory air agreed with measurements made using a cavity ring-down spectrometer, to within 1%. Measurements of the enhanced absorption resulting from ultrathin (<5 nm), nonabsorbing coatings on nanoscale soot particles demonstrate the sensitivity of this instrument. Together, these measurements show the instrument's ability to quantitatively measure the absorption coefficient for species of interest to the climate and atmospheric science communities. Because the system constant is known, in most applications the acoustic response of this instrument need not be calibrated against a sample of known optical density, a decided advantage in field applications. Routine enhancements, such as improved processing of the photoacoustic signal and higher laser beam power, should further increase the instrument's precision and sensitivity. PMID:20804170

  14. Shock tube coupled to the time-of-flight mass spectrometer via a molecular beam sampling system.

    PubMed

    Krizancic, I; Haluk, M; Cho, S H; Trass, O

    1979-07-01

    A method for continuous mass spectrometric analysis of high-temperature reacting gas mixtures is described. The apparatus consists of a unique combination of three devices: the shock tube, the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the supersonic molecular beam. The driven section of the shock tube constitutes the reservoir of a supersonic molecular beam by which gas is continuously extracted from the reaction zone and introduced through a two-stage high-capacity vacuum system into the ionization region of the mass spectrometer. The shock tube and the mass spectrometer are coupled at right angles to one another. This configuration avoids excessive pressure buildup in the mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an estimated mass resolution of 100 amu, a frequency range of 10-100 kHz, and can be operated over a wide range of shock conditions during the complete high-temperature pulse. PMID:18699630

  15. The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David L.; Zou, Peng; Johnsen, Howard; Hayden, Carl C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Knyazev, Vadim D.; North, Simon W.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-08-28

    We have developed a multiplexed time- and photon-energy?resolved photoionizationmass spectrometer for the study of the kinetics and isomeric product branching of gasphase, neutral chemical reactions. The instrument utilizes a side-sampled flow tubereactor, continuously tunable synchrotron radiation for photoionization, a multi-massdouble-focusing mass spectrometer with 100percent duty cycle, and a time- and positionsensitive detector for single ion counting. This approach enables multiplexed, universal detection of molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition to measurement of rate coefficients as a function of temperature and pressure, different structural isomers can be distinguished based on their photoionization efficiency curves, providing a more detailed probe of reaction mechanisms. The multiplexed 3-dimensional data structure (intensity as a function of molecular mass, reaction time, and photoionization energy) provides insights that might not be available in serial acquisition, as well as additional constraints on data interpretation.

  16. A new mass spectrometer system for investigating laser-induced vaporization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    A laser has been combined with a mass spectrometer in a new configuration developed for studies of high-temperature materials. A vacuum-lock, solid-sample inlet is mounted at one end of a cylindrical, high-vacuum chamber one meter in length with a nude ion-source, time-of-flight mass spectrometer at the opposite end. The samples are positioned along the axis of the chamber at distances up to one meter from the ion source, and their surfaces are vaporized by a pulsed laser beam entering via windows on one side of the chamber. The instrumentation along with its capabilities is described, and results from laser-induced vaporization of several graphites are presented.

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments. PMID:26483183

  18. Biological Particle Emissions From a South-East Asian Tropical Rainforest Using a Real- Time Dual Channel UV Fluorescence Bio-Aerosol Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; McFiggans, G.; Kaye, P.; Stanley, W.; Foot, V.

    2008-12-01

    Primary biogenic aerosols (PBA) contribute typically up to half of coarse mode particulate loading in tropical regions (e.g. Elbert et al. 2007). PBA contribute to the spread of genetic material and hence biodiversity within the biosphere either directly by transport of the organisms or their reproductive components. This spread via various vectors contributes to disease both animal and plant. Many studies have suggested PBA might be important for initiation of cloud formation and subsequent precipitation evolution by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or possibly as ice nuclei (IN). This link is inferred from laboratory studies demonstrating the high activation efficiency of PBA at warm temperatures, coupled with observations that biological particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Despite more than two hundred years of research, e.g. Ehrenberg (1830), information on the abundance, composition and more importantly the sources and heterogeneity of PBA on global scales are still poorly understood. The first realistic estimates of global average emission rates of PBA based on observations (mainly in Amazonia) and budget calculations, were provided by Elbert et al. (2007). They demonstrate that fungi, which have evolved many passive and active spore dispersal mechanisms, contribute a major fraction of the observed PBA and coarse particulate mass (particles with diameters between 1-10 μ m) in many, but in particular, tropical regions. Two major classes of fungal spores are commonly identified, these being AAM and ABM, Acomycota and Basidiomycota respectively (we will adopt the nomenclature used by Elbert et al. 2007, in this study). These species discharge their spores via wet spore active discharge mechanisms. Elbert et al. (2007) estimate a global average spore emission rate for ABM of ~17-50 Tg yr-1. This is consistent with observed typical concentrations of ABS which range from ~103 to 104 m- 3; and ~0.1-1 μ g m-3 by mass. The global average abundance

  19. New mass measurement of {sup 6}Li and ppb-level systematic studies of the Penning trap mass spectrometer TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Smith, M.; Dilling, J.; Brunner, T.; Champagne, C.; Lapierre, A.; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Delheij, P.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.

    2009-10-15

    The frequency ratio of {sup 6}Li to {sup 7}Li was measured using the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. This measurement resolves a 16-ppb discrepancy between the {sup 6}Li mass of 6.015 122 795(16) u from the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 (AME03), which is based on a measurement by JILATRAP, and the more recent measurement of 6.015 122 890(40) u by SMILETRAP. Our measurement agrees with SMILETRAP and a more precise mass value for {sup 6}Li of 6.015 122 889(26) u is presented along with systematic evaluations of the measurement uncertainties. This result makes {sup 6}Li a solid anchor point for future mass measurements on highly charged ions with m/q{approx}6.

  20. Elimination of ``memory`` from sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Chastgner, P.

    1991-05-08

    This paper describes a method for preparing the sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer for analysis of a subsequent sample following analysis of a previous sample comprising the flushing of the system interior with supercritical CO{sub 2} and venting the interior. The method eliminates the effect of system ``memory`` on the subsequent analysis, especially following persistent samples such as xenon and krypton.

  1. Portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer for on-site chemical analyses

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Bushman, John F.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Eckels, Joel D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, lightweight (approximately 25 kg) gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, including the entire vacuum system, can perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of all sample types in the field. The GC/MS has a conveniently configured layout of components for ease of serviceability and maintenance. The GC/MS system can be transported under operating or near-operating conditions (i.e., under vacuum and at elevated temperature) to reduce the downtime before samples can be analyzed on-site.

  2. Unraveling the Complexity of Atmospheric Aerosol: Insights from Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Zhao, Yunzhu; Samburova, Vera; Gannet Hallar, A.; Lowenthal, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol organic matter (AOM) is a complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds, which may have significant influence on the climate-relevant properties of atmospheric aerosols. An improved understanding of the molecular composition of AOM is needed to evaluate the effect of aerosol composition upon aerosol physical properties. Products of gas, aqueous and particle phase reactions contribute to the aerosol organic mass. Thus, ambient aerosols carry a complex array of AOM components with variable chemical signatures depending upon its origin and aerosol life-cycle processes. In this work, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize ambient aerosol AOM collected at the Storm Peak Laboratory (3210 m a.s.l.) near Steamboat Springs, CO. Thousands of molecular formulas were assigned in the mass range of m/z 100-800 after negative-ion electrospray ionization. Using multivariate statistical analysis, correlations between the site meteorological conditions and specific molecular compositions were identified. For example, days with strong UV radiation and high temperature were found to contain large numbers of biogenic SOA molecular formulas. Similarly, days with high relative humidity and high sulfate concentrations were found to contain many sulfur-containing compounds, suggesting their aqueous phase formation.

  3. Aerosol speciation and mass prediction from toluene oxidation under high NO x conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Janya L.; Michelangeli, Diane V.; Makar, Paul A.; Hastie, Donald R.; Mozurkewich, Michael; Auld, Janeen

    2010-01-01

    A kinetically based gas-particle partitioning box model is used to highlight the importance of parameter representation in the prediction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation following the photo-oxidation of toluene. The model is initialized using experimental data from York University's indoor smog chamber and provides a prediction of the total aerosol yield and speciation. A series of model sensitivity experiments were performed to study the aerosol speciation and mass prediction under high NO x conditions (VOC/NO x = 0.2). Sensitivity experiments indicate vapour pressure estimation to be a large area of weakness in predicting aerosol mass, creating an average total error range of 70 μg m -3 (range of 5-145 μg m -3), using two different estimation methods. Aerosol speciation proved relatively insensitive to changes in vapour pressure. One species, 3-methyl-6-nitro-catechol, dominated the aerosol phase regardless of the vapour pressure parameterization used and comprised 73-88% of the aerosol by mass. The dominance is associated with the large concentration of 3-methyl-6-nitro-catechol in the gas-phase. The high NO x initial conditions of this study suggests that the predominance of 3-methyl-6-nitro-catechol likely results from the cresol-forming branch in the Master Chemical Mechanism taking a significant role in secondary organic aerosol formation under high NO x conditions. Further research into the yields and speciation leading to this reaction product is recommended.

  4. Development of a dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Gall', L. N.; Sachenko, V. M.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2013-06-01

    A dedicated isotope mass spectrometer for the noninvasive diagnostics of humans infected with Helicobacter Pylori using the isotope respiratory test is developed. A low-aberration mass analyzer is calculated, an input system that makes it possible to eliminate the memory effects is developed, and a small-size ion detector is constructed. The mass spectrometer is created, and the tests are performed. The measurement accuracy of the 13C/12C and 16O/18O isotope ratios are 1.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. Preliminary medical tests show that the spectrometer can be employed for the desired diagnostics.

  5. Global model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric composition and temperature based on mass spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Spencer, N. W.; Brinton, H. C.; Kayser, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of N2, O, He, and Ar densities from neutral gas mass spectrometers on four satellites and inferred O2 and H densities from an ion mass spectrometer have been combined to produce a model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric neutral composition and temperature. The longitude/UT model is an extension of the mass spectrometer-incoherent scatter thermospheric model (Hedin et al., 1977) and uses spherical harmonic terms dependent on geographic latitude, longitude, and UT. The combined longitude and UT variations reflect the influence of the geomagnetic field but indicate that the variations may not simply be represented in magnetic coordinates.

  6. Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight (CXIDB ID 16)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loh, N. Duane

    2012-06-20

    This deposition includes the aerosol diffraction images used for phasing, fractal morphology, and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Files in this deposition are ordered in subdirectories that reflect the specifics.

  7. Theoretical calculations for mass resolution of a quadrupole ion trap reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Min; Heo, Jiyoung; Park, Chang Joon; Kim, Nam Joon

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a theoretical method of predicting the mass resolution for a quadrupole ion trap reflectron time-of-flight (QIT-reTOF) mass spectrometer as a function of the spatial and velocity distributions of ions, voltages applied to the electrodes, and dimensions of the instrument. The flight times of ions were calculated using theoretical equations derived with an assumption of uniform electric fields inside the QIT and with the analytical description of the potential including the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole components. The mass resolution was then estimated from the flight-time spread of the ions with finite spatial and velocity distributions inside the QIT. The feasibility of the theoretical method was confirmed by the reasonable agreement of the theoretical resolution with the experimental one measured by varying the extraction voltage of the QIT or the deceleration voltage of the reflectron. We found that the theoretical resolution estimated with the assumption of the uniform electric fields inside the QIT reproduced the experimental one better than that with the analytical description of the potential. The possible applications of this theoretical method include the optimization of the experimental parameters of a given QIT-reTOF mass spectrometer and the design of new instruments with higher mass resolution.

  8. Characterization of aromaticity in analogues of titan's atmospheric aerosols with two-step laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Schwell, Martin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Benilan, Yves; Cernogora, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2016-10-01

    The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Nitrogen containing PAH (PANH) as intermediates of aerosol production in the atmosphere of Titan has been a subject of controversy for a long time. An analysis of the atmospheric emission band observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at 3.28 μm suggests the presence of neutral polycyclic aromatic species in the upper atmosphere of Titan. These molecules are seen as the counter part of negative and positive aromatics ions suspected by the Plasma Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, but the low resolution of the instrument hinders any molecular speciation. In this work we investigate the specific aromatic content of Titan's atmospheric aerosols through laboratory simulations. We report here the selective detection of aromatic compounds in tholins, Titan's aerosol analogs, produced with a capacitively coupled plasma in a N2:CH4 95:5 gas mixture. For this purpose, Two-Step Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (L2DI-TOF-MS) technique is used to analyze the so produced analogs. This analytical technique is based on the ionization of molecules by Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) using a λ=248 nm wavelength laser which is selective for aromatic species. This allows for the selective identification of compounds having at least one aromatic ring. Our experiments show that tholins contain a trace amount of small PAHs with one to three aromatic rings. Nitrogen containing PAHs (PANHs) are also detected as constituents of tholins. Molecules relevant to astrobiology are detected as is the case of the substituted DNA base adenine.

  9. Advanced laser architecture for the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie; Grubisic, Andrej; Brinckerhoff, William

    2016-05-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. We have made significant progress in the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry area with advancement in the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to deconvolve complex organic signatures. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete mid-infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths on a single laser bench with a straightforward path toward space deployment.

  10. Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, j.m.

    1999-01-26

    A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.

  11. Ion neutral mass spectrometer results from the first flyby of Titan.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Hunter; Niemann, Hasso; Yelle, Roger V; Kasprzak, Wayne T; Cravens, Thomas E; Luhmann, Janet G; McNutt, Ralph L; Ip, Wing-Huen; Gell, David; De La Haye, Virginie; Müller-Wordag, Ingo; Magee, Brian; Borggren, Nathan; Ledvina, Steve; Fletcher, Greg; Walter, Erin; Miller, Ryan; Scherer, Stefan; Thorpe, Rob; Xu, Jing; Block, Bruce; Arnett, Ken

    2005-05-13

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, molecular hydrogen, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in Titan's upper atmosphere. INMS in situ mass spectrometry has also provided evidence for atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which reveal interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon's upper atmosphere do not appear to have changed considerably since the Voyager 1 flyby.

  12. Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Results from the First Flyby of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Niemann, Hasso; Yelle, Roger V.; Kasprzak, Wayne T.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Gell, David; De La Haye, Virginie; Müller-Wordag, Ingo; Magee, Brian; Borggren, Nathan; Ledvina, Steve; Fletcher, Greg; Walter, Erin; Miller, Ryan; Scherer, Stefan; Thorpe, Rob; Xu, Jing; Block, Bruce; Arnett, Ken

    2005-05-01

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, molecular hydrogen, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in Titan's upper atmosphere. INMS in situ mass spectrometry has also provided evidence for atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which reveal interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon's upper atmosphere do not appear to have changed considerably since the Voyager 1 flyby.

  13. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  14. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-01

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained.

  15. Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-07-02

    The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

  16. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  17. In Situ Geochemical Analysis and Age Dating of Rocks Using Laser Ablation-Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized instrument for performing chemical and isotopic analysis of rocks has been developed. The rock sample is ablated by a laser and the neutral species produced are analyzed using the JPL-invented miniature mass spectrometer. The direct sampling of neutral ablated material and the simultaneous measurement of all the elemental and isotopic species are the novelties of this method. In this laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) method, the ablated neutral atoms are led into the electron impact ionization source of the MMS, where they are ionized by a 70-eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 microsecond wide, compared to the original 5-10-nanosecond laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer and measured in parallel by a modified CCD (charge-coupled device) array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LAMMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect laser-ionized species produced directly in the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the laser beam, and the ionization energies of the elements. The measurement of high-precision isotopic ratios and elemental composition of different rock minerals by LAMMS method has been demonstrated. The LA-MMS can be applied for the absolute age determination of rocks. There is no such instrument available presently in a miniaturized version that can be used for NASA space missions. Work is in progress in the laboratory for geochronology of rocks using LA-MMS that is based on K-Ar radiogenic dating technique.

  18. In Situ Chemical Composition Measurements of Planetary Surfaces with a Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Riedo, Andreas; Meyer, Stefan; Mezger, Klaus; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of moons, comets, asteroids or other planetary bodies is of particular importance for the investigation of the origin and evolution of the Solar System. For cosmochemistry, the elemental and isotopic composition of the surface material is essential information to investigate origin, differentiation and evolution processes of the body and therefore the history of our Solar System [1]. We show that the use of laser-based mass spectrometers is essential in such research because of their high sensitivity in the ppm range and their capability for quantitative elemental and isotopic analysis. A miniaturised Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS) was developed in our group to study the elemental composition of solid samples [2]. The instrument's small size and light weight make it suitable for an application on a space mission to determine the elemental composition of a planetary surface for example [3]. Meteorites offer the excellent possibility to study extraterrestrial material in the laboratory. To demonstrate the sensitivity and functionality of the LMS instrument, a sample of the Allende meteorite has been investigated with a high spatial resolution. The LMS measurements allowed investigations of the elemental abundances in the Allende meteorite and detailed studies of the mineralogy and volatility [4]. These approaches can be of considerable interest for in situ investigation of grains and inhomogeneous materials with high sensitivity on a planetary surface. [1] Wurz, P., Whitby, J., Managadze, G., 2009, Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science, AIP Conf. Proc. CP1144, 70-75. [2] Tulej, M., Riedo, A., Iakovleva, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Int. J. Spec., On Applicability of a Miniaturized Laser Ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Measurements, article ID 234949. [3] Riedo, A., Bieler, A., Neuland, M., Tulej, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Performance evaluation of a miniature laser ablation time

  19. A method for segregating the optical absorption properties and the mass concentration of winter time urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Major, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szab