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Sample records for aerosol microphysical properties

  1. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  2. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 < ?(440) < 2.30, < ?(440)>=0.25 Range of Ångström parameter < α440_870 >: 0.14 < α < 2.28 Asymmetry factor (440/670/870/1020): 0.70/0.63/0.59/0.58 ±0.04 Refraction (n) and absorption (k) indices@440 nm: 1.41 ± 0.06; 0.009 ± 0.005 Single scattering albedo < ?o >(440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter < α440_870 > at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban

  3. Improving satellite retrieved aerosol microphysical properties using GOCART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kahn, R.; Chin, M.; Garay, M. J.; Chen, L.; Liu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite can provide more reliable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, τ) and more particle information, such as constraints on particle size (Angström exponent or ANG, α), particle shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA, ω), than many other satellite instruments. However, MISR's ability to retrieve aerosol properties is weakened at low AOD levels. When aerosol-type information content is low, many candidate aerosol mixtures can match the observed radiances. We propose an algorithm to improve MISR aerosol retrievals by constraining MISR mixtures' ANG and absorbing AOD (AAOD) with Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model-simulated aerosol properties. To demonstrate this approach, we calculated MISR aerosol optical properties over the contiguous US from 2006 to 2009. Sensitivities associated with the thresholds of MISR-GOCART differences were analyzed according to the agreement between our results (AOD, ANG, and AAOD) and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations. Overall, our AOD has a good agreement with AERONET because the MISR AOD retrieval is not sensitive to different mixtures under many retrieval conditions. The correlation coefficient (r) between our ANG and AERONET improves to 0.45 from 0.29 for the MISR Version 22 standard product and 0.43 for GOCART when all data points are included. However, when only cases having AOD > 0.2, the MISR product itself has r ~ 0.40, and when only AOD > 0.2 and the best-fitting mixture are considered, r ~ 0.49. So as expected, the ANG improvement occurs primarily when the model constraint is applied in cases where the particle type information content of the MISR radiances is low. Regression analysis for AAOD shows that MISR Version 22 and GOCART misestimate AERONET by a ratio (mean retrieved AAOD to mean AERONET AAOD) of 0.5; our method improves this ratio to 0.74. Large discrepancies are found through an inter

  4. Retrieving aerosol microphysical properties by Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Valenzuela, A.; Lyamani, H.; Chaikovsky, A.; Wandinger, U.; Ansmann, A.; Dubovik, O.; Grudo, J. O.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-04-01

    LIRIC (Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code) is applied to combined lidar and Sun photometer data from Granada station corresponding to different case studies. The main aim of this analysis is to evaluate the stability of LIRIC output volume concentration profiles for different aerosol types, loadings, and vertical distributions of the atmospheric aerosols. For this purpose, in a first part, three case studies corresponding to different atmospheric situations are analyzed to study the influence of the user-defined input parameters in LIRIC when varied in a reasonable range. Results evidence the capabilities of LIRIC to retrieve vertical profiles of microphysical properties during daytime by the combination of the lidar and the Sun photometer systems in an automatic and self-consistent way. However, spurious values may be obtained in the lidar incomplete overlap region depending on the structure of the aerosol layers. In a second part, the use of a second Sun photometer located in Cerro Poyos, in the same atmospheric column as Granada but at higher altitude, allowed us to obtain LIRIC retrievals from two different altitudes with independent Sun photometer measurements in order to check the self-consistency and robustness of the method. Retrievals at both levels are compared, providing a very good agreement (differences below 5 µm3/cm3) in those cases with the same aerosol type in the whole atmospheric column. However, some assumptions such as the height independency of parameters (sphericity, size distribution, or refractive index, among others) need to be carefully reviewed for those cases with the presence of aerosol layers corresponding to different types of atmospheric aerosols.

  5. Microphysical, chemical and optical aerosol properties in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Ülle; Reinart, Aivo; Pugatshova, Anna; Tamm, Eduard; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2008-11-01

    The microphysical structure, chemical composition and prehistory of aerosol are related to the aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in the UV spectral range. The aim of this work is the statistical mapping of typical aerosol scenarios and adjustment of regional aerosol parameters. The investigation is based on the in situ measurements in Preila (55.55° N, 21.00° E), Lithuania, and the AERONET data from the Gustav Dalen Tower (58 N, 17 E), Sweden. Clustering of multiple characteristics enabled to distinguish three aerosol types for clear-sky periods: 1) clean maritime-continental aerosol; 2) moderately polluted maritime-continental aerosol; 3) polluted continental aerosol. Differences between these types are due to significant differences in aerosol number and volume concentration, effective radius of volume distribution, content of SO 4- ions and Black Carbon, as well as different vertical profiles of atmospheric relative humidity. The UV extinction, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Ångstrom coefficient α increased with the increasing pollution. The value α = 1.96 was observed in the polluted continental aerosol that has passed over central and eastern Europe and southern Russia. Reduction of the clear-sky UV index against the aerosol-free atmosphere was of 4.5%, 27% and 41% for the aerosol types 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

  6. New algorithm to derive the microphysical properties of the aerosols from lidar measurements using OPAC aerosol classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to retrieve the aerosol complex refractive index and effective radius from multiwavelength lidar data, using an integrated model-measurement approach. In the model, aerosols are assumed to be a non-spherical ensemble of internally mixed components, with variable proportions. OPAC classification schemes and basic components are used to calculate the microphysical properties, which are then fed into the T-matrix calculation code to generate the corresponding optical parameters. Aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratios, extinction and backscatter Angstrom coefficients, and linear particle depolarization ratios) are computed at the altitude of the aerosol layers determined from lidar measurements, and iteratively compared to the values obtained by simulation for a certain aerosol type, for which the critical component's proportion in the overall mixture is varied. Microphysical inversion based on the Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) algorithm is performed for selected cases of spherical aerosols, and comparative results of the two methods are shown. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, Data inversion, Optical parameters, Complex Refractive Index Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project numbers 38/2012 - CAPESA and 55/2013 - CARESSE, and by the European Community's FP7-INFRASTRUCTURES-2010-1 under grant no. 262254 - ACTRIS and by the European Community's FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN under grant no. 289923 - ITARS

  7. Optimal Estimation Retrievals of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and Polarimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Stamnes, S.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Sawamura, P.; Cairns, B.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size distribution of aerosols is required to quantify the impacts of aerosols on human health, global and regional climate, clouds and precipitation, and ocean ecosystems. We will describe an Optimal Estimation (OE) retrieval method that will use three wavelengths of aerosol backscattering (3β) and two wavelengths of aerosol extinction (2α). We will also describe how to use the OE framework to retrieve vertical profiles simultaneously using altitude resolved HSRL data. Finally, we will describe how to include additional measurements (e.g. polarimeter or Sun photometer) for improved aerosol microphysical property retrievals. In a traditional aerosol retrieval algorithm, one solves for aerosol size distributions under various parameter space (rmin, rmax, real and imaginary refractive index) using Tikhonov (or other) regularization and then selects physically and mathematically meaningful solutions from hundreds of thousand retrievals. In an attempt to speed up the retrieval and to provide retrieval error estimates, the OE method solves for all related aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g. number concentrations, particle size distribution, real and imaginary part of refractive indices) simultaneously in a maximum-likelihood sense by fitting the observed data. Other quantities such as effective particle radius, surface area concentration, volume concentration, and single scattering albedo are also derived from the retrieved size distribution and the number concentrations. We will show preliminary results using both simulated data and airborne measurements from HSRL-2. Coincident airborne in-situ and surface remote sensing datasets will be used to evaluate the performance of the new OE algorithm.

  8. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Properties using Polarization and Lidar Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols cause a substantial forcing of the terrestrial climate, but the magnitude of this forcing remains largely unknown. This explains the significant interest of the climate community to the prospect of measuring key aerosol properties from space using advanced remote sensing techniques. It has been known for a long time that polarization of the scattered light is much more sensitive to the aerosol microphysics than the scattered intensity. It is, therefore, not surprising that the most recent addition to the New Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) payload is the so-called Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS). The main objective of this instrument is to measure the aerosol and cloud properties with accuracy and coverage sufficient for a reliable estimate of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings of climate. Accordingly, the first part of this lecture course will focus on describing the basic concept of the APS, the physical principles of polarization data analyses, and the results already obtained with an aircraft version of the APS. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) represent another poorly understood aerosol component of the terrestrial atmosphere which affects the climate by supporting chemical reactions destroying the ozone layer. The high altitude of the PSCs and their predominant occurrence in high latitude and polar regions make it very difficult to study PSCs using conventional in situ techniques. Most of the information that we have about this type of clouds has been gathered using ground-based polarization lidars. The second part of the course will focus on explaining the physical principles of the polarization lidar technique and describing retrievals of PSC particle microphysical characteristics by converting I multispectral lidar measurements of the backscattered intensity and depolarization.

  9. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties as derived from collocated measurements using polarization lidar and direct sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tetsu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Mano, Yuzo; Zaizen, Yuji; Inomata, Yayoi

    2012-12-01

    Collocated and simultaneous measurements of aerosols near the ground were conducted using a lidar and aerosol sampler at Tsukuba, Japan, to clarify the relationship between lidar-derived optical properties and in-situ microphysical properties. The total linear particle depolarization ratio (δp) ranged from 14% to 18% when nonspherical mineral dust particles were predominant in the supermicrometer range on May 7-8, 2008, whereas it ranged from 6% to 7% when spherical sea-salt particles were predominant in that range on September 3-4, 2008. Sulfates and nitrates were predominant in the submicrometer range for these two periods. Water-dialysis analysis on May 6-7 indicated that 29% of the coarse particles were water insoluble, whereas 70% were water soluble or nearly soluble on September 3-4. The ratio of dry mass concentration to the backscattering coefficient (M/βp) was 34-39 g m-2 sr on May 7-8 and 6.2-6.3 g m-2 sr on September 3-4. Our results provide evidence that lidar-derived βp and δp capture the aerosol mass concentration and relative abundance of the spherical and nonspherical particles although the microphysical properties vary significantly for individual particles.

  10. Retrieval of aerosol optical and micro-physical properties with 2D-MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Hair, Johnathan; Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Berg, Larry; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason; Hodges, Gary; Lantz, Kathy; Wagner, Thomas; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Recent retrievals of 2 dimensional (2D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2D-MAX-DOAS) have highlighted its importance in order to infer diurnal horizontal in-homogeneities around the measurement site. In this work, we expand the capabilities of 2D measurements in order to estimate simultaneously aerosol optical and micro-physical properties. Specifically, we present a retrieval method to obtain: (1) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the boundary layer (BL) and free troposphere (FT) and (2) the effective complex refractive index and the effective radius of the aerosol column size distribution. The retrieval method to obtain AOT is based on an iterative comparison of measured normalized radiances, oxygen collision pair (O4), and absolute Raman Scattering Probability (RSP) with the forward model calculations derived with the radiative transfer model McArtim based on defined aerosol extinction profiles. Once the aerosol load is determined we use multiple scattering phase functions and single scattering albedo (SSA) obtained with Mie calculations which then constrain the RTM to forward model solar almucantar normalized radiances. The simulated almucantar normalized radiances are then compared to the measured normalized radiances. The best-fit, determined by minimizing the root mean square, retrieves the complex refractive index, and effective radius. We apply the retrieval approach described above to measurements carried out during the 2012 intensive operation period of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) held on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Results are presented for two ideal case studies with both large and small aerosol loading and similar air mass outflow from the northeast coast of the US over the West Atlantic Ocean. The aerosol optical properties are compared with several independent instruments, including the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) for highly resolved extinction profiles during the overpasses, and with the

  11. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  12. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties Among Aerocom Models of a Range of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, K.; Ghan, S. J.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S. E.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by 12 global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the multimodel- mean data set simulates the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, suggesting

  13. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  14. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ˜2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ˜32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  15. Imaginary refractive index and other microphysical properties of volcanic ash, Sarahan dust, and other mineral aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Lima, A.; Martins, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Artaxo, P.; Todd, M.; Ben Ami, Y.; Dolgos, G.; Espinosa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol properties are essential to support remote sensing measurements, atmospheric circulation and climate models. This research aims to improve the understanding of the optical and microphysical properties of different types of aerosols particles. Samples of volcanic ash, Saharan dust and other mineral aerosols particles were analyzed by different techniques. Ground samples were sieved down to 45um, de-agglomerated and resuspended in the laboratory using a Fluidized Bed Aerosol Generator (FBAG). Particles were collected on Nuclepore filters into PM10, PM2.5, or PM1.0. and analyzed by different techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for determination of size distribution and shape, spectral reflectance for determination of the optical absorption properties as a function of the wavelength, material density, and X-Ray fluorescence for the elemental composition. The spectral imaginary part of refractive index from the UV to the short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength was derived empirically from the measurements of the spectral mass absorption coefficient, size distribution and density of the material. Some selected samples were also analyzed with the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) instrument for the characterization of the aerosol polarized phase function. This work compares results of the spectral refractive index of different materials obtained by our methodology with those available in the literature. In some cases there are significant differences both in magnitude and spectral dependence of the imaginary refractive index. These differences are evaluated and discussed in this work.

  16. Sensitivity of Scattering and Backscattering Coefficients to Microphysical and Chemical Properties: Weakly Absorbing Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M. S.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Scattering and backscattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosol are crucial parameters for numerous climate-relevant applications, including studies related to the Earth's radiation budget. Due to their strong connection to aerosol chemical and microphysical characteristics, in situ measurements have been commonly used for evaluating optical properties routines in global and regional scale models. However, these in situ measurements, including size distribution and chemical composition data, can be subject to uncertainties. Techniques for obtaining these data depend on particle size (submicron versus supermicron) and relative humidity range (dry versus wet conditions). In this study, we examine how the data uncertainties can impact the level of agreement between the calculated and measured optical properties (commonly known as optical closure). Moreover, we put forth a novel technique for inferring in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosols from simultaneously measured size distributions (with mobility and aerodynamic sizes), and two optical properties, namely the scattering coefficient and hemispheric backscatter fraction, measured by integrating nephelometer. We demonstrate the performance of our technique, which permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10-micron particles, using both a sensitivity study with synthetically generated inputs with random noise and a six-week case study with real measurements. These measurements cover a wide range of coastal summertime conditions observed during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP, http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/) and include periods with a wide range of aerosol loading and relative humidity. Finally, we discuss how in situ data and retrievals of aerosol characteristics can be applied for model evaluation.

  17. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Rudich, Y.; Mentel, Th. F.; Bohne, A.; Buchholz, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2010-08-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak and small Mediterranean stand of Wild Pistacio, Aleppo Pine, and Palestine Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber. For Holm Oak the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA were investigated. Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and Mediterranean stand (97%). Higher temperatures enhanced the overall VOC emission but with different ratios of the emitted species. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 6.0±0.6%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The investigated particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor of 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation was 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree) was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree). The SOA yield for Mediterranean trees determined here is similar as for Boreal trees. Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas could thus have a stronger impact on BVOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  18. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Rudich, Y.; Mentel, Th. F.; Buchholz, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2010-02-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature and light intensity on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber, as well as the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA. Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and temperature increase enhanced the emission strength under variation of the emission pattern. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 5.7±1%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor was 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation of 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree) was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree). Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas therefore may have a stronger impact on VOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  19. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of

  20. Optical and microphysical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol observed over Warsaw on 10th July 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicka, Lucja; Stachlewska, Iwona; Veselovskii, Igor; Baars, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning aerosol originating from Canadian forest fires was widely observed over Europe in July 2013. Favorable weather conditions caused long-term westward flow of smoke from Canada to Western and Central Europe. During this period, PollyXT lidar of the University of Warsaw took wavelength dependent measurements in Warsaw. On July 10th short event of simultaneous advection of Canadian smoke and Saharan dust was observed at different altitudes over Warsaw. Different origination of both air masses was indicated by backward trajectories from HYSPLIT model. Lidar measurements performed with various wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), using also Raman and depolarization channels for VIS and UV allowed for distinguishing physical differences of this two types of aerosols. Optical properties acted as input for retrieval of microphysical properties. Comparisons of microphysical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust observed will be presented.

  1. Optical and microphysical properties of column-integrated aerosols at a SKYNET site downwind of Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, J. S.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A skyradiometer (POM-02, Prede Co. Ltd.) has been operated to investigate aerosol properties at a SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork) site, YGN (Yongin) for six years starting from November 2008. The site is at the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul (37.34 °N, 127.27 °E and 167 m above sea level). POM-02 measures the diffuse radiation at six minute intervals at 11 wavelengths. Using version 5 of the skyrad.pack, aerosol optical (aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (volume size distribution) properties were retrieved from the measurements at five wavelengths such as 400, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. In comparison with CIMEL sun photometers used in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork), another worldwide ground-based network, skyradiometers have an advantage that they can provide larger number of aerosol property data at shorter time intervals. However, standard procedures for instrument operation and data retrieval have not been established. In this study, we first showed how we calibrated the instrument and how we obtained cloud screened and quality assured data. Next, we presented variations in aerosol optical and microphysical properties, depending on air masses and/or meteorological conditions, and examined the characteristic of high aerosol loading episodes including Asian dust storm and smog.

  2. The great Indian haze revisited: aerosol distribution effects on microphysical and optical properties of warm clouds over peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanti, R.; Ghosh, S.

    2010-03-01

    The Indian subcontinent is undergoing a phase of rapid urbanisation. Inevitable fallout of this process is a concomitant increase in air pollution much of which can be attributed to the infamous great Indian haze phenomena. One observes that the aerosol size distributions vary considerably along the Bay of Bengal (BOB), Arabian Sea (AS) and the Indian Ocean (IO), although, the dynamical attributes are very similar, particularly over the BOB and the AS during this season. Unlike major European studies (e.g. Aerosol Characterization Experiment-2, Ghosh et al., 2005), there are no cloud microphysical modelling studies to complement these observational results for the Indian sub-continent. Ours is the first modelling study over this important region where a time-tested model (O'Dowd et al., 1999a; Ghosh et al., 2007; Rap et al., 2009) is used to obtain cloud microphysical and optical properties from observed aerosol size distributions. Un-activated aerosol particles and very small cloud droplets have to be treated specially to account for non-ideal effects-our model does this effectively yielding realistic estimate of cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc). Empirical relationships linking aerosol concentration to (Nc) yield a disproportionately higher Nc suggesting that such empirical formulations should be used with caution. Our modelling study reveals that the cloud's microphysical and optical properties are very similar along the AS and the BOB despite them having disparate dry aerosol spectral distributions. This is non-intuitive, as one would expect changes in microphysical development with widely different aerosol distributions. There is some increase in cloud droplet numbers with increased haze concentrations but much less than a simple proportion would indicate.

  3. The impact of the microphysical properties of aerosol on the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, C.; Manzo, C.; Braga, F.; Bresciani, M.; Giardino, C.; Alberotanza, L.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides quantitative remote sensing of ocean colour by the high spectral resolution of the water features. The HICO™ (Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean) is suitable for coastal studies and monitoring. The accurate retrieval of hyperspectral water-leaving reflectance from HICO™ data is still a challenge. The aim of this work is to retrieve the water-leaving reflectance from HICO™ data with a physically based algorithm, using the local microphysical properties of the aerosol in order to overcome the limitations of the standard aerosol types commonly used in atmospheric correction processing. The water-leaving reflectance was obtained using the HICO@CRI (HICO ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) atmospheric correction algorithm by adapting the vector version of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV) radiative transfer code. The HICO@CRI algorithm was applied on to six HICO™ images acquired in the northern Mediterranean basin, using the microphysical properties measured by the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) AERONET site. The HICO@CRI results obtained with AERONET products were validated with in situ measurements showing an accuracy expressed by r2 = 0.98. Additional runs of HICO@CRI on the six images were performed using maritime, continental and urban standard aerosol types to perform the accuracy assessment when standard aerosol types implemented in 6SV are used. The results highlight that the microphysical properties of the aerosol improve the accuracy of the atmospheric correction compared to standard aerosol types. The normalized root mean square (NRMSE) and the similar spectral value (SSV) of the water-leaving reflectance show reduced accuracy in atmospheric correction results when there is an increase in aerosol loading. This is mainly when the standard aerosol type used is characterized with different optical properties compared to the local aerosol. The results suggest

  4. Effects of long-range aerosol transport on the microphysical properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Q.; Garrett, T. J.; Riedi, J.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of clouds in the Arctic can be altered by long-range aerosol transport to the region. The goal of this study is to use satellite, tracer transport model, and meteorological data sets to determine the effects of pollution on cloud microphysics due only to pollution itself and not to the meteorological state. Here, A-Train, POLDER-3 and MODIS satellite instruments are used to retrieve low-level liquid cloud microphysical properties over the Arctic between 2008 and 2010. Cloud retrievals are co-located with simulated pollution represented by carbon-monoxide concentrations from the FLEXPART tracer transport model. The sensitivity of clouds to pollution plumes - including aerosols - is constrained for cloud liquid water path, temperature, altitude, specific humidity, and lower tropospheric stability (LTS). We define an Indirect Effect (IE) parameter from the ratio of relative changes in cloud microphysical properties to relative variations in pollution concentrations. Retrievals indicate that, depending on the meteorological regime, IE parameters range between 0 and 0.34 for the cloud droplet effective radius, and between -0.10 and 0.35 for the optical depth, with average values of 0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.02 respectively. The IE parameter increases with increasing specific humidity and LTS. Further, the results suggest that for a given set of meteorological conditions, the liquid water path of arctic clouds does not respond strongly to pollution. Or, not constraining sufficiently for meteorology may lead to artifacts that exaggerate the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect. The converse is that the response of arctic clouds to pollution does depend on the meteorologic state. Finally, we find that IE values are highest when pollution concentrations are low, and that they depend on the source of pollution.

  5. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution

  6. Gradient Correlation Method for the Stabilization of Inversion Results of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Retrieved from Profiles of Optical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Romanov, Anton; Chemyakin, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    Correlation relationships between aerosol microphysical parameters and optical data are investigated. The results show that surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for arbitrary particle size distribution. The correlation relationships that we obtained can be used as constraints in our inversion of optical lidar data. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of aerosol microphysical data products if we apply the gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique.

  7. Profiling of aerosol microphysical properties at several EARLINET/AERONET sites during July 2012 ChArMEx/EMEP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Binietoglou, I.; Pereira, S. N.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Belegante, L.; Chaikovsky, A.; Comerón, A.; D'Amico, G.; Dubovik, O.; Ilic, L.; Kokkalis, P.; Muñoz-Porcar, C.; Nickovic, S.; Nicolae, D.; Olmo, F. J.; Papayannis, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Rodríguez, A.; Schepanski, K.; Sicard, M.; Vukovic, A.; Wandinger, U.; Dulac, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of aerosol microphysical properties profiles at different European stations is made in the framework of the ChArMEx/EMEP 2012 field campaign (9-11 July 2012). During and in support to this campaign, five lidar ground-based stations (Athens, Barcelona, Bucharest, Évora and Granada) performed 72 h of continuous lidar and collocated and coincident sun-photometer measurements. Therefore it was possible to retrieve volume concentration profiles with the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). Results indicated the presence of a mineral dust plume affecting the Western Mediterranean region (mainly Granada station) whereas a different aerosol plume was observed over the Balkans area. LIRIC profiles showed a predominance of coarse spheroid particles above Granada, as expected for mineral dust, and an aerosol plume composed mainly of fine and coarse spherical particles above Athens and Bucharest. Due to the exceptional characteristics of the ChArMEx database, the analysis of the microphysical properties profiles temporal evolution was also possible. An in depth analysis was performed mainly at Granada station because of the availability of continuous lidar measurements and frequent AERONET inversion retrievals. The analysis at Granada was of special interest since the station was affected by mineral dust during the complete analyzed period. LIRIC was found to be a very useful tool for performing continuous monitoring of mineral dust, allowing for the analysis of the dynamics of the dust event in the vertical and temporal coordinates. Results obtained here illustrate the importance of having collocated and simultaneous advanced lidar and sun-photometer measurements in order to characterize the aerosol microphysical properties both in the vertical and temporal coordinates at a regional scale. In addition, this study revealed that the use of the depolarization information as input in LIRIC in the stations of Bucharest, Évora and Granada was crucial for the

  8. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  9. Retrieval of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from AERONET Photo-Polarimetric Measurements. 2: A New Research Algorithm and Case Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Dubovik, Oleg; Li, Li; Li, Zhengqiang; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Siniuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent N.

    2015-01-01

    A new research algorithm is presented here as the second part of a two-part study to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties from the multispectral and multiangular photopolarimetric measurements taken by Aerosol Robotic Network's (AERONET's) new-generation Sun photometer. The algorithm uses an advanced UNified and Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model and incorporates a statistical optimization approach.While the new algorithmhas heritage from AERONET operational inversion algorithm in constraining a priori and retrieval smoothness, it has two new features. First, the new algorithmretrieves the effective radius, effective variance, and total volume of aerosols associated with a continuous bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) function, while the AERONET operational algorithm retrieves aerosol volume over 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves complex refractive indices for both fine and coarsemodes,while the AERONET operational algorithm assumes a size-independent aerosol refractive index. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of the single-scattering albedo (SSA) for each aerosol mode and thus facilitate the validation of satellite products and chemistry transport models. We applied the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site and found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET operational inversions but can offer mode-resolved refractive index and SSA with acceptable accuracy for the aerosol composed by spherical particles. Along with the retrieval using both radiance and polarization, we also performed radiance-only retrieval to demonstrate the improvements by adding polarization in the inversion. Contrast analysis indicates that with polarization, retrieval error can be reduced by over 50% in PSD parameters, 10-30% in the refractive index, and 10-40% in SSA, which is consistent with theoretical analysis presented in the companion paper of this two-part study.

  10. Effects of long-range aerosol transport on the microphysical properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Quentin; Garrett, Timothy J.; Riedi, Jérôme; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic can be altered by long-range pollution transport to the region. Satellite, tracer transport model, and meteorological data sets are used here to determine a net aerosol-cloud interaction (ACInet) parameter that expresses the ratio of relative changes in cloud microphysical properties to relative variations in pollution concentrations while accounting for dry or wet scavenging of aerosols en route to the Arctic. For a period between 2008 and 2010, ACInet is calculated as a function of the cloud liquid water path, temperature, altitude, specific humidity, and lower tropospheric stability. For all data, ACInet averages 0.12 ± 0.02 for cloud-droplet effective radius and 0.16 ± 0.02 for cloud optical depth. It increases with specific humidity and lower tropospheric stability and is highest when pollution concentrations are low. Carefully controlling for meteorological conditions we find that the liquid water path of arctic clouds does not respond strongly to aerosols within pollution plumes. Or, not stratifying the data according to meteorological state can lead to artificially exaggerated calculations of the magnitude of the impacts of pollution on arctic clouds.

  11. Simulation of the aerosol effect on the microphysical properties of shallow stratocumulus clouds over East Asia using a bin-based meso-scale cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, I.-J.; Iguchi, T.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Nakajima, T.

    2010-10-01

    A bin-based meso-scale cloud model has been employed to explore the aerosol influence on the cloud microphysical properties and precipitation efficiency of shallow stratocumulus in East Asia in March 2005. We newly constructed aerosol size distributions and hygroscopicity parameters for five aerosol species that reproduced observed aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations in the target period, and thereby used in model simulation of the cloud microphysical properties and precipitation efficiency. It is found that the simulated results were satisfactorily close to the satellite-based observation. Significant effects of aerosols as well as of the meteorological condition were found in the simulated cloud properties and precipitation as confirmed by comparing maritime and polluted aerosol cases and by a sensitivity test with interchanging the aerosol conditions for two cases. Cloud droplets in the polluted condition tended to exhibit relatively narrower cloud drop spectral widths with a bias toward smaller droplet sizes than those in maritime condition, supporting the dispersion effect. The polluted aerosol condition also had a tendency of thinner and higher cloud layers than maritime aerosol condition under relatively humid meteorological condition, possibly due to enhanced updraft. In our cases, vertical structures of cloud droplet number and size were affected predominantly by the change in aerosol conditions, whereas in the structures of liquid water content and cloud fraction were influenced by both meteorological and aerosol conditions. Aerosol change made little differences in cloud liquid water, vertical cloud structure, and updraft/downdraft velocities between the maritime and polluted conditions under dry atmospheric condition. Quantitative evaluations of the sensitivity factor between aerosol and cloud parameters revealed a large sensitivity values in the target area compared to the previously reported values, indicating the strong

  12. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    there. Thus, larger scale forcings that impact cloud macrophysical properties, as well as enhanced aerosol particles, are important in determining cloud droplet size and cloud albedo. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, some of which may initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. Geometric mean diameters of droplet residual particles were larger than those of the below-cloud and above cloud distributions. However, a wide range of particle sizes can act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show that this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition of cloud-nucleating particles.

  13. Demonstration of simultaneous retrievals of trace gases and aerosol microphysical properties by ground based 2D-MAX-DOAS during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Coburn, S.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hodges, G.; Lantz, K. O.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-12-01

    The two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigates uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) provide an opportunity for 1) atmospheric radiation closure studies, and 2) test retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties in the presence and absence of clouds. The University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed during the first intensive period of the TCAP field project. This presentation presents an inversion algorithm to obtain both aerosol extinction profiles and column from off axis measurements, and infer - for the first time- aerosol microphysical properties from the solar angular distribution of sky radiances. An innovative aspect of the method is that the optical and microphysical properties of aerosols are inferred without the need for an absolute radiance calibration. We compare retrievals of aerosol optical properties with those retrieved from the MFRSR and the Cimel Sunphotometer, for case studies in the presence/absence of clouds, and assess the need for atmospheric correction of NO2. 2D-GMAX-DOAS also facilitates a link between the ground-based ARM/MAOS dataset and DoE's G1 aircraft, NASA's King Air aircraft, and NASA's OMI satellite (i.e., NO2 vertical column). Early results that explore these linkages are presented for a case study that combines ground based MFRSR, in-situ observations aboard the G1 aircraft, as well as High Spectral Resolution LIDAR aboard the King Air aircraft.

  14. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles such as power plants, urban pollution and smelters on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. Higher droplet number concentration and physically thinner clouds both contributed to the smaller droplets near shore. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths there. Differences in the size

  15. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  16. Vertical distribution of optical and micro-physical properties of ambient aerosols during dry haze periods in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghang; Liu, Qiong; Geng, Fuhai; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Changjie; Xu, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Based on the lidar data obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), the vertical distributions of aerosols are revealed during dry haze periods in the Shanghai vicinity by analyzing the optical and micro-physical parameters including total attenuated backscatter coefficient (TABC), volume depolarization ratio (VDR) and total attenuated color ratio (TACR). The preliminary conclusion is that when dry haze occurs in the Shanghai vicinity, smoke and maritime aerosols are the major types in summer and autumn and aerosols might be affected by long-distance transport of dust in spring; lower troposphere below 2 km is the layer polluted most severely and aerosol scattering with relatively irregular shape is much stronger than that of aerosols with relatively regular shape within 2-10 km in middle and upper troposphere; relatively large aerosols appear more frequently in lower (0-2 km) and middle troposphere (2-6 km) than those in upper troposphere (6-10 km). In addition, HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model is applied to analyze the aerosol sources during two typical episodes. The results indicate that the middle and upper troposphere in the Shanghai vicinity are affected by the long-distance transport of dusts from northwest of China or other upstream regions. The high aerosol concentrations in the Shanghai vicinity are mainly caused not only by local human activities but also by the long-distance transport from other places.

  17. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  18. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  19. A comparative study of aerosol microphysical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Baumgardner, Darrel; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Veselovskii, Igor; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; José Olmo, Francisco; Titos, Gloria; Andrey, Javier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present an analysis of aerosol microphysical properties during a mineral dust event taking advantage of the combination of different state-of-the-art retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements and the evaluation of some of those techniques using independent data acquired from in situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak at the Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry, which allows for a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and nighttime. Both the linear estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during nighttime. LIRIC retrievals reveal the presence of dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 µm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of the total volume concentration retrieved with LIRIC with independent in situ measurements, obtaining agreement within

  20. Study on optical and microphysical properties of mixed aerosols from lidar during the EMEP 2012 summer campaign at 45oN 26oE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Nicolae, Doina; Belegante, Livio; Marmureanu, Luminita

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols optical and chemical properties in the upper layers of the atmosphere and near ground are variable, as function of the different mixtures of aerosol components resulting from their origin and transport over polluted areas. Due to a complex dynamics of air masses, the Romanian atmosphere has strong influences from dust and biomass-burning transported from South, West or East Europe. The dominant transport, and consequently the dominant aerosol type, depends on the season. As a result of the transport distance from the source and depending on the chemical and physical characteristics of the particles, tropospheric aerosols detected at Magurele, Romania, show different optical and microphysical properties than at the originating source. The differences are caused by the mixing with local particles, and also by the ageing processes and hygroscopic growth during the transport. This paper presents a statistical analysis of tropospheric aerosol optical properties during the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) summer campaign (08 June - 17 July 2012), as retrieved from multiwavelength Raman and depolarization lidar data. Three elastic (1064, 532 and 355 nm), two Raman (607 and 387 nm) and one depolarization channel (532 nm parallel / 532 nm cross) are used to independently retrieve the backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols between 0.8 and 10 km altitude. Intensive optical parameters (Angstrom exponent, color ratios and color indexes) and microphysical parameters (effective radius, complex refractive index) from multiwavelength optical data inversion of the layer mean values are obtained. During the campaign, aerosol profiles were measured daily around sunset, following EARLINET standards. An intensive 3-days continuous measurements exercise was also performed. Layers were generally present above 2 km and bellow 6 km altitude, but descent of air masses from the free troposphere to the

  1. Influence of the micro-physical properties of the aerosol on the atmospheric correction of OLI data acquired over desert area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of surface reflectance obtained by different atmospheric correction algorithms of the Landsat 8 OLI data considering or not the micro-physical properties of the aerosol when images are acquired in desert area located in South-West of Nile delta. The atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. In particular, the role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was investigated [Bassani et al., 2015; Tirelli et al., 2015]. In this work, the OLI surface reflectance was retrieved by the developed OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) physically-based atmospheric correction which considers the aerosol micro-physical properties available from the two AERONET stations [Holben et al., 1998] close to the study area (El_Farafra and Cairo_EMA_2). The OLI@CRI algorithm is based on 6SV radiative transfer model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997], specifically developed for Landsat 8 OLI data. The OLI reflectance obtained by the OLI@CRI was compared with reflectance obtained by other atmospheric correction algorithms which do not consider micro-physical properties of aerosol (DOS) or take on aerosol standard models (FLAASH, implemented in ENVI software). The accuracy of the surface reflectance retrieved by different algorithms were calculated by comparing the spatially resampled OLI images with the MODIS surface reflectance products. Finally, specific image processing was applied to the OLI reflectance images in order to compare remote sensing products obtained for same scene. The results highlight the influence of the physical characterization of aerosol on the OLI data improving the retrieved atmospherically corrected

  2. Sensitivity of clear-sky direct radiative effect of the aerosol to micro-physical properties by using 6SV radiative transfer model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Tirelli, Cecilia; Manzo, Ciro; Pietrodangelo, Adriana; Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The aerosol micro-physical properties are crucial to analyze their radiative impact on the Earth's radiation budget [IPCC, 2007]. The 6SV model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997] has been used to perform physically-based atmospheric correction of hyperspectral airborne and aircraft remote sensing data [Vermote et al., 2009; Bassani et al. 2010; Tirelli et al., 2014]. The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data has been shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. The role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data acquired over water and land targets is investigated within the framework of CLAM-PHYM (Coasts and Lake Assessment and Monitoring by PRISMA HYperspectral Mission) and PRIMES (Synergistic use of PRISMA products with high resolution meteo-chemical simulations and their validation on ground and from satellite) projects, both funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI). In this work, the results of the radiative field of the Earth/Atmosphere coupled system simulated by using 6SV during the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data are presented. The analysis of the clear-sky direct radiative effect is performed considering the aerosol micro-physical properties used to define the aerosol model during the atmospheric correction process. In particular, the AERONET [Holben et al., 1998] and FLEXAOD [Curci et al., 2014] micro-physical properties are used for each image to evaluate the contribution of the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance and on the direct radiative forcing. The results highlight the potential of the hyperspectral remote sensing data for atmospheric studies as well as for environmental studies. Currently, the future hyperspectral missions, such as the

  3. Profiling of aerosol microphysical properties at several EARLINET/AERONET sites during the July 2012 ChArMEx/EMEP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sergio; Basart, Sara; María Baldasano, José; Belegante, Livio; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Comerón, Adolfo; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Dubovik, Oleg; Ilic, Luka; Kokkalis, Panos; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Nickovic, Slobodan; Nicolae, Doina; José Olmo, Francisco; Papayannis, Alexander; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Schepanski, Kerstin; Sicard, Michaël; Vukovic, Ana; Wandinger, Ulla; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-06-01

    The simultaneous analysis of aerosol microphysical properties profiles at different European stations is made in the framework of the ChArMEx/EMEP 2012 field campaign (9-11 July 2012). During and in support of this campaign, five lidar ground-based stations (Athens, Barcelona, Bucharest, Évora, and Granada) performed 72 h of continuous lidar measurements and collocated and coincident sun-photometer measurements. Therefore it was possible to retrieve volume concentration profiles with the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). Results indicated the presence of a mineral dust plume affecting the western Mediterranean region (mainly the Granada station), whereas a different aerosol plume was observed over the Balkans area. LIRIC profiles showed a predominance of coarse spheroid particles above Granada, as expected for mineral dust, and an aerosol plume composed mainly of fine and coarse spherical particles above Athens and Bucharest. Due to the exceptional characteristics of the ChArMEx database, the analysis of the microphysical properties profiles' temporal evolution was also possible. An in-depth analysis was performed mainly at the Granada station because of the availability of continuous lidar measurements and frequent AERONET inversion retrievals. The analysis at Granada was of special interest since the station was affected by mineral dust during the complete analyzed period. LIRIC was found to be a very useful tool for performing continuous monitoring of mineral dust, allowing for the analysis of the dynamics of the dust event in the vertical and temporal coordinates. Results obtained here illustrate the importance of having collocated and simultaneous advanced lidar and sun-photometer measurements in order to characterize the aerosol microphysical properties in both the vertical and temporal coordinates at a regional scale. In addition, this study revealed that the use of the depolarization information as input in LIRIC in the stations of Bucharest,

  4. Improving bulk microphysics parameterizations in simulations of aerosol effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, L. Ruby; Franklin, Charmaine

    2013-06-01

    To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol effects in regional and global climate models, the Morrison double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting model is modified by replacing the prescribed aerosols in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR) with a prognostic double-moment aerosol representation to predict both aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes: maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (Sc) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds in the southeast of China. The results from Bulk-OR and Bulk-2M are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). The prescribed aerosol approach (Bulk-OR) produces unreliable aerosol and cloud properties throughout the simulation period, when compared to the results from those using Bulk-2M and SBM, although all of the model simulations are initiated by the same initial aerosol concentration on the basis of the field observations. The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion of cloud droplets and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated by comparing the results from the modified Bulk-2M with those from SBM simulations. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 µm is determined as a more realistic setting in the autoconversion parameterization. The saturation adjustment employed in calculating condensation/evaporation in the bulk scheme is identified as the main factor responsible for the large

  5. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  6. Analysis of the sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir satellite observations to the chemical and micro-physical properties of upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Sèze, Geneviève; Legras, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Secondary sulphate aerosols are the predominant typology of aerosols in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), and can have an important impact on radiative transfer and climate, cirrus formation and chemistry in the UTLS. Despite their importance, the satellite observation at the regional scale of sulphate aerosols in the UTLS is limited. In this work, we address the sensitivity of the thermal infrared satellite observations to secondary sulphate aerosols in the UTLS. The absorption properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The absorption coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques : Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the absorption of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the radiance spectra observed by these simulated satellite instruments. We found a marked spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. Micro-windows with a sensitivity to chemical and micro-physical properties of the sulphate aerosol layer are identified, and the role of interfering species, and temperature and water vapour profile is discussed.

  7. Tropospheric Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Concentration Properties in the Frame of the Hygra-CD Campaign (Athens, Greece 2014): A Case Study of Long-Range Transport of Mixed Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Müller, Detlef; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Solomos, Stavros; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Combined multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar and sun photometry measurements were performed during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece during May-June 2014. The retrieved aerosol optical properties (3 aerosol backscatter at 355-532-1064 nm and 2 aerosol extinction profiles at 355-532 nm) were used as input to an inversion code to retrieve the aerosol microphysical properties (effective radius reff and number concentration N) using regularization techniques. Additionally, the volume concentration profile was derived for fine particles using the LIRIC code. In this paper we selected a complex case study of long-range transport of mixed aerosols (biomass burning particles mixed with dust) arriving over Athens between 10-12 June 2014 in the 1.5-4 km height. Between 2-3 km height we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) ranging from 45 to 58 sr (at 355 and 532 nm), while the Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol extinction-related values (355nm/532nm) ranged between 0.8-1.3. The retrieved values of reff and N ranged from 0.19±0.07 to 0.22±0.07 μm and 460±230 to 2200±2800 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm was lower than 5-7% (except for the Saharan dust cases, where δ~10-15%).

  8. Light absorption, optical and microphysical properties of trajectory-clustered aerosols at two AERONET sites in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, O. G.; Cai, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol remote sensing techniques and back-trajectory modeling can be combined to identify aerosol types. We have clustered 7 years of AERONET aerosol signals using trajectory analysis to identify dominant aerosol sources at two AERONET sites in West Africa: Ilorin (4.34 oE, 8.32 oN) and Djougou (1.60 oE, 9.76 oN). Of particular interest are air masses that have passed through the gas flaring region in the Niger Delta area, of Nigeria, en-route the AERONET sites. 7-day back trajectories were calculated using the UK UGAMP trajectory model driven by ECMWF wind analyses data. Dominant sources identified, using literature classifications, are desert dust (DD), Biomass burning (BB) and Urban-Industrial (UI). Below, we use a combination of synoptic trajectories and aerosol optical properties to distinguish a fourth source: that due to gas flaring. Gas flaring, (GF) the disposal of gas through stack in an open-air flame, is believed to be a prominent source of black carbon (BC) and greenhouse gases. For these different aerosol source signatures, single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index , extinction Angstrom exponent (EEA) and absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) were used to classify the light absorption characteristics of the aerosols for λ = 440, 675, 870 and1020 nm. A total of 1625 daily averages of aerosol data were collected for the two sites. Of which 245 make up the GF cluster for both sites. For GF cluster, the range of fine-mode fraction is 0.4 - 0.7. Average values SSA(λ), for the total and GF clusters are 0.90(440), 0.93(675), 0.95(870) and 0.96(1020), and 0.93(440), 0.92(675), 0.9(870) and 0.9(1020), respectively. Values of for the GF clusters for both sites are 0.62 - 1.11, compared to 1.28 - 1.66 for the remainder of the clusters, which strongly indicates the dominance of carbonaceous particles (BC), typical of a highly industrial area. An average value of 1.58 for the real part of the refractive index at low SSA for aerosol in the GF cluster is also

  9. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd

  10. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  11. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Properties During a Rare Case of Long-range Transport of Mixed Biomass Burning-polluted Dust Aerosols from the Russian Federation-kazakhstan to Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Solomos, Stavros; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine; Raptis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar measurements with elastic depolarization at 532 nm were combined with sun photometry during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece, on May-June 2014. We retrieved the aerosol optical [3 aerosol backscatter profiles (baer) at 355-532-1064 nm, 2 aerosol extinction (aaer) profiles at 355-532 nm and the aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm] and microphysical properties [effective radius (reff), complex refractive index (m), single scattering albedo (ω)]. We present a case study of a long distance transport (~3.500-4.000 km) of biomass burning particles mixed with dust from the Russian Federation-Kazakhstan regions arriving over Athens on 21-23 May 2014 (1.7-3.5 km height). On 23 May, between 2-2.75 km we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) of 35 sr (355 nm) and 42 sr (532 nm), while the mean Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol backscatter-related values (355nm/532nm and 532nm/1064nm) were 2.05 and 1.22, respectively; the mean value of δ at 532 nm was measured to be 9%. For that day the retrieved mean aerosol microphysical properties at 2-2.75 km height were: reff=0.26 μm (fine mode), reff=2.15 μm (coarse mode), m=1.36+0.00024i, ω=0.999 (355 nm, fine mode), ω=0.992(355 nm, coarse mode), ω=0.997 (532 nm, fine mode), and ω=0.980 (532 nm, coarse mode).

  12. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  13. Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2011-11-04

    Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

  14. Aerosol Microphysical and Macrophysical Effects on Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Li, Z.; Wilcox, E. M.; Oreopoulos, L.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Posselt, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    We illustrate a conceptual model of hydrometeor vertical development inside a convective cloud and its utility in studying of aerosol-DCC interactions. Both case studies and ensemble means are used to investigate aerosol-DCC interactions. We identify a few scenarios where possible signal of aerosol effect on DCC may be extracted. The results show a consistent and physically sound picture of aerosols affecting DCC microphysics as well as macrophysical properties. Specifically, pollutions and smokes are shown to consistently decrease ice particle size. On the contrary, dust particles close to source regions are shown to make cloud ice particle size more maritime like. We postulate that dust may achieve this by acting as either heterogeneous ice nuclei or giant cloud condensation nuclei. This contrast between smoke or pollution and dust also exists for their effects on cloud glaciation temperature. Smoke and pollution aerosols are shown to decrease glaciation temperature while dust particles do the opposite. Possible Implications of our results for studying aerosol indirect forcing, cirrus cloud properties, troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange and cloud latent heating are discussed.

  15. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  16. Temporal heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiative impact at a tropical coastal station - Part 1: Microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Moorthy, K.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    In Part 1 of this two-part paper, we present the results of extensive and collocated measurements of the columnar and near-surface (in the well mixed region) properties of atmospheric aerosol particles at a tropical coastal location, Trivandrum (8.55° N; 76.97° E), located close to the southwest tip of Indian peninsula. These are used to evolve average, climatological pictures of the optical and microphysical properties and to delineate the distinct changes associated with the contrasting monsoon seasons as well as the transition from one season to the other. Our observations show a dramatic change in the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra, being steep during winter monsoon season (WMS, months of December through March) and becoming quite flat during summer monsoon season (SMS, June through September). The derived Ångström exponent (α) decreases from a mean value of 1.1±0.03 in WMS to 0.32±0.02 in SMS, signifying a change in columnar aerosol size spectrum from an accumulation mode dominance in WMS to a coarse mode dominance in SMS. The composite aerosols near the surface follow suit with the share of the accumulation mode to the total mass concentration decreasing from ~70% to 34% from WMS to SMS. The overall mass burden also decreases in tandem. The changes in α are well correlated to those in the accumulation fraction of the mass concentration. Long-term measurements of the concentration of aerosol black carbon (BC), show prominent annual variations, with its mean value decreasing from as high as 6 μg m-3 in WMS to 2 μg m-3 in SMS. Correspondingly, its mass mixing ratio to the composite aerosols comes down from 11% to 4%. The changes in AOD and α are significantly positively correlated to those of BC concentration. The columnar properties are, in general well associated with the features near the surface. The implications of these changes to the optical properties and single scattering albedo and the resulting impact on direct radiative

  17. Microphysical processes affecting stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Kiang, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Physical processes which affect stratospheric aerosol particles include nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Quantitative studies of these mechanisms to determine if they can account for some of the observed properties of the aerosol are carried out. It is shown that the altitude range in which nucleation of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets can take place corresponds to that region of the stratosphere where the aerosol is generally found. Since heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mechanism, the stratospheric solution droplets are mainly formed on particles which have been mixed up from the troposphere or injected into the stratosphere by volcanoes or meteorites. Particle growth by heteromolecular condensation can account for the observed increase in mixing ratio of large particles in the stratosphere. Coagulation is important in reducing the number of particles smaller than 0.05 micron radius. Growth by condensation, applied to the mixed nature of the particles, shows that available information is consistent with ammonium sulfate being formed by liquid phase chemical reactions in the aerosol particles. The upper altitude limit of the aerosol layer is probably due to the evaporation of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, while the lower limit is due to mixing across the tropopause.

  18. Optical-microphysical properties of Saharan dust aerosols and composition relationship using a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, in situ sensors and modelling: a case study analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, A.; Mamouri, R. E.; Amiridis, V.; Remoundaki, E.; Tsaknakis, G.; Kokkalis, P.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Nenes, A.; Fountoukis, C.

    2012-05-01

    A strong Saharan dust event that occurred over the city of Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E) between 27 March and 3 April 2009 was followed by a synergy of three instruments: a 6-wavelength Raman lidar, a CIMEL sun-sky radiometer and the MODIS sensor. The BSC-DREAM model was used to forecast the dust event and to simulate the vertical profiles of the aerosol concentration. Due to mixture of dust particles with low clouds during most of the reported period, the dust event could be followed by the lidar only during the cloud-free day of 2 April 2009. The lidar data obtained were used to retrieve the vertical profile of the optical (extinction and backscatter coefficients) properties of aerosols in the troposphere. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) values derived from the CIMEL ranged from 0.33-0.91 (355 nm) to 0.18-0.60 (532 nm), while the lidar ratio (LR) values retrieved from the Raman lidar ranged within 75-100 sr (355 nm) and 45-75 sr (532 nm). Inside a selected dust layer region, between 1.8 and 3.5 km height, mean LR values were 83 ± 7 and 54 ± 7 sr, at 355 and 532 nm, respectively, while the Ångström-backscatter-related (ABR355/532) and Ångström-extinction-related (AER355/532) were found larger than 1 (1.17 ± 0.08 and 1.11 ± 0.02, respectively), indicating mixing of dust with other particles. Additionally, a retrieval technique representing dust as a mixture of spheres and spheroids was used to derive the mean aerosol microphysical properties (mean and effective radius, number, surface and volume density, and mean refractive index) inside the selected atmospheric layers. Thus, the mean value of the retrieved refractive index was found to be 1.49( ± 0.10) + 0.007( ± 0.007)i, and that of the effective radiuses was 0.30 ± 0.18 μm. The final data set of the aerosol optical and microphysical properties along with the water vapor profiles obtained by Raman lidar were incorporated into the ISORROPIA II model to provide a possible aerosol composition

  19. Aerosols-Cloud-Microphysics Interactions in Tropical Cyclone Earl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Yaitza

    Aerosols-cloud-microphysical processes are largely unknown in their influence on tropical cyclone evolution and intensification; aerosols possess the largest uncertainty. For example: What is the link between aerosols and cloud microphysics quantities? How efficient are the aerosols (i.e. dust from the Saharan Air Layer -SAL) as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN)? Does aerosols affect the vertical velocity, precipitation rates, cloud structure and lifetime? What are the dominant factors and in which sectors of the tropical cyclone? To address some of the questions in-situ microphysics measurements from the NASA DC-8 aircraft were obtained during the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) 2010 field campaign. A total of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Mathew) were sampled. Earl presented the excellent opportunity to study aerosols-cloud-microphysics interactions because Saharan dust was present and it underwent rapid intensification. This thesis seeks to explore hurricane Earl to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the SAL aerosols and cloud microphysics evolution. To assist in the interpretation of the microphysics observations, high resolution numerical simulations of hurricane Earl were performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with the new Aerosol-Aware bulk microphysics scheme. This new version of Thompson scheme includes explicit activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from a major CCN source (i.e. sulfates and sea salt) and explicit ice nucleation (IN) from mineral dust. Three simulations are performed: (1) the Control case with the old Thompson scheme and initial conditions from GFS model, (2) the Aerosol-Aware first baseline case with GOCART aerosol module as an input conditions, and (3) the Aerosol-Aware increase case in which the GOCART aerosols concentrations were increased significantly. Overall, results of model simulations along with aircraft observations

  20. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  1. Advancements in the Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Microphysics in the GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Sud, Y.; Barahona, D.; Nemes, A.; Bhattacharjee, P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite numerous challenges, the physical parameterization of cloud-aerosol interactions in atmospheric GCMs has become a top priority for advancement because of our need to simulate and understand past, current, and future indirect effects of aerosols on clouds. The challenges stem from the involvement of wide range of cloud-scale dynamics and aerosol activation physical processes. Cloud dynamics modulate cloud areal extent and condensate, while aerosol activation depends on aerosol mass load, size distribution, internal mixing state, and nucleating properties, and ultimately determines cloud optical properties via particle sizes. Both macro- and micro-scale processes are obviously important for cloud-radiation interactions. We will present the main features of cloud microphysical properties in the GEOS- 5 Atmospheric GCM (AGCM) as simulated by the McRAS-AC (Microphysics of Clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert and Aerosol-Cloud interaction) scheme. McRAS-AC uses Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) aerosol activation for liquid clouds, and has an option for either Liu and Penner (2005) or Barahona and Nenes (2008, 2009) aerosol activation for ice clouds. Aerosol loading (on-line or climatological) comes from GOCART, with an assumed log-normal size distribution. Other features of McRAS-AC are level-by-level cloud-scale thermodynamics, and Seifert-Beheng (2001)-type precipitation microphysics, particularly from moist convection. Results from Single-Column Model simulations will be shown to demonstrate how cloud radiative properties, lifetimes, and precipitation are influenced by different parameterization assumptions. Corresponding fields from year-long simulations of the full AGCM will also be presented with geographical distributions of cloud effective particle sizes compared to satellite retrievals. While the primary emphasis will be on current climate, simulation results with perturbed aerosol loadings will also be shown to expose the radiative sensitivity of the

  2. Separating dynamical and microphysical impacts of aerosols on deep convection applying piggybacking methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2016-04-01

    Formation and growth of cloud and precipitation particles ("cloud microphysics") affect cloud dynamics and such macroscopic cloud field properties as the mean surface rainfall, cloud cover, and liquid/ice water paths. Traditional approaches to investigate the impacts involve parallel simulations with different microphysical schemes or with different scheme parameters (such as the assumed droplet/ice concentration for single-moment bulk schemes or the assumed CCN/IN concentration for double-moment schemes). Such methodologies are not reliable because of the natural variability of a cloud field that is affected by the feedback between cloud microphysics and cloud dynamics. In a nutshell, changing the cloud microphysics leads to a different realization of the cloud-scale flow, and separating dynamical and microphysical impacts is cumbersome. A novel modeling methodology, referred to as the microphysical piggybacking, was recently developed to separate purely microphysical effects from the impact on the dynamics. The main idea is to use two sets of thermodynamic variables driven by two microphysical schemes or by the same scheme with different scheme parameters. One set is coupled to the dynamics and drives the simulation, and the other set piggybacks the simulated flow, that is, it responds to the simulated flow but does not affect it. By switching the sets (i.e., the set driving the simulation becomes the piggybacking one, and vice versa), the impact on the cloud dynamics can be isolated from purely microphysical effects. Application of this methodology to the daytime deep convection development over land based on the observations during the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) field project in Amazonia will be discussed applying single-moment and double-moment bulk microphysics schemes. We show that the new methodology documents a small indirect aerosol impact on convective dynamics, and a strong microphysical effect. These results question the postulated strong

  3. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  4. Representation of Nucleation Mode Microphysics in a Global Aerosol Model with Sectional Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Pierce, J. R.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    In models, nucleation mode (1 nmmicrophysics can be represented explicitly with aerosol microphysical processes or can be parameterized to obtain the growth and survival of nuclei to the model's lower size boundary. This study investigates how the representation of nucleation mode microphysics impacts aerosol number predictions in the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) aerosol microphysics model running with the GISS GCM II-prime by varying its lowest diameter boundary: 1 nm, 3 nm, and 10 nm. The model with the 1 nm boundary simulates the nucleation mode particles with fully resolved microphysical processes, while the model with the 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries uses a nucleation mode dynamics parameterization to account for the growth of nucleated particles to 10 nm and 3 nm, respectively.We also investigate the impact of the time step for aerosol microphysical processes (a 10 min versus a 1 h time step) to aerosol number predictions in the TOMAS models with explicit dynamics for the nucleation mode particles (i.e., 3 nm and 1 nm boundary). The model with the explicit microphysics (i.e., 1 nm boundary) with the 10 min time step is used as a numerical benchmark simulation to estimate biases caused by varying the lower size cutoff and the time step. Different representations of the nucleation mode have a significant effect on the formation rate of particles larger than 10 nm from nucleated particles (J10) and the burdens and lifetimes of ultrafinemode (10 nm=Dp =70 nm) particles but have less impact on the burdens and lifetimes of CCN-sized particles. The models using parameterized microphysics (i.e., 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries) result in higher J10 and shorter coagulation lifetimes of ultrafine-mode particles than the model with explicit dynamics (i.e., 1 nm boundary). The spatial distributions of CN10 (Dp =10 nm) and CCN(0.2 %) (i.e., CCN concentrations at 0.2%supersaturation) are moderately affected, especially CN10 predictions above 700 h

  5. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  6. Simulations of Aerosol Microphysics in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Smith; Randles; daSilva

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud-chemistry interactions have potentially large but uncertain impacts on Earth's climate. One path to addressing these uncertainties is to construct models that incorporate various components of the Earth system and to test these models against data. To that end, we have previously incorporated the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5). GEOS-5 provides a platform for Earth system modeling, incorporating atmospheric and ocean general circulation models, a land surface model, a data assimilation system, and treatments of atmospheric chemistry and hydrologic cycle. Including GOCART online in this framework has provided a path for interactive aerosol-climate studies; however, GOCART only tracks the mass of aerosols as external mixtures and does not include the detailed treatments of aerosol size distribution and composition (internal mixtures) needed for aerosol-cloud-chemistry-climate studies. To address that need we have incorporated the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) online in GEOS-5. CARMA is a sectional aerosol-cloud microphysical model, capable of treating both aerosol size and composition explicitly be resolving the aerosol distribution into a variable number of size and composition groupings. Here we present first simulations of dust, sea salt, and smoke aerosols in GEOS-5 as treated by CARMA. These simulations are compared to available aerosol satellite, ground, and aircraft data and as well compared to the simulated distributions in our current GOCART based system.

  7. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  8. Using Raman-lidar-based regularized microphysical retrievals and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements for the characterization of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Nicolae, Doina; Böckmann, Christine; Vasilescu, Jeni; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2015-10-01

    In this work we extract the microphysical properties of aerosols for a collection of measurement cases with low volume depolarization ratio originating from fire sources captured by the Raman lidar located at the National Institute of Optoelectronics (INOE) in Bucharest. Our algorithm was tested not only for pure smoke but also for mixed smoke and urban aerosols of variable age and growth. Applying a sensitivity analysis on initial parameter settings of our retrieval code was proved vital for producing semi-automatized retrievals with a hybrid regularization method developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University. A direct quantitative comparison of the retrieved microphysical properties with measurements from a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (CToF-AMS) is used to validate our algorithm. Microphysical retrievals performed with sun photometer data are also used to explore our results. Focusing on the fine mode we observed remarkable similarities between the retrieved size distribution and the one measured by the AMS. More complicated atmospheric structures and the factor of absorption appear to depend more on particle radius being subject to variation. A good correlation was found between the aerosol effective radius and particle age, using the ratio of lidar ratios (LR: aerosol extinction to backscatter ratios) as an indicator for the latter. Finally, the dependence on relative humidity of aerosol effective radii measured on the ground and within the layers aloft show similar patterns.

  9. Impacts of alternative fuels in aviation on microphysical aerosol properties and predicted ice nuclei concentration at aircraft cruise altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; D'Ascoli, E.; Sauer, D. N.; Kim, J.; Scheibe, M.; Schlager, H.; Moore, R.; Anderson, B. E.; Ullrich, R.; Mohler, O.; Hoose, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decades air traffic has been substantially growing affecting air quality and climate. According to the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), in the next few years world passenger and freight traffic is expected to increase annually by 6-7% and 4-5%, respectively. One possibility to reduce aviation impacts on the atmosphere and climate might be the replacement of fossil fuels by alternative fuels. However, so far the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions from aircraft engines and their ability to form contrails remain uncertain. To study the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions and the formation of contrails, the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) field experiment was conducted in California. In May 2014, the DLR Falcon 20 and the NASA HU-25 jet aircraft were instrumented with an extended aerosol and trace gas payload probing different types of fuels including JP-8 and JP-8 blended with HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) while the NASA DC8 aircraft acted as the source aircraft for ACCESS-2. Emission measurements were taken in the DC8 exhaust plumes at aircraft cruise level between 9-12 km altitude and at distances between 50 m and 20 km behind the DC8 engines. Here, we will present results from the ACCESS-2 aerosol measurements which show a 30-60% reduction of the non-volatile (mainly black carbon) particle number concentration in the aircraft exhaust for the HEFA-blend compared to conventional JP-8 fuel. Size-resolved particle emission indices show the largest reductions for larger particle sizes suggesting that the HEFA blend contains fewer and smaller black carbon particles. We will combine the airborne measurements with a parameterization of deposition nucleation developed during a number of ice nucleation experiments at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe and discuss the impact of alternative fuels on the abundance of potential ice nuclei at cruise conditions.

  10. A numerical model of aerosol scavenging: Part 1, Microphysics parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Bradley, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional numerical model (OCTET) to simulate the dynamics and microphysics of clouds and the transport, diffusion and precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles. In this paper we describe the cloud microphysics and scavenging parameterizations. The representation of cloud microphysics is a bulk- water parameterization which includes water vapor and five types of hydrometeors (cloud droplets, rain drops, ice crystals, snow, and graupel). A parallel parameterization represents the scavenging interactions between pollutant particles and hydrometeors including collection of particles because of condensation nucleation, Brownian and phoretic attachment, and inertial capture, resuspension because of evaporation and sublimation; and transfer interactions where particles collected by one type of hydrometeor are transferred to another type of freezing, melting, accretion, riming and autoconversion.

  11. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  12. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  13. Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and fractional cloudiness.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, B A

    1989-09-15

    Increases in aerosol concentrations over the oceans may increase the amount of low-level cloudiness through a reduction in drizzle-a process that regulates the liquid-water content and the energetics of shallow marine clouds. The resulting increase in the global albedo would be in addition to the increase due to enhancement in reflectivity associated with a decrease in droplet size and would contribute to a cooling of the earth's surface. PMID:17747885

  14. Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

    2013-06-05

    To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 μm is determined as a more

  15. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. J.; Makkonen, R.; Arola, A.; Mielonen, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kulmala, M.; Kokkola, H.

    2011-12-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics model SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by keeping the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution to the minimum. The aerosol size distribution is described using 20 size sections with 10 size sections in size space which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm divided to three subranges each having distinct optimised process and compound selection. The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparison against (1) measured continental and marine size distributions, (2) observed variability of continental modal number concentrations, (3) measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea salt mass concentrations, (4) observations of AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5) global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6) model results using M7 which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM. The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well using the coarse resolution of 10 size sections in size space. The simulated global aerosol budgets are within the range of previous studies. Surface concentrations of sea salt, sulphate and carbonaceous species have an annual mean within a factor of five of the observations, while the simulated sea salt concentrations reproduce the observations less accurately and show high variability. Regionally, AOD is in relatively good agreement with the observations (within a factor of two). At mid-latitudes the observed AOD is captured well, while at high-latitudes as well as in some polluted and dust regions the modeled AOD is

  16. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  17. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. J.; Makkonen, R.; Arola, A.; Mielonen, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kulmala, M.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-06-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by minimising the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution. The aerosol size distribution is described using 10 size classes with parallel sections which can have different chemical compositions. Thus in total, the module tracks 20 size sections which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm and are divided into three subranges, each with an optimised selection of processes and compounds. The implementation of SALSA into ECHAM5-HAM includes the main aerosol processes in the atmosphere: emissions, removal, radiative effects, liquid and gas phase sulphate chemistry, and the aerosol microphysics. The aerosol compounds treated in the module are sulphate, organic carbon, sea salt, black carbon, and mineral dust. In its default configuration, ECHAM5-HAM treats aerosol size distribution using the modal method. In this implementation, the aerosol processes were converted to be used in a sectional model framework. The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparing against (1) measured continental and marine size distributions, (2) observed variability of continental number concentrations, (3) measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea-salt mass concentrations, (4) observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5) global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6) model results using M7, which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM. The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well

  18. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  19. SeReNA Project: studying aerosol interactions with cloud microphysics in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, A. L.; Catandi, P. B.; Frigeri, F. F.; Ferreira, W. C.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cloud microphysics and its interaction with aerosols is a key atmospheric process for weather and climate. Interactions between clouds and aerosols can impact Earth's radiative balance, its hydrological and energetic cycles, and are responsible for a large fraction of the uncertainty in climatic models. On a planetary scale, the Amazon Basin is one of the most significant land sources of moisture and latent heat energy. Moreover, every year this region undergoes mearked seasonal shifts in its atmospheric state, transitioning from clean to heavily polluted conditions due to the occurrence of seasonal biomass burning fires, that emit large amounts of smoke to the atmosphere. These conditions make the Amazon Basin a special place to study aerosol-cloud interactions. The SeReNA Project ("Remote sensing of clouds and their interaction with aerosols", from the acronym in Portuguese, @SerenaProject on Twitter) is an ongoing effort to experimentally investigate the impact of aerosols upon cloud microphysics in Amazonia. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius of water and ice particles, in single convective clouds, can be derived from measurements of the emerging radiation on cloud sides. Aerosol optical depth, cloud top properties, and meteorological parameters retrieved from satellites will be correlated with microphysical properties derived for single clouds. Maps of cloud brightness temperature will allow building temperature vs. effective radius profiles for hydrometeors in single clouds. Figure 1 shows an example extracted from Martins et al. (2011), illustrating a proof-of-concept for the kind of result expected within the framework for the SeReNA Project. The results to be obtained will help foster the quantitative knowledge about interactions between aerosols and clouds in a microphysical level. These interactions are a fundamental process in the context of global climatic changes, they are key to understanding basic processes within clouds and how aerosols

  20. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-01-01

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol’s thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ∼27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3–5 W⋅m−2) and a surface cooling (−5 to −8 W⋅m−2). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  1. Cirrus Microphysical Properties from Stellar Aureole Measurements, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, J. G.; Kristl, J. A.; Rappaport, S. A.

    2012-04-20

    While knowledge of the impact of aerosols on climate change has improved significantly due to the routine, ground-based, sun photometer measurements of aerosols made at AERONET sites world-wide, the impact of cirrus clouds remains much less certain because they occur high in the atmosphere and are more difficult to measure. This report documents work performed on a Phase I SBIR project to retrieve microphysical properties of cirrus ice crystals from stellar aureole imagery. The Phase I work demonstrates that (1) we have clearly measured stellar aureole profiles; (2) we can follow the aureole profiles out to ~1/4 degree from stars (~1/2 degree from Jupiter); (3) the stellar aureoles from cirrus have very distinctive profiles, being flat out to a critical angle, followed by a steep power-law decline with a slope of ~-3; (4) the profiles are well modeled using exponential size distributions; and (5) the critical angle in the profiles is ~0.12 degrees, (6) indicating that the corresponding critical size ranges from ~150 to ~200 microns. The stage has been set for a Phase II project (1) to proceed to validating the use of stellar aureole measurements for retrieving cirrus particle size distributions using comparisons with optical property retrievals from other, ground-based instruments and (2) to develop an instrument for the routine, automatic measurement of thin cirrus microphysical properties.

  2. Modeling of microphysics and optics of aerosol particles in the marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Gennady

    2013-05-01

    We present a microphysical model for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, height above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH), are investigated. At present, the model covers the ranges H = 0 - 25 m, U = 3 - 18 km s-1, X ≤ 120 km and RH = 40 - 98%. The latest version of the Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles model (MaexPro) is described and applied for the computation and analysis of the spectral profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients α(λ) in the wavelength band λ = 0.2-12 μm. MaexPro is based on the aforementioned aerosol model assuming spherically shaped aerosol particles and the well-known Mie theory. The spectral profiles of α(λ) calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigating the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Comparison of Modeled Backscatter using Measured Aerosol Microphysics with Focused CW Lidar Data over Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1997-01-01

    During NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) II flight mission over the Pacific Ocean in May-June 1990, extensive aerosol backscatter data sets from two continuous wave, focused CO2 Doppler lidars and an aerosol microphysics data set from a laser optical particle counter (LOPC) were obtained. Changes in aerosol loading in various air masses with associated changes in chemical composition, from sulfuric acid and sulfates to dustlike crustal material, significantly affected aerosol backscatter, causing variation of about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Some of the significant backscatter features encountered in different air masses were the low backscatter in subtropical air with even lower values in the tropics near the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), highly variable backscatter in the ITCZ, mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode, and high backscatter in an Asian dust plume off the Japanese coast. Differences in aerosol composition and backscatter for northern and southern hemisphere also were observed. Using the LOPC measurements of physical and chemical aerosol properties, we determined the complex refractive index from three different aerosol mixture models to calculate backscatter. These values provided a well-defined envelope of modeled backscatter for various atmospheric conditions, giving good agreement with the lidar data over a horizontal sampling of approximately 18000 km in the mid-troposphere.

  4. Evaluation of cloud microphysical schemes on aerosol indirect effects from different scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, C. J.; Chen, Y. H.; Hashino, T.; Tsai, I. C.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, J. P.; Hsu, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of aerosol indirect effects in climate modeling remain unresolved and of large uncertainties. The complicated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in climate model are suggested to be quite sensitive to some tunable microphysical parameters such as the threshold radius associated with autoconversion of cloud droplets to rain droplets. More fundamental studies regarding to different microphysical processes used in various cloud microphysical schemes should be devoted, evaluated and investigated. In this study, we apply a synergy of different scale models with the same cloud and aerosol microphysical schemes (Chen and Liu, 2004; Cheng et al., 2007; and Chen et al., 2013) to understand and evaluate how cloud microphysical processes can be influenced by different microphysical schemes and their interaction with aerosols and radiation. These models include Kinematic Driver (KiD), Single Column Model of Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM), Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and NCAR CESM model. Simulation results from these models will be further validated and compared to either field campaign or satellite observations depending on the scale of the models. Off-line satellite simulator approach (i.e. Joint-Simulator) will also be applied for evaluating cloud microphysics against CloudSat and CALIPSO. Such type of synergy of models can be very useful for improvement, development and evaluation of physical parameterizations for global climate prediction and weather forecast in the near future especially for processes related to cloud macrophysics and microphysics.

  5. Microphysical properties of low clouds over the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takumi; Hayasaka, Tadahiro

    2012-11-01

    Low clouds are widespread over the North Pacific Ocean during summer. Past ship observations, which were carried out in the western region of the North Pacific Ocean, suggested that low clouds (stratus and fog) are likely to occur when sea surface temperature (SST) is lower than surface air temperature (SAT). In this study, we investigated the SST-SAT relationship and microphysical properties of low clouds for the first step of understanding the mechanism of cloud occurrence, maintenance and disappearance by using MODIS satellite observations, JAMSTEC ship observations and MERRA reanalysis data. We divided the North Pacific into four regions according to meteorological condition and made basic statistical analysis about cloud properties in each region by using monthly mean data for July 2011. The statistical analysis indicates that in the central region of the North Pacific where SST-SAT value is negative and the difference is the largest, cloud effective particle radius (re) is larger than those in other regions. We also used ship observation data and simultaneous satellite observation data to examine the relationship between SST-SAT and cloud microphysical properties in detail. This analysis indicates that re in the positive SST-SAT area is larger than that in the negative SSTSAT area. This feature is opposite to the monthly mean results. It suggests that other factors such as humidity and aerosols as well as SST-SAT have to be taken into account, although the SST-SAT relationship can be one of the important factors determining cloud microphysical properties in the summer North Pacific region.

  6. Aerosol Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation in Eastern China: Results from Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing; Morrison, H.; Chen, Hongbin; Zhou, Yuquan; Qian, Yun; Wang, Yuan

    2012-01-19

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a 3 spectral-bin microphysics ('SBM') and measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation 4 Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility field campaign in China (AMF-China), the authors 5 examine aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in the typical cloud regimes of the warm and cold 6 seasons in Southeast China: deep convective clouds (DCC) and stratus clouds (SC), 7 respectively. Comparisons with a two-moment bulk microphysics ('Bulk') are performed 8 to gain insights for improving bulk schemes in estimating AIE in weather and climate 9 simulations. For the first time, measurements of aerosol and cloud properties acquired in 10 China are used to evaluate model simulations to better understand AIE in China. It is 11 found that changes in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration significantly 12 change the timing of storms, the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation, the 13 frequency distribution of precipitation rate, as well as cloud base and top heights for the 14 DCC, but not for the SC. CCN increase cloud droplet number (Nc) and mass 15 concentrations, decrease raindrop number concentration (Nr), and delay the onset of 16 precipitation. It is indicated much higher Nc and the opposite CCN effects on convection 17 and heavy rain with Bulk compared to SBM stem from the fixed CCN prescribed in Bulk. 18 CCN have a significant effect on ice microphysical properties with SBM but not Bulk 19 and different condensation/deposition freezing parameterizations employed could be the 20 main reason. This study provided insights to further improve the bulk scheme to better 21 account for aerosol-cloud interactions in regional and global climate simulations, which 22 will be the focus for a follow-on paper.

  7. Depolarization Lidar Determination Of Cloud-Base Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; de Roode, S.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The links between multiple-scattering induced depolarization and cloud microphysical properties (e.g. cloud particle number density, effective radius, water content) have long been recognised. Previous efforts to use depolarization information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud microphysical cloud properties have also been undertaken but with limited scope and, arguably, success. In this work we present a retrieval procedure applicable to liquid stratus clouds with (quasi-)linear LWC profiles and (quasi-)constant number density profiles in the cloud-base region. This set of assumptions allows us to employ a fast and robust inversion procedure based on a lookup-table approach applied to extensive lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering calculations. An example validation case is presented where the results of the inversion procedure are compared with simultaneous cloud radar observations. In non-drizzling conditions it was found, in general, that the lidar- only inversion results can be used to predict the radar reflectivity within the radar calibration uncertainty (2-3 dBZ). Results of a comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud base number considerations are also presented. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  8. Dual-field-of-view Raman lidar measurements for the retrieval of cloud microphysical properties.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jörg; Wandinger, Ulla; Malinka, Aleksey

    2013-04-10

    Dual-field-of-view Raman lidar measurements, detecting Raman-scattered light with two fields of view simultaneously, are used for the first time to retrieve cloud microphysical properties. The measurements are performed with the Multiwavelength Atmospheric Raman Lidar for Temperature, Humidity, and Aerosol Profiling (MARTHA) at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research in Leipzig, Germany. Light that is scattered in forward direction by cloud droplets and inelastically backscattered by N2 molecules is detected. A forward iterative algorithm uses the measured signals to derive profiles of the effective cloud droplet radius, extinction coefficient, and liquid-water content of the investigated clouds. The setup, algorithm, error analysis, and a measurement example are presented. The obtained liquid-water path is validated by observations with a microwave radiometer. With the capability to retrieve aerosol properties as well as cloud microphysical properties, the Raman lidar MARTHA is an ideal tool for studies of the aerosol indirect effect. PMID:23670751

  9. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  10. Applying super-droplets as a compact representation of warm-rain microphysics for aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds may influence aerosol characteristics of their environment. The relevant processes include wet deposition (rainout or washout) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) recycling through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle drops. Recycled CCN physicochemical properties may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions (e.g. SO2 oxidation). The key challenge of representing these processes in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track properties of activated CCN throughout the cloud lifecycle. Lack of such "memory" characterises the so-called bulk, multi-moment as well as bin representations of cloud microphysics. In this study we apply the particle-based scheme of Shima et al. 2009. Each modelled particle (aka super-droplet) is a numerical proxy for a multiplicity of real-world CCN, cloud, drizzle or rain particles of the same size, nucleus type,and position. Tracking cloud nucleus properties is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. The super-droplet scheme is furthermore characterized by linear scalability in the number of computational particles, and no numerical diffusion in the condensational and in the Monte-Carlo type collisional growth schemes. The presentation will focus on processing of aerosol by a drizzling stratocumulus deck. The simulations are carried out using a 2D kinematic framework and a VOCALS experiment inspired set-up (see http://www.rap.ucar.edu/~gthompsn/workshop2012/case1/).

  11. Evolution of stratospheric sulfate aerosol from the 1991 Pinatubo eruption: Roles of aerosol microphysical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, T.; Sudo, K.; Nagai, T.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the role of aerosol microphysics in stratospheric sulfate aerosol changes after the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption using an atmospheric general circulation model that is coupled interactively with a chemistry module and a modal aerosol microphysical module with three modes. Our model can reproduce the global mean stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD) observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II during June 1991 to January 1993. The model underestimates the observed SAOD before the eruption and after January 1993. The model also underestimates the integrated backscatter coefficient observed by ground-based lidar at Tsukuba, Naha, and Lauder. The modeled effective radius becomes larger (about 0.5 μm) and agrees with the balloon-borne measurements at Laramie, Wyoming (41°N, 105°W). We further investigate effects of the inclusion of evaporation along with the condensation processes and the inclusion of van der Waals and viscous forces in the coagulation processes. The inclusion of evaporation along with the condensation processes reduces the global mean effective radius by up to 0.04 μm and increases the global burden of stratospheric sulfate aerosols (about 15% in late 1993). The inclusion of van der Waals and viscous forces in the coagulation processes increases the global mean effective radius by up to 0.06-0.07 μm and decreases the global burden (15-30% in late 1993). The effects of van der Waals and viscous forces differ between two schemes. However, we do not conclude which simulation is superior because all simulations fall within error bars.

  12. Synergetic technique combining elastic backscatter lidar data and sunphotometer AERONET inversion for retrieval by layer of aerosol optical and microphysical properties.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H; Flamant, Cyrille

    2008-09-01

    We present a so-called lidar and almucantar (LidAlm) algorithm that combines information provided by standard elastic backscatter lidar (i.e., calibrated attenuated backscatter coefficient profile at one or two wavelengths) and sunphotometer AERONET inversion of almucantar like measurements (i.e., column-integrated aerosol size distribution and refractive index). The purpose of the LidAlm technique is to characterize the atmospheric column by its different aerosol layers. These layers may be distinct or partially mixed, and they may contain different aerosol species (e.g., urban, desert, or biomass burning aerosols). The LidAlm synergetic technique provides the extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles, particle size distributions, and backscatter-to-extinction ratios for each aerosol layer. We present the LidAlm procedure and sensitivity studies. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual atmospheric conditions encountered in the Paris area. PMID:18758531

  13. Study of the microphysical properties in stratus clouds on the Romanian Black Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Stefan, Sabina; Sorin Vajaiac, Nicolae

    2016-04-01

    Stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in the Earth's climate system due to their spatial and temporal large extent. For this reason, this study aims to highlight the significant differences of microphysical properties of maritime and continental stratus clouds and By using the ATMOSLAB research aircraft were examined aerosol and microphysical properties, as well as the thermodynamics of the marine boundary layer in and around the Black Sea (between Mangalia, N: 43 48' 34,6'', E: 28̊ 35' 25,12'' and Navodari City N: 44̊ 19' 02'', E: 28̊ 36' 55,24''). More than 10 h measurements obtained by a Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer and the HAWKEYE included aerosol, CCN, cloud droplet and drizzle drop concentrations, air temperatures, liquid water content, real time cloud droplet and ice crystals images and marine aerosol measurements above the sea surface. The over 15 flight legs in clouds (minimum altitude 250 m and maximum altitude 4000 m) and the 4 flight legs performed directly above the sea surface (altitude 120 m) from the three flight 30 October 2015 and 23 November 2015 conducted to results that provide evidence of indirect aerosol effects associated with natural variability in the cloud and aerosol characteristics. For a complete understanding of the large-scale context processes maintaining and dissipating the continental and marine stratocumulus clouds information from a Sun Photometer (Eforie, N: 44̊ 04' 30'', E: 28̊ 37' 55'', altitude 40 m) and satellite data were used. The interpretation performed on the in situ (into cloud and below cloud) measured data have shown, as it was expected, differences between microphysical parameters for maritime and continental clouds and their dependence on aerosol concentrations. These presented results of in situ measurements of clouds above the Romanian Black Sea Coast are the first reported, so that more data is needed for an enhanced understanding of the maritime/continental microphysical contrasts in

  14. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  15. Microphysical Ice Crystal Properties in Mid-Latitude Frontal Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlage, Romy; Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Minikin, Andreas; Weigel, Ralf; Molleker, Sergej; Klingebiel, Marcus; Borrmann, Stephan; Luebke, Anna; Krämer, Martina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schäfler, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds modulate the climate by reflection of shortwave solar radiation and trapping of longwave terrestrial radiation. Their net radiative effect can be positive or negative depending on atmospheric and cloud parameters including ice crystal number density, size and shape. Latter microphysical ice crystal properties have been measured during the mid-latitude cirrus mission ML-CIRRUS with a set of cloud instruments on the new research aircraft HALO. The mission took place in March/April 2014 with 16 flights in cirrus formed above Europe and the Atlantic. The ice clouds were encountered at altitudes from 7 to 14 km in the typical mid-latitude temperature range. A focus of the mission was the detection of frontal cirrus linked to warm conveyor belts (WCBs). Within WCBs, water vapor is transported in the warm sector of an extra-tropical cyclone from the humid boundary layer to the upper troposphere. Cirrus cloud formation can be triggered in the WCB outflow region at moderate updraft velocities and additionally at low updrafts within the high pressure system linked to the WCB. Due to their frequent occurrence, WCBs represent a major source for regions of ice supersaturation and cirrus formation in the mid-latitudes. Here, we use data from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with detection for POLarization (CAS-POL) and the Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), combining a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) and a greyscale Cloud Imaging Probe (CIPgs) to investigate the ice crystal distribution in the size range from 0.5 µm to 1 mm. We derive microphysical cirrus properties in mid-latitude warm front cirrus. Further, we investigate their variability and their dependence on temperature and relative humidity. Finally, we compare the microphysical properties of these frontal cirrus to cirrus clouds that formed at low updrafts within high pressure systems or at high updraft velocities in lee waves. We quantify statistically significant differences in cirrus properties formed in these

  16. Impact of large-scale dynamics on the microphysical properties of midlatitude cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Evans, Stuart M.; Lawson, R. Paul; Marchand, Roger T.

    2014-04-01

    In situ microphysical observations of midlatitude cirrus collected during the Department of Energy Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) field campaign are combined with an atmospheric state classification for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to understand statistical relationships between cirrus microphysics and the large-scale meteorology. The atmospheric state classification is informed about the large-scale meteorology and state of cloudiness at the ARM SGP site by combining ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data with 14 years of continuous observations from the millimeter-wavelength cloud radar. Almost half of the cirrus cloud occurrences in the vicinity of the ARM SGP site during SPARTICUS can be explained by three distinct synoptic conditions, namely, upper level ridges, midlatitude cyclones with frontal systems, and subtropical flows. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cirrus microphysical properties such as particle size distributions (PSDs), ice number concentrations, and ice water content (IWC) are examined and exhibit striking differences among the different synoptic regimes. Generally, narrower PSDs with lower IWC but higher ice number concentrations are found in cirrus sampled in upper level ridges, whereas cirrus sampled in subtropical flows, fronts, and aged anvils show broader PSDs with considerably lower ice number concentrations but higher IWC. Despite striking contrasts in the cirrus microphysics for different large-scale environments, the PDFs of vertical velocity are not different, suggesting that vertical velocity PDFs are a poor predictor for explaining the microphysical variability in cirrus. Instead, cirrus microphysical contrasts may be driven by differences in ice supersaturations or aerosols.

  17. High resolution WRF simulations of Hurricane Irene: Sensitivity to aerosols and choice of microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, A.; Lynn, B.; Shpund, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have pointed to the possible sensitivity of hurricanes to aerosols via aerosol effects on microphysical and thermodynamic processes in clouds. Hurricane Irene, occurring in August 2011, is an excellent case study for investigating aerosol effects on tropical cyclone (TC) structure and intensity: it moved northward along the eastern coast of the United States, and weakened much faster than was predicted by the National Hurricane Center. Moreover, the minimum pressure in Irene occurred, atypically, about 40 h later than the time of maximum wind speed. In this study, we simulate Hurricane Irene with 1-km grid spacing using Spectral Bin Microphysics (SBM) and various bulk microphysical schemes in WRF. Simulations with SBM showed that aerosols penetrating the eyewall of Irene from the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) led to an intensification of convection at Irene's eyewall and to a deepening of the hurricane. When Irene moved along the eastern coast of the United States, continental aerosols led to an intensification of convection at Irene's periphery, which interfered with the re-forming of the inner eyewall and to Irene weakening. Sensitivity tests using different "bulk" microphysics schemes indicated a large dispersion of simulated minimum pressure and maximum wind between different simulations. This showed that the simulated hurricane intensity was very sensitive to microphysical processes. Moreover, in consequence, forecast hurricane intensity was highly dependent on the choice of microphysical scheme. New bulk-parameterization schemes simulated the tropical storm intensity of Irene reasonably well. Most bulk schemes that used saturation adjustment indicate the weak sensitivity to aerosols that prevents them from precisely predicting the time evolution of TC intensity and structure.

  18. Aerosol microphysical retrievals from precision filter radiometer direct solar radiation measurements and comparison with AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, S.; Veselovskii, I.; Amiridis, V.; Gröbner, J.; Suvorina, A.; Nyeki, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Kouremeti, N.; Taylor, M.; Tsekeri, A.; Wehrli, C.

    2014-07-01

    Synchronized sun-photometric measurements from the AERONET-CIMEL (AErosol RObotic NETwork) and GAW-PFR (Global Atmospheric Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) aerosol networks are used to compare retrievals of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), effective radius, and volume concentration during a high-temporal-resolution measurement campaign at the Athens site in the Mediterranean Basin from 14 to 22 July 2009. During this period, direct-sun AOD retrievals from both instruments exhibited small differences in the range 0.01-0.02. The AODs measured with CIMEL and PFR instruments were inverted to retrieve particle microphysical properties using the linear estimation (LE) technique. For low aerosol loads (AOD < 0.2), measurements of the effective radius by the PFR were found to be -20% to +30% different from CIMEL values for both direct-sun data and inversion data. At higher loads (AOD > 0.4), measurements of the effective radius by the PFR are consistently 20 % lower than CIMEL for both direct-sun and inversion data. Volume concentrations at low aerosol loads from the PFR are up to 80% higher than the CIMEL for direct-sun data but are up to 20% lower when derived from inversion data under these same conditions. At higher loads, the percentage difference in volume concentrations from the PFR and CIMEL is systematically negative, with inversion data predicting differences 30% lower than those obtained from direct-sun data. An assessment of the effect of errors in the AOD retrieval on the estimation of PFR bulk parameters was performed and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the particle volume concentration and effective radius with an uncertainty < 65% when AOD < 0.2 and when input errors are as high as 10%.

  19. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  20. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  1. A New Approach to Modeling Aerosol Effects on East Asian Climate: Parametric Uncertainties Associated with Emissions, Cloud Microphysics and their Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Yang, Ben; Liu, Xiaohong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-16

    In this study, we adopt a parametric sensitivity analysis framework that integrates the quasi-Monte Carlo parameter sampling approach and a surrogate model to examine aerosol effects on the East Asian Monsoon climate simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). A total number of 256 CAM5 simulations are conducted to quantify the model responses to the uncertain parameters associated with cloud microphysics parameterizations and aerosol (e.g., sulfate, black carbon (BC), and dust) emission factors and their interactions. Results show that the interaction terms among parameters are important for quantifying the sensitivity of fields of interest, especially precipitation, to the parameters. The relative importance of cloud-microphysics parameters and emission factors (strength) depends on evaluation metrics or the model fields we focused on, and the presence of uncertainty in cloud microphysics imposes an additional challenge in quantifying the impact of aerosols on cloud and climate. Due to their different optical and microphysical properties and spatial distributions, sulfate, BC, and dust aerosols have very different impacts on East Asian Monsoon through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. The climatic effects of aerosol do not always have a monotonic response to the change of emission factors. The spatial patterns of both sign and magnitude of aerosol-induced changes in radiative fluxes, cloud, and precipitation could be different, depending on the aerosol types, when parameters are sampled in different ranges of values. We also identify the different cloud microphysical parameters that show the most significant impact on climatic effect induced by sulfate, BC and dust, respectively, in East Asia.

  2. Aerosol indirect effects in the ECHAM5-HAM2 climate model with subgrid cloud microphysics in a stochastic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, Juha; Räisänen, Petri; Järvinen, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Representing cloud properties in global climate models remains a challenging topic, which to a large extent is due to cloud processes acting on spatial scales much smaller than the typical model grid resolution. Several attempts have been made to alleviate this problem. One such method was introduced in the ECHAM5-HAM2 climate model by Tonttila et al. (2013), where cloud microphysical properties, along with the processes of cloud droplet activation and autoconversion, were computed using an ensemble of stochastic subcolumns within the climate model grid columns. Moreover, the subcolumns were sampled for radiative transfer using the Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation approach. The same model version is used in this work (Tonttila et al. 2014), where 5-year nudged integrations are performed with a series of different model configurations. Each run is performed twice, once with pre-industrial (PI, year 1750) aerosol emission conditions and once with present-day (PD, year 2000) conditions, based on the AEROCOM emission inventories. The differences between PI and PD simulations are used to estimate the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on clouds and the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). One of the key results is that when both cloud activation and autoconversion are computed in the subcolumn space, the aerosol-induced PI-to-PD change in the global-mean liquid water path is up to 19 % smaller than in the reference with grid-scale computations. Together with similar changes in the cloud droplet number concentration, this influences the cloud radiative effects and thus the AIE, which is estimated as the difference in the net cloud radiative effect between PI and PD conditions. Accordingly, the AIE is reduced by 14 %, from 1.59 W m-2 in the reference model version to 1.37 W m-2 in the experimental model configuration. The results of this work explicitly show that careful consideration of the subgrid variability in cloud microphysical properties and consistent

  3. Microphysical Modeling and POAM III Observations of Aerosol Extinction in the 1998-2003 Antarctic Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, C. M.; Drdla, K.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Alfred, J.; Hoppel, K. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Microphysics and Chemistry on Trajectories (IMPACT) model is used to study Polar stratospheric cloud formation and evolution in the Southern Polar vortex during the 1998-2003 winters. The model is applied to individual air parcels which are advected through the vortex on UKMO wind and temperature fields. The parcel temperature and pressure histories are used by IMPACT to calculate the formation and sedimentation of ice, NAT, SAT, and STS aerosols. Model results are validated by the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III solar occultation instrument. Comparisons of POAM data to the model results help to constrain the microphysical parameters influencing aerosol formation and growth. Measurements of the water vapor mixing ratio are of limited use in clarifying the model microphysics; however, POAM measurements of aerosol extinction prove to be valuable in differentiating model runs. Specifically, the relationship of aerosol extinction to temperature arises from the different temperatures at which the various particle types form and grow. Comparisons of IMPACT calculations of this relationship to POAM measurements constrain the initial fraction of nuclei available for heterogeneous NAT freezing to 0.02% of all aerosols. Constraints are also placed on the ice accommodation coefficient and the NAT-ice lattice compatibility factor. However, these two parameters have similar effects on the extinction-temperature relationship, and thus a range of values are permissible for each.

  4. Arrange and average algorithm for the retrieval of aerosol microphysical parameters from HSRL-2. Comparison with in-situ measurements during DISCOVER-AQ California and Texas (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemyakin, E.; Sawamura, P.; Mueller, D.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Scarino, A. J.; Hair, J. W.; Berkoff, T.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Seaman, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Although aerosols are only a fairly minor constituent of Earth's atmosphere they are able to affect its radiative energy balance significantly. Light detection and ranging (lidar) instruments have the potential to play a crucial role in atmospheric research as only these instruments provide information about aerosol properties at a high vertical resolution. We are exploring different algorithmic approaches to retrieve microphysical properties of aerosols using lidar. Almost two decades ago we started with inversion techniques based on Tikhonov's regularization that became a reference point for the improvement of retrieval capabilities of inversion algorithms. Recently we began examining the potential of the "arrange and average" scheme, which relies on a look-up table of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. The future combination of these two different inversion schemes may help us to improve the accuracy of the microphysical data products.The novel arrange and average algorithm was applied to retrieve aerosol optical and microphysical parameters using NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) data. HSRL-2 is the first airborne HSRL system that is able to provide advanced datasets consisting of backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm as input information for aerosol microphysical retrievals. HSRL-2 was deployed on-board NASA LaRC's King Air aircraft during the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaigns over the California Central Valley and Houston. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and size distributions were obtained from in-situ instruments on-board the NASA's P-3B aircraft. As HSRL-2 flew along the same flight track of the P-3B, synergistic measurements and retrievals were obtained by these two independent platforms. We will present an

  5. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  6. Simulating Feedbacks Between Stratocumulus Cloud Dynamics, Microphysics and Aerosols Over Large Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Field, P.; Hill, A. A.; Shipway, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The response of a stratocumulus cloud deck to aerosols involves a complex interplay between cloud microphysics, precipitation, cold pool dynamical interactions between neighboring cells, cloud top entrainment and the boundary layer structure over larger scales. Such feedbacks are thought to be involved in, for example, the formation of Pockets of Open Cells (POCs), which represent a large albedo change relative to the closed cell regime. However, they are not represented in GCM parameterizations and have also so far have not been simulated adequately in mesoscale models, which is a necessary step in order to develop parameterizations. We will show results from high resolution (<1 km) mesoscale simulations of stratocumulus using a new multi-moment microphysics scheme coupled to the UK Met Office Unified Model. The new scheme represents the processing of aerosol by clouds, allowing examination of the feedbacks between cloud dynamics, microphysics and aerosol. Results will be shown for domains of order 1000km that are driven by meteorological analysis, allowing realistic forcing and large scale interactions, in contrast to idealized LES simulations. Additionally, a representation of sub-grid vertical velocities based on resolved motions has been implemented, which will allow consistent droplet activation across a range of horizontal model resolutions. A cloud scheme to account for sub-grid humidity variability was also added and was found to be necessary in order to simulate realistic clouds.

  7. Dust Aerosols Investigated Using an Integrated Microphysical-Climate-Radiation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lin

    I have developed a three-dimensional coupled microphysical-climate-radiation model based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheres Model (CAM3.0 and CAM5.0) and the University of Colorado/NASA Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA2.3 and CARMA3.0). The model has been used to investigate the sources, removal processes, transport, optical properties, and radiative effects of Asian dust aerosols on climate. In the initial project, a A Weibull distribution is implemented to estimate the sub-grid scale wind speed variability. The dust AOD agrees well with AERONET data and the timing of dust events is comparable to the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) lidar data in Beijing and Nagasaki. In the second project, the simulated properties of atmospheric dust from the Saharan deserts and the Asian deserts are compared using data from CALIPSO and AERONET during 2006 and 2007. In my model the yearly horizontal dust flux just downwind of the African dust source is about 1088 Tg (10S-40N, 10W) and from the Asian dust source it is about 355 Tg (25N-55N, 105E) in 2007. I find the difference in dust flux is mainly due to the larger area over which dust is lifted in Africa than Asia. However, Africa also has stronger winds in some seasons. Some previous studies suggested that the observed descent of Saharan dust is due to sedimentation of the particles, but my work and satellite data show instead it is dominated by meteorology. I find the size distributions of Asian and African dust are similar when the dust is lifted, but the mode size can differ and secondary size modes can develop probably due to differences in vertical wind velocities during transport. The importance of the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo (SSA) to the radiative effects of dust on the climate of China is explored in my final project through two case studies based on the modeled and observed solar diffuse fluxes/irradiances at

  8. Properties of jet engine combustion particles during the PartEmis experiment: Microphysics and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Stein, C.; Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Giebl, H.; Hitzenberger, R.; Döpelheuer, A.; Vrchoticky, S.; Puxbaum, H.; Johnson, M.; Hurley, C. D.; Marsh, R.; Wilson, C. W.

    2003-07-01

    The particles emitted from an aircraft engine combustor were investigated in the European project PartEmis. Measured aerosol properties were mass and number concentration, size distribution, mixing state, thermal stability of internally mixed particles, hygroscopicity, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation potential. The combustor operation conditions corresponded to modern and older engine gas path temperatures at cruise altitude, with fuel sulphur contents (FSC) of 50, 410, and 1270 μg g-1. Operation conditions and FSC showed only a weak influence on the microphysical aerosol properties, except for hygroscopic and CCN properties. Particles of size D >= 30 nm were almost entirely internally mixed. Particles of sizes D < 20 nm showed a considerable volume fraction of compounds that volatilise at 390 K (10-15%) and 573 K (4-10%), while respective fractions decreased to <5% for particles of size D >= 50 nm.

  9. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Müller, Detlef; Balis, Dimitris; Komppula, Mika

    2016-07-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type are available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol properties, i.e. effective radius and single-scattering albedo, were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the lidar ratio at 532 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr, 41 ± 13 sr, 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively, for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr, 75 ± 14 sr, 3.2 ± 1.3 % and 1.7 ± 0.3, respectively, for biomass burning aerosol layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 µm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed aerosols, respectively, while the single-scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532

  10. A Comparison of Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties during TOGA-COARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Pilewskie, P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The impact of cirrus clouds on climate is an issue of research interest currently. Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the cloud shortwave albedo and infrared reflectance and absorptance. These in turn are determined by the size distribution, phase, and composition of particles in the clouds. The TOGA-COARE campaign presented an excellent opportunity to study cirrus clouds and their influence on climate. In this campaign, a microphysics instrument package was flown aboard the DC-8 aircraft at medium altitudes in cirrus clouds. This package included a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe, a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe, and an ice crystal replicator. At the same time the ER-2 equipped with a radiation measurement system flew coordinated flight tracks above the DC-8 at very high altitude. The radiation measurement made were short and long wave fluxes, as well as narrowband fluxes, both upwelling and downwelling. In addition LIDAR data is available. The existence of these data sets allows for a the comparison of radiation measurement with microphysical measurements. For example, the optical depth and effective radius retrieved from the ER-2 radiation measurements can be compared to the microphysical data. Conversely, the optical properties and fluxes produced by the clouds can be calculated from the microphysical measurements and compared to those measured aboard the ER-2. The assumptions required to make these comparisons are discussed. Typical microphysical results show a prevalence of micron-sized particles, in addition to the cloud particles that exceed 100 mm. The large number of small particles or "haze" cause the effective cloud radii to shift to smaller sizes, leading to changes in optical parameters.

  11. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, E.; van Zyl, P. G.; Müller, D.; Balis, D.; Komppula, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm), respectively for

  12. Effects of Wildfire Pollution on the Microphysical and Electrical Properties of Pyrocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, R.; Grant, L. D.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Pyrocumulus clouds form over wildfires when hot, smoke-filled air rises, cools and condenses. These clouds have higher cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, which affect their microphysical and electrical properties. It is important to better understand pyrocumulus cloud microphysical characteristics and lightning formation, which have implications for the prediction of wildfire growth as well as the radiative and chemical characteristics of the upper troposphere. A recent observational study documented an electrified pyrocumulus over the May 2012 Hewlett Gulch fire located to the west of Fort Collins, Colorado. This cloud produced approximately 20 intracloud lightning flashes, and its electrical activity differed from surrounding convection that was not directly impacted by the fire and associated smoke. The goal of this research is to investigate aerosol-induced cloud-scale microphysical differences between clean clouds and polluted pyrocumulus to better characterize the mechanisms that cause pyrocumulus electrification. In order to address this goal, idealized cloud-resolving model simulations were performed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The model environment was initialized with an average of the 12Z 16 May and 00Z 17 May 2012 observed Denver soundings to represent the conditions when the Hewlett Gulch pyrocumulus occurred. Five simulations were performed using surface aerosol concentrations from 100 to 5000 #/mg. The results demonstrate that in moderately polluted pyrocumulus, rain processes are suppressed while graupel production increases. Extremely polluted pyrocumulus, however, experience a complete shut-down of graupel production, which favors the production of large amounts of liquid water and smaller ice species such as ice crystals and snowflakes. The processes responsible for these microphysical changes, as well as inferred pyrocumulus electrification mechanisms, will be compared with those discussed in previous

  13. Cloud microphysics and aerosol indirect effects in the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Stier, P.; Hoose, C.; Ferrachat, S.; Kloster, S.; Roeckner, E.; Zhang, J.

    2007-07-01

    The double-moment cloud microphysics scheme from ECHAM4 that predicts both the mass mixing ratios and number concentrations of cloud droplets and ice crystals has been coupled to the size-resolved aerosol scheme ECHAM5-HAM. ECHAM5-HAM predicts the aerosol mass, number concentrations and mixing state. The simulated liquid, ice and total water content and the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as a function of temperature in stratiform mixed-phase clouds between 0 and -35° C agree much better with aircraft observations in the ECHAM5 simulations. ECHAM5 performs better because more realistic aerosol concentrations are available for cloud droplet nucleation and because the Bergeron-Findeisen process is parameterized as being more efficient. The total anthropogenic aerosol effect includes the direct, semi-direct and indirect effects and is defined as the difference in the top-of-the-atmosphere net radiation between present-day and pre-industrial times. It amounts to -1.9 W m-2 in ECHAM5, when a relative humidity dependent cloud cover scheme and aerosol emissions representative for the years 1750 and 2000 from the AeroCom emission inventory are used. The contribution of the cloud albedo effect amounts to -0.7 W m-2. The total anthropogenic aerosol effect is larger when either a statistical cloud cover scheme or a different aerosol emission inventory are employed because the cloud lifetime effect increases.

  14. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties from Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Yang, P.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A retrieval algorithm has been developed for the microphysical analysis of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical data obtained using lidar instrumentation. The parameterization scheme of the PSC microphysical properties allows for coexistence of up to three different particle types with size-dependent shapes. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate optical properties of particles with maximum dimensions equal to or less than 2 mu m and with shapes that can be considered more representative of PSCs on the scale of individual crystals than the commonly assumed spheroids. Specifically. these are irregular and hexagonal crystals. Selection of the optical parameters that are input to the inversion algorithm is based on a potential data set such as that gathered by two of the lidars on board the NASA DC-8 during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 0 p (SAGE) Ozone Loss Validation experiment (SOLVE) campaign in winter 1999/2000: the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) and the NASA Langley Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). The 0 microphysical retrieval algorithm has been applied to study how particle shape assumptions affect the inversion of lidar data measured in leewave PSCs. The model simulations show that under the assumption of spheroidal particle shapes, PSC surface and volume density are systematically smaller than the FDTD-based values by, respectively, approximately 10-30% and approximately 5-23%.

  15. Atmospheric numerical simulation of the aerosol microphysics and radiative effects in a regional biomass burning smoke plume in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Silva Dias, M.; Silva Dias, P.; Chatfield, R.

    2003-04-01

    A study about the atmospheric transport of biomass burning emissions in the Amazon and the central of Brazil including its radiative effects is presented. The sources are spatially and temporally distributed and daily assimilated, according to the biomass burning spots defined by GOES-8 ABBA fire products. A fire smoke particles source parameterization, including aerosol particle concentration and optical properties, was used to build the initial smoke plumes associated with biomass burning in tropical forest and savanna. This study is carried out through a numerical simulation of the atmospheric motions using the atmospheric model RAMS "Regional Atmospheric Modeling System" and the coupled microphysics aerosol model CARMA "Community Aerosol &Radiation Model for Atmospheres". In this method the mass conservation equation and aerosol particle process, like nucleation, coagulation, condensation and dry deposition, are resolved for the biomass burning aerosol particles. The advection, in a resolved scale, and turbulent transport, in a sub-grid scale, are resolved using RAMS model parameterizations. A transport sub-grid parameterization, associated to deep and shallow cumulus convection, not explicitly resolved by the model due its low spatial resolution, is introduced. Also, a wet deposition term, coupled to the cumulus parameterization, is taken into account. The methodology is applied to a case study on August 2002 and the responses of the model to the presence of the aerosol particles in the atmosphere are explored. Also the comparison of the simulated smoke haze layer with MODIS products pointed out the usefulness of the sources emissions parameterization and the suitability of the aerosol process description presented here.

  16. A Fast and Efficient Version of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) Global Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yunha; Adams, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops more computationally efficient versions of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithms, collectively called Fast TOMAS. Several methods for speeding up the algorithm were attempted, but only reducing the number of size sections was adopted. Fast TOMAS models, coupled to the GISS GCM II-prime, require a new coagulation algorithm with less restrictive size resolution assumptions but only minor changes in other processes. Fast TOMAS models have been evaluated in a box model against analytical solutions of coagulation and condensation and in a 3-D model against the original TOMAS (TOMAS-30) model. Condensation and coagulation in the Fast TOMAS models agree well with the analytical solution but show slightly more bias than the TOMAS-30 box model. In the 3-D model, errors resulting from decreased size resolution in each process (i.e., emissions, cloud processing wet deposition, microphysics) are quantified in a series of model sensitivity simulations. Errors resulting from lower size resolution in condensation and coagulation, defined as the microphysics error, affect number and mass concentrations by only a few percent. The microphysics error in CN70CN100 (number concentrations of particles larger than 70100 nm diameter), proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, range from 5 to 5 in most regions. The largest errors are associated with decreasing the size resolution in the cloud processing wet deposition calculations, defined as cloud-processing error, and range from 20 to 15 in most regions for CN70CN100 concentrations. Overall, the Fast TOMAS models increase the computational speed by 2 to 3 times with only small numerical errors stemming from condensation and coagulation calculations when compared to TOMAS-30. The faster versions of the TOMAS model allow for the longer, multi-year simulations required to assess aerosol effects on cloud lifetime and precipitation.

  17. Development of a global aerosol microphysics model driven by assimilated meteorology and evaluation against field campaign data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivitayanurak, Win

    We implement the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics model into the GEOS-Chem CTM that is driven by assimilated meteorology. TOMAS has 30 size sections covering 0.01 --- 10 mum diameter with conservation equation for both aerosol mass and number. The implementation enables GEOS-Chem to simulate aerosol microphysics, size distributions, mass and number concentrations. In the first stage of development, sulfate and sea-salt aerosol model results from GEOS-Chem with TOMAS are intercompared with global models with sectional microphysics: GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP. Predictions of CN10 and CCN(0.2%) by all models agree well within a factor of two in the boundary layer but differ more at altitudes. Comparison with marine boundary layer observations of CN10 and CCN(0.2%) shows that all models perform well with average errors of 30 -- 50%. Differences among models stress the need for updated emission inventories and accurate meteorology and oxidant fields. The second stage encompasses implementation of carbonaceous aerosols, including organic mass (OM), elemental carbon (EC), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Sensitivity of CCN prediction to the uncertain POA-SOA contribution to the total OA budget is examined by artificially shifting OA sources from POA emission to SOA production rate. The different microphysical pathways of POA and SOA resulting in decreased CCN(0.2%) everywhere as the model changes from POA to SOA because SOA condenses onto mostly accumulation mode. POA is twice as effective per unit mass compared to SOA at CCN production at the model surface. Completely changing from POA to SOA results in 20% CCN(0.2%) reduction at the surface as well as globally. The fully developed TOMAS aerosol microphysics model with sulfate, sea-salt, OM, EC, and dust is evaluated against observations from ACE-Asia field campaign. This is the first highly time-resolved aerosol microphysics evaluation. The Napari et al. (2002) ternary nucleation captures PBL

  18. Simulation of the recent evolution of stratospheric aerosols by the MOSTRA Simulation of the recent evolution of stratospheric aerosols by the MOSTRA microphysical/transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingen, Christine; Errera, Quentin; Vanhellemont, Filip; Fussen, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Loodts, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    We present recent advances in the development of a microphysical/transport model for stratospheric aerosols, called MOdel for STRatospheric Aerosols (MOSTRA). MOSTRA is a 3D model describing the evolution in time and space of the stratospheric aerosol distribution described using a set of discrete size bins. The microphysical module used in this model makes use of the PSCBOX model developed by Larsen (2000). The transport module is based on the flux-form semi-Lagragian scheme by Lin and Rood (1996). The model structure will be presented with simulations of the evolution of the volcanic aerosol plume after recent volcanic eruptions. References: N. Larsen, Polar Stratospheric Clouds, Microphysical and optical models, Scientific Report 00-06, Danish Meteorological Institute, 2000 Lin, S.-J. Rood, R.B., Multidimensional Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian Transport Schemes, Monthly Weather Review, 124, 2046-2070, 1996.

  19. Vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of Portuguese forest fire smoke observed in February 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preißler, Jana; Pereira, Sérgio; Silva, Ana Maria; Wagner, Frank

    2013-10-01

    For the first time fresh biomass burning aerosol from wild fires in the north of Portugal was studied in detail by analysing profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties obtained from multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements. During the driest February since 1931, in 2012, an unusual high number of forest fires occurred in the north of the country. Despite the strong fires and back-trajectories directly crossing the burning areas, the optical and microphysical properties indicate a mixture of the biomass burning smoke with dust from the dried out soil of the Iberian peninsula or with other aerosol types. The layer means of the particle effective radius, the real part of the complex refractive index (CRI), and the imaginary part of the CRI ranged, respectively, from 0.20 μm to 0.30 μm, from 1.52 to 1.64, and from 0.009 to 0.017. The large single scattering albedo between 0.92 and 0.96, 0.92 and 0.96, and 0.88 and 0.94 at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, respectively, indicate weak absorption.

  20. Complex Coupling of Air Quality and Climate-Relevant Aerosols in a Chemistry-Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C.; Mann, G.

    2013-12-01

    Controlling emissions of aerosols and their precursors to improve air quality will impact the climate through direct and indirect radiative forcing. We have investigated the impacts of changes in a range of aerosol and gas-phase emission fluxes and changes in temperature on air quality and climate change metrics using a global aerosol microphysics and chemistry model, GLOMAP. We investigate how the responses of PM2.5 and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are coupled, and how attempts to improve air quality could have inadvertent effects on CCN, clouds and climate. The parameter perturbations considered are a 5°C increase in global temperature, increased or decreased precursor emissions of anthropogenic SO2, NH3, and NOx, and biogenic monoterpenes, and increased or decreased primary emissions of organic and black carbon aerosols from wildfire, fossil fuel, and biofuel. To quantify the interactions, we define a new sensitivity metric in terms of the response of CCN divided by the response of PM in different regions. .Our results show that the coupled chemistry and aerosol processes cause complex responses that will make any co-benefit policy decision problematic. In particular, we show that reducing SO2 emissions effectively reduces surface-level PM2.5 over continental regions in summer when background PM2.5 is high, with a relatively small reduction in marine CCN (and hence indirect radiative cooling over ocean), which is beneficial for near-term climate. Reducing NOx emissions does not improve summertime air quality very effectively but leads to a relatively high reduction of marine CCN. Reducing NH3 emissions has moderate effects on both PM2.5 and CCN. These three species are strongly coupled chemically and microphysically and the effects of changing emissions of one species on mass and size distributions of aerosols are very complex and spatially and temporally variable. For example, reducing SO2 emissions leads to reductions in sulphate and ammonium mass

  1. The effect of mineral dust and soot aerosols on ice microphysics near the foothills of the Himalayas: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anupam; Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the influence of different ice nuclei (IN) species and their number concentrations on cloud ice production. The numerical simulation with different species of ice nuclei is investigated using an explicit bulk-water microphysical scheme in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model version 5 (MM5). The species dependent ice nucleation parameterization that is based on the classical nucleation theory has been implemented into the model. The IN species considered include dust and soot with two different concentrations (Low and High). The simulated cloud microphysical properties like droplet number concentration and droplet effective radii as well as macro-properties (equivalent potential temperature and relative humidity) are comparable with aircraft observations. When higher dust IN concentrations are considered, the simulation results showed good agreement with the cloud ice and cloud water mixing ratio from aircraft measurements during Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) and Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. Relative importance of IN species is shown as compared to the homogeneous freezing nucleation process. The tendency of cloud ice production rates is also analyzed and found that dust IN is more efficient in producing cloud ice when compared to soot IN. The dust IN with high concentration can produce more surface precipitation than soot IN at the same concentration. This study highlights the need to improve the ice nucleation parameterization in numerical models.

  2. Microphysical properties of semi-transparent cirrus from AIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, Anthony; Stubenrauch, Claudia; Cros, Sylvain; Lamquin, Nicolas; Baran, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Cirrus covers about 30% of the globe and has been identified as one of the most influential atmospheric components on the Earth's radiative budget. In order to improve the parameterization of cirrus clouds within GCMs, modellers need long term records of cloud properties. Due to their complex microphysical characteristics (consisting of non-spherical ice crystals of various shapes and sizes) their physical and radiative properties are still not completely understood. Because of its high spectral resolution, the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard the NASA Aqua satellite is used for the identification of cirrus clouds night and day. AIRS can be easily collocated with the spaceborne lidar CALIOP of the CALIPSO mission and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat mission, as these instruments are part of the A-Train (a constellation of satellites that share the same orbit). These active instruments deliver accurate information on multi-layered clouds and geometrical cirrus thickness. We take advantage of the synergy between these passive and active remote sensing instruments to design a microphysical property retrieval for semi-transparent ice clouds. A subset of 17 channels between 8 and 12.5 micron has been selected in order to retrieve the effective diameter (De) and the ice water path (IWP) of the cirrus. The retrieval of De is based on spectral differences of cirrus emissivities. Relationships are complex and non-linear. Therefore we simulate these emissivities for a large range of values for De and IWP and for two ice crystal shapes (randomly oriented columns and aggregates). Ice crystal single scattering properties have been integrated over a bimodal size distribution and have been implemented into the 4A radiative transfer model coupled with Disort (taking into account multiple scattering) to generate look up tables that link these emissivities to the microphysical properties. We only consider clouds with temperatures less than 260 K and

  3. Assessment of microphysical and chemical factors of aerosols over seas of the Russian Artic Eastern Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, Liudmila; Polkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The newly observed kickoff of the Northern Route development drew serious attention to state of the Arctic Resource environment. Occurring climatic and environmental changes are more sensitively seen in polar areas in particular. Air environment control allows for making prognostic assessments which are required for planning hazardous environmental impacts preventive actions. In August - September 2013, RV «Professor Khlustin» Northern Sea Route expeditionary voyage took place. En-route aerosol sampling was done over the surface of the Beringov, Chukotka and Eastern-Siberia seas (till the town of Pevek). The purpose of sampling was to assess spatio-temporal variability of optic, microphysical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles of the surface layer within different areas adjacent to the Northern Sea Route. Aerosol test made use of automated mobile unit consisting of photoelectric particles counter AZ-10, aetalometr MDA-02, aspirator on NBM-1.2 pump chassis, and the impactor. This set of equipment allows for doing measurements of number concentration, dispersed composition of aerosols within sizes d=0.3-10 mkm, mass concentration of submicron sized aerosol, and filter-conveyed aerosols sampling. Filter-conveyed aerosols sampling was done using method accepted by EMEP and EANET monitoring networks. The impactor channel was upgraded to separate particles bigger than 1 mkm in size, and the fine grain fraction settled down on it. Reverse 5-day and 10-day trajectories of air mass transfer executed at heights of 10, 1500 and 3500 m were analyzed. The heights were selected by considerations that 3000 m is the height which characterizes air mass trend in the lower troposphere. 1500 m is the upper border of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the sampling was done in the Earth's surface layer at less than 10 m. Minimum values of the bespoken microphysical characteristics are better characteristic of higher latitudes where there are no man induced sources of

  4. Comparison of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Retrievals from HSRL-2, AERONET, and In-situ Measurements During DISCOVER-AQ 2013 (California and Texas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, P.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Scarino, A. J.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Berkoff, T.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Seaman, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The second-generation NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) is the first airborne multiwavelength HSRL system to provide 3β + 2α datasets (i.e. backscatter coefficient at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficient at 355 and 532 nm) which are used in an unsupervised and automated inversion algorithm to retrieve optical and microphysical properties of aerosols. HSRL-2 was deployed onboard NASA Langley King Air on the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field mission over San Joaquin Valley, California between January and February 2013 and over Houston, Texas in September 2013. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties, hygroscopicity, and size distributions were obtained from in-situ instruments onboard the NASA Langley P-3B over a number of DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network) AERONET ground stations. As HSRL-2 flew over those same ground stations, measurements and retrievals of optical depth, and microphysical aerosol properties were obtained by all three platforms. We will present the results of this intercomparison and discuss the challenges inherent to such comparisons.

  5. Global microphysical simulation of stratospheric sulfate aerosol after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, T.; Sudo, K.

    2014-12-01

    An explosive volcanic eruption can inject a large amount of SO2 into the stratosphere, which is oxidized to form sulfate aerosol. Such aerosol has an impact on the Earth's radiative budget by enhancing back-scattering of the solar radiation. Changes in the size distribution of the aerosol were observed after large volcanic eruptions. Representing the changes in size distribution is important for climate simulation, because the changes affect climate responses to large volcanic eruptions. This study newly developed an aerosol microphysics module and investigated changes in stratospheric sulfate aerosol after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the framework of a chemistry-aerosol coupled climate model MIROC-CHASER/SPRINTARS. The module represents aerosol size distribution with three lognormal modes (nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation modes) and includes nucleation, condensation growth/evaporation, and coagulation processes. As a model evaluation, we tested reproducibility of the impacts of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. We carried out a simulation, in which 20 Mt of SO2 and 100 Mt of volcanic ash were injected respectively into 25 km and 16—22 km altitudes over Mt. Pinatubo (120.4°E, 15.1°N) on June 15th 1991. We compared the model results with space-borne and balloon-borne observations. Although our model overestimated a near-global mean (60°N—60°S) of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD) observed by SAGE II instrument until one year after the eruption, it reproduced the observed SAOD in the subsequent period. The model well captured the observed increase of effective radius at 20 km altitude in the northern midlatitudes. In addition, we analyzed the pathway of volcanic sulfur from SO2 to sulfate aerosol. The most amount of the volcanic sulfur was converted from SO2 to accumulation mode aerosol by 100 days after the eruption. The conversion into the accumulation mode aerosol is attributable to coagulation until the first 14 days and to condensation growth

  6. Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Property Measurements with Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoz, B.; Wang, Z.; Whiteman, D.

    2006-12-01

    To improve our understanding of the impact of cirrus clouds on the current and future climate, improved knowledge of cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties is needed. However, long-term studies of the problem indicate that accurate cirrus cloud measurements are challenging, especially in the low ice water content regime most frequent in the tropical cirrus layers. Recent advances in Raman lidar techniques have demonstrated that Raman lidar is an excellent tool to provide reliable cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties, which are important to study cirrus clouds as well as to validate satellite cirrus cloud measurements. Based on elastic and nitrogen Raman signals, cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction to backscatter ratio can be quantified. By utilizing the Raman scattered intensities from ice crystals, a new method to remotely sense cirrus ice water content and general effective radius profiles has been demonstrated with NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) measurements. Since the intensity of Raman scattering is fundamentally proportional to the number of molecules involved, this method provides a more direct way of measuring the ice water content compared with other schemes. Based on the SRL measurements, these Raman lidar capabilities will be illustrated.

  7. Numerical studies of microphysical modulations of stratospheric aerosol within ROMIC-ROSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, René; von Savigny, Christian; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John; Zalach, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    The stratospheric aerosol layer (so-called Junge layer) is an inherent part of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). Stratospheric aerosols play a large role in the Earth's climate system because they interact with catalytic cycles depleting ozone, directly alter the atmosphere's radiative balance and modulate the strength of polar vortices, in particular when this system is perturbed. In terms of mass the layer is predominantly composed of liquid sulphate-water droplets and is fed from the oxidation of gaseous precursors reaching the stratosphere either by direct volcanic injections (mainly supplying SO2) or troposphere-stratosphere exchange processes. In volcanically quiescent periods, latter processes predominantly maintain the so-called background state of aerosol layer through oxidation of OCS above 22 km, and SO2 below. The Junge layer begins to develop 2-3 km above the tropopause and reaches a height of about 35 km, with a largest vertical extent in the tropics and spring-time polar regions. Above the TTL, the layer's vertical extent varies between 2 km and 8 km (about 35% of its mean vertical expansion), depending on the phase of the QBO. The QBO-induced meridional circulation, overlying the BDC, and accompanied signatures in the stratospheric temperature directly affect the life cycle of stratospheric aerosol. Mainly by modulating the equilibrium between microphysical processes which maintain the layer. Effects caused by QBO modulations of the advective transport in the upwelling region of the BDC are smaller and difficult to quantify, because the overlying sedimentation of aerosol is also being modulated and counteract the aerosol lofting. Here we show results from numerical studies performed within the project ROMIC-ROSA (Role of Stratospheric Aerosol in Climate and Atmospheric Science). We further explored relationships between QBO forcing and aerosol processes in the lower stratosphere. We examined whether similar process interferences can be caused by

  8. Summary of long-term data on latitudinal dependence of the near-water aerosol microphysical characteristics in eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol'kin, Viktor V.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Pol'kin, Vasily V.; Turchinovich, Ury S.; Terpugova, Swetlana A.; Tikhomirov, Aleksey B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.

    2015-11-01

    Latitudinal dependences of aerosol microphysical characteristics are analyzed. The data were obtained in the Russian Antarctic Expedition (RAE) onboard the expedition vessels "Akademik Fedorov" and "Akademik Treshnikov" in 2006- 2014, as well as the research vessel "Akademik Sergey Vavilov" in 2004.

  9. Ground based in situ measurements of arctic cloud microphysical and optical properties at Mount Zeppelin (Ny-Alesund Svalbard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Gwennolé; Jourdan, Olivier; Olofson, Frans; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Dupuy, Régis; Bernard, Christophe; Tunved, Peter; Ancellet, Gérard; Law, Kathy; Wobrock, Wolfram; Shcherbakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The high sensitivity of the polar regions to climate perturbation, due to complex feedback mechanisms existing in this region, was shown by many studies (Solomon et al., 2007; Verlinde et al., 2007; IPCC, 2007). In particular, climate simulations suggest that cloud feedback plays an important role in the arctic warming (Vavrus 2004; Hassol, 2005). Moreover, the high seasonal variability of arctic aerosol properties (Engwall et al., 2008; Tunveld et al., 2013) is expected to significantly impact the cloud properties during the winter-summer transition. Field measurements are needed for improved understanding and representation of cloud-aerosol interactions in climate models. Within the CLIMSLIP project (CLimate IMpacts of Short-LIved Pollutants and methane in the arctic), a two months (March-April 2012) ground-based cloud measurement campaign was performed at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny-Alesund, Svalbard. The experimental set-up comprised a wide variety of instruments. A CPI (Cloud Particle Imager) was used for the microphysical and morphological characterization of ice particles. Measurements of sized-resolved liquid cloud parameters were performed by the FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe). The Nevzorov Probe measured the bulk properties (LWC and IWC) of clouds. The Polar Nephelometer (PN) was used to assess the single scattering properties of an ensemble of cloud particles. This cloud instrumentation combined with the aerosol properties (size distribution and total concentration) continuously measured at the station allowed us to study the variability of the microphysical and optical properties of low level Mixed Phase Clouds (MPC) as well as the aerosol-cloud interaction in the Arctic. Typical properties of MPC, snow precipitation and blowing snow will be presented. First results suggest that liquid water is ubiquitous in arctic low level clouds. Precipitations are characterized by large (typically 1 mm sized) stellar and pristine shape particles

  10. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds: The Software Package OPAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Koepke, P.; Schult, I.

    1998-05-01

    The software package OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) is described. It easily provides optical properties in the solar and terrestrial spectral range of atmospheric particulate matter. Microphysical and optical properties of six water clouds, three ice clouds, and 10 aerosol components, which are considered as typical cases, are stored as ASCII files. The optical properties are the extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients, the single scattering albedo, the asymmetry parameter, and the phase function. They are calculated on the basis of the microphysical data (size distribution and spectral refractive index) under the assumption of spherical particles in case of aerosols and cloud droplets and assuming hexagonal columns in case of cirrus clouds. Data are given for up to 61 wavelengths between 0.25 and 40 m and up to eight values of the relative humidity. The software package also allows calculation of derived optical properties like mass extinction coefficients and Ångström coefficients.Real aerosol in the atmosphere always is a mixture of different components. Thus, in OPAC it is made possible to get optical properties of any mixtures of the basic components and to calculate optical depths on the base of exponential aerosol height profiles. Typical mixtures of aerosol components as well as typical height profiles are proposed as default values, but mixtures and profiles for the description of individual cases may also be achieved simply.

  11. Aerosol property retrieval from geostationary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves

    The Meteosat satellites play an important role for the generation of consistent long time series of aerosol properties. This importance relies on (i) the long duration of past (Meteosat First Generation, MFG) starting in 1982, present (Meteosat Second Generation, MSG) and future (Meteosat Third Generation, MTG) missions and (ii) their frequent cycle of acquisition that can be used to document the anisotropy of the surface and therefore the lower boundary condition for aerosol retrieval over land surfaces. Hence, a similar approach is used for the processing of each Meteosat generation based on a joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties using an Optimal Estimation approach. Daily accumulation of the frequent Meteosat observations is used to discriminate the radiative effects that result from the surface anisotropy, from those caused by the aerosol scattering. The inverted forward model explicitly accounts for the surface anisotropy and the multiple scattering for the coupled surface-atmosphere system. Pinty et al. (2000) pioneered with the development of an original method to characterise simultaneously surface anisotropy and atmospheric scattering properties for the processing of MFG. Although these observations are limited to one single large VIS band poorly characterised, the main advantage of MFG relies in the duration of the archive (1982 - 2006), knowing that prior to 2000 space observations were very scarce. Despite these radiometric limitations, it is possible to detect major aerosol events like dust storms, fire plumes or pollution events, even over land surfaces. SEVIRI, on-board MSG, offers additional capabilities with its three solar channels and 15 min repeat cycle. AOD retrieval is much more accurate than with MFG and it is possible to discriminate among various aerosol classes. The additional FCI solar channels on-board MTG will offer improved capabilities with respect to MSG/SEVIRI for the retrieval of aerosol concentration and

  12. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  13. A General Uncertainty Quantification Methodology for Cloud Microphysical Property Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q.; Xie, S.; Chen, X.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program provides long-term (~20 years) ground-based cloud remote sensing observations. However, there are large uncertainties in the retrieval products of cloud microphysical properties based on the active and/or passive remote-sensing measurements. To address this uncertainty issue, a DOE Atmospheric System Research scientific focus study, Quantification of Uncertainties in Cloud Retrievals (QUICR), has been formed. In addition to an overview of recent progress of QUICR, we will demonstrate the capacity of an observation-based general uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology via the ARM Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) product. This UQ method utilizes the Karhunen-Loéve expansion (KLE) and Central Limit Theorems (CLT) to quantify the retrieval uncertainties from observations and algorithm parameters. The input perturbations are imposed on major modes to take into account the cross correlations between input data, which greatly reduces the dimension of random variables (up to a factor of 50) and quantifies vertically resolved full probability distribution functions of retrieved quantities. Moreover, this KLE/CLT approach has the capability of attributing the uncertainties in the retrieval output to individual uncertainty source and thus sheds light on improving the retrieval algorithm and observations. We will present the results of a case study for the ice water content at the Southern Great Plains during an intensive observing period on March 9, 2000. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Impact of large-scale dynamics on the microphysical properties of midlatitude cirrus

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Diskin, G. S.; Evans, Stuart; Lawson, Paul; Marchand, Roger

    2014-04-16

    In situ microphysical observations 3 of mid-latitude cirrus collected during the Department of Energy Small Particles in Cirrus (SPAR-TICUS) field campaign are combined with an atmospheric state classification for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to understand statistical relationships between cirrus microphysics and the large-scale meteorology. The atmospheric state classification is informed about the large-scale meteorology and state of cloudiness at the ARM SGP site by combining ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data with 14 years of continuous observations from the millimeter-wavelength cloud radar. Almost half of the cirrus cloud occurrences in the vicinity of the ARM SGP site during SPARTICUS can be explained by three distinct synoptic condi- tions, namely upper-level ridges, mid-latitude cyclones with frontal systems and subtropical flows. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cirrus micro- physical properties such as particle size distributions (PSDs), ice number con- centrations and ice water content (IWC) are examined and exhibit striking differences among the different synoptic regimes. Generally, narrower PSDs with lower IWC but higher ice number concentrations are found in cirrus sam- pled in upper-level ridges whereas cirrus sampled in subtropical flows, fronts and aged anvils show broader PSDs with considerably lower ice number con- centrations but higher IWC. Despite striking contrasts in the cirrus micro- physics for different large-scale environments, the PDFs of vertical velocity are not different, suggesting that vertical velocity PDFs are a poor predic-tor for explaining the microphysical variability in cirrus. Instead, cirrus mi- crophysical contrasts may be driven by differences in ice supersaturations or aerosols.

  15. Effects of aerosols on microphysics and on urban warm season precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosannah, Nathan

    Precipitation anomalies in and around major urban centers have been attributed to dynamic processes such as warm air updrafts induced by urban heat island events, and to microphysical processes affected by the release of natural and anthropogenic aerosols that affect atmospheric water balance. Both factors must be analyzed in order to fully understand the role that urban environments may have on precipitation. The research presented here is directed towards improving understanding of how aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and land cover land use (LCLU) affect cloud processes and precipitation over a complex urban environment such as New York City (NYC). While aerosols are intrinsically necessary for rainfall formation, and urban environments also influence precipitation via convection enhancement, the partial contributions of each are not yet known. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate several NYC summer precipitation scenarios. PSD data from NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) complemented with National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2006 land surface data for NYC and northern New Jersey (NJ) were processed and assimilated directly into RAMS to determine the effect of varying PSD and LCLU on simulated precipitation amounts. An ensemble of 17 numerical simulations were configured and run. The first two runs were month long runs for July 2007, the first with constant PSD values, and the second with PSD updates. The third and fourth runs mirrored the first two simulations for a "No-City" case. A fifth month long simulation was run with average Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Giant CCN values. Next, twelve 24 hour simulations driven with high volumes of fine mode particles and with high volumes of coarse mode particles each under "City" and "No City" conditions were compared for 1-day localized and mesoscale events. Results suggest that RAMS precipitation results are sensitive to both PSD variation and land use variations.

  16. Stratospheric ion and aerosol chemistry and possible links with cirrus cloud microphysics - A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of stratospheric ion chemistry and physics are assessed as they relate to aerosol formation and the transport of aerosols to upper tropospheric regions to create conditions favorable for cirrus cloud formation. It is found that ion-induced nucleation and other known phase transitions involving ions and sulfuric acid vapor are probably not efficient processes for stratospheric aerosol formation, and cannot compete with condensation of sulfuric acid on preexisting particles of volcanic or meteoritic origin which are larger than about 0.15 micron in radius. Thus, galactic cosmic rays cannot have a significant impact on stratospheric aerosol population. Changes in the stratospheric aerosol burden due to volcanos are up to two orders of magnitude larger than changes in ion densities. Thus, volcanic activity may modulate the radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  17. Retrieval of aerosol microstructure and radiative properties for moderate turbidity under conditions of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana B.; Bedareva, Tatiana V.; Sviridenkov, Mikhail A.

    2013-05-01

    This study focuses on the results of testing an algorithm for retrieval of aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics in the total atmospheric column from ground-based measurements of direct and diffuse solar radiation. Clear-sky photometric measurements carried out under moderate aerosol loading of the atmosphere in summer for 2003-2009 at Tomsk station of AERONET network were used. The retrieved aerosol optical and microphysical parameters are compared with AERONET data, an empirical model of the vertical profiles of aerosol optical characteristics over Western Siberia, well-known OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds) model and model recommended by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) (continental aerosol). In the visible spectral range, the mean value of single scattering albedo is 0.9-0.92, in good agreement with other data. It is shown, however, that asymmetry factor of aerosol scattering phase function disagrees with the WMO and OPAC values. A short description of the inversion strategy is also presented.

  18. [Microphysics of atmospheric aerosols during winter haze/fog events in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Niu, Zhong-qing; Shi, Chun-e; Liu, Duan-yang; Li, Zi-hua

    2010-07-01

    Intensive field observations of fog/haze events, including simultaneous measurements of aerosol particle and fog droplet size distributions, were conducted in Nanjing in November, 2007. Four weather conditions (fog, mist, wet haze and haze) were distinguished based on visibility and liquid water content firstly. Then, the microphysical characteristics of coarse and fine particles in each condition were investigated. The results showed the dominant sequence of the four weather conditions was haze<-->mist-->wet haze-->fog-->, wet haze-->mist<-->haze. The lasting time of pre-fog wet haze was longer than that of post-fog wet haze. The number, surface area and volume concentration of coarse particles with diameter larger than 2.0 micron in fog were much higher than those in the other three conditions, and the smallest concentrations were observed in haze. The size distributions of surface area and volume concentration exhibited multi-peak in fog droplets, while it showed single peak for coarse particles in haze, mist and wet haze. For the fine particles with diameter larger than 0.010 microm, the spectral shapes of surface area concentration are similar in fog (mist) and wet haze (haze) condition. The dominant size ranges of fine particle number concentration were in 0.04-0.13 microm and 0.02-0.14 microm for fog and wet haze, separately. The same dominant size ranges located in 0.02-0.06 microm for both mist and haze. During the transition processes from haze, mist and wet haze to fog, the concentration of smaller particles (less than 0.060-0.090 microm) reduced and vice versa for the corresponding larger particles. Temporal variation of aerosol number concentration correlated well with the root mean diameters negatively during the observation period. The number concentration of aerosol was the lowest and the mean diameter was the largest in fog periods. PMID:20825005

  19. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical, Microphysical, and Chemical Measurements between LAX and Long Beach Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, K. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Chen, G.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Nenes, A.; Lathem, T. L.; Arctas Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In the summer of 2008, measurements of aerosols were made on-board the NASA DC-8 over the state of California, as part of the second phase of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) on behalf of the California Air resources Board (CARB). The DC-8 made four flights, between 18 June and 26 June, totaling 33 hours, to examine California’s atmosphere to better understand the chemical dynamics of smog and greenhouse gases over the state. The NASA DC-8 had a suite of aerosol instruments, capable of measuring the number concentrations, optical properties, and size distributions of aerosols between 0.003 and 1500 um. In this presentation, we will compare aerosol observations made at two areas within the Los Angeles Basin, Los Angeles International airport (LAX) and Long Beach Harbor. LAX is in the middle of the second most populated metropolitan area in the United States and is the fifth busiest airport in the world, while Long Beach Harbor (20 miles south of LAX) is the world’s 2nd busiest container port. Initial results suggest a greater aerosol loading and additional presence of ultrafine aerosols during the week due to vehicular emissions. We will also present analysis of aerosol observations as a function of time of day from the four missed approaches at LAX and four over flights of Long Beach Harbor.

  20. Aerosol Properties From Multi-angle Satellite Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.; Martonchik, J. V.; Diner, D. J.; Chen, W. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Liu, Y.; Team, T.

    2005-12-01

    Based on pre-launch simulations, we expected that data from the multi-angle, multi-spectral MISR instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite would contain, in addition to aerosol optical depth (AOT), information about particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA). Such information would add a great deal to the global aerosol picture that satellites provide, allowing more meaningful assessments of aerosol direct radiative impact, source attribution, material fluxes, and possibly indirect effects of aerosols on clouds. But particle micro-physical property retrievals are much more difficult to validate than AOT, since there are significant uncertainties in aerosol size, and especially shape and SSA, retrieved from surface-based sun photometers, whereas instrumented aircraft must fly complex patterns to adequately sample all aerosol layers in the entire column seen simultaneously by MISR. Our multi-faceted validation effort, which makes use of ground-based AERONET sun photometers as well as coincident satellite and intensive field observations, has allowed us to quantify MISR data sensitivity to these aerosol micro-physical properties over dark water, and in a few situations, over land. In broad terms, over dark water MISR can distinguish three-to-five aerosol size bins between about 0.1 and 2.5 microns effective diameter, spherical vs. non-spherical particle shapes, plates from grains from spheroids at least in some cases, and two-to-four SSA groupings between 0.75 and 1.0. MISR can also identify several aerosol modes within the column, provided each contributes more than about 20% to the total column mid-visible AOT. These sensitivities diminish for column AOT below about 0.15, and for brighter underlying surfaces. This talk will summarize the current status of the MISR Standard Aerosol Product, the latest MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval validation study results, and our plans for completing aerosol micro-physical property formal validation for the MISR

  1. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2015-12-28

    We proposed to analyze in-situ cloud data collected during ARM/ASR field campaigns to create databases of cloud microphysical properties and their uncertainties as needed for the development of improved cloud parameterizations for models and remote sensing retrievals, and for evaluation of model simulations and retrievals. In particular, we proposed to analyze data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North Slope of Alaska during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), and over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) during The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), to meet the following 3 objectives; derive statistical databases of single ice particle properties (aspect ratio AR, dominant habit, mass, projected area) and distributions of ice crystals (size distributions SDs, mass-dimension m-D, area-dimension A-D relations, mass-weighted fall speeds, single-scattering properties, total concentrations N, ice mass contents IWC), complete with uncertainty estimates; assess processes by which aerosols modulate cloud properties in arctic stratus and mid-latitude cumuli, and quantify aerosol’s influence in context of varying meteorological and surface conditions; and determine how ice cloud microphysical, single-scattering and fall-out properties and contributions of small ice crystals to such properties vary according to location, environment, surface, meteorological and aerosol conditions, and develop parameterizations of such effects.In this report we describe the accomplishments that we made on all 3 research objectives.

  2. Towards More Consistent Retrievals of Ice Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties from Polar Orbiting Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, B. A.; Heymsfield, A.; Yang, P.

    2011-12-01

    Differences exist in the ice cloud optical thickness and effective particle size products provided by teams working with data from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of the Earth Reflectance), Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR), and CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization). The issue is in large part due to the assumed ice cloud single-scattering properties that each team uses in their retrievals. To gain insight into this problem, we are developing ice cloud single-scattering properties consistently from solar through far-infrared wavelengths by merging ice cloud microphysical data from in situ measurements with the very latest light scattering calculations for ice habits that include droxtals, solid/hollow columns, plates, solid/hollow bullet rosettes, aggregates of columns, and small/large aggregates of plates. The in-situ measurements are from a variety of field campaigns, including ARM-IOP, CRYSTAL-FACE, ACTIVE, SCOUT, MidCiX, pre-AVE, TC-4, and MACPEX. Among other advances, the light scattering calculations include the full phase matrix (i.e., polarization), incorporate a new treatment of forward scattering, and three levels of surface roughness from smooth to severely roughened. This talk will focus on improvements to our methodology for building both spectral and narrowband bulk scattering optical models appropriate for satellite imagers and hyperspectral infrared sensors. The new models provide a basis for investigating retrieval differences in the products from the sensor teams. We will discuss recent work towards improving the consistency of ice cloud microphysical/optical property retrievals between solar, polarimetric, and infrared retrieval approaches. It will be demonstrated that severely roughened ice particles correspond best in comparisons to polarization measurements. Further discussion will provide insight as to the

  3. Measurements of the Microphysics and Size Distributed Composition of Aerosol Particles at the Kosan Supersite, Jeju Island, Korea During ACE-ASIA and Their Influence on Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, K. N.; Alfarra, R.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; McFiggans, G. B.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.; Berner, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Canagaratne, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D.; Topping, D.; Burgess, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Measurements of particle number, size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were made at the Kosan supersite on the island of Jeju during the ACE-ASIA experiment. The measurements of chemical composition included those from an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, which can deliver quantitative information of the mass of a range of volatile and semi-volatile aerosol components in near real time. These include sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and the total organic fraction. The instrument also delivers measurements of the size-distributed mass of these components. In addition to the AMS, multi stage Berner impactors were also run for both mass collection on aluminium foil substrates and chemical analysis using Teflon substrates. The substrates were chemically analysed for a range of inorganic species, carbonate, a range of simple organic ions and also the water soluble organic fraction. The latter were subdivided by functionality: neutrals, mono and di carboxylix acids, and poly-carboxylic acids. A second sampling location on the mountain-side of Jeju was used to sample cloud microphysical parameters during the experiment. Measurements were made of liquid water content and cloud droplet number as a function of size during cloud events sampled during the experiment. We will show that the largest contributor to the accumulation mode particle mass is sulfate, with a variable contribution from the organic fraction. The organic is observed to be internally mixed with the sulfate in a mass mode centred at around 400 nm and using AMS data and the analyses from the impactors is oxidised and water soluble. The largest constituents of this component of the aerosol were di and poly carboxylic acids. There was little evidence for a mode of organic particles, typical of urban outflow at Jeju, indicating the particulate had been significantly processed between source and arrival at the sampling site. Little nitrate was observed in the sub micron aerosol at Jeju, but

  4. Comparison of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Retrievals from HSRL-2 and in-Situ Measurements During DISCOVER-AQ 2013 (California and Texas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, Patricia; Müller, Detlef; Burton, Sharon; Chemyakin, Eduard; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard; Kolgotin, Alexei; Ziemba, Luke; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Anderson, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    The combination of backscatter coefficients measured at 355, 532 and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm (i.e. 3β+2α) can be used to retrieve profiles of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols, such as effective radius, total volume concentration and total number concentration. NASA LaRC HSRL-2 is an airborne multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar in operation that provides the full 3β+2α dataset. HSRL-2 was deployed during DISCOVER-AQ along with other airborne and ground-based instruments that also measured many aerosol parameters in close proximity to the HSRL-2 system, allowing us to evaluate the performance of an automated and unsupervised retrieval algorithm that has been recently developed. We present the results from California (Jan/Feb 2013) and Texas (Sep 2013) DISCOVER-AQ.

  5. Using Directional Emissivity as a Probe of Particle Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Clayton, G. C.

    2002-09-01

    Real surfaces are not expected to be diffuse emitters, thus observed emissivity values are a function of viewing geometry. This fact has strong implications for analyses of the MGS/TES emission phase function (EPF) sequences and the upcoming Mars Exploration Rover mini-TES dataset. As reviewed previously [1], in the absence of strong thermal gradients, directional emissivity may be obtained via a combination of reciprocity and Kirchhoff's Law. Here we focus on the potential utility of directional emissivity as a direct probe of surface particle microphysical properties. We explore the effects of particle size and composition on observed radiances in the TES spectral regime using a combination of multiple scattering radiative transfer and Mie scattering algorithms. Comparisons of these simulated spectra to TES EPF observations of typical surface units (e.g., high and low albedo regions) will also be made. This work is supported through NASA grant NAGS-9820 (MJW) and LSU Board of Regents (KMP). [1] Pitman, K.M., et al. (2001), AAS-DPS meeting # 33, # 36.01.

  6. Modelling of contrail cirrus in a climate model: microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Kärcher, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Contrail cirrus is the largest climate forcing component of aviation. Current estimates using a climate model rely on an approach parameterizing contrail microphysical processes based on ice water content alone. A microphysical two-moment-scheme (prognostic ice water content and ice particle number density) allows a more realistic representation of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. That implies a better estimate of their radiative forcing and its sensitivity to changes in ice particle number concentration. We modify the cloud scheme in ECHAM5-HAM by changing the nucleation parameterization consistent with a fractional coverage. Afterwards the contrail cirrus module (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2009) developed for one-moment microphysics is implemented in ECHAM5 and extended with a two-moment-scheme. An exact description of contrail cirrus volume is important for a realistic characterization of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. Therefore, parameterizations for the growth of the contrail cirrus volume due to diffusion, wind shear and sedimentation are implemented. The fields of ice water content, ice particle number concentration, cloud coverage and the frequency of ice supersaturated regions are validated and microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus are studied. In an idealized experiment the relative importance of microphysical processes is evaluated. As a consequence of the improved parameterization of microphysical processes the optical depth of contrail cirrus is higher in regions with high flight density than it was in earlier studies (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2011) due to the high ice particle number concentrations on the main flight routes. Microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus turn out to be strongly dependent on the initial ice particle number. Reducing the latter leads to an overall decrease of contrail cirrus optical depth and visible coverage.

  7. Multi-frequency radar studies of PMSE: statistical properties, microphysical results, and electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    It is now common belief that polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) originate from turbu-lence induced scatter in combination with a large Schmidt number due to the presence of charged ice particles. This theory predicts a distinct frequency dependence of PMSE signal strength such that simultaneous observations of PMSE at two well separated frequencies should allow to gain quantitative information about relevant atmospheric parameters such as ice particle properties. In this study, we first present the statistical properties of PMSE obtained from the simultaneous observations with the EISCAT Svalbard radar and the SOUSY Svalbard radar (collocated near Longyearbern (78oN, 16oE), with frequencies of 500 and 53.5 MHz, respec-tively) in June 2006 and also with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars (collocated near Tromso (69oN, 19oE), with frequencies of 224 and 930 MHz, respectively) between 2003 and 2007. According to the above mentioned theory, volume reflectivity-ratios of PMSE simultaneously observed at two frequencies can be used to calculate the Schmidt number and hence radii of the charged aerosol particles. We have done this exercise for the calibrated observations with the ESR-SSR and with the EISCAT VHF-UHF radars, respectively. The resulting particle radii both display excellent agreement with expectations from microphysical models and indepen-dent observations of microphysical ice parameters. Finally, observations of electron densities with the EISCAT UHF-radar (i.e., in the absence of UHF-PMSE) have been used to interpret simultaneous and common volume observations of PMSE with the EISCAT VHF-radar. Key words: Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes, Schmidt number, volume reflectivity

  8. In-Situ Microphysical Measurements In Rocket Plumes With The Cloud And Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, G.; Baumgardner, D.; Avallone, L.; Kalnajs, L.; Herman, R.; Ross, M.; Thompson, T.; Toohey, D.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution, single particle measurements have been made in rocket plumes using an optical particle spectrometer that measures diameters from 0.5 to 44 um. The Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) measures the light scattered in two directions from individual particles that pass through a focused, 680 nm laser beam and we derive the diameter, shape and composition from this information. The CAS was mounted on the NASA WB57-F aircraft as part of the Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition (PUMA) project, an experiment funded by NSF and NASA to study the chemistry and microphysics of rocket plumes. Measurements were first made in a plume generated by an Atlas IIAS rocket in May, 2004 and again in July, 2005 in the plume formed from the exhaust of the solid state boosters used to launch the space shuttle Discovery into orbit. The microstructure of the two plumes and the characteristics of their particles were distinctly different. The two cases had similar maximum concentrations of 300 cm-3, but the space shuttle particles were on average larger and a greater percentage of them were irregular in shape. An analysis of the distance between particles suggests clustering because of the non-Poisson shape of the frequency distribution of inter-arrival times.

  9. Microphysical, Macrophysical and Radiative Signatures of Volcanic Aerosols in Trade Wind Cumulus Observed by the A-Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-tem1 degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcin", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount. is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  10. Continuous Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M; Jensen, K

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to produce and refine a one-year continuous time series of cloud microphysical properties based on cloud radar measurements for each of the fixed ARM sites. To accomplish this metric, we used a combination of recently developed algorithms that interpret radar reflectivity profiles, lidar backscatter profiles, and microwave brightness temperatures into the context of the underlying cloud microphysical structure.

  11. Microphysical particle properties derived from inversion algorithms developed in the framework of EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Böckmann, C.; Kolgotin, A.; Schneidenbach, L.; Chemyakin, E.; Rosemann, J.; Znak, P.; Romanov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a summary on the current status of two inversion algorithms that are used in EARLINET for the inversion of data collected with EARLINET multiwavelength Raman lidars. These instruments measure backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm. Development of these two algorithms started in 2000 when EARLINET was founded. The algorithms are based on manually controlled inversion of optical data which allows for detailed sensitivity studies and thus provides us with comparably high quality of the derived data products. The algorithms allow us to derive particle effective radius, and volume and surface-area concentration with comparably high confidence. The retrieval of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index still is a challenge in view of the accuracy required for these parameters in climate change studies in which light-absorption needs to be known with high accuracy. Single-scattering albedo can be computed from the retrieved microphysical parameters and allows us to categorize aerosols into high and low absorbing aerosols. We discuss the current status of these manually operated algorithms, the potentially achievable accuracy of data products, and the goals for future work on the basis of a few exemplary simulations with synthetic optical data. The optical data used in our study cover a range of Ångström exponents and extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratios that are found from lidar measurements of various aerosol types. We also tested aerosol scenarios that are considered highly unlikely, e.g., the lidar ratios fall outside the commonly accepted range of values measured with Raman lidar, even though the underlying microphysical particle properties are not uncommon. The goal of this part of the study is to test robustness of the algorithms toward their ability to identify aerosol types that have not been measured so far, but cannot be ruled out based on our current knowledge of

  12. Optical properties of aerosol contaminated cloud derived from MODIS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Lelli, Luca; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosols above/within cloud can reduce the amount of up-welling radiation in visible (VIS) and short-wave infrared and darken the spectral reflectance when compared with a spectrum of a clean cloud observed by satellite instruments (Jethva et al., 2013). Cloud properties retrieval for aerosol contaminated cases is a great challenge. Even small additional injection of aerosol particles into clouds in the cleanest regions of Earth's atmosphere will cause significant effect on those clouds and on climate forcing (Koren et al., 2014; Rosenfeld et al., 2014) because the micro-physical cloud process are non-linear with respect to the aerosol loading. The current cloud products like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ignoring the aerosol effect for the retrieval, which may cause significant error in the satellite-derived cloud properties. In this paper, a new cloud properties retrieval method, considering aerosol effect, based on the weighting-function (WF) method, is presented. The retrieval results shows that the WF retrieved cloud properties (e.g COT) agrees quite well with MODIS COT product for relative clear atmosphere (AOT ≤ 0.4) while there is a large difference for large aerosol loading. The MODIS COT product is underestimated for at least 2 - 3 times for AOT>0.4, and this underestimation increases with the increase of AOT.

  13. Cloud microphysical and optical properties from 'cloud-mode' observations during the ARM MAGIC campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Gregory, L.; Wagener, R.

    2013-12-01

    To better represent marine boundary layer clouds in climate models and to understand their feedback processes, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted the MAGIC field campaign to observe the transition from the stratocumulus to shallow trade-wind cumulus along the transect between Los Angeles, California and Honolulu, Hawaii in 2012-2013. These clouds pose great challenges for remote sensing techniques because of their highly inhomogeneous and fast evolving nature. To appropriately measure properties for such clouds at their time scale, we introduce the first marine 'cloud-mode' operation that measures zenith radiance from a sunphotometer, which has demonstrated a robust performance over lands in the worldwide sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Using cloud-mode observations, we will provide novel retrievals of cloud microphysical and optical properties, and contrast them between cloud regimes and between various retrieval techniques. This cloud-mode operation is a pathfinder not just for seagoing deployments, but also for many future deployments.

  14. Link between aerosol optical, microphysical and chemical measurements in an underground railway station in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Fortain, A.

    Measurements carried out in Paris Magenta railway station in April-May 2006 underlined a repeatable diurnal cycle of aerosol concentrations and optical properties. The average daytime PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations in such a confined space were approximately 5-30 times higher than those measured in Paris streets. Particles are mainly constituted of dust, with high concentrations of iron and other metals, but are also composed of black and organic carbon. Aerosol levels are linked to the rate at which rain and people pass through the station. Concentrations are also influenced by ambient air from the nearby streets through tunnel ventilation. During daytime approximately 70% of aerosol mass concentrations are governed by coarse absorbing particles with a low Angström exponent (˜0.8) and a low single-scattering albedo (˜0.7). The corresponding aerosol density is about 2 g cm -3 and their complex refractive index at 355 nm is close to 1.56-0.035 i. The high absorption properties are linked to the significant proportion of iron oxides together with black carbon in braking systems. During the night, particles are mostly submicronic, thus presenting a greater Angström exponent (˜2). The aerosol density is lower (1.8 g cm -3) and their complex refractive index presents a lower imaginary part (1.58-0.013 i), associated to a stronger single-scattering albedo (˜0.85-0.90), mostly influenced by the ambient air. For the first time we have assessed the emission (deposition) rates in an underground station for PM 10, PM 2.5 and black carbon concentrations to be 3314 ± 781(-1164 ± 160), 1186 ± 358(-401 ± 66) and 167 ± 46(-25 ± 9) μg m -2 h -1, respectively.

  15. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  16. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2015-02-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted in February and March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in-situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption. These measurements were used together with surface-based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in-situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles. Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. Mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717±604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247±370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Compared to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, elevated aerosol layers with increased aerosol number concentration were observed more frequently in 2012. However, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm)=8.5±4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999. By combining vertical in-situ measured particle absorption with scattering calculated with Mie-theory, layers with single-scattering albedo (SSA) values of specific source regions were derived and utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for dry conditions were found to be 0.94±0.02 and 0.91±0.02 for air masses from the Arabian Sea (and

  17. Implementation of an Aerosol-Cloud Microphysics-Radiation Coupling into the NASA Unified WRF: Simulation Results for the 6-7 August 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, J. J.; Matsui, T.; Tao, W.-K.; Tan, Q.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Chin, M.; Pickering, K.; Guy, N.; Lang, S.; Kemp, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's radiation balance directly and cloud microphysical processes indirectly via the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. These two effects have often been considered separately and independently, hence the need to assess their combined impact given the differing nature of their effects on convective clouds. To study both effects, an aerosol-microphysics-radiation coupling, including Goddard microphysics and radiation schemes, was implemented into the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF). Fully coupled NU-WRF simulations were conducted for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that passed through the Niamey, Niger area on 6-7 August 2006 during an African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) special observing period. The results suggest that rainfall is reduced when aerosol indirect effects are included, regardless of the aerosol direct effect. Daily mean radiation heating profiles in the area traversed by the MCS showed the aerosol (mainly mineral dust) direct effect had the largest impact near cloud tops just above 200 hectopascals where short-wave heating increased by about 0.8 Kelvin per day; the weakest long-wave cooling was at around 250 hectopascals. It was also found that more condensation and ice nuclei as a result of higher aerosol/dust concentrations led to increased amounts of all cloud hydrometeors because of the microphysical indirect effect, and the radiation direct effect acts to reduce precipitating cloud particles (rain, snow and graupel) in the middle and lower cloud layers while increasing the non-precipitating particles (ice) in the cirrus anvil. However, when the aerosol direct effect was activated, regardless of the indirect effect, the onset of MCS precipitation was delayed about 2 hours, in conjunction with the delay in the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. Overall, for this particular environment, model set-up and physics configuration, the effect of aerosol

  18. Aerosol climatology at Delhi in the western Indo-Gangetic Plain: Microphysics, long-term trends, and source strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Beegum, S. Naseema; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kumar, Krishan

    2013-02-01

    present the climatology of aerosol microphysics, its trends, and impact of potential sources based on the long term measurements (for a period of 11.5 years from December 2001 to May 2012) of aerosol optical depths (AOD) in the spectral range 340-1020 nm from an urban center Delhi (28.6°N, 77.3°E, 238 m mean sea level) in the western Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The study is the first ever long-term characterization of aerosols over the western IGP from the ground-based measurements. AODs are known to affect the air quality, visibility, radiative balance, and cloud microphysics of the region and IGP is one of the highest populated and polluted regions of the world. Our measurements show consistently high AOD during the entire period of observation. The seasonal variations of spectral AODs and Angstrom parameters are generally consistent every year. The AODs show a weak but statistically significant (in 95% confidence level) decreasing trend approximately -0.02/year at 500 nm, possibly, modulated by the pre-monsoon heavy dust loading during the first half of the observation period. The climatological monthly mean AOD at shorter wavelengths peaks twice, during June and November, while at longer wavelengths it shows only one peak in June. The annual variations of Angstrom exponent, α and its derivative, α' suggest the prevalence of multi-modal aerosol size distributions at Delhi. The coarse-mode aerosols dominate during summer (March-June) and monsoon (July-September) seasons, whereas fine/accumulation mode enhances during post-monsoon (October-November) and winter (December-February) seasons. Potential advection pathways have been identified using concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis of the 5 day isentropic air mass back trajectories at the observation site and their seasonal variations are discussed.

  19. Performance of McRAS-AC in the GEOS-5 AGCM: Part 1, Aerosol-Activated Cloud Microphysics, Precipitation, Radiative Effects, and Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.; Suarez, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A revised version of the Microphysics of clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert and Aerosol-Cloud interaction (McRAS-AC), including, among others, the Barahona and Nenes ice nucleation parameterization, is implemented in the GEOS-5 AGCM. Various fields from a 10-year long integration of the AGCM with McRAS-AC were compared with their counterparts from an integration of the baseline GEOS-5 AGCM, and with satellite data as observations. Generally using McRAS-AC reduced biases in cloud fields and cloud radiative effects are much better over most of the regions of the Earth. Two weaknesses are identified in the McRAS-AC runs, namely, too few cloud particles around 40S-60S, and too high cloud water path during northern hemisphere summer over the Gulf Stream and North Pacific. Sensitivity analyses showed that these biases potentially originated from biases in the aerosol input. The first bias is largely eliminated in a sensitivity test using 50% smaller aerosol particles, while the second bias is much reduced when interactive aerosol chemistry was turned on. The main drawback of McRAS-AC is dearth of low-level marine stratus clouds, probably due to lack of dry-convection, not yet implemented into the cloud scheme. Despite these biases, McRAS-AC does simulate realistic clouds and their optical properties that can improve with better aerosol-input and thereby has the potential to be a valuable tool for climate modeling research because of its aerosol indirect effect simulation capabilities involving prediction of cloud particle number concentration and effective particle size for both convective and stratiform clouds is quite realistic.

  20. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  1. Forest Fire Smoke Layers Observed in the Free Troposphere over Portugal with a Multiwavelength Raman Lidar: Optical and Microphysical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Silva, Ana Maria; Wagner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of biomass burning aerosols, measured in 2011 with a multiwavelength Raman lidar, are presented. The transportation time, within 1-2 days (or less), pointed towards the presence of relatively fresh smoke particles over the site. Some strong layers aloft were observed with particle backscatter and extinction coefficients (at 355 nm) greater than 5 Mm−1 sr−1 and close to 300 Mm−1, respectively. The particle intensive optical properties showed features different from the ones reported for aged smoke, but rather consistent with fresh smoke. The Ångström exponents were generally high, mainly above 1.4, indicating a dominating accumulation mode. Weak depolarization values, as shown by the small depolarization ratio of 5% or lower, were measured. Furthermore, the lidar ratio presented no clear wavelength dependency. The inversion of the lidar signals provided a set of microphysical properties including particle effective radius below 0.2 μm, which is less than values previously observed for aged smoke particles. Real and imaginary parts of refractive index of about 1.5-1.6 and 0.02i, respectively, were derived. The single scattering albedo was in the range between 0.85 and 0.93; these last two quantities indicate the nonnegligible absorbing characteristics of the observed particles. PMID:25114964

  2. Forest fire smoke layers observed in the free troposphere over Portugal with a multiwavelength Raman lidar: optical and microphysical properties.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Preißler, Jana; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Silva, Ana Maria; Wagner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of biomass burning aerosols, measured in 2011 with a multiwavelength Raman lidar, are presented. The transportation time, within 1-2 days (or less), pointed towards the presence of relatively fresh smoke particles over the site. Some strong layers aloft were observed with particle backscatter and extinction coefficients (at 355 nm) greater than 5 Mm(-1)sr(-1) and close to 300 Mm(-1), respectively. The particle intensive optical properties showed features different from the ones reported for aged smoke, but rather consistent with fresh smoke. The Ångström exponents were generally high, mainly above 1.4, indicating a dominating accumulation mode. Weak depolarization values, as shown by the small depolarization ratio of 5% or lower, were measured. Furthermore, the lidar ratio presented no clear wavelength dependency. The inversion of the lidar signals provided a set of microphysical properties including particle effective radius below 0.2 μm, which is less than values previously observed for aged smoke particles. Real and imaginary parts of refractive index of about 1.5-1.6 and 0.02i, respectively, were derived. The single scattering albedo was in the range between 0.85 and 0.93; these last two quantities indicate the nonnegligible absorbing characteristics of the observed particles. PMID:25114964

  3. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  4. Parameterizations of the Vertical Variability of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia; Heymsfield, Andrew; Gerber, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Our multi-investigator effort was targeted at the following areas of interest to CRYSTAL-FACE: (1) the water budgets of anvils, (2) parameterizations of the particle size distributions and related microphysical and optical properties (3) characterizations of the primary ice particle habits, (4) the relationship of the optical properties to the microphysics and particle habits, and (5) investigation of the ice-nuclei types and mechanisms in anvil cirrus. Dr. Twohy's effort focused on (l), (2), and (5), with the measurement and analysis of ice water content and cirrus residual nuclei using the counterflow virtual impactor (CVI).

  5. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  6. Effects of microphysics and aerosols on TC Intensity and structure as seen from high resolution WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, A.; Lynn, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    We simulate Hurricane Irene (2011) that moved northward along the eastern coast of the United States and weakened much faster than was predicted. The minimum pressure in Irene occurred about 40 h later than the time of maximum wind speed. Simulations performed with WRF with the spectral bin microphysics (SBM) showed that both the weakening of Irene and the time shift between maximum of wind and the minimum of pressure were caused by the effects of aerosols leading to the intensification of convection at its periphery resulting in an increase in size. Irena was also simulated using different bulk-parameterization schemes. The dispersion of TC in simulations using different schemes is very high, which indicates high sensitivity of TC intensity to microphysical processes. Despite the fact that new bulk-parameterization schemes simulated TC intensity quite well, non of bulk-schemes were able to predict the time shift between maximum wind and minimum surface pressure. The plausible reason is a too weak sensitivity of bulk schemes to aerosols.

  7. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  8. A Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study on Properties of Cloud Microphysics, Convection, and Precipitation for a Squall Line Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Morrison, H.; Varble, A.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Collis, S. M.; North, K.; Kollias, P.

    2015-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult (1) to further our understanding of deep convection and (2) to define "benchmarks" and recommendations for their use in parameterization developments. Past model intercomparison studies used different models with different complexities of dynamic-microphysics interactions, making it hard to isolate the causes of differences between simulations. In this intercomparison study, we employed a much more constrained approach - with the same model and same experiment setups for simulations with different cloud microphysics schemes (one-moment, two-moment, and bin models). Both the piggybacking and interactive approaches are employed to explore the major microphysical processes that control the model differences and the significance of their feedback to dynamics through latent heating/cooling and cold pool characteristics. Real-case simulations are conducted for the squall line case 20 May 2011 from the MC3E field campaign. Results from the piggybacking approach show substantially different responses of the microphysics schemes to the same dynamical fields. Although the interactive microphysics-dynamics simulations buffer some differences compared with those from the piggyback runs, large differences still exist and are mainly contributed by ice microphysical processes parameterizations. The presentation will include in-depth analyses of the major microphysical processes for the squall line case, the significance of the feedback of the processes to dynamics, and how those results differ in different cloud microphysics schemes.

  9. Polar stratospheric clouds in the 1998-2003 Antarctic vortex: Microphysical modeling and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, C. M.; Drdla, K.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Alfred, J.; Hoppel, K. W.

    2006-09-01

    The Integrated Microphysics and Aerosol Chemistry on Trajectories (IMPACT) model is used to study polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and evolution in the Antarctic vortex. The model is applied to individual air parcel trajectories driven by UK Met Office (UKMO) wind and temperature fields. The IMPACT model calculates the parcel microphysics, including the formation and sedimentation of ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), and supercooled ternary solution (STS) aerosols. Model results are validated by comparison with data obtained by the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III solar occultation instrument and are examined for 6 years of POAM data (1998-2003). Comparisons of POAM water vapor and aerosol extinction measurements to the model results help to constrain three microphysical parameters influencing the formation and growth of both type I and type II PSCs. Principally, measurements of aerosol extinction prove to be valuable in differentiating model runs; the relationship of aerosol extinction to temperature is determined by the various particle types as they form and grow. Comparison of IMPACT calculations of this relationship to POAM measurements suggests that the initial fraction of nuclei available for heterogeneous NAT freezing is approximately 0.02% of all aerosols. Constraints are also placed on the accommodation coefficient of ice and the NAT-ice lattice compatibility. However, these two parameters have similar effects on the extinction-temperature relationship, and thus a range of values are permissible for each.

  10. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  11. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  12. Satellite Retrieval of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, G.; Robles Gonzalez, C.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Decae, R.

    SATELLITE RETRIEVAL of AEROSOL PROPERTIES G. de Leeuw, C. Robles Gonzalez, J. Kusmierczyk-Michulec and R. Decae TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory, The Hague, The Netherlands; deleeuw@fel.tno.nl Methods to retrieve aerosol properties over land and over sea were explored. The dual view offered by the ATSR-2 aboard ERS-2 was used by Veefkind et al., 1998. The retrieved AOD (aerosol optical depth) values compare favourably with collocated sun photometer measurements, with an accuracy of 0.06 +/- 0.05 in AOD. An algorithm developed for GOME on ERS-2 takes advantage of the low surface reflection in the UV (Veefkind et al., 2000). AOD values retrieved from ATSR-2 and GOME data over western Europe are consistent. The results were used to produce a map of mean AOD values over Europe for one month (Robles-Gonzalez et al., 2000). The ATSR-2 is al- gorithm is now extended with other aerosol types with the aim to apply it over the In- dian Ocean. A new algorithm is being developed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to be launched in 2003 on the NASA EOS-AURA satellite. It is expected that, based on the different scattering and absorption properties of various aerosol types, five major aerosol classes can be distinguished. The experience with the retrieval of aerosol properties by using several wavelength bands is used to develop an algorithm for Sciamachy to retrieve aerosol properties both over land and over the ocean which takes advantage of the wavelengths from the UV to the IR. The variation of the AOD with wavelength is described by the Angstrom parameter. The AOD and the Angstrom parameter together yield information on the aerosol size distribution, integrated over the column. Analysis of sunphotometer data indicates a relation between the Angstrom parameter and the mass ratio of certain aerosols (black carbon, organic carbon and sea salt) to the total particulate matter. This relation has been further explored and was applied to satellite data over land to

  13. Retrieval of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties from SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, S.; Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Penning de Vries, M. J.; Hoermann, C.; von Savigny, C.; Deutschmann, T.; Wagner, T.

    2012-12-01

    Since the start of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement program in 1975 satellites have been improving our understanding of the global distribution of trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Observations in occultation and limb geometry provide profile information on stratospheric aerosol, which have an important influence on the global radiation budget (e.g., after strong volcanic eruptions) and the stratospheric ozone chemistry (e.g., the chlorine activation inside the polar vortex). The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT performed measurements in limb geometry for almost ten years between 2002 and 2012. Its vertical resolution of about 3.3 km at the tangent point and the broad spectral range (UV/VIS/NIR) allow to retrieve profile information of stratospheric trace gases (e.g., O3, NO2, BrO or OClO) and stratospheric aerosol properties. Pioneering studies (e.g., Savigny et al., 2005) showed that in particular from color indices (including the near IR spectral range) signatures of stratospheric aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can be retrieved. In our study we investigate the sensitivity of SCIAMACHY's broad spectral range to aerosol particle properties by comparing measured spectra with simulated results from the 3D full spherical Monte Carlo Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model McArtim. In particular, we focus on the absorption properties in the UV spectral range, the extinction coefficient and the Angström exponent. The final aim of our study is to use SCIAMACHY limb measurements for the profile retrieval of optical parameters (e.g., absorption and phase function) from which microphysical properties (e.g., mean aerosol particle diameter) of the stratospheric aerosol particles can be deduced.

  14. Are remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties a suitable proxy for cloud condensation nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions arguably remain the single greatest uncertainty among anthropogenic perturbations of the climate system. The large uncertainties associated with their representation in global aerosol climate models have emphasised the need for observational studies. In-situ measurements provide a detailed description of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties, providing strong observational constraints on aerosol cloud interactions. However, their spatio-temporal sampling is sparse so that "observational" estimates of global aerosol cloud interactions generally rely on co-located satellite retrievals of aerosol radiative properties and cloud properties. In this study I will critically evaluate the suitability of remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol index (AI) and aerosol fine mode optical depth, as proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). This analysis based on the fully self-consistent calculation of aerosol radiative properties and CCN in the aerosol climate model ECHAM-HAM. Correlating simulated aerosol radiative properties with CCN at a range of supersaturations (sampling different sizes/composition of the aerosol spectrum) highlights limitations in the suitability of AOD and AI as proxy for CCN. These discrepancies arise from a range of factors, including the limited representativeness of column-integrated aerosol radiative properties for surface or cloud-base CCN as well as the effects of humidity growth of aerosols, affecting AOD/AI but not CCN. Simulated correlations show a strong regional variability, with significant implications for "observational" estimates of aerosol cloud interactions from remote-sensing as well as in-situ data.

  15. The structure and microphysical properties of the clouds of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marov, M. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented from the processing and interpretation of measurement data in the descent capsules of the automatic stations Venera-9 and Venera-10 for the characteristics of light scattering in the atmosphere of Venus by means of onboard nephelometers. A model for the aerosol component in the planet's atmosphere in the altitude range 62-14 km is proposed.

  16. Contrail microphysical properties and radiative forcing over the Northern Hemisphere derived using MODIS infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedka, S. T.; Minnis, P.; Duda, D. P.; Spangenberg, D.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary ways that air traffic affects the Earth's radiation budget is through the formation of contrails. In order to quantify the radiative impact of contrails, one must assess their macro and microphysical properties (e.g. contrail temperature, optical depth and effective particle size) as well as the characteristics of the environment in which they occur (e.g. background radiation field and cloud properties). In-situ measurements of contrail microphysical properties are limited, and hence the retrieval of such properties from remotely sensed satellite data is useful. This paper details the ongoing progress being made to retrieve contrail properties and calculate the contrail radiative forcing from 2 years of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra data. Contrail microphysical properties from the seasonal months (January, April, July, October) of 2006 and 2012 are derived using an infrared-only heritage algorithm developed at NASA Langley for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. Results are subset by day/night, although the same retrieval algorithm will be used for all granules. Contrail properties and background cloud properties are then used as input into the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to compute the overall contrail radiative forcing.

  17. Comparison of modeled optical properties of Saharan mineral dust aerosols with SAMUM lidar and photometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Wiegner, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosols are, for example, relevant for the radiative transfer in Earth's atmosphere. An important source of information on this aerosol type is provided by remote sensing using lidar systems and sun/sky photometers. We investigate the sensitivity of lidar and photometer observations to the microphysical aerosol properties in a numerical study. Knowledge of this sensitivity is required for the development of microphysical retrieval algorithms. Until recently, such retrieval algorithms were applied only to lidar or photometer observations. Quite different sensitivities for lidar and photometer are found in our study, suggesting that synergistic effects can be expected from combining the observations from both techniques. Furthermore, we compare the modeled aerosol properties to observations of Saharan mineral dust aerosols performed during the SAMUM field campaign. We determined aerosol ensembles that are consistent with the lidar as well as the photometer observations, confirming the feasibility of combining the observations from both techniques. The consistent aerosol ensembles are based on the desert mixture from the OPAC aerosol dataset, and were improved by considering mixing of absorbing and non-absorbing irregularly shaped particles.

  18. Separating aerosol microphysical effects and satellite measurement artifacts of the relationships between warm rain onset height and aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yannian; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Yu, Xing; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-08-01

    The high resolution (375 m) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite on board the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership satellite allows retrieving relatively accurately the vertical evolution of convective cloud drop effective radius (re) with height or temperature. A tight relationship is found over SE Asia and the adjacent seas during summer between the cloud-free aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the cloud thickness required for the initiation of warm rain, as represented by the satellite-retrieved cloud droplet re of 14 µm, for a subset of conditions that minimize measurement artifacts. This cloud depth (ΔT14) is parameterized as the difference between the cloud base temperature and the temperature at the height where re exceeds 14 µm (T14). For a unit increase of AOD, the height of rain initiation is increased by about 5.5 km. The concern of data artifacts due to the increase in AOD near clouds was mitigated by selecting only scenes with cloud fraction (CF) < 0.1. For CF > 0.1 and ΔT14 > ~20°C, the increase of ΔT14 gradually levels off with further increase of AOD, possibly because the AOD is enhanced by aerosol upward transport and detrainment through the clouds below the T14 isotherm. The bias in the retrieved re due to the different geometries of solar illumination was also quantified. It was shown that the retrievals are valid only for backscatter views or when avoiding scenes with significant amount of cloud self-shadowing. These artifacts might have contributed to past reported relationships between cloud properties and AOD.

  19. Investigation of warm-cloud microphysics using a multi-component cloud model: Interactive effects of the aerosol spectrum. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zahn, S.G.

    1993-12-01

    Clouds, especially low, warm, boundary-layer clouds, play an important role in regulating the earth's climate due to their significant contribution to the global albedo. The radiative effects of individual clouds are controlled largely by cloud microstructure, which is itself sensitive to the concentration and spectral distribution of the atmospheric aerosol. Increases in aerosol particle concentrations from anthropogenic activity could result in increased cloud albedo and global cloudiness, increasing the amount of reflected solar radiation. However, the effects of increased aerosol particle concentrations could be offset by the presence of giant or ultragiant aerosol particles. A one-dimensional, multi-component microphysical cloud model has been used to demonstrate the effects of aerosol particle spectral variations on the microstructure of warm clouds. Simulations performed with this model demonstrate that the introduction of increased concentrations of giant aerosol particles has a destabilizing effect on the cloud microstructure. Also, it is shown that warm-cloud microphysical processes modify the aerosol particle spectrum, favoring the generation of the largest sized particles via the collision-coalescence process. These simulations provide further evidence that the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microstructure must be addressed when considering global climate forecasts.

  20. Comparisons of cirrus cloud microphysical properties between polluted and pristine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Jensen, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds occur in the upper troposphere at altitudes where atmospheric radiative forcing is most sensitive to perturbations of water vapor concentration and water phase. The formation of cirrus clouds influences the distributions of water in both vapor and ice forms. The radiative properties of cirrus depend strongly on particle sizes. Currently it is still unclear how the formation of cirrus clouds and their microphysical properties are influenced by anthropogenic emissions (e.g., industrial emission and biomass burning). If anthropogenic emissions influence cirrus formation in a significant manner, then one should expect a systematic difference in cirrus properties between pristine (clean) air and polluted air. Because of the pollution contrasts between the Southern (SH) and Northern Hemispheres (NH), cirrus properties could have hemispheric differences as well. Therefore, we study high-resolution (~200 m), in-situ observations from two global flight campaigns: 1) the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) global campaign in 2009-2011 funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), and 2) the Interhemispheric Differences In Cirrus Properties from Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) campaign in 2000 funded by the European Union and participating research institutions. To investigate the changes of cirrus clouds by anthropogenic emissions, we compare ice crystal distributions in polluted and pristine air, in terms of their frequency occurrence, number concentration (Nc) and mean diameter (i.e., effective-mean Deff and volume-mean Dc). Total aerosol concentration is used to represent the combined influence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols. In addition, measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio is used to discriminate between polluted and pristine air masses. All analyses are restricted to temperatures ≤ -40°C to exclude mixed-phased clouds. The HIPPO campaign observations were obtained over the North America continent and the central Pacific Ocean

  1. Examining the Sensitivity of Regional Scale Cloud Properties to Convective Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storer, R. L.; Zhang, G. J.; Song, X.

    2014-12-01

    A two-moment microphysics scheme for deep convection was implemented in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) by Song et al. (2012). The new scheme improved hydrometeor profiles in deep convective clouds and increased deep convective detrainment, reducing the negative biases in low and mid-level cloud fraction and liquid water path compared to observations. Here, we examine in more detail the impacts of this improved microphysical representation on regional scale water and radiation budgets. As the primary source of cloud water for stratus clouds is detrainment from deep and shallow convection, the enhanced convective activity leads to larger stratus cloud fractions, higher cloud water content, and more stratiform precipitation in all oceanic regions examined, particularly in the subtropics. This can be seen also in increased values of net cloud radiative forcing. Over land regions, cloud amounts are reduced, leading to weaker cloud forcing and increased OLR. The magnitude and, occasionally, the sign of the changes in cloud properties can differ if scaled by the precipitation produced in a region, and much of the changes occur in the mixed phase region of the atmosphere. This indicates that the complex interactions between liquid and ice phase microphysics can effect changes in regional scale circulations. We will present details of the large scale water and radiation budgets and the microphysical budgets of cloud liquid and ice for several regions. Results will be compared to cloud resolving model simulations.

  2. Lidar investigations on the structure and microphysical properties of cirrus at a tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N and 79.2° E), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayeshlal, Gloryselvan S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Motty, Gopinathan Nair S.; Dhaman, Reji K.; Krishnakumar, Vasudevannair; Mahadevan Pillai, Vellara P.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds are mainly composed of ice crystals and are known to be the major natural contributors to radiative forcing in the Earth's atmosphere system. Describing the formation and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and their role in climate models remain a challenging study. Lidar is a unique instrument, which provides the information on the optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds with good spatial and temporal resolutions. In this study we present the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds and their temporal variability, obtained using the ground based dual polarisation lidar at the tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N and 79.2° E), India, during the period January2009 to March 2011. Using the method developed in house for deriving range dependent lidar ratio (LR), the lidar measurements are used for deriving the extinction coefficient and to obtain the nature of the scatterers present in the cloud. It is noted that lidar ratio plays an important role and its measurements indicate directly the type of the ice nucleating aerosol particles present in the cloud. The long term data obtained on the structure of the cirrus in this regard are useful in the climate modelling studies.

  3. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program May 2003 Intensive Operations Period Examining Aerosol Properties and Radiative Influences: Preface to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Ogren, John; Schmid, Beat; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Sheridan, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate by scattering and absorbing radiation in clear air (direct effects) and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, modifying the microphysical properties of clouds, influencing radiation and precipitation development (indirect effects). Much of present uncertainty in forcing of climate change is due to uncertainty in the relations between aerosol microphysical and optical properties and their radiative influences (direct effects) and between microphysical properties and their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei at given supersaturations (indirect effects). This paper introduces a special section that reports on a field campaign conducted at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in North Central Oklahoma in May, 2003, examining these relations using in situ airborne measurements and surface-, airborne-, and space-based remote sensing.

  4. Improving the Representation of Snow Crystal Properties Within a Single-Moment Microphysics Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    As computational resources continue their expansion, weather forecast models are transitioning to the use of parameterizations that predict the evolution of hydrometeors and their microphysical processes, rather than estimating the bulk effects of clouds and precipitation that occur on a sub-grid scale. These parameterizations are referred to as single-moment, bulk water microphysics schemes, as they predict the total water mass among hydrometeors in a limited number of classes. Although the development of single moment microphysics schemes have often been driven by the need to predict the structure of convective storms, they may also provide value in predicting accumulations of snowfall. Predicting the accumulation of snowfall presents unique challenges to forecasters and microphysics schemes. In cases where surface temperatures are near freezing, accumulated depth often depends upon the snowfall rate and the ability to overcome an initial warm layer. Precipitation efficiency relates to the dominant ice crystal habit, as dendrites and plates have relatively large surface areas for the accretion of cloud water and ice, but are only favored within a narrow range of ice supersaturation and temperature. Forecast models and their parameterizations must accurately represent the characteristics of snow crystal populations, such as their size distribution, bulk density and fall speed. These properties relate to the vertical distribution of ice within simulated clouds, the temperature profile through latent heat release, and the eventual precipitation rate measured at the surface. The NASA Goddard, single-moment microphysics scheme is available to the operational forecast community as an option within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The NASA Goddard scheme predicts the occurrence of up to six classes of water mass: vapor, cloud ice, cloud water, rain, snow and either graupel or hail.

  5. Use of the NASA GEOS-5 SEAC4RS Meteorological and Aerosol Reanalysis for assessing simulated aerosol optical properties as a function of smoke age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Buchard, V.; Govindaraju, R.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Russell, P. B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Wagner, N.; Lack, D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model, which includes an online aerosol module, provided chemical and weather forecasts during the SEAC4RS field campaign. For post-mission analysis, we have produced a high resolution (25 km) meteorological and aerosol reanalysis for the entire campaign period. In addition to the full meteorological observing system used for routine NWP, we assimilate 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra satellites), ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and the MISR instrument (over bright surfaces only). Daily biomass burning emissions of CO, CO2, SO2, and aerosols are derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We have also introduced novel smoke "age" tracers, which provide, for a given time, a snapshot histogram of the age of simulated smoke aerosol. Because GEOS-5 assimilates remotely sensed AOD data, it generally reproduces observed (column) AOD compared to, for example, the airborne 4-STAR instrument. Constraining AOD, however, does not imply a good representation of either the vertical profile or the aerosol microphysical properties (e.g., composition, absorption). We do find a reasonable vertical structure for aerosols is attained in the model, provided actual smoke injection heights are not much above the planetary boundary layer, as verified with observations from DIAL/HRSL aboard the DC8. The translation of the simulated aerosol microphysical properties to total column AOD, needed in the aerosol assimilation step, is based on prescribed mass extinction efficiencies that depend on wavelength, composition, and relative humidity. Here we also evaluate the performance of the simulated aerosol speciation by examining in situ retrievals of aerosol absorption/single scattering albedo and scattering growth factor (f(RH)) from the LARGE and AOP suite of instruments. Putting these comparisons in the context of smoke age as diagnosed by the model helps us to

  6. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Fast, Jerome D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-30

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimation of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we developed an aerosol module, designated Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can represent these parameters explicitly by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 µm to resolve both aerosol size (12 bins) and BC mixing state (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters from 1 to 40 nm are resolved using an additional 8 size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module was implemented in the WRF-chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. BC absorption enhancement by coating materials was about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement was estimated to be 10 – 20% over northern East Asia and 20 – 35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast was also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increased CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increased CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. Application of ATRAS to East Asia also showed that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depended strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA

  7. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  8. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~ 7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~ 15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~ 1 μg m - 3 . The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (> 1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (< 1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  9. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S K; Vinoj, V; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 μg m-3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (>1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (<1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  10. Aerosol Mass Loading, Mixing State, Size and Number in Present Day (2000) and Future (2100): Study with the Advanced Particle Microphysics (APM) module in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, G.; Yu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols affect the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical properties, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). One of the key challenges in quantifying the aerosol direct and indirect effects is to deep our understanding about the size distribution, size-resolved composition, and mixing state of aerosols. However, detailed information on size distribution and mixing state is often not available or incomplete in current climate models. Here, we incorporated APM into CESM. APM is a multi-type, multi-component (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SOA, BC, OC, dust, and sea salt), size-resolved particle microphysics model. Online chemistry, up-to-date nucleation, oxidation aging of medium-volatile and semi-volatile organic gases, aerosol-cloud interaction with stratiform cloud, shallow convection cloud, and deep convection cloud are considered. The amounts of secondary species coated on primary particles, through condensation, coagulation, equilibrium uptake, and aqueous chemistry, are also tracked. Model results are compared with aerosol mass observed by IMPROVE/EMEP, vertical structure of global particle number from aircraft-based field campaigns, particle and cloud condensation nuclei number at ground-based stations, aerosol optical properties retrieved by several satellites. Model results can capture the major characteristics shown in these observations. With this model system, we find that global burdens of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, BC, OC from 2000 to 2100, under scenario RCP 4.5 where total radiative forcing is stabilized before 2100, are decreased by 44%, 50%, 43%, 40%, 40%, respectively. Dust and sea salt increase slightly. Global burdens of secondary species coated on BCOC, dust, and sea salt are deceased by 34%, 30% and 60%, respectively. Global averaged aerosol number in the lower troposphere (from surface to 3 km) is significantly decreased, especially for particles smaller than

  11. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  12. In Situ Measurements of Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Cirrus and Anvil Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P.; Baker, B.; Pilson, B.

    2003-12-01

    In situ microphysical and radiative properties of mid-latitude cirrus, anvil and tropical anvil clouds, based on research flights conducted with the SPEC Learjet, the NASA WB-57 and DC-8, and the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft, are presented. The measurements were collected in Colorado, Utah, Oklahoma, Florida and Kwajalein. All of the research aircraft were equipped with a standard complement of microphysical sensors and optical probes, plus a cloud particle imager (CPI), which produces high-definition (2.3 micron pixel) digital images of ice particles. The CPI data provide improved measurements of particle shape and size, facilitating better calculations of radiative properties of cirrus and anvil clouds. Based on the measurements, average mid-latitude cirrus, and mid-latitude and tropical cirrus microphysical properties of particle size distribution, crystal habit, ice water content, extinction coefficient, effective radius and optical depth are derived. The data show a distinct difference between particle characteristics in mid-latitude cirrus and anvil clouds. In cirrus, the predominate crystal type (weighted by area or mass) is the bullet rosette, a polycrystalline structure typical of crystal formation at temperatures colder than -30 C. Conversely, although anvils occur at temperatures similar to cirrus, bullet rosettes are very rare in anvils. Instead crystal types in anvils are typical of those formed at temperatures warmer than - 30 C. There is also a notable difference in microphysical and radiative characteristics between mid-latitude, Florida, and tropical (Kwajalein) anvils. Tropical anvils are comprised mainly of single crystals, mostly irregular blocky-shapes. In mid-latitude and Florida anvils, there are more aggregates and often chains of small particles that may be formed as a result of the higher electric fields in continental clouds. The impact of crystal type on calculations of radiative transfer are also considered.

  13. The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

    2011-05-31

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

  14. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom α, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause

  15. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  16. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; et al

    2016-06-09

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analyzing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analyzed period corresponds to the wet seasonmore » (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km–1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision–coalescence process. The

  17. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km-1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision-coalescence process. The overall shape

  18. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  19. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  20. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  1. Simulation of the effects of aerosol on mixed-phase orographic clouds using the WRF model with a detailed bin microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hui; Yin, Yan; Jin, Lianji; Chen, Qian; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-08-01

    The Weather Research Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model coupled with a detailed bin microphysics scheme is used to investigate the impact of aerosol particles serving as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei on orographic clouds and precipitation. A mixed-phase orographic cloud developed under two scenarios of aerosol (a typical continental background and a relatively polluted urban condition) and ice nuclei over an idealized mountain is simulated. The results show that, when the initial aerosol condition is changed from the relatively clean case to the polluted scenario, more droplets are activated, leading to a delay in precipitation, but the precipitation amount over the terrain is increased by about 10%. A detailed analysis of the microphysical processes indicates that ice-phase particles play an important role in cloud development, and their contribution to precipitation becomes more important with increasing aerosol particle concentrations. The growth of ice-phase particles through riming and Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen regime is more effective under more polluted conditions, mainly due to the increased number of droplets with a diameter of 10-30 µm. Sensitivity tests also show that a tenfold increase in the concentration of ice crystals formed from ice nucleation leads to about 7% increase in precipitation, and the sensitivity of the precipitation to changes in the concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles is becoming less pronounced when the concentration of ice crystals is also increased.

  2. Studying the influence of temperature and pressure on microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan; Sorin-Nicolae, Vajaiac; Mihai, Cimpuieru

    2015-04-01

    One cloud type for which the formation and evolution process is not well-understood is the mixed-phase type. In general mixed-phase clouds consist of liquid droplets and ice crystals. The temperature interval within both liquid droplets and ice crystals can potentially coexist is limited to 0 °C and - 40 °C. Mixed-phase clouds account for 20% to 30% of the global cloud coverage. The need to understand the microphysical characteristics of mixed-phase clouds to improve numerical forecast modeling and radiative transfer calculation is of major interest in the atmospheric community. In the past, studies of cloud phase composition have been significantly limited by a lack of aircraft instruments capable of discriminating between the ice and liquid phase for a wide range of particle sizes. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote-sensing techniques. The knowledge of the temperature and pressure variation during the airborne measurements is crucial in order to understand their influence on the cloud dynamics and also their role in the cloud formation processes like accretion and coalescence. Therefore, in this paper is presented a comprehensive study of cloud microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds in focus of the influence of temperature and pressure variation on both, cloud dynamics and the cloud formation processes, using measurements performed with the ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research in property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS). The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 µm) and a HAWKEYE cloud probe. The analyzed data in this

  3. Effects of systematic and random errors on the retrieval of particle microphysical properties from multiwavelength lidar measurements using inversion with regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Whiteman, D. N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we study the effects of systematic and random errors on the inversion of multiwavelength (MW) lidar data using the well-known regularization technique to obtain vertically resolved aerosol microphysical properties. The software implementation used here was developed at the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) in Troitsk (Russia) in conjunction with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Its applicability to Raman lidar systems based on backscattering measurements at three wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and extinction measurements at two wavelengths (355 and 532 nm) has been demonstrated widely. The systematic error sensitivity is quantified by first determining the retrieved parameters for a given set of optical input data consistent with three different sets of aerosol physical parameters. Then each optical input is perturbed by varying amounts and the inversion is repeated. Using bimodal aerosol size distributions, we find a generally linear dependence of the retrieved errors in the microphysical properties on the induced systematic errors in the optical data. For the retrievals of effective radius, number/surface/volume concentrations and fine-mode radius and volume, we find that these results are not significantly affected by the range of the constraints used in inversions. But significant sensitivity was found to the allowed range of the imaginary part of the particle refractive index. Our results also indicate that there exists an additive property for the deviations induced by the biases present in the individual optical data. This property permits the results here to be used to predict deviations in retrieved parameters when multiple input optical data are biased simultaneously as well as to study the influence of random errors on the retrievals. The above results are applied to questions regarding lidar design, in particular for the spaceborne multiwavelength lidar under consideration for the upcoming ACE mission.

  4. Effects of Systematic and Random Errors on the Retrieval of Particle Microphysical Properties from Multiwavelength Lidar Measurements Using Inversion with Regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Whiteman, David N.; Veselovskii, Igor; Kolgotin, Alexei; Korenskiy, Michael; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the effects of systematic and random errors on the inversion of multiwavelength (MW) lidar data using the well-known regularization technique to obtain vertically resolved aerosol microphysical properties. The software implementation used here was developed at the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) in Troitsk (Russia) in conjunction with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Its applicability to Raman lidar systems based on backscattering measurements at three wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and extinction measurements at two wavelengths (355 and 532 nm) has been demonstrated widely. The systematic error sensitivity is quantified by first determining the retrieved parameters for a given set of optical input data consistent with three different sets of aerosol physical parameters. Then each optical input is perturbed by varying amounts and the inversion is repeated. Using bimodal aerosol size distributions, we find a generally linear dependence of the retrieved errors in the microphysical properties on the induced systematic errors in the optical data. For the retrievals of effective radius, number/surface/volume concentrations and fine-mode radius and volume, we find that these results are not significantly affected by the range of the constraints used in inversions. But significant sensitivity was found to the allowed range of the imaginary part of the particle refractive index. Our results also indicate that there exists an additive property for the deviations induced by the biases present in the individual optical data. This property permits the results here to be used to predict deviations in retrieved parameters when multiple input optical data are biased simultaneously as well as to study the influence of random errors on the retrievals. The above results are applied to questions regarding lidar design, in particular for the spaceborne multiwavelength lidar under consideration for the upcoming ACE mission.

  5. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations contain large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. The development and deployment of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sunphotometer network and SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile supersite are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To characterize the regional natural and anthropogenic aerosols, AERONET is an internationally federated network of unique sunphotometry that contains more than 250 permanent sites worldwide. Since 1993, there are more than 480 million aerosol optical depth observations and about 15 sites have continuous records longer than 10 years for annual/seasonal trend analyses. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instrument into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over eight years, SMART-COMMIT have gradually refine( and been proven vital for field deployment. In this paper, we will demonstrate the

  6. A two-habit model for the microphysical and optical properties of ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, P.; Minnis, P.; Loeb, N.; Kato, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Schmitt, C.

    2014-12-01

    To provide a better representation of natural ice clouds, a novel ice cloud model is developed by assuming an ice cloud to consist of an ensemble of hexagonal columns and 20-element aggregates with specific habit fractions at each particle size bin. The microphysical and optical properties of this two-habit model (THM) are compared with both laboratory and in situ measurements, and its performance in downstream satellite remote sensing applications is assessed. The ice water contents and median mass diameters calculated based on the THM closely agree with in situ measurements made during 11 field campaigns. In this study, the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice crystals are calculated with a combination of the invariant imbedding T matrix, pseudo-spectral time domain, and improved geometric-optics methods over an entire practical range of particle sizes. The phase functions, calculated based on the THM, show close agreement with counterparts from laboratory and in situ measurements and from satellite-based retrievals. When the THM is applied to the retrievals of cloud microphysical and optical properties from MODIS (the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations, excellent spectral consistency is achieved; specifically, the retrieved cloud optical thicknesses based on the visible/near infrared bands and the thermal infrared bands agree quite well. Furthermore, a comparison between the polarized reflectivities observed by the PARASOL satellite and from theoretical simulations illustrates that the THM can be used to represent ice cloud polarization properties.

  7. Uncertainty of Microphysics Schemes in CRMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W. K.; van den Heever, S. C.; Wu, D.; Saleeby, S. M.; Lang, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysics is the framework through which to understand the links between interactive aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes. These processes play a critical role in the water and energy cycle. CRMs with advanced microphysics schemes have been used to study the interaction between aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes at high resolution. But, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. This has arisen, in part, from the fact microphysical processes cannot be measured directly; instead, cloud properties, which can be measured, are and have been used to validate model results. The utilization of current and future global high-resolution models is rapidly increasing and are at what has been traditional CRM resolutions and are using microphysics schemes that were developed in traditional CRMs. A potential NASA satellite mission called the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CaPPM) is currently being planned for submission to the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey. This mission could provide the necessary global estimates of cloud and precipitation properties with which to evaluate and improve dynamical and microphysical parameterizations and the feedbacks. In order to facilitate the development of this mission, CRM simulations have been conducted to identify microphysical processes responsible for the greatest uncertainties in CRMs. In this talk, we will present results from numerical simulations conducted using two CRMs (NU-WRF and RAMS) with different dynamics, radiation, land surface and microphysics schemes. Specifically, we will conduct sensitivity tests to examine the uncertainty of the some of the key ice processes (i.e. riming, melting, freezing and shedding) in these two-microphysics schemes. The idea is to quantify how these two different models' respond (surface rainfall and its intensity, strength of cloud drafts, LWP/IWP, convective-stratiform-anvil area distribution) to changes of these key ice

  8. FINAL REPORT: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew D

    2007-10-01

    This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.

  9. Decadal simulation and comprehensive evaluation of CESM/CAM5.1 with advanced chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Zhang, Yang; Glotfelty, Tim; He, Ruoying; Bennartz, Ralf; Rausch, John; Sartelet, Karine

    2015-03-01

    Earth system models have been used for climate predictions in recent years due to their capabilities to include biogeochemical cycles, human impacts, as well as coupled and interactive representations of Earth system components (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice). In this work, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with advanced chemistry and aerosol treatments, referred to as CESM-NCSU, is applied for decadal (2001-2010) global climate predictions. A comprehensive evaluation is performed focusing on the atmospheric component—the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) by comparing simulation results with observations/reanalysis data and CESM ensemble simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The improved model can predict most meteorological and radiative variables relatively well with normalized mean biases (NMBs) of -14.1 to -9.7% and 0.7-10.8%, respectively, although temperature at 2 m (T2) is slightly underpredicted. Cloud variables such as cloud fraction (CF) and precipitating water vapor (PWV) are well predicted, with NMBs of -10.5 to 0.4%, whereas cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud optical thickness (COT) are moderately-to-largely underpredicted, with NMBs of -82.2 to -31.2%, and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is overpredictd by 26.7%. These biases indicate the limitations and uncertainties associated with cloud microphysics (e.g., resolved clouds and subgrid-scale cumulus clouds). Chemical concentrations over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (e.g., SO42-, Cl-, OC, and PM2.5) are reasonably well predicted with NMBs of -12.8 to -1.18%. Concentrations of SO2, SO42-, and PM10 are also reasonably well predicted over Europe with NMBs of -20.8 to -5.2%, so are predictions of SO2 concentrations over the East Asia with an NMB of -18.2%, and the tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) over the globe with an NMB of -3.5%. Most meteorological and radiative variables

  10. Coupling of the microphysical and optical properties of an Arctic nimbostratus cloud during the ASTAR 2004 experiment: Implications for light-scattering modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Olivier; Mioche, Guillaume; Garrett, Timothy J.; SchwarzenböCk, Alfons; Vidot, JéRôMe; Xie, Yu; Shcherbakov, Valery; Yang, Ping; Gayet, Jean-FrançOis

    2010-12-01

    Airborne measurements in an Arctic mixed-phase nimbostratus cloud were conducted in Spitsbergen on 21 May 2004 during the international Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR) campaign. The in situ instrument suite aboard the Alfred Wegener Institute Polar 2 aircraft included a polar nephelometer (PN), a cloud particle imager (CPI), a Nevzorov probe, and a standard PMS 2DC probe to measure the cloud particle single-scattering properties (at a wavelength of 0.8 μm), and the particle morphology and size, as well as the in-cloud partitioning of ice/water content. The main objective of this work is to present a technique based on principal component analysis and light-scattering modeling to link the microphysical properties of cloud particles to their optical characteristics. The technique is applied to the data collected during the 21 May case study where a wide variety of ice crystal shapes and liquid water fractions were observed at temperatures ranging from -1°C to -12°C. CPI measurements highlight the presence of large supercooled water droplets with diameters close to 500 μm. Although the majority of ice particles were found to have irregular shapes, columns and needles were the prevailing regular habits between -3°C and -6°C while stellars and plates were observed at temperatures below -8°C. The implementation of the principal component analysis of the PN scattering phase function measurements revealed representative optical patterns that were consistent with the particle habit classification derived from the CPI. This indicates that the synergy between the CPI and the PN can be exploited to link the microphysical and shape properties of cloud particles to their single-scattering characteristics. Using light-scattering modeling, we have established equivalent microphysical models based on a limited set of free parameters (roughness, mixture of idealized particle habits, and aspect ratio of ice crystals) that reproduce the main

  11. A 2D Microphysical Analysis of Aerosol Nucleation in the Polar Winter Stratosphere: Implications for H2SO4 Photolysis and Nucleation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Mills, Michael J.; Solomon, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Each spring a layer of small particles forms between 20 and 30 km in the polar regions. Results are presented from a 2D microphysical model of sulfate aerosol, which provide the first self-consistent explanation of the observed "CN layer." Photochemical conversion of sulfuric acid to SO2 in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere is necessary for this layer to form. Recent laboratory measurements of H2SO4 and SO3 photolysis rates are consistent with such conversion, though an additional source of SO2 may be required. Nucleation throughout the polar winter extends the top of the aerosol layer to higher altitudes, despite strong downward transport of ambient air. This finding may be important to heterogeneous chemistry at the top of the aerosol layer in polar winter and spring.

  12. Polarization of skylight in the O(2)A band: effects of aerosol properties.

    PubMed

    Boesche, Eyk; Stammes, Piet; Preusker, Réne; Bennartz, Ralf; Knap, Wouter; Fischer, Juergen

    2008-07-01

    Motivated by several observations of the degree of linear polarization of skylight in the oxygen A (O(2)A) band that do not yet have a quantitative explanation, we analyze the influence of aerosol altitude, microphysics, and optical thickness on the degree of linear polarization of the zenith skylight in the spectral region of the O(2)A band, between 755 to 775 nm. It is shown that the degree of linear polarization inside the O(2)A band is particularly sensitive to aerosol altitude. The sensitivity is strongest for aerosols within the troposphere and depends also on their microphysical properties and optical thickness. The polarization of the O(2)A band can be larger than the polarization of the continuum, which typically occurs for strongly polarizing aerosols in an elevated layer, or smaller, which typically occurs for depolarizing aerosols or cirrus clouds in an elevated layer. We show that in the case of a single aerosol layer in the atmosphere a determination of the aerosol layer altitude may be obtained. Furthermore, we show limitations of the aerosol layer altitude determination in case of multiple aerosol layers. To perform these simulations we developed a fast method for multiple scattering radiative transfer calculations in gaseous absorption bands including polarization. The method is a combination of doubling-adding and k-binning methods. We present an error estimation of this method by comparing with accurate line-by-line radiative transfer simulations. For the Motivated by several observations of the degree of linear polarization of skylight in the oxygen A (O(2)A) band that do not yet have a quantitative explanation, we analyze the influence of aerosol altitude, microphysics, and optical thickness on the degree of linear polarization of the zenith skylight in the spectral region of the O(2)A band, between 755 to 775 nm. It is shown that the degree of linear polarization inside the O(2)A band is particularly sensitive to aerosol altitude. The

  13. Microphysical and macrophysical responses of marine stratocumulus polluted by underlying ships: Evidence of cloud deepening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew W.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2011-02-01

    Ship tracks observed by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) were analyzed to determine the extent to which aerosol plumes from ships passing below marine stratocumulus alter the microphysical and macrophysical properties of the clouds. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery was used to distinguish ship tracks embedded in closed, open, and undefined mesoscale cellular cloud structures. The impact of aerosol on the microphysical cloud properties in both the closed and open cell regimes were consistent with the changes predicted by the Twomey hypothesis. For the macrophysical changes, differences were observed between regimes. In the open cell regime, polluted clouds had significantly higher cloud tops (16%) and more liquid water (39%) than nearby unpolluted clouds. However, in the closed cell regime, polluted clouds exhibited no change in cloud top height and had less liquid water (-6%). Both microphysical (effective radius) and macrophysical (liquid water path) cloud properties contribute to a fractional change in cloud optical depth; in the closed cell regime the microphysical contribution was 3 times larger than the macrophysical contribution. However, the opposite was true in the open cell regime where the macrophysical contribution was nearly 2 times larger than the microphysical contribution because the aerosol probably increased cloud coverage. The results presented here demonstrate key differences aerosols have on the microphysical and macrophysical responses of boundary layer clouds between mesoscale stratocumulus convective regimes.

  14. Study of microphysical and radiative properties of contrail cirrus using large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Thouron, Odile; Cariolle, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Contrails are ice clouds that form by condensation of water vapor exhaust from aircraft engines and develop further in the wake as they are entrained by the airplane trailing vortices. When contrails spread to form contrail cirrus, they can persist for hours resulting in additional (artificial) cloud cover that adds to the cover due to natural cirrus. This talk presents recent results from large-eddy situations (LES) of contrail cirrus dispersion that are carried out using the atmospheric model Méso-NH. The objective is to investigate whether and how the ambient conditions and the microphysical and optical properties of ice crystals (e.g. shape, albedo), affect the three-dimensional structure and the overall microphysical and radiative characteristics of the contrail. The analysis is carried out by changing the radiative properties of the atmosphere (e.g. day/night conditions) for a given level of atmospheric turbulence. The turbulent field is generated by means of a stochastic forcing technique that reproduces the atmospheric conditions encountered in the upper troposphere. In addition to helping understanding the physics of contrails, the LES data retrieved from this study may provide useful inputs to the parameterization of contrail cirrus into global or climate models.

  15. A Study of Global Cirrus Optical and Microphysical Properties Based on an Efficient Infrared Retrieval Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Current studies of global upper tropospheric cirrus clouds from satellite observations are focused on daytime, primarily due to dependence on solar reflectance in the retrieval technique. Here, utilizing an accurate and efficient infrared based retrieval technique, cirrus cloud optical properties, including cloud optical thickness and effective particle size, are investigated using Aqua MODIS data during both day and night conditions. It is revealed that contrast of averaged day and night properties is small, despite of an apparent distinction in occurrence frequencies. The geographical differences are more pronounced. Seasonal variations, vertical distributions, as well as interrelations with other macrophysical and microphysical properties are also studied. The findings of this study will be useful for developing future cirrus cloud parameterization schemes in climate models.

  16. Quantifying the impacts of an updated global dimethyl sulfide climatology on cloud microphysics and aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Anoop S.; Fadnavis, Suvarna; Thomas, Manu A.; Pozzoli, Luca; Gupta, Smrati; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Simó, Rafel

    2015-03-01

    One of the critical parameters in assessing the global impacts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) on cloud properties and the radiation budget is the estimation of phytoplankton-induced ocean emissions, which are derived from prescribed, climatological surface seawater DMS concentrations. The most widely used global ocean DMS climatology was published 15 years ago and has recently been updated using a much larger database of observations. The updated climatology displays significant differences in terms of the global distribution and regional monthly averages of sea surface DMS. In this study, we use the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ aerosol-chemistry-climate general circulation model to quantify the influence of the updated DMS climatology in computed atmospheric properties, namely, the spatial and temporal distributions of atmospheric DMS concentration, sulfuric acid concentration, sulfate aerosols, number of activated aerosols, cloud droplet number concentration, and the aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. Significant differences are observed for all the modeled variables. Comparison with observations of atmospheric DMS and total sulfate also shows that in places with large DMS emissions, the updated climatology shows a better match with the observations. This highlights the importance of using the updated climatology for projecting future impacts of oceanic DMS emissions, especially considering that the relative importance of the natural sulfur fluxes is likely to increase due to legislation to "clean up" anthropogenic emissions. The largest estimated differences are in the Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean, and parts of the Pacific Ocean, where the climatologies differ in seasonal concentrations over large geographical areas. The model results also indicate that the former DMS climatology underestimated the effect of DMS on the globally averaged annual aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere by about 20%.

  17. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  18. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  19. Whole-atmosphere aerosol microphysics simulations of the Mt Pinatubo eruption: Part 2: Quantifying the direct and indirect (dynamical) radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Dhomse, Sandip; Carslaw, Ken; Chipperfield, Martyn; Lee, Lindsay; Emmerson, Kathryn; Abraham, Luke; Telford, Paul; Pyle, John; Braesicke, Peter; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991 injected between 10 and 20 Tg of sulphur dioxide into the tropical lower stratosphere. Following chemical conversion to sulphuric acid, the stratospheric aerosol layer thickened substantially causing a strong radiative, dynamical and chemical perturbation to the Earth's atmosphere with effects lasting several years. In this presentation we show results from model experiments to isolate the different ways the enhanced stratospheric aerosol from Pinatubo influenced the Earth's climate. The simulations are carried out in the UK Chemistry and Aerosol composition-climate model (UKCA) which extends the high-top (to 80km) version of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM). The UM-UKCA model uses the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics module coupled with a stratosphere-troposphere chemistry scheme including sulphur chemistry. By running no-feedback and standard integrations, we separate the main radiative forcings due to aerosol-radiation interactions (i.e. the direct forcings) from those induced by dynamical changes which alter meridional heat transport and distributions of aerosol, ozone and water vapour.

  20. Intercomparison of Pulsed Lidar Data with Flight Level CW Lidar Data and Modeled Backscatter from Measured Aerosol Microphysics Near Japan and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data were examined from two nights near Japan and Hawaii undertaken during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. During each of these two nights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provided an ideal opportunity to allow flight level focused continuous wave (CW) lidar backscatter measured at 9.11-micron wavelength and modeled aerosol backscatter from two aerosol optical counters to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths. The best agreement between all sensors was found in the altitude region below 7 km, where backscatter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters, suggesting sample volume effects were responsible for this. Aerosol microphysics analysis of data near Japan revealed a strong sea-salt aerosol plume extending upward from the marine boundary layer. On the basis of sample volume differences, it was found that large particles were of different composition compared with the small particles for low backscatter conditions.

  1. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties From Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens; Yang, Ping; McGee, Thomas J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of particle sizes and number densities of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is highly important, because they are critical parameters for the modeling of the ozone chemistry of the stratosphere. In situ measurements of PSC particles are rare. the main instrument for the accumulation of PSC data are lidar systems. Therefore the derivation of some microphysical properties of PSCS from the optical parameters measured by lidars would be highly beneficial for ozone research. Inversion of lidar data obtained in the presence of PSCs formed from crystalline particles type 11 and the various nitric acid tri Ydrrate (NAT) types cannot be easily accomplished, because a suitable scattering theory for small faceted crystals has not been readily available tip to now. As a consequence, the T-matrix method is commonly used for the interpretation of these PSC lidar data. Here the assumption is made that the optical properties of an ensemble of spheroids resemble those of crystalline PSCs, and microphysical properties of the PSC are inferred from the optical signatures of the PSC at two or more wavelengths. The problem with the T-matrix approach is that the assumption of spheroidal instead of faceted particles can lead to dramatically wrong results: Usually cloud particle properties are deduced from analysis of lidar profiles of backscatter ratio and depolarization ratio. The particle contribution to the backscatter ratio is given by the product of the particle number density and the backscattering cross section. The latter is proportional to the value of the particle's scattering phase function at 180 degrees scattering angle. At 180 degrees however, the phase functions of rough, faceted crystals and of spheroids with same maximum dimension differ by a factor of 6. From this it follows that for a PSC consisting of faceted crystals, the particle number density is underestimated by roughly the same factor if spheroidal particles are unrealistically assumed. We are currently

  2. Comparison of microphysical cloud properties from the FSSP and CDP during the CAMPS field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, A. J.; Hallar, A. G.; Salazar, V.; Chirokova, G.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding and accurately sampling microphysical cloud properties for orographic-forced mixed-phase is of crucial importance for an enhanced representation of mixed-phase clouds in global climate models. The Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) has been the most widely used instrument to measure cloud microphysical characteristics for over three decades. The Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) is a new instrument that was introduced to address mechanical issues the FSSP experienced (e.g. ice shattering). In current work, in-situ cloud data from 9 January 2011 of the Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS) field campaign were used to compare measurements by the FSSP and CDP. For all cloud penetrations considered, the FSSP measured a mean cloud droplet concentration of 131.66 cm-3 while the CDP measured a mean concentration of 110.89 cm-3. From calibration data, the CDP showed to undersize cloud particles. Results show concentrations measured by the FSSP and CDP, in general, do not agree in clouds comprised mostly of ice. In conclusion, on the considered day, data from the FSSP were significantly affected by ice particle shattering while the CDP undersized particles by 2-3.5 μm.

  3. Observed and Simulated Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Tropical Convective Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Increases in the ice content, albedo and cloud cover of tropical convective storms in a warmer climate produce a large negative contribution to cloud feedback in the GISS GCM. Unfortunately, the physics of convective upward water transport, detrainment, and ice sedimentation, and the relationship of microphysical to radiative properties, are all quite uncertain. We apply a clustering algorithm to TRMM satellite microwave rainfall retrievals to identify contiguous deep precipitating storms throughout the tropics. Each storm is characterized according to its size, albedo, OLR, rain rate, microphysical structure, and presence/absence of lightning. A similar analysis is applied to ISCCP data during the TOGA/COARE experiment to identify optically thick deep cloud systems and relate them to large-scale environmental conditions just before storm onset. We examine the statistics of these storms to understand the relative climatic roles of small and large storms and the factors that regulate convective storm size and albedo. The results are compared to GISS GCM simulated statistics of tropical convective storms to identify areas of agreement and disagreement.

  4. On Depolarization Lidar-Based Method for The Determination of Liquid-Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Gilles; Cao, Xiaoying; Tremblay, Grégoire; Bernier, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Under single scattering conditions, water droplets clouds do not depolarize the backscattered light. However, backscattered light from multiple scattering will be depolarized. The level of depolarization is a function of the droplets size, the cloud extinction coefficient value and profile; it has also an important dependency on the lidar field-of-view (FOV). The use of depolarization information to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, using Multiple-FOV has been the object of studies, [1], [2]. Recently the use of the depolarization, at a single FOV, has been studied for cloud with linear liquid water content profiles, [3], [4]. In this paper we present the mechanism leading to depolarization and identify the FOV values for which the information on particle size is high. Also Monte Carlo simulations for cloud with constant and ramp up profiles are presented. The degree of linear depolarization as a function of cloud penetration is significantly different for both cloud profiles. This suggests that the use of the degree of linear depolarization at a single FOV should be used with caution to determine clouds micro-physical parameters.

  5. Total Storm Currents and their Relationship to Microphysical and Dynamical Cloud Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, C. P.; Deierling, W.; Mach, D. M.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Electrified clouds are thought to play a major role in the global electric circuit (GEC). These clouds produce total storm currents from the top of thunderstorms which help maintain the potential difference between earth's surface and the upper atmosphere. Total storm currents for different types of electrified clouds were recently derived from overflights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft spanning several field campaigns between 1992 and 2005. In this study, total storm current measurements are compared with radar derived dynamical and microphysical properties to investigate whether these storm properties can be used to describe the current variability of different electrified clouds. When applied globally, such relationships may be used to improve modeling of the GEC via quantification and improved parameterization of the conduction current contribution from different cloud types in a model framework.

  6. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features. PMID:25402925

  7. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.; MCGRAW, R.; BENKOVITZ, C.M.; WRIGHT, D.L.

    2001-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  8. Role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kiran, V.; Rajeevan, M.; Gadhavi, H.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Five years (2006-2010) of clouds and earth's radiant energy system (CERES) and CloudSat data have been analyzed to examine the role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing (CRF) parameters at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Asian monsoon region during the summer monsoon season (June-September) and the Pacific warm pool region during April. Vertical profile of cloud properties (optical depth, cloud liquid water content and cloud ice water content) derived from CloudSat data has been used for the present analysis. Shortwave, longwave and net CRF derived from the CERES data have been used. The results suggest an imbalance between shortwave cloud radiative forcing and longwave cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region consistent with the results reported earlier. The present analysis suggests that over the Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), vertical profile of cloud microphysical properties determine more than 50 % of variance in CRF. However, over the Pacific warm pool region, cloud microphysical property profiles does not contribute significantly to variance in net CRF (<10 %). Over the BoB, large asymmetry between shortwave and longwave CRF is caused by large amounts of cloud liquid water content in the layer between the surface and 9 km. The present study highlights the importance of accurate representation of cloud microphysical properties in determining the influence of clouds on the radiative balance over the top-of-the atmosphere.

  9. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna E.; Afchine, Armin; Costa, Anja; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Meyer, Jessica; Rolf, Christian; Spelten, Nicole; Avallone, Linnea M.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Krämer, Martina

    2016-05-01

    The radiative role of ice clouds in the atmosphere is known to be important, but uncertainties remain concerning the magnitude and net effects. However, through measurements of the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, we can better characterize them, which can ultimately allow for their radiative properties to be more accurately ascertained. Recently, two types of cirrus clouds differing by formation mechanism and microphysical properties have been classified - in situ and liquid origin cirrus. In this study, we present observational evidence to show that two distinct types of cirrus do exist. Airborne, in situ measurements of cloud ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Nice), and ice crystal size from the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign provide cloud samples that have been divided according to their origin type. The key features that set liquid origin cirrus apart from the in situ origin cirrus are higher frequencies of high IWC ( > 100 ppmv), higher Nice values, and larger ice crystals. A vertical distribution of Nice shows that the in situ origin cirrus clouds exhibit a median value of around 0.1 cm-3, while the liquid origin concentrations are slightly, but notably higher. The median sizes of the crystals contributing the most mass are less than 200 µm for in situ origin cirrus, with some of the largest crystals reaching 550 µm in size. The liquid origin cirrus, on the other hand, were observed to have median diameters greater than 200 µm, and crystals that were up to 750 µm. An examination of these characteristics in relation to each other and their relationship to temperature provides strong evidence that these differences arise from the dynamics and conditions in which the ice crystals formed. Additionally, the existence of these two groups in cirrus cloud populations may explain why a bimodal distribution in the IWC-temperature relationship has been observed. We hypothesize that the low IWC mode is the result of in situ origin cirrus and the

  10. Vertical profiles of microphysical particle properties derived from inversion with two-dimensional regularization of multiwavelength Raman lidar data: experiment.

    PubMed

    Müller, Detlef; Kolgotin, Alexei; Mattis, Ina; Petzold, Andreas; Stohl, Andreas

    2011-05-10

    Inversion with two-dimensional (2-D) regularization is a new methodology that can be used for the retrieval of profiles of microphysical properties, e.g., effective radius and complex refractive index of atmospheric particles from complete (or sections) of profiles of optical particle properties. The optical profiles are acquired with multiwavelength Raman lidar. Previous simulations with synthetic data have shown advantages in terms of retrieval accuracy compared to our so-called classical one-dimensional (1-D) regularization, which is a method mostly used in the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET). The 1-D regularization suffers from flaws such as retrieval accuracy, speed, and ability for error analysis. In this contribution, we test for the first time the performance of the new 2-D regularization algorithm on the basis of experimental data. We measured with lidar an aged biomass-burning plume over West/Central Europe. For comparison, we use particle in situ data taken in the smoke plume during research aircraft flights upwind of the lidar. We find good agreement for effective radius and volume, surface-area, and number concentrations. The retrieved complex refractive index on average is lower than what we find from the in situ observations. Accordingly, the single-scattering albedo that we obtain from the inversion is higher than what we obtain from the aircraft data. In view of the difficult measurement situation, i.e., the large spatial and temporal distances between aircraft and lidar measurements, this test of our new inversion methodology is satisfactory. PMID:21556108

  11. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  12. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  13. Evolution of Biomass Burning Aerosol Optical Properties in the Near Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Arnott, W. P.; Chand, D.; Fortner, E.; Freedman, A.; Kleinman, L. I.; Onasch, T. B.; Shilling, J. E.; Springston, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) events are known to produce chemically rich environments that can impact the evolution of primary aerosols and influence secondary aerosols production rates. With their increasing in frequency, BB events are expected to exert an ever-increasing impact on climate due to aerosol radiative forcing processes. One area that is still poorly understood is the evolution of these smoke aerosols in the near field. Recent literature suggests that BB aerosols undergo a rapid evolution near their source that is then followed by a slower aging phase. During the summer of 2013, the Department of Energy-sponsored an aircraft field campaign called the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) that specifically targeted the evolution of smoke aerosols in the near field (< 2 hours). Results examining the evolution of BB optical and microphysical properties will be presented. To probe these properties, the BBOP field campaign deployed a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to probe the mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC) and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) to investigate the composition of both non-refractory and rBC-containing particles. Aerosol optical properties were measured in situ using a 355 nm Photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS), a 532 nm photo thermal interferometer (PTI), a 630 nm cavity Attenuation Phase Shifted (CAPS) spectrometer, a 3-λ nephelometer, and a 3-λ PSAP. The BBOP study represented the maiden aircraft deployment for the SP-AMS, the 355 nm PAS and 532 nm PTI. Discussion will be on the near-field evolution of particle mixing state and morphology, chemical composition, and microphysical processes that determine aerosol size distributions and single scattering albedo (SSA) of light absorbing aerosols. In the cases studied, increases in the coating thickness of refractive black carbon (rBC) particles, organic aerosol/rBC ratio, scattering/CO ratio, and aerosol size distributions have been observed. Results will be

  14. Contrasting ice microphysical properties of wintertime frontal clouds and summertime convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The microphysical and optical properties of ice clouds were derived from measurements collected during the Colorado Airborne Multi-phase Cloud Study (CAMPS) and the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) conducted in the winter of 2010-2011 over the Rocky Mountains and during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) conducted in the summer of 2011 over Oklahoma. A two-dimensional cloud (2DC) probe, two-dimensional precipitation (2DP) probe and Fast 2DC probe were installed on the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during CAMPS and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) and Precipitation Imaging Probe were operated on the ground at the Storm Peak Laboratory during STORMVEX. A 2DC, CIP and a high volume precipitation spectrometer were installed in the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft during MC3E. The distributions of particle habits, number distribution functions, total number concentrations, ice water contents, precipitation rates, extinction and effective radius from four cases of wintertime frontal clouds sampled during CAMPS/STORMVEX and from four cases of the stratiform region of summer convective systems from MC3E are compared. It is found that there is higher percentage of pristine ice particles, such as dendrites and columns, in the wintertime frontal clouds than in the summertime convective clouds, where the dominant habits are rimed particles. The number distribution functions are generally broader in the summertime clouds than in the wintertime frontal clouds. In addition, the number concentrations and ice water contents are generally lower in the wintertime frontal clouds than in the summertime convective clouds when comparing the same temperature ranges. Implications about the potential microphysical processes that are acting in these two types of ice clouds are discussed. The results in this study are also compared with previous studies using data from other field campaigns.

  15. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  16. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2008-02-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. Online measurements included: Size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles; total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm; gas-phase concentration of monoterpenes, CO, O3, OH, and H2SO4. Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: Fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: (23±39)% ammonium nitrate, (27±23)% ammonium sulfate, and (50±40)% organics (OM1). OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. The average ratio of OM1 to OC2.5 was 2.1±1.4, indicating a high proportion of heteroelements in the organic fraction of the sampled rural aerosol. This is consistent with the high ratio of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) over hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inferred from the AMS results (4:1), and also with the high abundance of proteins (~3%) indicating a high proportion of primary biological material (~30%) in PM2.5. This finding was confirmed by low abundance of PAHs (<1 ng m-3) and EC (<1 μg m-3) in PM2.5 and detection of several secondary organic aerosol compounds (dicarboxylic acids) and their precursors (monoterpenes). New particle formation was observed almost

  17. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  18. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-07-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows to determine the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud anvil. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicates that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  19. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-11-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of the Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements, only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows the determination of the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicate that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  20. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2014-05-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  1. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. The online measurement data and techniques included: size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS); total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm (CPC, SMPS, OPC); monoterpenes determined by gas chromatography- ion trap mass spectrometry; OH and H2SO4 determined by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: 11% ammonium, 19% nitrate, 20% sulfate, and 50% organics (OM1). In spite of strongly changing meteorological conditions and absolute concentration levels of particulate matter (3-13 μg m-3 PM1), OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. In contrast, the ratio of nitrate to sulfate was highly dependent on temperature (14-32°C) and relative humidity (20-100%), which could be explained by thermodynamic model calculations of NH3/HNO3/NH4NO3 gas-particle partitioning. From the combination of optical and other sizing techniques (OPC, AMS, SMPS), an average refractive index of 1.40-1.45 was inferred for the measured rural aerosol

  2. Remote sensing of aerosol properties during CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Pekour, Mikhail; Flynn, Connor; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram T.

    2011-11-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small (~0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 μm) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  3. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

    2011-10-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  4. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol, and water vapor properties from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Tanre, Didier D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning spectrometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micron. They review the various methods being developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical, and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles from spectral reflection and thermal emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be used for determining the total precipitable water vapor and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products are described, together with an example of their application to aircraft and/or satellite measurements.

  5. Assessment of aerosol optical and micro-physical features retrieved from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements from Skyradiometer at a high altitude station at Merak: Assessment of aerosol optical features from Merak.

    PubMed

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S; Srivastava, A K; Bagare, S P; Singh, R B; Kanawade, V P; Dorjey, Namgyal

    2015-11-01

    Optical and micro-physical features of aerosol are reported using Skyradiometer (POM-01L, Prede, Japan) observations taken from a high-altitude station Merak, located in north-eastern Ladakh of the western trans-Himalayas region during January 2011 to December 2013. The observed daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, at 500 nm) at the site varied from 0.01 to 0.14. However, 75 % of the observed AOD lies below 0.05 during the study period. Seasonal peaks of AOD occurred in spring as 0.06 and minimum in winter as 0.03 which represents the aged background aerosols at the site. Yearly mean AOD at 500 nm is found to be around 0.04 and inter-annual variations of AOD is very small (nearly ±0.01). Angstrom exponent (a) varied seasonally from 0.73 in spring to 1.5 in autumn. About 30 % of the observed a lies below 0.8 which are the indicative for the presence of coarse-mode aerosols at the site. The station exhibits absorbing aerosol features which prominently occurred during spring and that may be attributed by the transported anthropogenic aerosol from Indo-Gangatic Plain (IGP). Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectory analysis. Furthermore, seasonal mean of single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) varied from of 0.94 to 0.98 and a general increasing trend is noticed from 400 to 870 nm wavelengths. These features are apparently regional characteristics of the site. Aerosol asymmetry factor (AS) decreases gradually from 400 to 870 nm and varied from 0.66 to 0.69 at 500 nm across the seasons. Dominance of desert-dust aerosols, associated by coarse mode, is indicated by tri-modal features of aerosol volume size distribution over the station during the entire seasons. PMID:26081773

  6. A Comparison between Airborne and Mountaintop Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, R.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I.; Avallone, L. M.; Mace, G. G.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Complex terrain has a large impact on cloud dynamics and microphysics. Several studies have examined the microphysical details of orographically-enhanced clouds from either an aircraft or from a mountain top location. However, further research is needed to characterize the relationships between mountain top and airborne microphysical properties. During the winter of 2011, an airborne study, the Colorado Airborne Mixed-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS), and a ground-based field campaign, the Storm Peak Lab (SPL) Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) were conducted in the Park Range of the Colorado Rockies. The CAMPS study utilized the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) to provide airborne cloud microphysical and meteorological data on 29 flights totaling 98 flight hours over the Park Range from December 15, 2010 to February 28, 2011. The UWKA was equipped with instruments that measured both cloud droplet and ice crystal size distributions, liquid water content, total water content (vapor, liquid, and ice), and 3-dimensional wind speed and direction. The Wyoming Cloud Radar and Lidar were also deployed during the campaign. These measurements are used to characterize cloud structure upwind and above the Park Range. StormVEx measured cloud droplet, ice crystal, and aerosol size distributions at SPL, located on the west summit of Mt. Werner at 3220m MSL. The observations from SPL are used to determine mountain top cloud microphysical properties at elevations lower than the UWKA was able to sample in-situ. Comparisons showed that cloud microphysics aloft and at the surface were consistent with respect to snow growth processes while small crystal concentrations were routinely higher at the surface, suggesting ice nucleation near cloud base. The effects of aerosol concentrations and upwind stability on mountain top and downwind microphysics are considered.

  7. Statistical Retrieval of Thin Liquid Cloud Microphysical Properties Using Ground-Based Infrared and Microwave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marke, Tobias; Löhnert, Ulrich; Ebell, Kerstin; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, liquid water cloud microphysical properties are retrieved by exploiting passive remote sensing techniques in the microwave and infrared spectral regime. Liquid water clouds are highly frequent in various climate regimes and play a significant role in terms of interaction with radiation. Small perturbations in the amount of liquid water contained in the cloud can cause large variations in the radiative fluxes. This effect enhances for thin clouds with a low liquid water path (LWP), which requires accurate retrieval information on the cloud properties. Retrieving low LWP values using the microwave spectral regime reveals large relative errors, whereas the potential for infrared methods is high. Therefore robust and computationally low demanding synergistic retrievals based on a multivariate regression and a neural network are derived to estimate LWP and cloud effective radius. While the regression-type synergy retrievals are strongly influenced by the nonlinearities of saturating signals in the infrared regime for higher LWP, the neural network retrieval is able to retrieve LWP and cloud effective radius with a higher accuracy than the single instrument retrievals. This is achieved by examining synthetic observations in the low LWP range. Furthermore, the performance of the retrievals is assessed in a radiative closure study for the downwelling shortwave flux, using measurements of a microwave radiometer, a broadband infrared radiometer and a spectrally highly resolved Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI).

  8. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  9. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties for Radiative Impact Assessments. Derived from Column Closure Analyses in TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip A.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the climate change of the past century and predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of aerosols over the Atlantic Ocean. Both experiments used remote and in situ measurements from aircraft and the surface, coordinated with overpasses by a variety of satellite radiometers. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the United States over the western Atlantic, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols over the eastern Atlantic from both Europe and Africa. These aerosols often have a marked impact on satellite-measured radiances. However, accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved aerosol optical depths (AODs) remains a difficult challenge. Here we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and ACE-2, with a focus on closure analyses that yield aerosol microphysical models for use in improved assessments of flux changes. We show how one such model gives computed radiative flux sensitivities (dF/dAOD) that agree with values measured in TARFOX and preliminary values computed for the polluted marine boundary layer in ACE-2. A companion paper uses the model to compute aerosol-induced flux changes over the North Atlantic from AVHRR-derived AOD fields.

  10. Inter-comparison of CALIPSO and CloudSat retrieved profiles of aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters with aircraft profiles over a tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmakumari, B.; Harikishan, G.; Maheskumar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Satellites play a major role in understanding the spatial and vertical distribution of aerosols and cloud microphysical parameters over a large area. However, the inherent limitations in satellite retrievals can be improved through inter-comparisons with airborne platforms. Over the Indian sub-continent, the vertical profiles retrieved from space-borne lidar such as CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) on board the satellite CALIPSO and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board the satellite CloudSat were inter- compared with the aircraft observations conducted during Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX). In the absence of high clouds, both aircraft and CALIOP showed similar features of aerosol layering and water-ice cloud signatures. As CALIOP could not penetrate the thick clouds, the aerosol information below the cloud is missed. While the aircraft could measure high concentrations below the cloud base and above the low clouds in the presence of high clouds. The aircraft derived liquid water content (LWC) and droplet effective radii (Re) showed steady increase from cloud base to cloud top with a variable cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). While the CloudSat derived LWC, CDNC and Re showed increase from the cloud top to cloud base in contradiction to the aircraft measurements. The CloudSat profiles are underestimated as compared to the corresponding aircraft profiles. Validation of satellite retrieved vertical profiles with aircraft measurements is very much essential over the tropics to improve the retrieval algorithms and to constrain the uncertainties in the regional cloud parameterization schemes.

  11. Comparison of aerosol properties retrieved using GARRLiC, LIRIC, and Raman algorithms applied to multi-wavelength lidar and sun/sky-photometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, Valentyn; Goloub, Philippe; Podvin, Thierry; Veselovskii, Igor; Tanre, Didier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Mortier, Augustin; Lopatin, Anton; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Victori, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles are important and highly variable components of the terrestrial atmosphere, and they affect both air quality and climate. In order to evaluate their multiple impacts, the most important requirement is to precisely measure their characteristics. Remote sensing technologies such as lidar (light detection and ranging) and sun/sky photometers are powerful tools for determining aerosol optical and microphysical properties. In our work, we applied several methods to joint or separate lidar and sun/sky-photometer data to retrieve aerosol properties. The Raman technique and inversion with regularization use only lidar data. The LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) and recently developed GARRLiC (Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data) inversion methods use joint lidar and sun/sky-photometer data. This paper presents a comparison and discussion of aerosol optical properties (extinction coefficient profiles and lidar ratios) and microphysical properties (volume concentrations, complex refractive index values, and effective radius values) retrieved using the aforementioned methods. The comparison showed inconsistencies in the retrieved lidar ratios. However, other aerosol properties were found to be generally in close agreement with the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) products. In future studies, more cases should be analysed in order to clearly define the peculiarities in our results.

  12. Ice Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties from the CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Dubuisson, P.; Yang, P.; Vaughan, M.; Avery, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    We will present cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties as retrieved from the operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data in synergy with the CALIOP lidar co-located observations collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission. The IIR data provides nighttime and daytime independent retrievals of optical depth and effective diameter, from which the cloud layer ice water path is inferred. The technique takes advantage of the vertical information provided by CALIOP to select suitable scenes and compute effective emissivity and optical depth. Effective diameters are retrieved through microphysical indices defined as the ratio of the effective infrared optical depths in the two pairs of channels 10.6-12.05 μm and 8.65-12.05 μm, and are related to the ice crystal effective diameter and shape through pre-computed Look-Up Tables. Sources of uncertainty are discussed and possible biases are assessed through internal consistency checks. Comparisons of IIR and CALIOP cirrus optical depths show the very good sensitivity of the IIR retrievals, down to 0.05 visible optical depth. It is shown that particle effective diameter and cloud layer ice water path of single-layered cirrus clouds can be retrieved over ocean, land, as well as over low opaque clouds, for thin to dense clouds of visible optical depth ranging between 0.1 and 6 and of ice water path found typically between 1 and 150 g.m-2. Taking advantage of the cloud boundaries simultaneously derived by CALIOP, IIR power law relationships between mean ice water content (IWC, in g.m-3) and mean extinction coefficient (α, in m-1) are established for cloud temperatures between 190 and 233 K. An average global power law relationship IWC = 75. α1.23 is obtained, which compares well with parameterizations derived from in-situ observations at mid-latitude and in the tropics. However, the IWCs reported in our study are lower by about 40% than those derived from the power law relationship used

  13. Evolution of the Physicochemical and Activation Properties of Aerosols within Smoke Plumes during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Wang, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Fortner, E.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Kleinman, L. I.; Senum, G.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning from wildfires and controlled agricultural burns are known to be a major source of fine particles and organic aerosols at northern temperate latitudes during the summer months. However, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol during transport and the potential impact of this evolution on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity has rarely been studied for these events. During the DOE-sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) conducted in the summer and fall of 2013, over 30 research flights sampled biomass burning plumes from wildfires in the Northwestern United States and agricultural burns in the Mid-South region of the United States. A large suite of instruments aboard the DOE G-1 (Gulfstream-1) measured the chemical, physical, and optical properties of biomass burning aerosol with an emphasis on black carbon. A Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A), and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) were used to measure the aerosol size distribution from 15 - 3,000 nm at 1-Hz. A dual column CCN counter measured the CCN number concentration at supersaturations of 0.25% and 0.50% at a time resolution of 1-Hz and the aerosol chemical composition was measured using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, Aerodyne, Inc). The SP-AMS was operated in two modes: (i) as a traditional high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.), which measured chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols and (ii) as the SP-AMS which measured chemical composition of the refractory black carbon-containing (rBC) particle coating and rBC aerosol mass. Utilizing the aforementioned measurements, a CCN closure study is used to investigate the emitted aerosol hygroscopicity, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol, and the potential impacts on cloud microphysics from the different fuel sources.

  14. Using Nadir and Directional Emissivity as a Probe of Particle Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Wolff, Michael J.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

    Real surfaces are not expected to be diffuse emitters, thus observed emissivity values of surface dust deposits are a function of viewing geometry. Attempts to model infrared emission spectral profiles of surface dust deposits at nadir have not yet matured to match the sophistication of astrophysical dust radiative transfer codes. In the absence of strong thermal gradients, directional emissivity may be obtained theoretically via a combination of reciprocity and Kirchhoff's Law. Owing to a lack of laboratory data on directional emissivity for comparison, theorists have not explored the potential utility of directional emissivity as a direct probe of surface dust microphysical properties. Motivated by future analyses of MGS/TES emission phase function (EPF) sequences and the upcoming Mars Exploration Rover mini-TES dataset, we explore the effects of dust particle size and composition on observed radiances at nadir and off-nadir geometries in the TES spectral regime using a combination of multiple scattering radiative transfer and Mie scattering algorithms. Comparisons of these simulated spectra to laboratory spectra of standard mineral assemblages will also be made. This work is supported through NASA grant NAGS-9820 (MJW) and LSU Board of Regents (KMP).

  15. Influence of the Entrainment Interface Layer on Cloud Microphysical Properties near Stratocumulus Top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. Y.; Carman, J. K.; Rossiter, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Entrainment across the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer is a key process governing the cloud properties and evolution. This process is not well-represented even in high-resolution large-eddy simulations, in part due to the sharp gradients in temperature, buoyancy and (usually) humidity that occur at the top of the boundary layer. In summer 2008, the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) field campaign conduct extensive measurements in the vicinity of cloud top, including the so-called entrainment interface layer or EIL that separates boundary layer and free tropospheric air. Roughly half of the fifteen flights occurred during the day (near solar noon) while the remaining flights occurred during late evening-to-night when solar input was minimal. A wide diversity of EIL properties has been revealed over the course of the campaign. EIL vertical thickness diagnosed using total water varies from fairly thin (~20 m) to very thick (>100 m). The thickness and intensity of the turbulent layer in this interfacial region also varies substantially, with the top of the significantly turbulent region ranging from 10 m to 50 m above cloud top. Shear in the vicinity of cloud top also varied strongly from day-to-day. While almost all cases exhibited strong jumps in potential temperature, there are a number of cases where the jump in total water was very small-to-none, and one case where total water was higher in the free troposphere by 1.4 g/kg. POST thus demonstrates that the cloud-top interfacial region exhibits a rich and diverse range of properties. This study focuses on how this EIL diversity affects the stratocumulus cloud itself. We build on our study of the EIL dynamic and thermodynamic properties to investigate the influence of the EIL on the microphysical properties of the stratocumulus in the vicinity of cloud top. Entrainment of the overlying warmer and (usually) drier air can strongly impact the amount of liquid water as well as the size and concentration of cloud

  16. A Measurement-Based Climatology of Aerosol Radiative Properties and Direct Radiative Forcing in the Southeastern U.S.-Initial Results from a Regionally-Representative Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Robertson, L.; Taubman, B.; Brewbaker, A.; Sheridan, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    The southeastern U.S.(SEUS), home to large emission sources of biogenic VOCs, is one of only a few regions where surface temperatures did not increase from 1901-2005. Recent studies (Goldstein et al., 2008) show that negative top-of-atmosphere (TOA) aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is consistent with a warm-season regional cooling effect dominated by secondary organic aerosols resulting from BVOC oxidation in the presence of anthropogenic NOx and SO2. Established in 2009, the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research Facility (AppalAIR) at Appalachian State University is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and NASA AERONET aerosol monitoring sites in the SEUS. Equipped with a comprehensive list of aerosol optical, microphysical, and newly-added chemical measurements, this regionally representative, high elevation site (1100 m asl) removed from local pollution sources allows us to significantly advance the state of the science by better quantifying regional aerosol DRF, the relative contributions of source types and source regions to DRF, seasonal and diurnal DRF variability, and an estimate of the anthropogenic contribution to DRF. Seasonal statistics of measured aerosol optical and microphysical properties, aerosol optical depth, and aerosol DRF will be presented. The optical property statistics are placed in the context of those measured at the other three U.S.-based NOAA-ESRL aerosol monitoring sites. Winter months are characterized by smaller, more absorbing particles, low aerosol loading, and negligible DRF. Summer months are characterized by lower aerosol concentrations of primarily scattering particles, high aerosol loading, and a significant negative DRF. Aerosols measured at AppalAIR were smaller in size than those measured at the other U.S. NOAA-ESRL sites for all seasons and seasonal variability of aerosol light scattering was largest. Air mass back-trajectories were used to classify aerosols by source type and region for each season in

  17. Variability of Aerosol and its Impact on Cloud Properties Over Different Cities of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan

    Interaction between aerosols and clouds is the subject of considerable scientific research, due to the importance of clouds in controlling climate. Aerosols vary in time in space and can lead to variations in cloud microphysics. This paper is a pilot study to examine the temporal and spatial variation of aerosol particles and their impact on different cloud optical properties in the territory of Pakistan using the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite data and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) data. We also use Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for trajectory analysis to obtain origin of air masses in order to understand the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol concentrations. We validate data of MODIS and MISR by using linear correlation and regression analysis, which shows that there is an excellent agreement between data of these instruments. Seasonal study of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) shows that maximum value is found in monsoon season (June-August) over all study areas. We analyze the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and some cloud parameters like water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud top temperature (CTT) and cloud top pressure (CTP). We construct the regional correlation maps and time series plots for aerosol and cloud parameters mandatory for the better understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. Our analyses show that there is a strong positive correlation between AOD and water vapor in all cities. The correlation between AOD and CF is positive for the cities where the air masses are moist while the correlation is negative for cities where air masses are relatively dry and with lower aerosol abundance. It shows that these correlations depend on meteorological conditions. Similarly as AOD increases Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) is decreasing while Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) is increasing. Key Words: MODIS, MISR, HYSPLIT, AOD, CF, CTP

  18. Cloud Macro- and Microphysical Properties Derived from GOES over the ARM SGP Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Young, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    Cloud macrophysical properties like fractional coverage and height Z(sub c) and microphysical parameters such as cloud liquid water path (LWP), effective droplet radius r(sub e), and cloud phase, are key factors affecting both the radiation budget and the hydrological cycle. Satellite data have been used to complement surface observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) by providing additional spatial coverage and top-of-atmosphere boundary conditions of these key parameters. Since 1994, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) has been used for deriving at each half-hour over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) domain: cloud amounts, altitudes, temperatures, and optical depths as well as broadband shortwave (SW) albedo and outgoing longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A new operational algorithm has been implemented to increase the number of value-added products to include cloud particle phase and effective size (r(sub e) or effective ice diameter D(sub e)) as well as LWP and ice water path. Similar analyses have been performed on the data from the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite as part of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System project. This larger suite of cloud properties will enhance our knowledge of cloud processes and further constrain the mesoscale and single column models using ARM data as a validation/initialization resource. This paper presents the results of applying this new algorithm to GOES-8 data taken during 1998 and 2000. The global VIRS results are compared to the GOES SGP results to provide appropriate context and to test consistency.

  19. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  20. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, J

    1995-05-20

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content,and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead. PMID:21052418

  1. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lisheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    1995-05-01

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content, and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead.

  2. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  3. Utilization of AERONET polarimetric measurements for improving retrieval of aerosol microphysics: GSFC, Beijing and Dakar data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedarenka, Anton; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Barel, Luc; Gonzalez, Louis; Podvin, Thierry; Crozel, Didier

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the efforts on including the polarimetric data to the routine inversion of the radiometric ground-based measurements for characterization of the atmospheric aerosols and analysis of the obtained advantages in retrieval results. First, to operationally process the large amount of polarimetric data the data preparation tool was developed. The AERONET inversion code adapted for inversion of both intensity and polarization measurements was used for processing. Second, in order to estimate the effect from utilization of polarimetric information on aerosol retrieval results, both synthetic data and the real measurements were processed using developed routine and analyzed. The sensitivity study has been carried out using simulated data based on three main aerosol models: desert dust, urban industrial and urban clean aerosols. The test investigated the effects of utilization of polarization data in the presence of random noise, bias in measurements of optical thickness and angular pointing shift. The results demonstrate the advantage of polarization data utilization in the cases of aerosols with pronounced concentration of fine particles. Further, the extended set of AERONET observations was processed. The data for three sites have been used: GSFC, USA (clean urban aerosol dominated by fine particles), Beijing, China (polluted industrial aerosol characterized by pronounced mixture of both fine and coarse modes) and Dakar, Senegal (desert dust dominated by coarse particles). The results revealed considerable advantage of polarimetric data applying for characterizing fine mode dominated aerosols including industrial pollution (Beijing). The use of polarization corrects particle size distribution by decreasing overestimated fine mode and increasing the coarse mode. It also increases underestimated real part of the refractive index and improves the retrieval of the fraction of spherical particles due to high sensitivity of polarization to particle shape

  4. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties Performed at CNR- IMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; Cornacchia, C.; D'Amico, G.; Madonna, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2005-12-01

    during the Italian phase of the European AQUA Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) measurements campaign (6-10 September 2005) together with a water vapor Raman lidar for an integrated study of aerosol, water vapor and clouds. In order to obtain more information about microphysical properties of the particles, the IMAA lidar system for aerosol has been upgraded to increase the number of retrievable parameters. In particular, since July 2005, this system can provide independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles at 355 and 532 nm, and of aerosol backscatter profiles at 1064 nm. Moreover, other receiving channels were added to perform depolarization ratio measurements in order to obtain information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles. Starting from October 2005, this upgraded system will be employed in the validation program of aerosol data products from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite mission. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The support of this work by the European Commission under grant EVRI-CT1999-40003 is gratefully acknowledged. The CNR-IMAA ground based facility for Earth Observation has been partly funded by PON 2000-2006, Misura II.1, MIUR.

  5. The evolution of microphysical and optical properties of an A380 contrail in the vortex phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Shcherbakov, V.; Voigt, C.; Schumann, U.; Schäuble, D.; Jessberger, P.; Petzold, A.; Minikin, A.; Schlager, H.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.; Krämer, M.; Kübbeler, M.

    2011-09-01

    The contrail from a large-body A380 aircraft has extensively been probed in the vortex and early dispersion regime with in situ instruments to measure microphysical and optical properties of contrail ice particles on the DLR research aircraft Falcon. Concentrations up to 340 cm-3 of ice particles with diameters d >0.9 μm and extinction coefficients up to 7.0 km-1 were measured inside the plume. Initially the primary vortices were sampled about 270 m below the A380 flight altitude at contrail ages of 70 to 120 s in ice subsaturated conditions, followed by measurements in the secondary wake with contrail ages of 120 to 220 s at conditions near ice saturation. In the primary vortices the mean effective diameter was 3.5 μm and the maximum ice water content (IWC) was 7.0 mg m-3 increasing with altitude and ice saturation in the secondary wake to 4.8 μm and 10.0 mg m-3. The asymmetry parameter was found to decrease systematically with contrail age (and altitude) from 0.87 to 0.80 indicating that ice crystals become more and more aspherical during ice crystal growth. In addition, an inversion approach was used to retrieve the ice particle size distribution and the partitioning between spherical and aspherical particles. In the young primary vortex 100% of the ice particles were of spherical shape, whereas partitioning coefficients of 68% and 44% were found in the more aged secondary wake. The extrapolation of our results to older contrails under similar meteorological conditions suggests that contrails with ages over 5 min may be dominated by aspherically-shaped ice particles typical for natural mid latitude cirrus.

  6. In Situ Microphysical and Scattering Properties of Falling Snow in GPM-GCPEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, G.; Nesbitt, S. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Poellot, M.; Chandrasekar, C. V.; Hudak, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GPM-GCPEx) field campaign was conducted near Egbert, Ontario, Canada in January-February 2012 to study the physical characteristics and microwave radiative properties of the column of hydrometeors in cold season precipitation events. Extensive in situ aircraft profiling was conducted with the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft within the volume of several remote sensing instruments within a wide variety of precipitation events, from snow to freezing drizzle. Several of the primary goals of GCPEx include improving our understanding of the microphysical characteristics of falling snow and how those characteristics relate to the multi-wavelength radiative characteristics In this study, particle size distribution parameters, effective particle densities, and habit distributions are determined using in-situ cloud measurements obtained on the UND citation using the High Volume Precipitation Spectrometer, the Cloud Particle Imager, and the Cloud Imaging Probe. These quantities are matched compared to multi-frequency radar measurements from the Environment Canada King City C-Band and NASA D3R Ku-Ka Band dual polarization radars. These analysis composites provide the basis for direct evaluation of particle size distributions and observed multi-wavelength and multi-polarization radar observations, including radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity, and dual wavelength ratio) in falling snow at weather radar and GPM radar frequencies. Theoretical predictions from Mie, Rayleigh-Gans, and more complex snowflake aggregate scattering model predictions using observed particle size distributions are compared with observed radar scattering characteristics along the Citation flight track.

  7. Correlations among the Optical Properties of Cirrus-Cloud Particles: Microphysical Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in January 1997 reveal a strong positive correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio delta(sub par) and extinction- to-backscatter (lidar) ratio S, for delta(sub par) less than approximately 40%, and an anti-correlation for delta(sub par) greater than approximately 40%. Over the length of the measurements the particle properties vary systematically. Initially, delta (sub par) approximately equals 60% and S approximately equals 10sr are observed. Then, with decreasing delta(sub par), S first increases to approximately 27sr (delta(sub par) approximately equals 40%) before decreasing to values around 10sr again (delta(sub par) approximately equals 20%). The analysis of lidar humidity and radiosonde temperature data shows that the measured optical properties stem from scattering by dry solid ice particles, while scattering by supercooled droplets, or by wetted or subliming ice particles can be excluded. For the microphysical interpretation of the lidar measurements, ray-tracing computations of particle scattering properties have been used. The comparison with the theoretical data suggests that the observed cirrus data can be interpreted in terms of size, shape, and, under the assumption that the lidar measurements of consecutive cloud segments can be mapped on the temporal development of a single cloud parcel moving along its trajectory, growth of the cirrus particles: Near the cloud top in the early stage of cirrus development, light scattering by nearly isometric particles that have the optical characteristics of hexagonal columns (short, column-like particles) is dominant. Over time the ice particles grow, and as the cloud base height extends to lower altitudes characterized by warmer temperatures they become morphologically diverse. For large S and depolarization values of approximately 40%, the scattering contributions of column- and

  8. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  9. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  10. Combined sphere-spheroid particle model for the retrieval of the microphysical aerosol parameters via regularized inversion of lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine; Nicolae, Doina

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose a two-step advancement of the Mie spherical-particle model accounting for particle non-sphericity. First, a naturally two-dimensional (2D) generalized model (GM) is made, which further triggers analogous 2D re-definitions of microphysical parameters. We consider a spheroidal-particle approach where the size distribution is additionally dependent on aspect ratio. Second, we incorporate the notion of a sphere-spheroid particle mixture (PM) weighted by a non-sphericity percentage. The efficiency of these two models is investigated running synthetic data retrievals with two different regularization methods to account for the inherent instability of the inversion procedure. Our preliminary studies show that a retrieval with the PM model improves the fitting errors and the microphysical parameter retrieval and it has at least the same efficiency as the GM. While the general trend of the initial size distributions is captured in our numerical experiments, the reconstructions are subject to artifacts. Finally, our approach is applied to a measurement case yielding acceptable results.

  11. The 20-22 January 2007 Snow Events over Canada: Microphysical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao. W.K.; Shi, J.J.; Matsui, T.; Hao, A.; Lang, S.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Petersen, W.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S.

    2009-01-01

    One of the grand challenges of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to improve precipitation measurements in mid- and high-latitudes during cold seasons through the use of high-frequency passive microwave radiometry. Toward this end, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Goddard microphysics scheme is coupled with a Satellite Data Simulation Unit (WRF-SDSU) that has been developed to facilitate over-land snowfall retrieval algorithms by providing a virtual cloud library and microwave brightness temperature (Tb) measurements consistent with the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). This study tested the Goddard cloud microphysics scheme in WRF for snowstorm events (January 20-22, 2007) that took place over the Canadian CloudSAT/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) ground site (Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments - CARE) in Ontario, Canada. In this paper, the performance of the Goddard cloud microphysics scheme both with 2ice (ice and snow) and 3ice (ice, snow and graupel) as well as other WRF microphysics schemes will be presented. The results are compared with data from the Environment Canada (EC) King Radar, an operational C-band radar located near the CARE site. In addition, the WRF model output is used to drive the Goddard SDSU to calculate radiances and backscattering signals consistent with direct satellite observations for evaluating the model results.

  12. Measurements of Semi-volatile Aerosol and Its Effect on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2013-12-01

    Semi-volatile compounds, including particle-bound water, comprise a large part of aerosol mass and have a significant influence on aerosol lifecycle and its optical properties. Understanding the properties of semi-volatile compounds, especially those pertaining to gas/aerosol partitioning, is of critical importance for our ability to predict concentrations and properties of ambient aerosol. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of temperature and relative humidity on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder and a variable residence time constant temperature thermodenuder in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. It was found that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. The variable residence time thermodenuder data suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s, in contrast to other ambient observations. Preliminary analysis show that approximately 50% and 90% of total aerosol mass evaporated at temperatures of 100 C and 180C, respectively. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology. During course of this study, T50 (temperatures at which 50% aerosol mass evaporates) varied from 60 C to more than 120 C.

  13. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  14. Satellite retrieval of aerosol microphysical and optical parameters using neural networks: a new methodology applied to the Sahara desert dust peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Tsekeri, A.; Gkikas, A.; Amiridis, V.

    2014-09-01

    In order to exploit the full-earth viewing potential of satellite instruments to globally characterise aerosols, new algorithms are required to deduce key microphysical parameters like the particle size distribution and optical parameters associated with scattering and absorption from space remote sensing data. Here, a methodology based on neural networks is developed to retrieve such parameters from satellite inputs and to validate them with ground-based remote sensing data. For key combinations of input variables available from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) Level 3 data sets, a grid of 100 feed-forward neural network architectures is produced, each having a different number of neurons and training proportion. The networks are trained with principal components accounting for 98% of the variance of the inputs together with principal components formed from 38 AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Level 2.0 (Version 2) retrieved parameters as outputs. Daily averaged, co-located and synchronous data drawn from a cluster of AERONET sites centred on the peak of dust extinction in Northern Africa is used for network training and validation, and the optimal network architecture for each input parameter combination is identified with reference to the lowest mean squared error. The trained networks are then fed with unseen data at the coastal dust site Dakar to test their simulation performance. A neural network (NN), trained with co-located and synchronous satellite inputs comprising three aerosol optical depth measurements at 470, 550 and 660 nm, plus the columnar water vapour (from MODIS) and the modelled absorption aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (from OMI), was able to simultaneously retrieve the daily averaged size distribution, the coarse mode volume, the imaginary part of the complex refractive index, and the spectral single scattering albedo - with moderate precision: correlation coefficients in the

  15. The microphysical and radiative properties of tropical cirrus from the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jun Shik

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment conducted in the region near Darwin, Australia, the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft executed spiral profiles and flew horizontal legs through aging cirrus, fresh anvils, and cirrus of unknown origin. Data from 27 Jan., 29 Jan., and 2 Feb., when all the microphysical probes a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS), a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP), a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP), and a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) were working, are used to investigate whether a single parameterization can be used to characterize tropical cirrus in terms of prognostic variables used in large-scale models, to calculate the single-scattering properties (scattering phase function P11 and asymmetry parameter g) of aggregates and small ice crystals that more closely match observed ice crystals, and to quantify the influences of small ice crystals on the bulk scattering properties of tropical cirrus. A combination of CDP (D < 50 mum), fits (50 < D < 125 microm), and CIP (D > 125 mum) distributions is used to represent ice crystal size distributions. The CDP measurements are used for small ice crystals because comparison between the CAS and CDP suggested the CAS was artificially amplifying small ice crystal concentrations by detecting remnants of shattered large ice crystals. Artifacts in CIP images are removed or corrected and then CIP measurements are used to represent large ice crystals. Because of the uncertainties in both the CPI and CIP for 50 < D < 125 mum, the incomplete gamma fitting method with the CDP (D < 50 mum) and CIP (D > 125 mum) measurements as input is used to characterize these distributions. A new quasi-automatic habit classification scheme is developed. For all days, small quasi-spheres dominated the contributions from all ice crystal sizes (D > 0 mum, by number) for all 3 days. The areal fraction (D > 200 mum) from bullet rosettes and their aggregates was 48% and 60% for 27 and 29 Jan., respectively, but only 7

  16. Variability in morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosols during atmospheric processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyi; Khalizov, Alexei F.; Pagels, Joakim; Zhang, Dan; Xue, Huaxin; McMurry, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric effects of soot aerosols include interference with radiative transfer, visibility impairment, and alteration of cloud formation and are highly sensitive to the manner by which soot is internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. We present experimental studies to show that soot particles acquire a large mass fraction of sulfuric acid during atmospheric aging, considerably altering their properties. Soot particles exposed to subsaturated sulfuric acid vapor exhibit a marked change in morphology, characterized by a decreased mobility-based diameter but an increased fractal dimension and effective density. These particles experience large hygroscopic size and mass growth at subsaturated conditions (<90% relative humidity) and act efficiently as cloud-condensation nuclei. Coating with sulfuric acid and subsequent hygroscopic growth enhance the optical properties of soot aerosols, increasing scattering by ≈10-fold and absorption by nearly 2-fold at 80% relative humidity relative to fresh particles. In addition, condensation of sulfuric acid is shown to occur at a similar rate on ambient aerosols of various types of a given mobility size, regardless of their chemical compositions and microphysical structures. Representing an important mechanism of atmospheric aging, internal mixing of soot with sulfuric acid has profound implications on visibility, human health, and direct and indirect climate forcing. PMID:18645179

  17. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is currently not well established. This is largely attributed to the interdependencies of aerosols and cloud microphysical processes, among which primary ice formation contributes to considerable uncertainties. Although it is known that in a large range of thermodynamic conditions aerosol particles are required to initiate ice formation, identifying and characterizing the effect of specific ice nuclei is among current scientific efforts. Here we attempt to quantify the change of cloud properties with varying aerosol background concentrations. We adapt the concept of susceptibilities for mixed-phase and ice clouds, defining the susceptibility as the derivation of a macrophysical quantity with respect to ice nucleating aerosol concentrations. A focus of our study is the use of different model approaches in order to identify the distinct contributions of both cloud microphysics and cloud-dynamical feedbacks to the overall susceptibility. The classical method is the direct comparison of two independent model runs, where the whole range of microphysical and cloud-dynamical feedbacks contributes to different cloud properties in a perturbed simulation. Our alternative method relies on a single simulation which incorporates multiple executions of the microphysical scheme within the same time step, each "perturbed microphysics" scheme with varying aerosol concentrations and an additional set of cloud particle tracers. Since in the latter case the model dynamics are held constant and only microphysical feedbacks contribute to the properties of perturbed clouds, we can distinguish between the pure microphysical effect and the dynamical enhancement or suppression. For a persistent Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud layer which is expected to be particularly sensitive to feedback cycles, we show an enhancement of the cloud susceptibility to ice nucleating particles by dynamics of around 50%, but a decay of the enhancement with time

  18. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  19. ISDAC Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2011-07-25

    Best estimate of cloud microphysical parameters derived using data collected by the cloud microphysical probes installed on the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada Convair-580 during ISDAC. These files contain phase, liquid and ice crystal size distributions (Nw(D) and Ni(D) respectively), liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), extinction of liquid drops (bw), extinction of ice crystals (bi), effective radius of water drops (rew) and of ice crystals (rei) and median mass diameter of liquid drops (Dmml) and of ice crystals (Dmmi) at 30 second resolution.

  20. Remote sensing of aerosol in the terrestrial atmosphere from space: "AEROSOL-UA" mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Milinevsky, Gennadi; Degtyarev, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosols on a global scale are not well known in terms of determination of their effects on climate. This mostly is due to extreme variability of aerosol concentrations, properties, sources, and types. Aerosol climate impact is comparable to the effect of greenhouse gases, but its influence is more difficult to measure, especially with respect to aerosol microphysical properties and the evaluation of anthropogenic aerosol effect. There are many satellite missions studying aerosol distribution in the terrestrial atmosphere, such as MISR/Terra, OMI/Aura, AVHHR, MODIS/Terra and Aqua, CALIOP/CALIPSO. To improve the quality of data and climate models, and to reduce aerosol climate forcing uncertainties, several new missions are planned. The gap in orbital instruments for studying aerosol microphysics has arisen after the Glory mission failed during launch in 2011. In this review paper, we describe several planned aerosol space missions, including the Ukrainian project AEROSOL-UA that will obtain the data using a multi-channel scanning polarimeter and wide-angle polarimetric camera. The mission is designed for remote sensing of the aerosol microphysics and cloud properties on a global scale.

  1. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna; Rolf, Christian; Costa, Anja; Afchine, Armin; Avallone, Linnea; Borrmann, Stephan; Baumgardner, Darrel; Klingebiel, Marcus; Kraemer, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Ice clouds are known to play an important role in the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The nature of this role is determined by the macrophysical and microphysical properties of a cloud. Thus, it is crucial that we have an accurate understanding of properties such as the ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Ni), and ice crystal size (Ri). However, these properties are difficult to parameterize due to their large variability and the fact that they are influenced by a number of other factors such as temperature, vertical velocity, relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), and the available ice nuclei. The combination of those factors ultimately establishes whether heterogeneous or homogeneous nucleation will lead to ice crystal formation. The aforementioned factors are largely determined by the dynamics of the environment in which the ice cloud forms, collectively contained in a meteorological situation. Ice clouds have been observed in a variety of situations such as frontal systems, jet streams, gravity waves, and convective systems. Most recently, the concept of the influence of large-scale dynamics on midlatitude cirrus properties has been demonstrated in the work of Muehlbauer et al. (2014). In the work presented here, we explore this concept further by examining how differences in dynamics are translated into the differences in IWC, Ni, and Ri that are found within and between datasets. Data from two American-based campaigns, the 2004 Midlatitude Cirrus Experiment (MidCiX) and the 2011 Midlatitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX), as well as some European-based campaigns, the 2004 and 2006 CIRRUS campaigns, the 2013 AIRTOSS-ICE campaign, and the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign are combined to form a large, and more latitudinally comprehensive database of Northern Hemisphere in-situ, midlatitude ice cloud observations. We have divided the data by meteorological situation and explored the differences and similarities between

  2. Optical and microphysical properties of a cold cirrus cloud - Evidence for regions of small ice particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Hart, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An airborne lidar and a scanning radiometer aboard an ER-2 aircraft were used to observe a cold cirrus cloud, and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) was used to obtain simultaneous in situ microphysical observations at two altitudes within the cloud. Lidar depolarization ratio data show that the clouds were composed predominantly of ice crystals. At an altitude where the temperature was -62.7 C, the lidar and radiometer analysis gave a visible extinction to infrared absorption ratio (alpha) of 2.3, while the cloud microphysics data provided an alpha value of 3.77. The discrepancy is attributed to undersizing of particles by the FSSP. Direct and remote measurements showed better agreement for a lower layer where the temperature was -47.3 C.

  3. Improving the Representation of Snow Crystal Properties within a Single-Moment Microphysics Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The assumptions of a single-moment microphysics scheme (NASA Goddard) were evaluated using a variety of surface, aircraft and radar data sets. Fixed distribution intercepts and snow bulk densities fail to represent the vertical variability and diversity of crystal populations for this event. Temperature-based equations have merit, but they can be adversely affected by complex temperature profiles that are inverted or isothermal. Column-based approaches can mitigate complex profiles of temperature but are restricted by the ability of the model to represent cloud depth. Spheres are insufficient for use in CloudSat reflectivity comparisons due to Mie resonance, but reasonable for Rayleigh scattering applications. Microphysics schemes will benefit from a greater range of snow crystal characteristics to accommodate naturally occurring diversity.

  4. Satellite retrieval of aerosol microphysical and optical parameters using neural networks: a new methodology applied to the Sahara desert dust peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Tsekeri, A.; Gkikas, A.; Amiridis, V.

    2013-12-01

    In order to exploit the full-Earth viewing potential of satellite instruments to globally characterise aerosols, new algorithms are required to deduce key microphysical parameters like the particle size distribution and optical parameters associated with scattering and absorption from space remote sensing data. Here, a methodology based on neural networks is developed to retrieve such parameters from satellite inputs and to validate them with ground-based remote sensing data. For key combinations of input variables available from MODIS and OMI Level 3 datasets, a grid of 100 feed-forward neural network architectures is produced, each having a different number of neurons and training proportion. The networks are trained with principal components accounting for 98% of the variance of the inputs together with principal components formed from 38 AERONET Level 2.0 (Version 2) retrieved parameters as outputs. Daily-averaged, co-located and synchronous data drawn from a cluster of AERONET sites centred on the peak of dust extinction in Northern Africa is used for network training and validation, and the optimal network architecture for each input parameter combination is identified with reference to the lowest mean squared error. The trained networks are then fed with unseen data at the coastal dust site Dakar to test their simulation performance. A NN, trained with co-located and synchronous satellite inputs comprising three aerosol optical depth measurements at 470, 500 and 660 nm, plus the columnar water vapour (from MODIS) and the modelled absorption aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (from OMI), was able to simultaneously retrieve the daily-averaged size distribution, the coarse mode volume, the imaginary part of the complex refractive index, and the spectral single scattering albedo - with moderate precision: correlation coefficients in the range 0.368 ≤ R ≤ 0.514. The network failed to recover the spectral behaviour of the real part of the complex refractive index

  5. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  6. Temporal dynamics of optical-microphysical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol at the Spitsbergen Archipelago in 2011-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, D. G.; Kozlov, V. S.; Panchenko, M. V.; Turchinovich, Yu. S.; Radionov, V. F.; Gubin, A. V.; Prakhov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    In 2011-2014, the Institute of Atmospheric Optics (IAO SB RAS, Tomsk) and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI, St. Petersburg) conducted field investigations of the near-ground aerosol characteristics near Barentsburg (Spitsbergen Archipelago) in the spring and summer seasons. The particle number density in the size range 0.3-20 μm, size distribution of particles, and mass concentrations of aerosol and black carbon were measured round-the-clock every hour with Grimm 1.108 and 1.109; and AZ-10 optical counters. The mass concentration of black carbon was measured by the MDA-02 aethalometer developed by the IAO SB RAS. Series of observations are obtained, annual and seasonal average values and their standard deviations are estimated, and seasonal and annual dynamics of the studied parameters is analyzed. Peculiarities of the temporal dynamics of average values of the aerosol characteristics are revealed and compared with the data of observations at other stations of the Spitsbergen Archipelago and in different regions of the Russian Arctic and Subarctic.

  7. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  8. Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

    2009-02-27

    The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed

  9. Aerosol Properties Changes of Northeast Asia due to a Severe Dust Storm in April 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xingfa; Zhang, Xingying; Wang, Weihe; Ren, Suling

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing the aerosol properties changes due to the dust storm named as "China's Great Wall of Dust" oriented from Taklimakan desert in April, 2014. Dust identification IDDI (Infrared Difference Dust Index) images from FY-2E and true color composite images from FY-3C MERSI (Medium Resolution Spectral Imager) show the breakout and transport of the dust storm.From 4-day forward air mass trajectories, the dusty air masses were mostly transported within the lower boundary layer(<3km) over the Northwest China on April 23rd and April 24th, however they were progressively increasing in altitude to above 5km above the surface when they reached the central part of north China region (32°N-42°N; 105°E-123°E). 3-hourly data records at surface stations suggest that anticyclonic circulation occupying southern Xinjiang basin and cyclonic circulation maintaining in Mongolia formed the typical Synoptic condition which leaded to the strong dust storm. Aerosol Index (AI) results of TOU (Total Ozone Unit) aboard FY-3B are first developed and used in studying the affected areas due to the dust storm. The retrieved aerosol indexes show sensitivity to the dust particles. The dust affected areas agree with the synoptic meteorological condition analysis, which prove the synoptic meteorological condition is the main reason for the break out and transport of the dust storm. Anomalies of the average MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) distributions over Northeast Asia during the dust storm to the average of that in April between 2010-2014 show high aerosol loading due to the dust storm. Compared with the 5-year average AOD in April, aerosol loading during this dust storm was much higher, with AOD values at 550nm up to 2.9 observed over the northwest China.The dust storm also brought different change in the aerosol microphysical properties between Beijing and Dalanzadgad. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals

  10. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  11. Measurements of aerosol distributions and properties from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and DRAGON during the DISCOVER-AQ California Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Scarino, A. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Hare, R.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.; Anderson, B. E.; Sawamura, P.

    2011-12-01

    The new NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 (HSRL-2) was deployed from the NASA Langley King Air aircraft for the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) and DRAGON experiments that occurred over the San Joaquin Valley during January and February, 2013. The HSRL-2, which is the world's first airborne multiwavelength HSRL, measures aerosol extinction at 355 and 532 nm via the HSRL technique, as well as aerosol backscatter and depolarization at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g., effective radius, index of refraction, single scatter albedo, and concentration). During this mission, the King Air flights and HSRL-2 measurements were acquired over the DRAGON network and long-term AERONET sites and were closely coordinated with flights of the NASA P-3 aircraft that carried a suite of in situ aerosol instruments. In this presentation, we discuss how the HSRL-2 and DRAGON observations have been used to examine aerosol optical and microphysical properties as well as spatial and temporal variability. On some days, both HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements indicated that coarse mode dust contributed a significant fraction of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT); in these cases, HSRL-2 measurements indicated that this depolarizing layer was located at the top of the boundary layer. We discuss differences in the aerosol properties between two episodes of high surface PM2.5 concentrations as revealed by the HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements. Both the HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements reveal considerable day-to-day spatial variability in the aerosol distributions across the valley. The HSRL-2 measurements also show variability in the daily evolution of the vertical distribution of aerosols.

  12. Measurements of aerosol distributions and properties from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and DRAGON during the DISCOVER-AQ California Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Scarino, A. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Hare, R.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.; Anderson, B. E.; Sawamura, P.

    2013-12-01

    The new NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 (HSRL-2) was deployed from the NASA Langley King Air aircraft for the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) and DRAGON experiments that occurred over the San Joaquin Valley during January and February, 2013. The HSRL-2, which is the world's first airborne multiwavelength HSRL, measures aerosol extinction at 355 and 532 nm via the HSRL technique, as well as aerosol backscatter and depolarization at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Additional HSRL-2 data products include aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and range-resolved aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g., effective radius, index of refraction, single scatter albedo, and concentration). During this mission, the King Air flights and HSRL-2 measurements were acquired over the DRAGON network and long-term AERONET sites and were closely coordinated with flights of the NASA P-3 aircraft that carried a suite of in situ aerosol instruments. In this presentation, we discuss how the HSRL-2 and DRAGON observations have been used to examine aerosol optical and microphysical properties as well as spatial and temporal variability. On some days, both HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements indicated that coarse mode dust contributed a significant fraction of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT); in these cases, HSRL-2 measurements indicated that this depolarizing layer was located at the top of the boundary layer. We discuss differences in the aerosol properties between two episodes of high surface PM2.5 concentrations as revealed by the HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements. Both the HSRL-2 and DRAGON measurements reveal considerable day-to-day spatial variability in the aerosol distributions across the valley. The HSRL-2 measurements also show variability in the daily evolution of the vertical distribution of aerosols.

  13. Microphysical relationships of clouds observed during March 2000 Cloud IOP at SGP Site and important implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15

    Cloud droplet size distributions ---- hence the key microphysical quantities of climate importance (e.g., the total droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, mean-volume radius, radar reflectivity, and effective radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms such as pre-cloud aerosols, cloud updraft and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, the relationships among these microphysical properties are expected to behave differently in response to aerosols, cloud updrafts and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Identifying and quantifying the influences on these microphysical relationships of the various mechanisms is critical for accurately representing cloud microphysics in climate models and for reducing the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol indirect effects. This study first examines the characteristics of the relationships between relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, mean-volume radius, effective radius and radar reflectivity calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions collected during the March 2000 Cloud IOP at the SGP site. The relationships are further analyzed to dissect the effects from different mechanisms/factors (aerosols, updraft, and different turbulent entrainment-mixing processes). Potential applications to improve radar retrievals of cloud properties will be explored as well.

  14. Stratospheric Heterogeneous Chemistry and Microphysics: Model Development, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: define the chemical and physical processes leading to stratospheric ozone change that involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCS) and the reactions occurring on the surfaces of PSC particles; study the formation processes, and the physical and chemical properties of PSCS, that are relevant to atmospheric chemistry and to the interpretation of field measurements taken during polar stratosphere missions; develop quantitative models describing PSC microphysics and heterogeneous chemical processes; assimilate laboratory and field data into these models; and calculate the extent of chemical processing on PSCs and the impact of specific microphysical processes on polar composition and ozone depletion. During the course of the project, a new coupled microphysics/physical-chemistry/ photochemistry model for stratospheric sulfate aerosols and nitric acid and ice PSCs was developed and applied to analyze data collected during NASA's Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition-II (AASE-II) and other missions. In this model, detailed treatments of multicomponent sulfate aerosol physical chemistry, sulfate aerosol microphysics, polar stratospheric cloud microphysics, PSC ice surface chemistry, as well as homogeneous gas-phase chemistry were included for the first time. In recent studies focusing on AASE measurements, the PSC model was used to analyze specific measurements from an aircraft deployment of an aerosol impactor, FSSP, and NO(y) detector. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observations for particle volumes as well as NO(y) concentrations, thus confirming the importance of supercooled sulfate/nitrate droplets in PSC formation. The same model has been applied to perform a statistical study of PSC properties in the Northern Hemisphere using several hundred high-latitude air parcel trajectories obtained from Goddard. The rates of ozone depletion along trajectories with different meteorological histories are presently

  15. Cirrus Clouds Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Properties Observed During Crystal-Face Experiment: I. A Radar-Lidar Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Haynes, J. M.; Stephens, G. L.; Heymsfield, G. M.; McGill, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    A method of retrieving cloud microphysical properties using combined observations from both cloud radar and lidar is introduced. This retrieval makes use of an improvement to the traditional optimal estimation retrieval method, whereby a series of corrections are applied to the state vector during the search for an iterative solution. This allows faster convergence to a solution and is less processor intensive. The method is first applied to a synthetic cloud t o demonstrate its validity, and it is shown that the retrieval reliably reproduces vertical profiles of ice water content. The retrieval method is then applied to radar and lidar observations from the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment, and vertical profiles of ice crystal diameter, number concentration, and ice water content are retrieved for a cirrus cloud layers observed one day of that experiment. The validity of the relationship between visible extinction coefficient and radar reflectivity was examined. While synthetic tests showed such a functional relationship, the measured data only partially supported such a conclusion. This is due to errors in the forward model (as explained above) as well as errors in the data sets, including possible mismatch between lidar and radar profiles or errors in the optical depth. Empirical relationships between number concentrations and mean particle diameter were also examined. The results indicate that a distinct and robust relationship exists between these retrieved quantities and it is argued that such a relationship is more than an artifact of the retrieval process offering insight into the nature of the microphysical processes taking place in cirrus.

  16. A study of thunderstorm microphysical properties and lightning flash counts associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. E.; Splitt, M. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lazarus, S.; Smith, D. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-04-01

    The terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) is an emission of highly energetic radiation produced by or at least in close association with lightning. Previous investigations attempted to isolate the production mechanisms and production altitude(s) of TGFs as well as macrophysical characteristics, while thunderstorm microphysical characteristics were largely ignored. This investigation into thunderstorms and their hydrometeor and flash characteristics utilize temporal and spatial coincident satellite passes between the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to determine the bulk (or footprint) microphysical properties of two types of study events, the thunderstorm complexes which are associated with TGFs (TGF case) and the thunderstorm complexes which did not produce a TGF detected by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the pass (non-TGF case). Results are presented for two different comparison methods. The first case utilizes geographic region weighted by TGF distribution, and the second is based on TGF percentage of occurrence when compared to total flash count of data set. Results show that the associated storms around the TGF location possess differences in the hydrometeor concentrations: cloud liquid water, cloud ice, precipitation water, and precipitation ice. These results take place at different levels of the atmosphere, including the mixed phase region. Additionally, results will show that TGFs are a consistent percentage of observed flashes as the rate of TGFs as a function of Lightning Imaging Sensor flash count is relatively constant.

  17. Microphysical properties of the November 26 cirrus cloud retrieved by Doppler radar/IR radiometer technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Orr, Brad W.; Snider, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    Gaining information about cirrus cloud microphysics requires development of remote sensing techniques. In an earlier paper. Matrosov et al. (1992) proposed a method to estimate ice water path (IWP) (i.e., vertically integrated ice mass content IMC) and characteristic particle size averaged through the cloud from combined groundbased measurements of radar reflectivities and IR brightness temperatures of the downwelling thermal radiation in the transparency region of 10-12 mu m. For some applications, the vertically averaged characteristic particle sizes and IWP could be the appropriate information to use. However, vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters can provide a better understanding of cloud structure and development. Here we describe a further development of the previous method by Matrosov et al. (1992) for retrieving vertical profiles of cirrus particle sizes and IMC rather than their vertically averaged values. In addition to measurements of radar reflectivities, the measurements of Doppler velocities are used in the new method. This provides us with two vertical profiles of measurements to infer two vertical profiles of unknowns, i.e., particle characteristic sizes and IMC. Simultaneous measurements of the IR brightness temperatures are still needed to resolve an ambiguity in particle size-fall velocity relationships.

  18. Aerosol variability, synoptic-scale processes, and their link to the cloud microphysics over the northeast Pacific during MAGIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painemal, David; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele

    2015-05-01

    Shipborne aerosol measurements collected from October 2012 to September 2013 along 36 transects between the port of Los Angeles, California (33.7°N, 118.2°), and Honolulu, Hawaii (21.3°N, 157.8°W), during the Marine ARM GPCI (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)-Cloud System Study (GCSS)-Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison) Investigation of Clouds campaign are analyzed to determine the circulation patterns that modulate the synoptic and monthly variability of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the boundary layer. Seasonal changes in CCN are evident, with low magnitudes during autumn/winter, and high CCN during spring/summer accompanied with a characteristic westward decrease. CCN monthly evolution is consistent with satellite-derived cloud droplet number concentration Nd from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. One-point correlation (r) analysis between the 1000 hPa zonal wind time series over a region between 125°W and 135°W, 35°N and 45°N, and the Nd field yields a negative r (up to -0.55) over a domain that covers a zonal extent of at least 20° from the California shoreline, indicating that Nd decreases when the zonal wind intensifies. The negative r expands southwestward as the zonal wind precedes Nd by up to 3 days, suggesting a transport mechanism from the coast of North America mediated by the California low-coastal jet, which intensifies in summer when the aerosol concentration and Nd reach a maximum. A first assessment of aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) is performed by combining CCN and satellite Nd values from the Fifteenth Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. The CCN-Nd correlation is 0.66-0.69, and the ACI metric defined as ACI = ∂ln(Nd)/∂ln(CCN) is high at 0.9, similar to other aircraft-based studies and substantially greater than those inferred from satellites and climate models.

  19. Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud-aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Miller, M.; Kollias, P.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Turner, D.; Andrews, E.; Jefferson, A.; Daum, P.

    2008-03-10

    Cloud microphysical properties measured at the ARM Mobile Facility site located on the northern coast of California near Point Reyes, during the 2005 Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol and Drizzle experiment, were analyzed to determine their relationship to the coastal sea surface temperature (SST) which was characterized using measurements acquired from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration offshore buoy. An increase in SST resulting from a relaxation of upwelling, occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in summer is observed to strongly correlate with nearby ground measured cloud microphysical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. Correlations between these atmospheric and oceanic features provide insight into the interplay between the ocean and cloud radiative properties. We present evidence of this robust correlation and examine the factors controlling these features. The marine boundary layer is in direct contact with the sea surface and is strongly influenced by SST. Moisture and vertical motion are crucial ingredients for cloud development and so we examine the role of SST in providing these key components to the atmosphere. Although upwelling of cold subsurface waters is conventionally thought to increase aerosols in the region, thus increasing clouds, here we observed a relaxation of upwelling associated with changes in the structure of marine stratus clouds. As upwelling relaxes, the SST get warmer, thick clouds with high liquid water paths are observed and persist for a few days. This cycle is repeated throughout the summer upwelling season. A concomitant cyclic increase and decrease of CCN concentration is also observed. Forcing mechanisms and large-scale atmospheric features are discussed. Marine stratocumulus clouds are a critical component of the earth's radiation budget and this site provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of SST on these clouds.

  20. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  1. The Importance of the Vertical Location of Aerosol Layers on Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, Susan; Grant, Leah

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced aerosol concentrations appear to influence a number of the aspects of convective storms including the strength of the convective updraft, the intensity of the cold pool, and the microphysical and radiative characteristics of the convective anvil. However, in order for such influences to occur, aerosols need to be effectively ingested by the storm system of interest. The vertical location of an aerosol layer impacting a convective storm may influence how effectively aerosol are ingested by the storm system, and hence the degree to which the ingested aerosol subsequently influence storm microphysical and radiative processes. Furthermore, if the aerosol species impacting the storm are effective at absorbing solar radiation, heating within the aerosol layer enhances atmospheric stability, the level of which will be dictated by where the aerosol layer is located. Enhanced static stability may have negative impacts on the initial development of the convection of interest. Convective storms developing within environments of the same aerosol optical depth may therefore respond differently to aerosol indirect forcing by virtue of where the aerosol layer is vertically located. In this talk, the results of various high-resolution, cloud-resolving simulations will be presented, in which the sensitivity to the vertical location of the aerosol source on the convective development, aerosol ingestion efficiency, and subsequent microphysical and radiative properties are investigated. Microphysical budgets and storm trajectories will form an integral part of the analysis.

  2. Aerosol properties from multi-spectral and multi-angular aircraft 4STAR observations: expected advantages and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Flynn, Connor; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and synthetic 4STAR-like data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband radiative fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or +/-0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or +/-0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  3. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or ±0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  4. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  5. Studyng the Influence of Aerosols in the Evolution of Cloud Microphysics Procesess Associated with Tropical Cyclone Earl Using Airborne Measurements from the NASA Grip Field Campaing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Y.; Heymsfield, A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Bansemer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud microphysics processes are strongly related to tropical cyclones evolution. Although there have been three decades of research dedicated to understand the role of cloud microphysics in tropical cyclogenesis, there are still questions unanswered. With the intention of fulfill the gaps and to better understand the processes involves in tropical storms formation the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign was conducted during the months of August and September of 2010. In-situ microphysical measurements, including particle size distributions, shapes, liquid/ice water content and supercooled liquid water were obtained from the DC-8 aircraft. A total of 139 hrs of flying science modules were performed including sampling of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Matthew). One tropical cyclone, Earl, was one of the major hurricanes of the season reaching a category 4 in the Saffir-Simpson scale. Earl emerged from the West Africa on August 22 as an easterly wave, moved westward and became a tropical storm on August 25 before undergoing rapid intensification. This project seeks to explore the lifecycle of hurricane Earl including the genesis and rapid intensification from a microphysics perspective; to develop a better understanding of the relationship between dust from the Saharan Air Layer and cloud microphysics evolution and to develop a better understanding of how cloud microphysics processes interacts and serve as precursor for thermodynamics processes. An overview of the microphysics measurements as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  6. Retrievals of cloud microphysical properties from the Research Scanning Polarimeter measurements made during PODEX field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. D.; Cairns, B.; Sinclair, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the retrievals of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements made during NASA's POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX), which was based in Palmdale, California in January - February 2013. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was built for the NASA Glory Mission project. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels with center wavelengths of 410, 470, 555, 670, 865, 960, 1590, 1880 and 2250 nm. The RSP is a push broom scanner making samples at 0.8 degree intervals within 60 degrees from nadir in both forward and backward directions. The data from actual RSP scans is aggregated into "virtual" scans, each consisting of all reflectances (at a variety of scattering angles) from a single point on the ground or at the cloud top. In the case of water clouds the rainbow is observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 170 degrees. It has a unique signature that is being used to accurately determine the droplet size and is not affected by cloud morphology. Simple parametric fitting algorithm applied to these polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows to retrieve the droplet size distribution a parametric model. Of particular interest is the information contained in droplet size distribution width, which is indicative of cloud life cycle. The absorbing band method is also applied to RSP total reflectance observations. The difference in the retrieved droplet size between polarized and absorbing band techniques is expected to reflect the strength of the vertical gradient in cloud liquid water content. In addition to established retrieval

  7. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  8. DYNAMICS of optical-microphysical properties of atmospheric haze at stepwise change of air humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, Rustam F.; Kozlov, Valerii S.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    The three-day cycle of spectronephelometric measurements of the angular aerosol scattering coefficients of the near-ground aerosol at the stepwise increase/decrease of the relative air humidity of 50, 65, 75, 85, and 90% has been conducted in the Large Aerosol Chamber of IAO SB RAS filled with the atmospheric air. The results of solution of the inverse problem have shown that the condensation coarsening of particles at the simultaneous decrease of their refractive index and the imaginary part of the complex refraction index (absorption index) is stably observed with an increase of the relative air humidity for ultrafine (with radii of 30-100 nm) and fine (100-370 nm) particles. However, for the coarse particles (370-600 nm), the increase of humidity leads to the effect of increase of the refractive index from 1.60 to 1.66, while the values of the absorption index are low (˜10-5) and vary only slightly at the aerosol humidification. The effective radius of particles (165-195 nm) and the single scattering albedo (0.71-0.83) increase synchronously with an increase of the air humidity. For two days of aerosol evolution in the closed volume of the chamber, the total extinction and absorption coefficients also vary synchronously with the variation of humidity, but at the third day the influence of humidity on the absorption coefficient was not observed. A possible reason for appearance of specific condensation peculiarities is the influence of humidity variations on the inflow/outflow of particles smaller than 30 nm and larger than 600 nm having various physical-chemical composition into the optically active size range.

  9. Studying Taklamakan aerosol properties with lidar (STAPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul; Mueller, Detlef; Shin, Dong-Ho; Zhang, Xiao Xiao; Feng, Guanglong; McKendry, Ian; Strawbridge, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependant on the conditions under which the dust is emitted. Even greater variations have been documented during the process of long-range transport. With continued improvement of detection technologies, research focus is increasingly turning to refinement of our knowledge of these properties of dust in order to better account for the presence of dust in models and data analysis. The purpose of this study is to use a combination of lidar data and models to directly observe the changing properties of dust layers as they are transported from their origin in the Taklamakan Desert of western China. With the co-operation of the Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, a portable micropulse lidar system was installed at Aksu National Field on the northern edge of the Tarim Basin in late April 2013, during the Spring dust storm season. Over six days, data were collected on the optical properties of dust emissions passing over this location. The measurements of this lidar have shown the dust over Aksu on these days to have a significantly higher depolarization ratio than has been previously reported for the region. Model results show this dust was then transported across the region at least as far as Korea and Japan. Models from the Naval Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) show that during transport the dust layers became intermixed with sulfate emissions from industrial sources in China as well as smoke from wildfires burning in south-east Asia and Siberia. The multi-wavelength raman-elastic lidar located in Gwangju South Korea was used to observe the vertical structure of the layers as well as optical properties such as colour ratio, depolarization ratio and extinction

  10. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  11. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  12. The Truth about Stratospheric Aerosols: Key Results from SPARC`s Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2005-12-01

    Given the critical role it plays in ozone chemistry, the Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP) has been carried out by the WCRP project on Stratospheric Process and their Role in Climate (SPARC). The objective of this report was to present a systematic analysis of the state of knowledge of stratospheric aerosols including their precursors. It includes an examination of precursor concentrations and trends, measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties, trends in those properties, and modeling their formation, transport, and distribution in both background and volcanic conditions. The assessment found that the dominant nonvolcanic stratospheric aerosol precursor gases are OCS, SO2, and tropospheric aerosol. Therefore, though SO2, human-related activities play a significant role in the observed background stratospheric aerosol. There is general agreement between measured OCS and modeling of its transformation to sulfate aerosol, and observed aerosols. However, there is a significant dearth of SO2 measurements, and the role of tropospheric SO2 in the stratospheric aerosol budget - while significant - remains a matter of some guesswork. The assessment also found that there is basic agreement between the various data sets and models particularly during periods of elevated loading. However, at background levels significant differences were found that indicate that substantial questions remain regarding the nature of stratospheric aerosol during these periods particularly in the lower stratosphere. For instance, during periods of very low aerosol loading significant differences exist between systems for key parameters including aerosol surface area density and extinction. At the same time, comparisons of models and satellite observations of aerosol extinction found good agreement at visible wavelengths above 20-25 km altitude region but are less satisfactory for infrared wavelengths. While there are some model short-comings relative to observations in

  13. Lidar-radar synergy for characterizing properties of ultragiant volcanic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Giunta, A.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2011-12-01

    , but from Central Europe where many lidar observations confirm the presence of volcanic aerosol in the previous days. Therefore, both CIAO lidar observations and the backtrajectory analysis suggests a volcanic origin of the ultragiant aerosol observed by the radar, revealing that these particles might have travelled for more than 4000 km after their injection into the atmosphere. The reported observation fostered a study, reported in this work, about the performances of multi-wavelength Raman lidars in the identification and the characterization of ultragiant aerosols layers in the troposphere. Results from simulations using Mie, T-Matrix and ray-tracing codes will be presented and compared with the observations performed in April-May 2010 during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Sensitivity ranges in detection of aerosol layer are pointed out in terms of experimental limits of both lidar and radar techniques and of aerosol optical depth. Moreover, recommendations for use of a combined lidar-radar approach for the aerosol typing and for the retrieval of their microphysical properties are reported.

  14. Optical-chemical-microphysical relationships and closure studies for mixed carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island; 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer, particle sizing, and filter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Stone, E. A.; Schauer, J. J.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S. C.

    2010-11-01

    Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX) field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PASS-3), chemical filter analysis, and size distributions. The PASS-3 directly measures the effects of morphology (e.g. coatings) on light absorption that traditional filter-based instruments are unable to address. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 74% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning wide ranges of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that episodes with higher organic carbon (OC)/sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-)/SO42- composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405). We infer complex refractive indices (n-ik) as a function of wavelength for the high, intermediate, and low OC/SO42- pollution episodes by using the observed particle size distributions and the measured optical properties. The smallest mean particle diameter corresponds to the high OC/SO42- aerosol episode. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k) is greater for the high OC/SO42- episode at all wavelengths. A distinct, sharp increase in k at short wavelength implies enhanced light absorption by OC, which accounts for 50% of the light absorption at 405 nm, in the high OC/SO42- episode. Idealized analysis indicates increased absorption at 781 nm by factors greater than 3 relative to denuded black carbon in the laboratory. We hypothesize that coatings of black carbon cores are the mechanism of this enhancement. This implies that climate warming and atmospheric heating rates from black carbon particles can be significantly larger than have been

  15. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  16. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  17. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Site. Part I; Low-Level Cloud Macrophysical, Microphysical, and Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Minnis, Patrick; Xi, Baike

    2005-01-01

    A record of single-layer and overcast low cloud (stratus) properties has been generated using approximately 4000 hours of data collected from January 1997 to December 2002 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains Central Facility (SCF). The cloud properties include liquid-phase and liquid-dominant, mixed-phase, low cloud macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties including cloud-base and -top heights and temperatures, and cloud physical thickness derived from a ground-based radar and lidar pair, and rawinsonde sounding; cloud liquid water path (LWP) and content (LWC), and cloud-droplet effective radius (r(sub e)) and number concentration (N) derived from the macrophysical properties and radiometer data; and cloud optical depth (tau), effective solar transmission (gamma), and cloud/top-of-atmosphere albedos (R(sub cldy)/R(sub TOA)) derived from Eppley precision spectral pyranometer measurements. The cloud properties were analyzed in terms of their seasonal, monthly, and hourly variations. In general, more stratus clouds occur during winter and spring than in summer. Cloud-layer altitudes and physical thicknesses were higher and greater in summer than in winter with averaged physical thicknesses of 0.85 km and 0.73 km for day and night, respectively. The seasonal variations of LWP, LWC, N. tau, R(sub cldy), and R(sub TOA) basically follow the same pattern with maxima and minima during winter and summer, respectively. There is no significant variation in mean r(sub e), however, despite a summertime peak in aerosol loading, Although a considerable degree of variability exists, the 6-yr average values of LWP, LWC, r(sub e), N, tau, gamma, R(sub cldy) and R(sub TOA) are 150 gm(exp -2) (138), 0.245 gm(exp -3) (0.268), 8.7 micrometers (8.5), 213 cm(exp -3) (238), 26.8 (24.8), 0.331, 0.672, 0.563 for daytime (nighttime). A new conceptual model of midlatitude continental low clouds at the ARM SGP site has been developed from this study

  18. Parameterization of the Vertical Variability of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud Integrating Nephelometers (CIN) were flown on the U. North Dakota Citation aircraft and the NASA WB-57 aircraft for the purpose of measuring in-situ the optical extinction coefficient and the asymmetry parameter (g) at a wavelength of 635 nm of primarily ice particles encountered during the NASA CRYSTAL-FACE study of large cumulus clouds (Cu) and their anvils found in the southern Florida region. The probes performance was largely successful and produced archived data for vertical profiles of extinction, asymmetry parameter, and effective radius (Re), the latter being obtained by combining CIN and CVI (total water; Oregon State U.) measurements. Composites of the CIN and CVI data describing the average microphysical and optical behavior of the Cu and their anvils showed the following: The extinction increases with height as a result of the size of the particles also decreasing with height as shown by the Re measurements; near the top of anvils the size of the primary ice particles is about 10-um radius; and the value of g does not vary significantly with height and has a mean value of about 0.73 consistent with the idea that ambient ice crystals are primarily of complex shape and reflect solar radiation more efficiently than particles of pristine crystal shape. Other observations include: The g measurements were found to be an indicator of the phase of the cloud permitting identification of the clouds with water droplets, rain, and ice; visual ranges as small as several tens of meters were occasionally found in "extinction cores" that coincided with strong updraft cores; and comparison of the cloud probes on the Citation showed significant disagreement.

  19. Aerosol Optical Properties in Southeast Asia From AERONET Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Boonjawat, J.; Le, H. V.; Schafer, J. S.; Reid, J. S.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2003-12-01

    There is little published data available on measured optical properties of aerosols in the Southeast Asian region. The AERONET project and collaborators commenced monitoring of aerosol optical properties in February 2003 at four sites in Thailand and two sites in Viet Nam to measure the primarily anthropogenic aerosols generated by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion/ industrial emissions. Automatic sun/sky radiometers at each site measured spectral aerosol optical depth in 7 wavelengths from 340 to 1020 nm and combined with directional radiances in the almucantar, retrievals were made of spectral single scattering albedo and aerosol size distributions. Angstrom exponents, size distributions and spectral single scattering albedo of primarily biomass burning aerosols at rural sites are compared to measurements made at AERONET sites in other major biomass burning regions in tropical southern Africa, South America, and in boreal forest regions. Additionally, the aerosol single scattering albedo and size distributions measured in Bangkok, Thailand are compared with those measured at other urban sites globally. The influences of aerosols originating from other regions outside of Southeast Asia are analyzed using trajectory analyses. Specifically, cases of aerosol transport and mixing from Southern China and from India are presented.

  20. A Sensitivity Study of Radiative Fluxes at the Top of Atmosphere to Cloud-Microphysics and Aerosol Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; McFarlane, Sally A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Ma, Po-Lun; Yan, Huiping; Bao, Jie

    2013-11-08

    In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of net radiative fluxes (FNET) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to 16 selected uncertain parameters mainly related to the cloud microphysics and aerosol schemes in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). We adopted a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling approach to effectively explore the high dimensional parameter space. The output response variables (e.g., FNET) were simulated using CAM5 for each parameter set, and then evaluated using generalized linear model analysis. In response to the perturbations of these 16 parameters, the CAM5-simulated global annual mean FNET ranges from -9.8 to 3.5 W m-2 compared to the CAM5-simulated FNET of 1.9 W m-2 with the default parameter values. Variance-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the relative contributions of individual parameter perturbation to the global FNET variance. The results indicate that the changes in the global mean FNET are dominated by those of cloud forcing (CF) within the parameter ranges being investigated. The size threshold parameter related to auto-conversion of cloud ice to snow is confirmed as one of the most influential parameters for FNET in the CAM5 simulation. The strong heterogeneous geographic distribution of FNET variation shows parameters have a clear localized effect over regions where they are acting. However, some parameters also have non-local impacts on FNET variance. Although external factors, such as perturbations of anthropogenic and natural emissions, largely affect FNET variations at the regional scale, their impact is weaker than that of model internal parameters in terms of simulating global mean FNET in this study. The interactions among the 16 selected parameters contribute a relatively small portion of the total FNET variations over most regions of the globe. This study helps us better understand the CAM5 model behavior associated with parameter uncertainties, which will aid the next step of reducing model

  1. Impact of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the dynamics and microphysics of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. High aerosol concentrations provide enhanced cloud condensation nuclei that can lead to the invigoration of convection and increase of surface rainfall. Such effects are dependent on environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Clouds are not only affected by aerosol, they also alter aerosol properties by various processes. Cloud processing of aerosol includes: convective redistribution, modification in the number and size of aerosol particles, chemical processing, new particle formation around clouds, and aerosol removal by rainfall to the surface. Among these processes, the wet removal during intense rain events, in polluted continental regions, can lead to spikes in acidic deposition into environment. In this study, we address the effects of clouds and precipitation on the aerosol distribution in cases of convective precipitation events in eastern US. We examine the effects of clouds and precipitation on various aerosol species, as well as their temporal and spatial variability.

  2. Retrieval of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties from SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörner, S.; Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Penning de Vries, M.; Hörmann, C.; von Savigny, C.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Balloon-borne and aircraft measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties have been supplemented by satellite measurements since 1975 (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement program). Ever since, the technological possibilities of satellite measurements increased steadily. Nowadays the large number of satellites provides global data sets of trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Stratospheric aerosol properties are usually determined from observations in occultation or limb geometry. Stratospheric aerosol has an important influence on the global radiation budget (e.g. after strong volcanic eruptions) and stratospheric ozone chemistry (e.g. the chlorine activation inside the polar vortex). Since the launch of SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT in 2002 measurements in limb geometry for the UV/VIS/NIR spectral range with a vertical resolution of 3.3 km at the tangent point are available. By using these measurements, profile information of stratospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, BrO or OClO) can be retrieved. From the broad band spectral dependence of the SCIAMACHY limb measurements, also information on stratospheric aerosol properties can be derived. Pioneering studies (e.g. von Savigny et al., 2005) showed that signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and also stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from color indices (including the near IR spectral range). In our study we make use of the color index method and additionally investigate the effects of aerosols on the whole UV/VIS/NIR spectral range. Aerosol properties are estimated by comparisons of the measured values with radiative transfer simulations. We investigate different atmospheric phenomena, e.g. volcanic eruptions (e.g. Kasatochi, 2008) or large biomass burning events (e.g. Australia, 2009). We also have a look at the spatio-temporal variation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the polar regions and stratospheric aerosol properties on a global scale.

  3. Measurements of aerosol physical properties at a high altitude station in central Himalayas during RAWEX-GVAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Vimlesh; Sagar, Ram; Pant, P.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Venkata Phanikumar, Devulapalli; Dumka, Umesh Chandra; Singh, Narendra; Sahai, Shivraj; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Satheesh, S. K.; Naja, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Physical properties of atmospheric aerosols are being measured at a high altitude site Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4°N, 79.5°E; 1950 m amsl) in central Himalaya under the Regional Aerosols Warming Experiment-Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (RAWEX-GVAX). The cloud condensation nuclei counter (single-column DMT Model 1) and condensation particle counter (TSI Model 3010) are operated round the clock since June 2011 during the first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment. The preliminary analyses of data obtained from these instruments together with the meteorological observations during June-September, 2011 are reported here. Number concentrations of condensation nuclei (N _{CN}) and cloud condensation nuclei (N _{CCN}) show characteristic features of atmospheric aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) region in the northern India. Concentrations of N _{CCN} are measured at seven supersaturations between -0.01% to 0.75% in steps. The nominal concentration of N _{CN}, particularly during low wind speeds, was in the range of 500 -- 2000 cm ^{-3}. The concentrations of N _{CCN} are observed to increase with the increasing supersaturations. In most of the cases, the variations in both N _{CN} and N _{CCN} are similar. Rapid decrease in aerosol number concentrations was observed after the precipitation associated with southwest monsoon. The effects of regional sources as well as the long-range transport on the aerosol physical properties in the IGP region are studied. Further analysis of data expected to reveal crucial role of aerosols in cloud microphysical processes and regional climate over this region.

  4. Trends in the aerosol load properties over south eastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, J. A. G.; Perrone, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term (2003-2013) variations in columnar aerosol properties at Lecce, a site representative of the central Mediterranean, have been analysed for trend assessment. The study focuses on aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 340, 440, 500 and 1020 nm and Ångström exponent (AE) for the pair 440-870 nm, retrieved from a sun photometer operating within the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A non-parametric trend analysis of the monthly mean, median and upper and lower tails (90th and 10th percentiles) suggests that the aerosol load has decreased during the study period, while the mean particle size remained unchanged. The characteristic advections reaching the study site were found by clustering analysis of back trajectories at 500, 1500 and 3000 m. Despite the strong influence they have on aerosol load and particle size, neither of the trends in advection routes could explain the tendencies found in the columnar aerosol properties. However, trends in aerosol data by advection type allow understanding the overall trends. Aerosol properties under flows with high residence time over continental Europe present differences according to the specific residing area. More specifically, no trend is found when flows arrive from Ukraine and the Balkans, while under advections from north-western/central Europe there are downward trends in the background levels and a reduction of the fine fraction. Negative trends are also found under flows with high residence time over the Mediterranean and northern Africa, again with differences according to the residing area.

  5. Sunphotometer network for monitoring aerosol properties in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Pereira, Alfredo; Vermote, E.; Reagan, J. A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Tanre, D.; Slutsker, I.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite platforms have provided a methodology for regional and global remote sensing of aerosols. New systems will significantly improve that capability during the EOS era; however, the voluminous 20 year record of satellite data has produced only regional snapshots of aerosol loading and have not yielded a data base of the optical properties of those aerosols which are fundamental to our understanding of their influence on climate change. The prospect of fully understanding the properties of the aerosols with respect to climate change is small without validation and augmentation by ancillary ground based observations. Sun photometry was demonstrated to be an effective tool for ground based measurements of aerosol optical properties from fire emissions. Newer technology has expanded routine sun photometer measurements to spectral observations of solar aureole and almucantar allowing retrievals of size distribution, scattering phase function, and refractive index. A series of such observations were made in Brazil's Amazon basin from a network of six simultaneously recording instruments deployed in Sep. 1992. The instruments were located in areas removed from local aerosol sources such that sites are representative of regional aerosol conditions. The overall network was designed to cover the counter clockwise tropospheric circulation of the Amazon Basin. Spectral measurements of sun, aureole and sky data for retrieval of aerosol optical thickness, particle size distribution, and scattering phase function as well as measurements of precipitable water were made during noncloudy conditions.

  6. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  7. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  8. Use of microphysical relationships to discern growth/decay mechanisms of cloud droplets with focus on Z-LWC relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Daum, P.H.; Yum, S.S.; Wang, J.

    2008-05-01

    Cloud droplet size distributions hence the key microphysical quantities (e.g., radar reflectivity, droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, and mean-volume radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms, including pre-cloud aerosols as CCNs, cloud updraft, and various turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, different relationships among these microphysical properties are expected in response to these various mechanisms. The effect of turbulent entrainment-mixing processes is particularly vexing, with different entrainment-mixing processes likely leading to different microphysical relationships. Cloud radar has been widely used to infer the cloud liquid water content (L) from the measurement of radar reflectivity (Z) using a Z-L relationship. Existing Z-L expressions have been often obtained empirically, and differ substantially (Khain et al. 2008). The discrepancy among Z-L relations, which has been hindering the application of cloud radar in measuring cloud properties, likely stems from the different relationships between the relevant microphysical properties caused by different physical processes. This study first analyzes the Z-L relationship theoretically, and identify the key microphysical properties that affect this relationship, and then address the effects of various processes on the Z-L relationship by discerning the characteristics of the relationships between the relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, and mean-volume radius calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions. Effort is also made to further relate the microphysical relationships to physical processes such as turbulent entrainment-mixing.

  9. Application of Cloud Vertical Structure to Investigate the Microphysical and Optical Properties of Cirriform, Anvil, and Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.; Young, A. H.; Curry, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    This study uses cloud vertical structure (CVS) to evaluate the optical and microphysical properties of high clouds including cirriform, anvil, and deep convection (DC) over the region between 35°S-35°N for a 1-yr period from January-December 2007. The analyses are based on integrated multisensory pixel-level observations of CVS from CloudSat/CALIPSO and Level 2 cloud data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the Aqua satellite. Cloud products evaluated include mean cloud optical thickness, cloud effective radius, cloud-top temperature, cloud-top pressure, cloud brightness temperature, and cloud effective emissivity. Unlike other studies, high clouds investigated in this study are not determined by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud classification scheme. Instead it relies on the CloudSat 2B-CLDCLASS product which uses radar reflectivity data and also considers the spatial and horizontal cloud structure to classify cirriform, anvil, and DC clouds. Results of the study are used to evaluate the capabilities of MODIS to estimate cloud properties and identify the impacts of using CVS to classify various types of high level clouds rather than the ISCCP cloud classification scheme. Applications of the study's results include potential improvements to precipitation retrievals and the representation of cloud systems in general circulation models.

  10. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  11. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  12. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  13. A Study of Aerosol Effect on Marine Water Clouds with Long-term Satellite Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Heidinger, A. K.; Walther, A.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud microphysical structures and properties provide a critical link between the energy and hydrological cycles of Earth's climate system. A change of cloud microphysical properties related to anthropogenic activities may result in distressing climate consequence and changes. Since atmospheric aerosol is the major source of cloud condensation nuclei (CNN) that is critical for the formation of cloud microphysical structures and properties, aerosol changes due to anthropogenic emissions will result in the modification of CCN and cloud microphysical properties and eventually cause the changes of Earth's climate. In this study, we will investigate the effect of aerosol on the microphysical properties, including cloud particle effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical depth, of marine stratus clouds by using more than 30-years climate data records (CDRs) of aerosols and clouds derived from NOAA operational AVHRR satellite observations. The correlation between satellite derived cloud and aerosol microphysical parameters will be determined and the statistics significance will be examined using the long-term AVHRR satellite CDRs.

  14. Ultraviolet dust aerosol properties as observed by MARCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael J.; Todd Clancy, R.; Goguen, Jay D.; Malin, Michael C.; Cantor, Bruce A.

    2010-07-01

    Observations by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) in two ultraviolet (UV, Bands 6 and 7; 258 nm, and 320 nm, respectively) and one visible (Band 1, 436 nm) channels of the 2007 planet encircling dust storm are combined with those made by the two Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) to better characterize the single scattering albedo (ω0) of martian dust aerosols. Exploiting the low contrast of the surface in the UV (and blue) as well as the reduced importance of surface reflectance under very dusty conditions, we utilize the sampling of photometric angles by the MARCI cross-track geometry to synthesize an analog of the classical Emergence Phase Function (EPF). This so-called "pseudo-EPF", used in conjunction with the "ground-truth" measurements provided by the MERs, is able to effectively isolate the effects of the dust ω0. The motivation for this approach is the elimination of a significant portion of the type of uncertainty involved in many previous radiative transfer analyses. Furthermore, we produce a self-consistent set of complex refractive indices (m=n+ik) through our use of an explicit microphysical representation of the aerosol scattering properties. Because of uncertainty in the exact size of the dust particles during the epoch of the observations, we consider two effective particle radii (reff) to cover the range anticipated from the literature: 1.6 and 1.8 μm. The resulting set of model-data comparisons, ω0, and m are presented along with an assessment of potential sources of error and uncertainty. Analysis of the Band 1 results is limited to ω0 as a "proof-of-concept" for our approach through a comparison to contemporaneous CRISM EPF results at 440 nm. The derived ω0 are: assuming reff=1.6μm-0.619-0.626,0.648, and 0.765, for Bands 6, 7, and 1, respectively; for reff=1.8μm-0.625-0.635,0.653,0.769, for the same band order. For either reff case, the total estimated error is 0.022, 0.019, and 0.010, again for

  15. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties over Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Saponaro, Giulia; Virtanen, Timo; Rodriguez, Edith; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Atlaskina, Ksenia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides the spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud properties over a wide area. In our studies large data sets are used for statistical studies on aerosol and cloud interaction in an area over Fennoscandia, the Baltic Sea and adjacent regions over the European mainland. This area spans several regimes with different influences on aerosol cloud interaction such as a the transition from relative clean air over Fennoscandia to more anthropogenically polluted air further south, and the influence maritime air over the Baltic and oceanic air advected from the North Atlantic. Anthropogenic pollution occurs in several parts of the study area, and in particular near densely populated areas and megacities, but also in industrialized areas and areas with dense traffic. The aerosol in such areas is quite different from that produced over the boreal forest and has different effects on air quality and climate. Studies have been made on the effects of aerosols on air quality and on the radiation balance in China. The aim of the study is to study the effect of these different regimes on aerosol-cloud interaction using a large aerosol and cloud data set retrieved with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer (A)ATSR Dual View algorithm (ADV) further developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute and aerosol and cloud data provided by MODIS. Retrieval algorithms for aerosol and clouds have been developed for the (A)ATSR, consisting of a series of instruments of which we use the second and third one: ATSR-2 which flew on the ERS-2 satellite (1995-2003) and AATSR which flew on the ENVISAT satellite (2002-2012) (both from the European Space Agency, ESA). The ADV algorithm provides aerosol data on a global scale with a default resolution of 10x10km2 (L2) and an aggregate product on 1x1 degree (L3). Optional, a 1x1 km2 retrieval products is available over smaller areas for specific studies. Since for the retrieval of AOD no prior knowledge is needed on

  16. HETEAC: The Aerosol Classification Model for EarthCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Hünerbein, Anja; Horn, Stefan; Kanitz, Thomas; Donovan, David; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Daou, David; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Filipitsch, Florian; Docter, Nicole; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the Hybrid End-To-End Aerosol Classification (HETEAC) model for the upcoming EarthCARE mission. The model serves as the common baseline for development, evaluation, and implementation of EarthCARE algorithms. It shall ensure the consistency of different aerosol products from the multi-instrument platform as well as facilitate the conform specification of broad-band optical properties necessary for the EarthCARE radiative closure efforts. The hybrid approach ensures the theoretical description of aerosol microphysics consistent with the optical properties of various aerosol types known from observations. The end-to-end model permits the uniform representation of aerosol types in terms of microphysical, optical and radiative properties.

  17. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  18. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March–May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls. PMID:24707452

  19. Research Spotlight: Is there a relationship between aerosol and cloud properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi; Ofori, Leslie; Tretkoff, Ernie

    The interaction of aerosols and clouds is a significant uncertainty in studies of anthropogenic forcing of climate. To learn more about the effects of fine aerosols on cloud microphysics, Costantino and Bréon performed a multisensor analysis of the atmosphere off the southwest coast of Africa. They chose this particular area because it is often affected by smoke from biomass burning. The aerosol particles from this smoke are transported by trade winds into the atmosphere, where they come in contact with low-level stratocumulus clouds.

  20. Physical properties of the stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A comparison of the equilibrium vapor pressure over nitric acid solutions with observed water and nitric acid partial pressures in the stratosphere implies that nitric acid cannot be present as an aerosol particle in the lower stratosphere. A similar comparison for sulfuric acid solutions indicates that sulfuric acid aerosol particles are 75% H2SO4 by weight in water, in good agreement with direct observations. The freezing curve of H2SO4 solutions requires that the H2SO4 aerosol particles be solid or supercooled. The equilibrium vapor pressure of H2SO4 in the stratosphere is of the order of 20 picotorr. At stratospheric temperatures, ammonium sulfate is in a ferroelectric phase. As a result, polar molecules may form a surface coating on these aerosols, which may be a fertile ground for further chemical reaction.

  1. Remote sensing of aerosol in the terrestrial atmosphere from space: new missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Ivanov, Yu.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Mishchenko, M.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Bovchaliuk, V.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosols on a global scale are not well known in terms of determination of their effects on climate. This mostly is due to extreme variability of aerosol concentrations, properties, sources, and types. Aerosol climate impact is comparable to the effect of greenhouse gases, but its influence is more difficult to measure, especially with respect to aerosol microphysical properties and the evaluation of anthropogenic aerosol effect. There are many satellite missions studying aerosol distribution in the terrestrial atmosphere, such as MISR/Terra, OMI/Aura, AVHHR, MODIS/Terra and Aqua, CALIOP/CALIPSO. To improve the quality of data and climate models, and to reduce aerosol climate forcing uncertainties, several new missions are planned. The gap in orbital instruments for studying aerosol microphysics has arisen after the Glory mission failed during launch in 2011. In this review paper, we describe several planned aerosol space missions, including the Ukrainian project Aerosol-UA that obtains data using a multi-channel scanning polarimeter and wide-angle polarimetric camera. The project is designed for remote sensing of the aerosol microphysics and cloud properties on a global scale.

  2. Remote Sensing of Aerosol in the Terrestrial Atmosphere from Space: New Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Ivanov, Yu.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Mishchenko, M.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Bovchaliuk, V.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosols on a global scale are not well known in terms of determination of their effects on climate. This mostly is due to extreme variability of aerosol concentrations, properties, sources, and types. Aerosol climate impact is comparable to the effect of greenhouse gases, but its influence is more difficult to measure, especially with respect to aerosol microphysical properties and the evaluation of anthropogenic aerosol effect. There are many satellite missions studying aerosol distribution in the terrestrial atmosphere, such as MISR/Terra, OMI/Aura, AVHHR, MODIS/Terra and Aqua, CALIOP/CALIPSO. To improve the quality of data and climate models, and to reduce aerosol climate forcing uncertainties, several new missions are planned. The gap in orbital instruments for studying aerosol microphysics has arisen after the Glory mission failed during launch in 2011. In this review paper, we describe several planned aerosol space missions, including the Ukrainian project Aerosol-UA that obtains data using a multi-channel scanning polarimeter and wide-angle polarimetric camera. The project is designed for remote sensing of the aerosol microphysics and cloud properties on a global scale.

  3. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  4. Aerosol optical properties of the free troposphere: Tropospheric backscatter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1994-12-01

    A unique ensemble of aerosol sensors (backscattersondes, nephelometers and particle counters) has been assembled during the course of this research to obtain new measurements relating to the optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere, especially in the free troposphere. A knowledge of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio has been greatly enhanced as a result of this project and the inference of representative values along with the range of variation is now possible. Agreement between the optical model results and actual measurements appears to be quite satisfactory. An initial climatology of aerosol backscatter in the free troposphere has been developed and is in general agreement with results and inferences from global remote sensing instruments. However, the data from remote sensors may indicate a larger influence of volcanic aerosols on the upper troposphere than actually exists. Further work with high resolution soundings is needed to fully resolve this issue.

  5. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  6. Aerosol properties over south india during different seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprasad, P.; Babu, C. A.; Jayakrishnan, P. R.

    Aerosols play an important role in the radiation balance and cloud properties, thereby affect the entire climatology of the earth-atmosphere system. Besides natural sources like dust, seasalt and natural sulphates, anthropogenic activities also inject aerosols like soot and industrial sulphates. Of these sea-salt and sulphates scatter the solar radiation. Soot is an absorbing aerosol while soil dust and organic matters are partly absorbing aerosols. Wind and rainfall are major factors affecting the transportation and deposition of the aerosols. India is a country blessed with plenty of monsoon rains. Winter (December to February), summer (March to May), monsoon (June to September) and post monsoon (October to November) are the four seasons over the region. Aerosol properties vary according to the season. Natural aerosols blown from the deserts have a major role in the aerosol optical depth over India. Of this, dust from Arabian desert that is carried by the winds are most important. The aerosol optical depth of south India is entirely different from that of north India. Maximum aerosol concentration is found over Gangetic plane in most of the seasons, whereas entire south India shows less aerosol optical depth. In the present study the aerosol properties of south India is analysed in general. Particular analysis is carried out for the four regions in the east and west coasts around Chennai, Kolkotha, Mumbai and Cochin. Chennai and Kolkotha are situated in the east coast whereas Cochin and Mumbai are in the west coast. These are industrial cities in India. Chennai region does not get monsoon rainfall since it is situated in the leeward side of Western ghats. But in the post monsoon season Chennai gets good amount of rainfall. Other three regions get good amount of rainfall during monsoon season. The study uses Terra MODIS, TOMS, NCEP/NCAR and TRMM data. Aerosol properties are analysed using Terra MODIS and Nimbus TOMS data. The variations of the aerosol optical

  7. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  8. Climatology and Characteristics of Aerosol Optical Properties in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Lauren; Ogren, John; Backman, John; Asmi, Eija; Andrews, Elisabeth; Jefferson, Anne; Bergin, Michael; Tunved, Peter; Sharma, Sangeeta; Starkweather, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Within the Arctic, climate forcers like atmospheric aerosols are important contributors to the observed warming and environmental changes in the region. Quantifying the forcing by aerosols in the Arctic is especially difficult, given short aerosol lifetimes, annual variability in illumination and surface albedo, stratified atmospheric conditions, complex feedbacks, and long-range aerosol transport. However, in-situ surface measurements of Arctic aerosol optical properties can be used to constrain variability of light scattering and absorption, identify potential particle sources, and help evaluate the resulting forcing. Data from six WMO Global Atmosphere Watch stations are presented: Alert, Canada (ALT); Barrow, Alaska (BRW); Pallas, Finland (PAL); Summit, Greenland (SUM); Tiksi, Russia (TIK); and Zeppelin Mountain, Norway (ZEP). These sites contribute to the International Arctic System for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA), which facilitates Arctic-wide data collection and analysis. Climatologies of aerosol optical properties from each station show differences in magnitude and variability of observed parameters. For example, most stations (ALT, BRW, SUM, TIK, ZEP) experience maximum scattering in winter/spring, while PAL exhibits maximum scattering in the summer. The observed range in scattering across these sites is large (almost an order of magnitude) - SUM has the lowest annual median scattering at 0.82 Mm-1 while BRW has the highest at 6.9 Mm-1. A closer look at systematic variability between optical properties at each station, as well as site back trajectories, suggest differences in aerosol processes, sources and transport. The development of consistent climatologies and additional analyses like the ones presented here can help provide a better understanding of trans-Arctic aerosol variability, which can be an asset for improving aerosol models in this unique and remote region.

  9. Impacts of Aminium Sulfates on Atmospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, C.; Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence our environment significantly by interacting with the solar radiation and modifying cloud formation processes. Amines are emitted into the atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Recent studies have shown that atmospheric amines can enter the particle-phase as salts like aminium sulfates by reacting with aerosol constituents including sulfuric acid and ammonium salts. However, little knowledge is available about the properties of these aminium salts and their impacts on aerosol properties. We have conducted laboratory experiments to measure the hygroscopicity, thermostability, and density of five representative alkylaminium sulfates, using an integrated aerosol analytical system including a tandem differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer. When exposed to increasing RH, alkylaminium sulfate aerosols show monotonic growth in size without a well-defined deliquescence point. Aerosols of mixed ammonium-alkylaminium sulfates have deliquescence points lower than that of ammonium sulfate. The measurements of thermostability reveal that dimethylaminium sulfate is the most stable species upon heating. Trimethyl- and triethyl-aminium sulfates volatilize similarly to ammonium sulfate, but exhibit lower volatility than monomethyl- and diethyl-aminium sulfates. The density of alkylaminium sulfates ranges from 1.2 to 1.5 g cm-3, and can be predicted from an empirical model on the basis of the mole ratio of alkyl carbons to total sulfate. Our results suggest that the properties of aerosols may be considerably altered by the incorporation of atmospheric amines through heterogeneous reactions. In particular, these processes may lead to an enhanced water uptake at low RH and considerably change the contribution of aerosols to climate forcing.

  10. Microphysical Model Studies of Venus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, P. E.; Bullock, M. A.; Grinspoon, D. H.

    2004-11-01

    We have adapted a standard cloud microphysics model to construct a self-consistent microphysical model of Venus' cloud layer which reproduces and extends previous studies (e.g. James et al. 1997). Our model is based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model Atmosphere (CARMA), which is a widely used computer code for terrestrial cloud microphysics, derived from the work of Toon et al. (1988). The standard code has been adapted to treat H2O and H2SO4 as co-condensing vapor species onto aqueous H2SO4 cloud droplets, as well as the nucleation of condensation nuclei to droplets. Vapor condensation and evaporation follows the method of James et al. (1997). Microphysical processes included in this model include nucleation of condensation nuclei, condensation and evaporation of H2O and H2SO4 vapor, and droplet coagulation. Vertical transport occurs though advection, eddy diffusion, sedimentation for both droplets and condensation nuclei. The cloud model is used to explore the sensitivity of Venus' cloud layer to environmental changes. Observations of the Venus' lower cloud from the Pioneer Venus, Venera, and Galileo spacecraft have suggested that the properties of the lower cloud may be time-variable, and at times may be entirely absent (Carlson et al. 1993, Grinspoon et al. 1993, Esposito et al. 1997). Our model explores the dependence of such behavior on environment factors such as variations in water or SO2 abundance. We have also calculated the optical properties of the model atmosphere using both the conventional optical constants for H2SO4 (Palmer and Williams, 1975), and the new data of Tisdale et al. (1998). This work has been supported by NASA's Exobiology Program. References Carlson, R.W., et al., 1993. Planetary and Space Science, 41, 477-486. Esposito, L.W., et al., 1997. In Venus II, eds. S.W. Bougher et al., pp. 415-458, University of Arizona Press, Tucson. Grinspoon, D.H., et al., 1993. Planetary and Space Science, 41 (July 1993), 515-542. James, E. P

  11. How We Can Constrain Aerosol Type Globally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In addition to aerosol number concentration, aerosol size and composition are essential attributes needed to adequately represent aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in models. As the nature of ACI varies enormously with environmental conditions, global-scale constraints on particle properties are indicated. And although advanced satellite remote-sensing instruments can provide categorical aerosol-type classification globally, detailed particle microphysical properties are unobtainable from space with currently available or planned technologies. For the foreseeable future, only in situ measurements can constrain particle properties at the level-of-detail required for ACI, as well as to reduce uncertainties in regional-to-global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). The limitation of in situ measurements for this application is sampling. However, there is a simplifying factor: for a given aerosol source, in a given season, particle microphysical properties tend to be repeatable, even if the amount varies from day-to-day and year-to-year, because the physical nature of the particles is determined primarily by the regional environment. So, if the PDFs of particle properties from major aerosol sources can be adequately characterized, they can be used to add the missing microphysical detail the better sampled satellite aerosol-type maps. This calls for Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses (SAM-CAAM). We are defining a relatively modest and readily deployable, operational aircraft payload capable of measuring key aerosol absorption, scattering, and chemical properties in situ, and a program for characterizing statistically these properties for the major aerosol air mass types, at a level-of-detail unobtainable from space. It is aimed at: (1) enhancing satellite aerosol-type retrieval products with better aerosol climatology assumptions, and (2) improving the translation between satellite-retrieved aerosol optical properties and

  12. Remote Sensing of Spectral Aerosol Properties: A Classroom Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2006-01-01

    Bridging the gap between current research and the classroom is a major challenge to today s instructor, especially in the sciences where progress happens quickly. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland teamed up in designing a graduate class project intended to provide a hands-on introduction to the physical basis for the retrieval of aerosol properties from state-of-the-art MODIS observations. Students learned to recognize spectral signatures of atmospheric aerosols and to perform spectral inversions. They became acquainted with the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm over oceans, and methods for its evaluation, including comparisons with groundbased AERONET sun-photometer data.

  13. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  14. An investigation of the effect of sulfate on cloud microphysics using a chemistry/transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.D.; Green, R.; Schwartz, S.E.; Benkovitz, C.M.

    2001-01-14

    Here the authors have used the output of a chemistry/transport model to identify a situation in which sulfate aerosol from industrial sources may be expected to exert a strong influence on cloud microphysical and radiative properties in an oceanic area that is well displaced from source regions. Pertinent cloud microphysical properties (optical depth and cloud drop radius) are inferred from radiance data obtained from satellite remote sensing. Comparison of these quantities in situations where the model indicates the presence or absence of industrial sulfate has allowed identification of the expected signature of one aerosol indirect effect--an increase in droplet number concentration and concomitant decrease in droplet radii, on a synoptic scale. Although the information obtained on changes in cloud optical depth is too meager to draw conclusions regarding radiative forcing, there is no doubt that the cloud microphysical properties are influenced by the incursion of continental sulfate aerosol in a way that is consistent with that expected by the Twomey indirect forcing mechanism.

  15. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  16. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  17. On the instrumental characterization of a 3-λ scanning lidar to monitor industrial flames and its application for retrieving optical and microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; da Costa, Renata; Esteban Bedoya, Andrés; Guardani, Roberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Efrain Bastidas, Álvaro; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The emission of pollutants in megacities and industrial areas can have strong impact, not only from an environmental point of view, but also for human health. Cubatão (23° 53' S, 46° 26' W, 10 m asl) has been one of the most industrialized city in Brazil (located at São Paulo state coast) during the last decades. This work deals with the recent advances made on a 3-λ scanning lidar placed at this industrial region. Special attention has been paid to the characterization of the electronic performance of this lidar system. For this goal, the quality assurance tests, regularly applied in well-established lidar networks such as LALINET [Guerrero-Rascado et al., 2014] and EARLINET [Pappalardo et al. 2014], were applied to the Cubatão scanning lidar in order to improve the knowledge of its performing itself and to design protocols for correcting lidar signal for undesirable instrumental effects. The application of the results derived from these quality assurance tests together with the state-of-the-art methodologies to map the particle optical and microphysical properties inside industrial flares demonstrate the potential of this lidar for the study and measurement of industrial emissions. References: J. L. Guerrero-Rascado, E. Landulfo, J. C. Antuña, H. M. J. Barbosa, B. Barja, A. E. Bastidas, A. E. Bedoya, R. da Costa, R. Estevan, R. N. Forno, D. A. Gouveia, C. Jiménez, E. G. Larroza, F. J. S. Lopes, E. Montilla-Rosero, G. A. Moreira, W. M. Nakaema, D. Nisperuza, L. Otero, J. V. Pallotta, S. Papandrea, E. Pawelko, E. J. Quel, P. Ristori, P. F. Rodrigues, J. Salvador, M. F. Sánchez, and A. Silva, "Towards an instrumental harmonization in the framework of LAINET: dataset of technical specifications", Proceedings of SPIE 2014, vol. 9246, 92460O-1 -- 92460O-14, doi: 10.1117/12.2066873 (2014) G. Pappalardo, A. Amodeo, A. Apituley, A. Comerón, V. Freudenthaler, H. Linné, A. Ansmann, J. Bösenberg, G. D'Amico, I. Mattis, L. Mona, U. Wandinger, V. Amiridis, L

  18. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 1: Study of physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisok, J.; Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Makuch, P.; Petelski, T.; Chilinski, M.; Kaminski, J. W.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Rozwadowska, A.; Jefimow, M.; Markuszewski, P.; Neuber, R.; Pakszys, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Struzewska, J.; Zielinski, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties during iAREA2014 campaign that took place on Svalbard between 15th of Mar and 4th of May 2014. With respect to field area, the experiment consisted of two sites: Ny-Ålesund (78°55‧N, 11°56‧E) and Longyearbyen (78°13‧N, 15°33‧E) with further integration of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station in Hornsund (77°00‧N, 15°33‧E). The subject of this study is to investigate the in-situ, passive and active remote sensing observations as well as numerical simulations to describe the temporal variability of aerosol single-scattering properties during spring season on Spitsbergen. The retrieval of the data indicates several event days with enhanced single-scattering properties due to the existence of sulphate and additional sea-salt load in the atmosphere which is possibly caused by relatively high wind speed. Optical results were confirmed by numerical simulations made by the GEM-AQ model and by chemical observations that indicated up to 45% contribution of the sea-salt to a PM10 total aerosol mass concentration. An agreement between the in-situ optical and microphysical properties was found, namely: the positive correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient measured by the nephelometer and effective radius obtained from laser aerosol spectrometer as well as negative correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent indicated that slightly larger particles dominated during special events. The in-situ surface observations do not show any significant enhancement of the absorption coefficient as well as the black carbon concentration which might occur during spring. All of extensive single-scattering properties indicate a diurnal cycle in Longyearbyen, where 21:00-5:00 data stays at the background level, however increasing during the day by the factor of 3-4. It is considered to be highly connected with local emissions originating

  19. The thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zengzhou; Pan, Delu; Tu, Qianguang; Gong, Fang; Chen, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    Asian dust storms, which can long-range transport to ocean, often occur on spring. The present of Asian dust aerosols over ocean makes some difficult for other studies, such as cloud detection, and also take some advantage for ocean, such as take nutrition into the ocean by dry or wet deposition. Therefore, it is important to study the dust aerosol and retrieve the properties of dust from satellite observations that is mainly from the thermal infrared radiance. In this paper, the thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean are analyzed from MODIS and MTSAT2 observations and Streamer model simulations. By analyzing some line samples and a series of dust aerosol region, it shows that the dust aerosol brightness temperature at 12μm (BT12) is always greater than BT11 and BT8.5, and BT8.5 is general greater than BT11. The brightness temperature different between 11μm and 12μm (BTD11-12) increases with the dust intensity. And the BTD11-12 will become positive when the atmospheric relative humidity is greater than 70%. The BTD11-12 increases gradually with the surface temperature while the effect on BTD11-12 of dust layer temperature is not evident. Those are caused by the transmission of the dust aerosol is different at the two thermal infrared channels. During daytime, dust infrared brightness temperature at mid-infrared bands should reduce the visual radiance, which takes about 25K or less. In general, BT3.7 is greater than BT11 for dust aerosol. Those results are helpful to monitor or retrieve dust aerosol physical properties over ocean from satellite.

  20. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume concentrations of steady-state secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were measured in several hydrocarbon/NOx irradiation experiments. These measurements were used to estimate the thermal behavior of the particles that may be formed in the atmosphere. These laborator...

  1. MAPTIP experiment, marine aerosol properties and thermal imager performance

    SciTech Connect

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Leeuw, G. de; Jensen, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    During the fall of 1993, a field experimental study on Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance (MAPTIP) was conducted in the Dutch coastal waters. The objectives of the MAPTIP trial were: (1) to improve and validate vertical marine aerosol models by providing an extensive set of aerosol and meteorological measurements, within a coastal environment, at different altitudes and for a range of meteorological conditions; (2) to make aerosol and meteorological observations in the first 10 m above the ocean surface with a view to extending existing aerosol models to incorporate near-surface effects; (3) to assess marine boundary layer effects on thermal imaging systems. Aerosol and meteorological instruments, as well as thermal imagers and calibrated targets, were used at several platforms and locations. Measurements have been made of atmospheric turbulence and refractivity effects at wavelengths in the IR and visible, to assess the marine boundary layer effects on the degradation of thermal images. Calibrated targets at different altitudes were observed to the maximum observable range under a wide variety of conditions in both the 3--5 and 8--12 gm bands, These data will be used for the development and validation of IRST models and IR ship signature models with the view of determining the effects of marine-generated aerosols, turbulence and meteorological profiles on their performance.

  2. Hygroscopic and Chemical Properties of Aerosols collected near a Copper Smelter: Implications for Public and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples collected near an active copper smelter were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g. arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18–0.55 µm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10–0.32 µm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  3. Comparison of CERES-MODIS cloud microphysical properties with surface observations over Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongru; Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Yi, Yuhong; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Wang, Tianhe; Nakajima, Takashi Y.

    2015-03-01

    To enhance the utility of satellite-derived cloud properties for studying the role of clouds in climate change and the hydrological cycle in semi-arid areas, it is necessary to know their uncertainties. This paper estimates the uncertainties of several cloud properties by comparing those derived over the China Loess Plateau from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua by the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) with surface observations at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). The comparisons use data from January 2008 to June 2010 limited to single layer and overcast stratus conditions during daytime. Cloud optical depths (τ) and liquid water paths (LWP) from both Terra and Aqua generally track the variation of the surface counterparts with modest correlation, while cloud effective radius (re) is only weakly correlated with the surface retrievals. The mean differences between Terra and the SACOL retrievals are -4.7±12.9, 2.1±3.2 μm and 30.2±85.3 g m-2 for τ, re and LWP, respectively. The corresponding differences for Aqua are 2.1±8.4, 1.2±2.9 μm and 47.4±79.6 g m-2, respectively. Possible causes for biases of satellite retrievals are discussed through statistical analysis and case studies. Generally, the CERES-MODIS cloud properties have a bit larger biases over the Loess Plateau than those in previous studies over other locations.

  4. The Operational MODIS Cloud Optical and Microphysical Property Product: Overview of the Collection 6 Algorithm and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Wind, Galina; Amarasinghe, Nandana; Marchant, Benjamin; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of cloud optical and microphysical properties (part of the archived products MOD06 and MYD06, for MODIS Terra and Aqua, respectively) are currently being reprocessed along with other MODIS Atmosphere Team products. The latest "Collection 6" processing stream, which is expected to begin production by summer 2012, includes updates to the previous cloud retrieval algorithm along with new capabilities. The 1 km retrievals, based on well-known solar reflectance techniques, include cloud optical thickness, effective particle radius, and water path, as well as thermodynamic phase derived from a combination of solar and infrared tests. Being both global and of high spatial resolution requires an algorithm that is computationally efficient and can perform over all surface types. Collection 6 additions and enhancements include: (i) absolute effective particle radius retrievals derived separately from the 1.6 and 3.7 !-lm bands (instead of differences relative to the standard 2.1 !-lm retrieval), (ii) comprehensive look-up tables for cloud reflectance and emissivity (no asymptotic theory) with a wind-speed interpolated Cox-Munk BRDF for ocean surfaces, (iii) retrievals for both liquid water and ice phases for each pixel, and a subsequent determination of the phase based, in part, on effective radius retrieval outcomes for the two phases, (iv) new ice cloud radiative models using roughened particles with a specified habit, (v) updated spatially-complete global spectral surface albedo maps derived from MODIS Collection 5, (vi) enhanced pixel-level uncertainty calculations incorporating additional radiative error sources including the MODIS L1 B uncertainty index for assessing band and scene-dependent radiometric uncertainties, (v) and use of a new 1 km cloud top pressure/temperature algorithm (also part of MOD06) for atmospheric corrections and low cloud non-unity emissivity temperature adjustments.

  5. Correlation Between Cirrus Particle Optical Properties: Microphysics and Implications for Spaceborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Hess, M.; Reichardt, S.; Behrendt, A.; McGee, T. J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in arctic winter reveal a strong correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio and extinction-to-backscatter ratio, for ambient cloud temperatures above approximately -45 C, and an anti-correlation for colder temperatures. Similar correlations are evident in a 2-year midlatitude (53.4 deg N) cirrus data set. Scattering calculations show that the observed dependences can be interpreted in terms of the shapes and sizes of the cirrus ice particles. These findings suggest a retrieval method for determining cirrus extinction profiles from spaceborne lidar polarization data.

  6. Characterization of optical and micro-physical properties of cirrus clouds using a wideband thermal infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, Luca; Di Natale, Gianluca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    High-altitude ice clouds such as cirrus clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget since they cover permanently about 20-30% of the surface of the planet, reaching even to 60-70% in the tropics. The modulation of the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing Earth's thermal emission due to cirrus can contribute to heat or to cool the atmosphere, according to their optical properties, which must be characterised with great accuracy and over the whole spectral range involved in the scattering and emission processes. Here we present the infrared measurements over the wide spectral range from 9 to 50 micron performed by the Fourier transform spectrometer REFIR-PAD (Radiation Explorer in Far InfraRed - Prototype for Application and Development) during many field campaigns that have taken place since 2007 from different high-altitude ground-based stations: Testa Grigia Station, Cervinia-Italy, (3480 m asl), Cerro Toco, Atacama-Chile, (5380 m asl), Concordia Base, Dome C-Antarctica (3230 m asl). These measurements show for the first time the spectral effect of cirrus clouds in the long-wave part of the emission spectrum above 15 micron of wavelength. To characterise these measurements over the wide spectral range as a function of the optical properties of ice particles, a model of the radiative transfer, that integrates the well known numerical code LBLRTM, which simulates the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, with a specific code which simulates the propagation of the radiation through the cloud, was developed. The optical properties of clouds have been modelled using the δ-scaled Eddington approximation for a single layer and the Ping Yang's database for the single-scattering properties of ice crystals. The preliminary results of the fit procedure used for the determination of the micro-physical parameters of ice crystals, such as the effective diameter, ice water path, effective temperature and optical thickness will be shown in the presentation. The

  7. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is an Earth-viewing sensor being developed as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) to be launched in the late 1990s. MODIS consists of two separate instruments that scan a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. Of primary interest for studies of atmospheric physics is the MODIS-N (nadir) instrument which will provide images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resoulutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean and atmosperhic processes. The intent of this lecture is to describe the current status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning radiometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micrometers, and to describe the physical principles behind the development of MODIS for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties. Primary emphasis will be placed on the main atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles form spectral-reflection and thermal-emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be utilized for the determination of the total precipitable water vapor over land and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described herein.

  8. Measuring Aerosol Optical Properties with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Torres, O.; Syniuk, A.; Decae, R.; deLeeuw, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to the NASA EOS-Aura mission scheduled for launch in January 2004. OM1 is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance between 270 an 500 nm. With its relatively high spatial resolution (13x24 sq km at nadir) and daily global coverage. OM1 will make a major contribution to our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to climate research. OM1 will provide data continuity with the TOMS instruments. One of the pleasant surprises of the TOMS data record was its information on aerosol properties. First, only the absorbing aerosol index, which is sensitive to elevated lay- ers of aerosols such as desert dust and smoke aerosols, was derived. Recently these methods were further improved to yield aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over land and ocean for 19 years of TOMS data (1979-1992,1997-2002), making it one of the longest and most valuable time series for aerosols presently available. Such long time series are essential to quantify the effect of aerosols on the Earth& climate. The OM1 instrument is better suited to measure aerosols than the TOMS instruments because of the smaller footprint, and better spectral coverage. The better capabilities of OMI will enable us to provide an improved aerosol product, but the knowledge will also be used for further analysis of the aerosol record from TOMS. The OM1 aerosol product that is currently being developed for OM1 combines the TOMS experience and the multi-spectral techniques that are used in the visible and near infrared. The challenge for this new product is to provide aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from the near ultraviolet to the visible (330-500 nm) over land and ocean. In this presentation the methods for deriving the OM1 aerosol product will be presented. Part of these methods developed for OM1 can already be applied to TOMS data and results of such analysis will be shown.

  9. Tropical Anvil Cirrus Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Schmitt, C.; Baumgardner, D.; Poellot, M.; Twohy, C.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. T.; Sayres, D.; Avallone, L.; Hallar, G.

    2003-12-01

    This study synthesizes data collected during a number of field campaigns by in-situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of tropical, convectively-generated cirrus. The field campaigns include the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission KWAJEX campaign near Kwajalein, M. I., KAMP (the Keys Area Microphysics Project) and the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE), both over southern Florida, and CAMEX-4 (the fourth convection and moisture experiment), studying hurricanes off the east coast of Florida. The measurements include particle size distribution and particle shape information, direct measurements of the condensed water content (CRYSTAL-FACE), and radar imagery. We examine the temperature dependence and vertical variability of the ice water content (IWC), extinction, and effective radii, and deduce the ensemble-mean ice particle densities. Data obtained in quiescent regions outside of convection are compared to observations within convective cells. The relationship between the properties of the particle size distributions and proximity to convection are examined. The IWCs show a strong temperature dependence and dependence on distance below cloud top. The IWCs are larger in the convective regions than in the quiescent regions, and the particle size distributions are markedly broader. Ensemble-mean ice particle densities are a strong function of the breadth of the particle size distributions.

  10. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  11. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  12. Optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degheidy, A. R.; Sallah, M.; Elgarayhi, A.; Shaaban, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The optical and radiative-transfer properties of mixed atmospheric aerosols have been investigated. The aerosol medium is considered as a plane-parallel anisotropic scattering medium with diffusive reflecting boundaries and containing an internal radiation source. The basic components are defined by their complex refractive index, a lognormal size distribution and humidity dependence in hygroscopic particles. The aerosol particles are assumed to be spherical, so the scattering parameters in the form of single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, scattering, absorption, extinction efficiencies and linear anisotropic coefficient are calculated using the Mie theory. The calculations have been performed for individual aerosol particles, internal and external mixing media. Radiation transfer problem through the considered aerosol medium has been solved in terms of the solution of the corresponding source-free problem with simple boundary conditions. For the solution of the source-free problem, the Variational Pomraning-Eddington technique has been employed. The variation of the radiative-transfer properties (partial radiative fluxes at the medium boundaries) have been calculated and represented graphically for the different aerosols with their different mixing states. A comparison of the obtained results versus available published data has been performed and a very good agreement was observed.

  13. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  14. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of

  15. Determination of optical and microphysical properties of thin warm clouds using ground based hyper-spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, E.; Agassi, E.; Koren, I.

    2012-04-01

    Clouds play a critical role in the Earth's radiative budget as they modulate the atmosphere by reflecting shortwave solar radiation and absorbing long wave IR radiation emitted by the Earth's surface. Although extensively studied for decades, cloud modelling in global circulation models is far from adequate, mostly due to insufficient spatial resolution of the circulation models. In addition, measurements of cloud properties still need improvement, since the vast majority of remote sensing techniques are focused in relatively large, thick clouds. In this study, we utilize ground based hyperspectral measurements and analysis to explore very thin water clouds. These clouds are characterized by liquid water path (LWP) that spans from as high as ~50g m-2 and down to 65 mg m-2 with a minimum of about 0.01 visible optical depth. The retrieval methodology relies on three elements: a detailed radiative transfer calculations in the longwave IR regime, signal enhancement by subtraction of a clear sky reference, and spectral matching method which exploits fine spectral differences between water droplets of different radii. A detailed description of the theoretical basis for the retrieval technique is provided along with a comprehensive discussion regarding its limitations. The proposed methodology was validated in a controlled experiment where artificial clouds were sprayed and their effective radii were both measured and retrieved simultaneously. This methodology can be used in several ways: (1) the frequency and optical properties of very thin water clouds can be studied more precisely in order to evaluate their total radiative forcing on the Earth's radiation budget. (2) The unique optical properties of the inter-region between clouds (clouds' "twilight zone") can be studied in order to more rigorously understanding of the governing physical processes which dominate this region. (3) Since the optical thickness of a developed cloud gradually decreases towards its edges, the

  16. Determination of optical and microphysical properties of thin warm clouds using ground based hyper-spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, E.; Agassi, E.; Koren, I.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds play a critical role in the Earth's radiative budget as they modulate the atmosphere by reflecting shortwave solar radiation and absorbing long wave IR radiation emitted by the Earth's surface. Although extensively studied for decades, cloud modelling in global circulation models is far from adequate, mostly due to insufficient spatial resolution of the circulation models. In addition, measurements of cloud properties still need improvement, since the vast majority of remote sensing techniques are focused in relatively large, thick clouds. In this study, we utilize ground based hyperspectral measurements and analysis to explore very thin water clouds. These clouds are characterized by liquid water path (LWP) that spans from as high as ~50 g m-2 and down to 65 mg m-2 with a minimum of about 0.01 visible optical depth. The retrieval methodology relies on three elements: a detailed radiative transfer calculations in the longwave IR regime, signal enhancement by subtraction of a clear sky reference, and spectral matching method which exploits fine spectral differences between water droplets of different radii. A detailed description of the theoretical basis for the retrieval technique is provided along with a comprehensive discussion regarding its limitations. The proposed methodology was validated in a controlled experiment where artificial clouds were sprayed and their effective radii were both measured and retrieved simultaneously. This methodology can be used in several ways: (1) the frequency and optical properties of very thin water clouds can be studied more precisely in order to evaluate their total radiative forcing on the Earth's radiation budget. (2) The unique optical properties of the inter-region between clouds (clouds' "twilight zone") can be studied in order to more rigorously understanding of the governing physical processes which dominate this region. (3) Since the optical thickness of a developed cloud gradually decreases towards its edges

  17. Global dust infrared aerosol properties retrieved using hyperspectral sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, alain; Pondrom, Marc; Pierangelo, Clémence; Armante, Raymond; Crevoisier, Cyril; Crépeau, Laurent; Scott, Noëlle

    2015-04-01

    Observations from infrared hyperspectral sounders, here IASI and AIRS, are interpreted in terms of dust aerosol properties (AOD and mean altitude). The method is based on a "Look-Up-Table" (LUT) approach, where all radiative transfer computation is performed once for all and "off-line", for a large selection of atmospheric situations, of observing conditions, of surface characteristics (in particular the surface emissivity and temperature), and different aerosol refractive index models. The inversion scheme follows two main steps: first, determination of the observed atmospheric thermodynamic situation, second, simultaneous retrieval of the 10µm coarse-mode AOD and of the mean altitude. The method is here applied over sea and over land, at daily scale daytime and nighttime, and at the satellite pixel resolution (12 km at nadir). The geographical study area studied includes the northern tropics from west Atlantic to the Arabian peninsula and Indian ocean, and the Mediterranean basin, all of them characterized by strong, regular dust events. A special focus is given to the hourly variation of aerosol properties within a day. In this context, both IASI overpasses are processed, providing two measurements at 9:30AM and 9:30PM (equator local time) each day. First results obtained from AIRS observations, made at 1:30 AM and PM, open the way to the analysis of the aerosol diurnal cycle. For the AOD, comparisons are made with AERONET ground-based data , when available, in order to 1) evaluate our results, and 2) show the importance of a better knowledge of the aerosol diurnal cycle, especially close to the sources. Mean aerosol layer altitude obtained from IASI is compared at local scale with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP/CALIPSO) aerosol altitude.

  18. Regional assessment of microphysical properties of marine boundary layer cloud using the PATMOS-x dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, John; Heidinger, Andrew; Bennartz, Ralf

    2010-12-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration and geometrical thickness of marine boundary layer clouds are inferred from 25 years of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres-Extended (PATMOS-x) Level 2b retrievals of optical thickness and cloud droplet effective radius over the period 1982 through 2009. A novel approach to addressing nonphysical values of cloud droplet number concentration N owing to satellite orbital drift is applied by normalizing estimated droplet number concentrations with respect to local observation time. Cloud geometrical thickness H is also normalized to a common reference time by scaling H against diurnal values from a passive microwave liquid water path climatology. The effectiveness of the methods applied to correct N and H are evaluated. Both quantities are spatially and temporally characterized in several subtropical subsidence regions for likely drizzle-free observations. Estimated liquid water path from PATMOS-x is further validated against 20 years of liquid water path values from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). Good agreement between SSM/I and PATMOS-x is found in coastal regions. Cloud droplet number concentrations in excess of 300 cm-3 are found along the western boundaries of the American and African continents, with greatly lower values found further out to sea with no observed long-term trends in cloud properties.

  19. Retrieving of Microphysical Properties of Spheroidal Particles in the Atmosphere-Surface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, S.; Lyapustin, A.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we continue our study of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm [1, 2] as a tool for retrieval of properties of particles, suspended in the plane-parallel atmosphere coupled with the reflecting surface [3]. The effect of polarization of light is included. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm provides an iterative solution to the problem of minimization of a function over a space of its parameters. Each iteration involves solution of the forward problem and computation of the Jacobian matrix (the derivatives of signal over optical parameters). The recently developed code APC (Atmospheric Polarization Computations) is used to solve the forward problem [4, 5]. We use O.Dubovik's et al. [6] package to simulate scattering by spheroidal particles. Unlike for the purely spherical particles (Mie scattering), the Jacobian matrix for spheroids is computed numerically. We will consider retrievals over the land and the ocean with the bidirectional polarization distribution functions from [7-8]. Using MISR observation geometry and spectral bands [9] as an example, we will discuss the problem of convergence of iterations, sensitivity of the algorithm to the initial guess, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the geometry of observation. Possible ways of acceleration of iterations will be discussed, as well as the role of polarization in the retrieval process. References: 1. Levenberg K, Q. App. Math., 1944, V.2, P.164. 2. Marquardt D, J. Appl. Math., 1963, V.11, N.2, P.431. 3. Korkin S, Lyapustin A, AGU 2012, A23A-011. 4. Korkin S et al., JQSRT, 2013, V.127, P.1 5. ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/ 6. Dubovik O et al., Geophys. Res. Letters, 2006, V.111, D11208. 7. Ota Y, et al., JQSRT, 2010, V.111, P.878. 8. Nadal F, Breon F-M, IEEE Trans. Geos. Rem. Sens., 1999, V.37, N.3, P.1709. 9. http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov/Mission/misrInstrument/

  20. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  1. 3D Cloud Tomography, Followed by Mean Optical and Microphysical Properties, with Multi-Angle/Multi-Pixel Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; von Allmen, P. A.; Marshak, A.; Bal, G.

    2010-12-01

    The geometrical assumption in all operational cloud remote sensing algorithms is that clouds are plane-parallel slabs, which applies relatively well to the most uniform stratus layers. Its benefit is to justify using classic 1D radiative transfer (RT) theory, where angular details (solar, viewing, azimuthal) are fully accounted for and precise phase functions can be used, to generate the look-up tables used in the retrievals. Unsurprisingly, these algorithms catastrophically fail when applied to cumulus-type clouds, which are highly 3D. This is unfortunate for the cloud-process modeling community that may thrive on in situ airborne data, but would very much like to use satellite data for more than illustrations in their presentations and publications. So, how can we obtain quantitative information from space-based observations of finite aspect ratio clouds? Cloud base/top heights, vertically projected area, mean liquid water content (LWC), and volume-averaged droplet size would be a good start. Motivated by this science need, we present a new approach suitable for sparse cumulus fields where we turn the tables on the standard procedure in cloud remote sensing. We make no a priori assumption about cloud shape, save an approximately flat base, but use brutal approximations about the RT that is necessarily 3D. Indeed, the first order of business is to roughly determine the cloud's outer shape in one of two ways, which we will frame as competing initial guesses for the next phase of shape refinement and volume-averaged microphysical parameter estimation. Both steps use multi-pixel/multi-angle techniques amenable to MISR data, the latter adding a bi-spectral dimension using collocated MODIS data. One approach to rough cloud shape determination is to fit the multi-pixel/multi-angle data with a geometric primitive such as a scalene hemi-ellipsoid with 7 parameters (translation in 3D space, 3 semi-axes, 1 azimuthal orientation); for the radiometry, a simple radiosity

  2. Numerical Simulations of Precipitation Processes, Microphysics, and Microwave Radiative Properties of flood Producing Storms in Mediterranean & Adriatic Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the meteorological and microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms requires a combination of in situ data analysis, radar data analysis, and satellite data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales. An important aspect of understanding microphysical controls of severe storms, is first understanding the meteorological controls under which a storm has evolved, and then using that information to help characterize the dominant microphysical processes. For hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted by the October 5-6, 1998 Friuli flood event in northern Italy, a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution. This involves intense convective development, Sratiform decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes, as well as the associated vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that effect details of the size distributions and fall rates of the various types of hydrometeors found within the storm environment. This talk overviews the microphysical elements of a severe Mediterranean storm in such a context, investigated with the aid of TRMM satellite and other remote sensing measurements, but guided by a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model simulation of the Friuli flood event. The data analysis for this paper was conducted by my research groups at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, AL and Florida State University in Tallahassee, and in collaboration with Dr. Alberto Mugnai's research group at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Rome. The numerical modeling was conducted by Professor Oreg Tripoli and Ms. Giulia Panegrossi at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, using Professor Tripoli's nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). This is a scalable, fully nested mesoscale model capable of resolving nonhydrostatic circulations from regional scale down to cloud scale

  3. The evolution of microphysical and optical properties of an A380 contrail in the vortex phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Shcherbakov, V.; Voigt, C.; Schumann, U.; Schäuble, D.; Jessberger, P.; Petzold, A.; Minikin, A.; Schlager, H.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.

    2012-07-01

    A contrail from a large-body A380 aircraft at cruise in the humid upper troposphere has been probed with in-situ instruments onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon. The contrail was sampled during 700 s measurement time at contrail ages of about 1-4 min. The contrail was in the vortex regime during which the primary wake vortices were sinking 270 m below the A380 flight level while the secondary wake remained above. Contrail properties were sampled separately in the primary wake at 90 and 115 s contrail age and nearly continously in the secondary wake at contrail ages from 70 s to 220 s. The scattering phase functions of the contrail particles were measured with a polar nephelometer. The asymmetry parameter derived from these data is used to distinguish between quasi-spherical and aspherical ice particles. In the primary wake, quasi-spherical ice particles were found with concentrations up to 160 cm-3, mean effective diameter Deff of 3.7 μm, maximum extinction of 7.0 km-1, and ice water content (IWC) of 3 mg m-3 at slightly ice-subsaturated conditions. The secondary and primary wakes were separated by an almost particle-free wake vortex gap. The secondary wake contained clearly aspherical contrail ice particles with mean Deff of 4.8 μm, mean (maximum) concentration, extinction, and IWC of 80 (350) cm-3, 1.6 (5.0) km-1, and 2.5 (10) mg m-3, respectively, at conditions apparently above ice-saturation. The asymmetry parameter in the secondary wake decreased with contrail age from 0.87 to 0.80 on average indicating a preferential aspherical ice crystal growth. A retrieval of ice particle habit and size with an inversion code shows that the number fraction of aspherical ice crystals increased from 2% initially to 56% at 4 min contrail age. The observed crystal size and habit differences in the primary and secondary wakes of an up to 4 min old contrail are of interest for understanding ice crystal growth in contrails and their climate impact. Aspherical contrail ice

  4. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land using PMAp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Ruediger; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolutions for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) is delivered as operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithms retrieve aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The next releases of PMAp will provide an extended set of aerosol and cloud properties which include AOD over land and an improved volcanic ash retrieval combining AVHRR and IASI. This presentation gives an overview on the existing product and the prototypes in development. The major focus is the discussion of the AOD retrieval over land implemented in the upcoming PMAp2 release. In addition, the results of our current validation studies (e.g. comparisons to AERONET, other satellite platforms and model data) are shown.

  5. Measurements of physical and chemical properties of urban aerosols and their CCN activities in Seoul during the KORUS-AQ pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N.; Yum, S. S.; Park, M.; Shin, H. J.; Bae, G. N.; Kwak, K. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S. M.; Ahn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Interest in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) has been increasing for the last few decades due to their first order effects on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds. Particularly, scientific understanding of CCN from anthropogenic sources becomes important because it is now considered that large uncertainties in climate change predictions stem from insufficient understanding of CCN. CCN activity is influenced by size and chemical component of aerosols. The KORUS-AQ campaign, jointly organized by National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER) of Korea and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aims at understanding various aspects of air quality problem in Korea and will be held in spring, 2016. In preparation for this campaign, pre-campaign was held during May 18-June 13, 2015, in Seoul where numerous local anthropogenic sources exist and influence of Chinese continental outflow directly affects. Here we present some of the important results from the pre-campaign. Chemical properties of aerosols were measured with AMS. Aerosol and CCN number concentrations, aerosol size distribution and aerosol hygroscopic growth factor were measured by CPC, CCN counter, SMPS and H-TDMA, respectively. Average diurnal variation of aerosol number concentration showed three dominant peaks at around 0600_UTC and morning and evening rush hours. Each peak seemed to have different characteristics and therefore detailed analyses of physical and chemical properties of aerosols during the peaks as well as during some special events will be made. The hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, will be estimated by examining CCN activity, H-TDMA measured hygroscopic growth factor and mixing rule of aerosol chemical components, and the result will be compared as well.

  6. Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, and Water Vapor Properties from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai

    2001-01-01

    MODIS is an earth-viewing cross-track scanning spectroradiometer launched on the Terra satellite in December 1999. MODIS scans a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 kilometers, and provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resolutions of 250 meters (2 bands), 500 meters (5 bands) and 1000 meters (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes. In this presentation we review the comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms that have been developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS data, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of (i) developing a cloud mask for distinguishing clear sky from clouds, (ii) retrieving global cloud radiative and microphysical properties, including cloud top pressure and temperature, effective emissivity, cloud optical thickness, thermodynamic phase, and effective radius, (iii) monitoring tropospheric aerosol optical thickness over the land and ocean and aerosol size distribution over the ocean, (iv) determining atmospheric profiles of moisture and temperature, and (v) estimating column water amount. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described, together with an example of their application using MODIS observations. All products are archived into two categories: pixel-level retrievals (referred to as Level-2 products) and global gridded products at a latitude and longitude resolution of 1 degree (Level-3 products). An overview of the MODIS atmosphere algorithms and products, status, validation activities, and early level-2 and -3 results will be presented.

  7. Development and testing of parameterizations for continental and tropical ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties in GCM and mesoscale models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heymsfield, A.

    1997-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to exploit measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs, especially from experiments in tropical regions, in a four-component study to develop and validate cloud parameterizations for general circulation models, emphasizing ice clouds. The components were: (1) parameterization of basic properties of mid- and upper-tropospheric clouds, such as condensed water content, primarily with respect to cirrus from tropical areas; (2) the second component was to develop parameterizations which express cloud radiative properties in terms of basic cloud microphysical properties, dealing primarily with tropical oceanic cirrus clouds and continental thunderstorm anvils, but also including altocumulus clouds; (3) the third component was to validate the parameterizations through use of ground-based measurements calibrated using existing and planned in-situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties and bulk radiative properties, as well as time-resolved data collected over extended periods of time; (4) the fourth component was to implement the parameterizations in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM) II or in the NOAA-GFDL model (by L. Donner GFDL) and to perform sensitivity studies.

  8. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  9. Background Maritime Aerosol: Their Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of human induced change in the aerosol concentration and properties, or the aerosol response to climate change (e.g. droughts producing fires or dust) should be measured relative to a "background aerosol". How to define this background aerosol, so that it is both measurable and useful? Here we use 10 stations located in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to answer this question. Using a data set of the spectral optical thickness measured by the Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET), extending 1-3 years, we find the background conditions for these stations. The oceanic background aerosol is the result of ocean emission and spray, and some residual long lived continental aerosol. Its source is very broadly spread and is expected to vary little in time. Pollution or dust sources are from specific locations, emitted and transported to the measuring site in specific combination of meteorological conditions. Therefore they are expected to vary with time. It follows that the background aerosol can be identified as the median for conditions with small variations. To define the background we compute the median of N consequent measurements. We use N=50 that in average cloudy conditions corresponds to 2-3 days of measurements and N=100 (4-5 days). Most high polluted or dusty conditions correspond to data sequences with high standard deviation (greater than 0.02 in optical thickness) and are excluded. From the remaining N point running medians with low standard deviations we derive again the median. This excludes those rare cases of pollution or dust that is stable during the N measurements. The results show that the background aerosol over the Pacific Ocean is characterize by optical thickness of 0.055 at 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 0.74. Over the Atlantic Ocean the values are 0.070 and 1.1 respectively, with little influence of the assumed value of N (50 or 100). The derivation of the background uses 20,000 and 5000 medians respectively that passed the

  10. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by  ∼  0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from  ∼ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  11. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ~0.2 and 0.05, respectively. Furthermore, a model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ~0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  12. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ˜ 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ˜ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  13. The effect of complex black carbon microphysics on the determination of the optical properties of brown carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Young, Dominque E.; Flynn, Michael J.; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James D.

    2015-01-01

    of the impacts of brown carbon (BrC) requires accurate determination of its physical properties, but a model must be invoked to derive these from instrument data. Ambient measurements were made in London at a site influenced by traffic and solid fuel (principally wood) burning, apportioned by single particle soot photometer data and optical properties measured using multiwavelength photoacoustic spectroscopy. Two models were applied: a commonly used Mie model treating the particles as single-coated spheres and a Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation treating them as aggregates of smaller-coated monomers. The derived solid fuel BrC parameters at 405 nm were found to be highly sensitive to the model treatment, with a mass absorption cross section ranging from 0.47 to 1.81 m2/g and imaginary refractive index from 0.013 to 0.062. This demonstrates that a detailed knowledge of particle morphology must be obtained and invoked to accurately parameterize BrC properties based on aerosol phase measurements.

  14. Heterogeneous Photochemistry and Optical Properties of Mineral Dust Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassian, Vicki

    2012-02-01

    It is now widely recognized that heterogeneous reactions of mineral dust aerosol with trace atmospheric gases impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere and the physicochemical properties of these particles. Field studies using single particle analysis, have now shown that the chemistry is mineralogy specific and follows the trends expected from laboratory studies. These laboratory studies, which were initiated over a decade ago, have focused on the nighttime chemistry of mineral dust aerosol which is really only ``half'' the story. This talk will focus on two aspects of solar light interaction with mineral dust aerosol. First, the heterogeneous photochemistry of adsorbed chromophores (e.g. nitrate ion) and light absorbing components of mineral dust (iron oxides and titanium dioxide) is discussed. These heterogeneous photochemical reactions are poorly understood and laboratory studies to better quantify these reactions in order to determine the impact on the chemical balance of the atmosphere are needed, as will be discussed. Second, the optical properties of mineral dust aerosol measured by extinction infrared spectroscopy and visible light scattering show that shape effects are extremely important for mineral dust aerosol.

  15. Properties of Stratospheric Aerosol Estimated from HALOE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kwang-Mog; Park, Jae H.; Massie, Steven T.; Choi, Wookap

    2001-01-01

    Extinction coefficients for stratospheric aerosols at 8 HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment) wavelengths are determined by comparing transmittances data for two adjacent solar occultation measurements, where one limb path is loaded with aerosols but the other path is free of aerosols. These extinction coefficients are used to infer the aerosol properties such as composition and size distribution parameters. Mie theory has been used to calculate the extinction coefficients, and a nonlinear least square method is applied to determine the aerosol properties. Sixteen cases are selected for the retrieval in southern hemisphere at latitudes from 21 to 48 deg S for the period of 29 Mar - 31 May 1992. Retrieved size width ranges from 1.1 to 1.5 and radius ranges from 0.25 to 0.45 micrometers. These size parameters are within the ranges of in situ measurements at Laramie, Wyoming. Retrieved weight percent of H2SO4 is larger than the equilibrium value by about 5 to approximately 10 weight percent, similar to the results for northern hemisphere at latitudes 20 to 55 deg N for the period from Nov 1991 to Feb. 1992.

  16. Retrieval of aerosol properties from combined multiwavelength lidar and sunphotometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Markus; Müller, Detlef; Tesche, Matthias; Eichler, Heike; Feingold, Graham; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Cheng, Ya-Fang

    2006-10-01

    Simulation studies were carried out with regard to the feasibility of using combined observations from sunphotometer (SPM) and lidar for microphysical characterization of aerosol particles, i.e., the retrieval of effective radius, volume, and surface-area concentrations. It was shown that for single, homogeneous aerosol layers, the aerosol parameters can be retrieved with an average accuracy of 30% for a wide range of particle size distributions. Based on the simulations, an instrument combination consisting of a lidar that measures particle backscattering at 355 and 1574 nm, and a SPM that measures at three to four channels in the range from 340 to 1020 nm is a promising tool for aerosol characterization. The inversion algorithm has been tested for a set of experimental data. The comparison with the particle size distribution parameters, measured with in situ instrumentation at the lidar site, showed good agreement.

  17. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Neely, Ryan R; Martinsson, Bengt G; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations. Key Points The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer is composed of sulfate, primary organics, and secondary organics The North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer is mostly composed of sulfate and secondary organics Aerosol Optical Depth of Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer increases by 0.002 from 2000 to 2010 PMID:26709320

  18. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  19. The Effect of Asian Dust Aerosols on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing from MODIS and CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Wang, Tianhe; Yi, Yuhong; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust storms on cloud properties and radiative forcing are analyzed over northwestern China from April 2001 to June 2004 using data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites. On average, ice cloud effective particle diameter, optical depth and ice water path of the cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions are 11%, 32.8%, and 42% less, respectively, than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments. The humidity differences are larger in the dusty region than in the dust-free region, and may be caused by removal of moisture by wet dust precipitation. Due to changes in cloud microphysics, the instantaneous net radiative forcing is reduced from -71.2 W/m2 for dust contaminated clouds to -182.7 W/m2 for dust-free clouds. The reduced cooling effects of dusts may lead to a net warming of 1 W/m2, which, if confirmed, would be the strongest aerosol forcing during later winter and early spring dust storm seasons over the studied region.

  20. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Properties under Thin Cirrus from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew Mark.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties using shortwave bands from passive satellite sensors, such as MODIS, is typically limited to cloud-free areas. However, if the clouds are thin enough (i.e. thin cirrus) such that the satellite-observed reflectance contains signals under the cirrus layer, and if the optical properties of this cirrus layer are known, the TOA reflectance can be corrected for the cirrus layer to be used for retrieving aerosol optical properties. To this end, we first correct the TOA reflectances in the aerosol bands (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 micron for ocean algorithm and 0.412, 0.47, and 0.65 micron for deep blue algorithm) for the effects of thin cirrus using 1.38 micron reflectance and conversion factors that convert cirrus reflectance in 1.38 micron band to those in aerosol bands. It was found that the conversion factors can be calculated by using relationships between reflectances in 1.38 micron band and minimum reflectances in the aerosol bands (Gao et al., 2002). Refer to the example in the figure. Then, the cirrus-corrected reflectance can be calculated by subtracting the cirrus reflectance from the TOA reflectance in the optically thin case. A sensitivity study suggested that cloudy-sky TOA reflectances can be calculated with small errors in the form of simple linear addition of cirrus-only reflectances and clear-sky reflectances. In this study, we correct the cirrus signals up to TOA reflectance at 1.38 micron of 0.05 where the simple linear addition is valid without extensive radiative transfer simulations. When each scene passes the set of tests shown in the flowchart, the scene is corrected for cirrus contamination and passed into aerosol retrieval algorithms.

  1. Effects of aerosol organics on cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration and first indirect aerosol effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Lee, Y.- N.; Daum, Peter H.; Jayne, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-03

    Abstract. Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN properties were measured on the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus/ Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosols measured during MASE included free tropospheric aerosols, marine boundary layer aerosols, and aerosols with high organic concentration within a thin layer above the cloud. Closure analysis was carried out for all three types of aerosols by comparing the measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation to those predicted based on size distribution and chemical composition using K¨ohler theory. The effect of aerosol organic species on predicted CCN concentration was examined using a single hygroscopicity parameterization.

  2. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    Knowledge of aerosol physical, chemical, optical properties is essential for judging the effect that particulates have on human health, climate and visibility. The aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) is capable of measuring, in real-time, the size and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. This was exemplified by the recent deployments of the ATOFMS to Mexico City and Riverside. The ATOFMS provided rapid information about the major particle types present in the atmosphere. Industrial sources of particles, such as fine mode particles containing lead, zinc and chloride were detected in Mexico City. The rapid time response of the ATOFMS was also exploited to characterize a coarse particle concentrator used in human health effects studies. The ATOFMS showed the ability to detect changes in particle composition with a time resolution of 15 min during short 2 hour human exposure studies. As a major component of this work, an optical measurement has been added to the ATOFMS. The scattered light intensity was acquired for each sized and chemically analyzed particle. This scattering information together with the particle aerodynamic diameter, enabled the refractive index and density of the aerosol to be retrieved. This method was validated in the laboratory using different test particles such as oils, aqueous salt solutions and black carbon particles. It was found that the nozzle-type inlet does not evaporate aqueous salt particles as has been observed for aerodynamic lens inlets. These new optical and microphysical measurements were integrated into the ATOFMS for field deployment in Riverside and Mexico City. For both cities, the different mixing states were found to have unique refractive indexes and densities. A fraction of the strongly absorbing elemental carbon particles were observed to have a spherical morphology due to heavy mixing with secondary species. In addition to the quantitative refractive index and effective density measurements

  3. Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influences of water solubility and light absorption on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can