Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol physical characteristics

  1. Physical characteristics and health effects of aerosols from collapsed buildings.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H

    2006-01-01

    Airborne pollutants can rise to extreme levels when large buildings fall down. The terrorist attack on New York's World Trade Center (WTC) towers caused the release of an enormous quantity of pulverized building materials and combustion products into the local environment. Particulate matter (PM) from crushed WTC building materials is primarily non-respirable (>96% larger than 10 microm mass median aerodynamic diameter [MMAD]) and composed of fibrous and nonfibrous components such as gypsum, calcite, silica, glass fibers, cellulose, and asbestos. Respirable fine WTC PM (PM(2.5)) may include finely crushed building materials as well as combustion products such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Rescue workers at the WTC site had exposure-related increases in the incidences of nasal congestion, bronchial hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and persistent cough. Toxicological studies in mice indicate that WTC PM(2.5) causes airflow obstruction above a critical dose. The review of physical characteristics and health effects of major pollutants derived from the collapse of the WTC towers has assisted in risk assessment efforts related to the collapse of large buildings.

  2. Climatological Aspects of Aerosol Physical Characteristics in Tunisia Deduced from Sun Photometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chaâbane, Mabrouk; Azri, Chafai; Medhioub, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric and climatic data measured at Thala site (Tunisia) for a long-time period (1977–2001) are used to analyse the monthly, seasonal, and annual variations of the aerosol optical depth at 1 μm wavelength. We have shown that aerosol and microphysical properties and the dominating aerosol types depend on seasons. A comparison of the seasonal cycle of aerosol optical characteristics at Thala site showed that the contribution of long-range transported particles is expected to be larger in summer as a consequence of the weather stability typical of this season. Also, the winter decrease in atmospheric turbidity may result from increases in relative humidity and decreases in temperature, leading to increased particle size and mass and increased fall and deposition velocities. The spring and autumn weather patterns usually carry fine dust and sand particles for the desert area to Thala region. The annual behaviour of the aerosol optical depth recorded a period of stead increase started in 1986 until 2001. Trends in atmospheric turbidity after 1988 could be explained other ways by the contribution of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 and by local or regional changes in climate or in aerosol emissions. PMID:22629150

  3. Chemical and physical characteristics of aerosol particles at a remote coastal location, Mace Head, Ireland, during NAMBLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Bower, K. N.; Flynn, M. J.; McFiggans, G. B.; Topping, D. O.; Williams, P. I.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    A suite of aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland, a coastal site on the eastern seaboard of the north Atlantic Ocean during NAMBLEX. The data have been used in this paper to show that over a wide range of aerosol sizes there is no impact of the inter-tidal zone or the surf zone on measurements made at 7 m above ground level or higher. During the measurement period a range of air mass types were observed. During anticyclonic periods and conditions of continental outflow Aitken and accumulation mode were enhanced by a factor of 5 compared to the marine sector, whilst coarse mode particles were enhanced during westerly conditions. Baseline marine conditions were rarely met at Mace Head during NAMBLEX and high wind speeds were observed for brief periods only. The NAMBLEX experiment focussed on a detailed assessment of photochemistry in the marine environment, investigating the linkage between the HOx and the halogen radical cycles. Heterogeneous losses are important in both these cycles. In this paper loss rates of gaseous species to aerosol surfaces were calculated for a range of uptake coefficients. Even when the accommodation coefficient is unity, lifetimes due to heterogeneous loss of less than 10 s were never observed and rarely were they less than 500 s. Diffusional limitation to mass transfer is important in most conditions as the coarse mode is always significant. We calculate a minimum overestimate of 50% in the loss rate if this is neglected and so it should always be considered when calculating loss rates of gaseous species to particle surfaces. HO2 and HOI have accommodation coefficients of around 0.03 and hence we calculate lifetimes due to loss to particle surfaces of 2000 s or greater under the conditions experienced during NAMBLEX. Aerosol composition data collected during this experiment provide representative information on the input aerosol characteristics to western

  4. Aerosol Source Plume Physical Characteristics from Space-based Multiangle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Li, W.-H.; Moroney, Catherine; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Fishbein, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Models that assess aerosol effects on regional air quality and global climate parameterize aerosol sources in terms of amount, type, and injection height. The multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite retrieves total column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and aerosol type over cloud-free land and water. A stereo-matching algorithm automatically retrieves reflecting-layer altitude wherever clouds or aerosol plumes have discernable spatial contrast, with about 500-m accuracy, at 1.1-km horizontal resolution. Near-source biomass burning smoke, volcanic effluent, and desert dust plumes are observed routinely, providing information about aerosol amount, particle type, and injection height useful for modeling applications. Compared to background aerosols, the plumes sampled have higher AOT, contain particles having expected differences in Angstrom exponent, size, single-scattering albedo, and for volcanic plume and dust cloud cases, particle shape. As basic thermodynamics predicts, thin aerosol plumes lifted only by regional winds or less intense heat sources are confined to the boundary layer. However, when sources have sufficient buoyancy, the representative plumes studied tend to concentrate within discrete, high-elevation layers of local stability; the aerosol is not uniformly distributed up to a peak altitude, as is sometimes assumed in modeling. MISR-derived plume heights, along with meteorological profile data from other sources, make it possible to relate radiant energy flux observed by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), also aboard the Terra spacecraft, to convective heat flux that plays a major role in buoyant plume dynamics. A MISR climatology of plume behavior based on these results is being developed.

  5. Aerosols optical and physical characteristics and direct radiative forcing during a "Shamal" dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. M.; Al-Dashti, H.; Spyrou, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dust aerosols are analyzed for their optical and physical properties during an episode of dust storm that hit Kuwait on 26 March 2003 when "Iraqi Freedom" military operation was in full swing. The intensity of the dust storm was such that it left a thick suspension of dust throughout the following day, 27 March, resulting in a considerable cooling effect at the surface on both days. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical thickness reached 3.617 and 4.17 on 26-27 March respectively while Ångstrom coefficient, α870/440, dropped to -0.0234 and -0.0318. Particulate matter concentration of diameter 10 μm or less, PM10, peaked at 4800 μg m-3 during dust storm hours of 26 March. Moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) retrieved optical and physical characteristics that exhibited extreme values as well. The synoptic of the dust storm is presented and source regions are identified using total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index retrieved images. The vertical profile of the dust layer was simulated using SKIRON atmospheric model. Instantaneous net direct radiative forcing is calculated at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface level. The thick dust layer of 26 March resulted in cooling the TOA by -60 Wm-2 and surface level by -175 Wm-2 for a surface albedo of 0.35. Slightly higher values were obtained for 27 March due to the increase in aerosol optical thickness. The large reduction in the radiative flux at the surface level had caused a drop in surface temperature by approximately 6 °C below its average value. Radiative heating/cooling rates in the shortwave and longwave bands were also examined. Shortwave heating rate reached a maximum value of 2 °K day-1 between 3 and 5 km, dropped to 1.5 °K day-1 at 6 km and diminished at 8 km. Longwave radiation initially heated the lower atmosphere by a maximum value of 0.2 °K day-1 at surface level, declined sharply at increasing altitude and diminished at 4 km. Above 4 km longwave radiation started to

  6. Atmospheric aerosols: A literature summary of their physical characteristics and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains a summary of 199 recent references on the characterization of atmospheric aerosols with respect to their composition, sources, size distribution, and time changes, and with particular reference to the chemical elements measured by modern techniques, especially activation analysis.

  7. Aerosol characteristics at a rural station in southern peninsular India during CAIPEEX-IGOC: physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Bisht, D S; Srivastava, A K; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, M K; Pandey, A K; Tiwari, S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-04-01

    To understand the boundary layer characteristics and pathways of aerosol-cloud interaction, an Integrated Ground Observational Campaign, concurrent with Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment, was conducted by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, under Ministry of Earth Sciences at Mahabubnagar (a rural environment, which is ~100 km away from an urban city Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh), during the period of July-November 2011. Collected samples of PM2.5 and PM10 were analyzed for water-soluble ionic species along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). During study period, the average mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were about 50(±10) and 69(±14) μg m(-3), respectively, which are significantly higher than the prescribed Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards values. The chemical species such as sum of anions and cations from measured chemical constituents were contributed to be 31.27 and 38.49% in PM2.5 and 6.35 and 5.65% to the PM10, whereas carbonaceous species contributed ~17.3 and 20.47% for OC and ~3.0 and 3.10% for EC, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 during study period was ~0.73(±0.2), indicating that the dominance of fine size particles. Carbonaceous analysis results showed that the average concentration of OC was 14 and 8.7 μg m(-3), while EC was 2.1 and 1.5 μg m(-3) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. The ratios between OC and EC were estimated, which were 6.6 and 5.7 for PM10 and PM2.5, suggesting the presence of secondary organic aerosol. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounts 23% of PM10 in which the contribution of OC is 20% and EC is 3%, while 20% of PM2.5 mass in which the contribution of OC is 17% and EC is 3%. Out of the total aerosols mass, water-soluble constituents contributed an average of 45% in PM10 and 38% in PM2.5 including about 39% anions and 6% cations in PM10, while 31% anions and 7% cations in PM2.5 aerosol mass collectively at study site.

  8. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  9. Aerosol's optical and physical characteristics and direct radiative forcing during a shamal dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. M.; Al-Dashti, H.; Spyrou, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dust aerosols are analyzed for their optical and physical properties during an episode of a dust storm that blew over Kuwait on 26 March 2003 when the military Operation Iraqi Freedom was in full swing. The intensity of the dust storm was such that it left a thick suspension of dust throughout the following day, 27 March. The synoptic sequence leading to the dust storm and the associated wind fields are discussed. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical thickness reached 3.617 and 4.17 on 26 and 27 March respectively while the Ångstrom coefficient, α870/440, dropped to -0.0234 and -0.0318. Particulate matter concentration of 10 μm diameter or less, PM10, peaked at 4800 μg m-3 during dust storm hours of 26 March. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) by Deep Blue algorithm and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index (AI) exhibited high values. Latitude-longitude maps of AOD and AI were used to deduce source regions of dust transport over Kuwait. The vertical profile of the dust layer was simulated using the SKIRON atmospheric model. Instantaneous net direct radiative forcing is calculated at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface level. The thick dust layer of 26 March resulted in cooling the TOA by -60 Wm-2 and surface level by -175 Wm-2 for a surface albedo of 0.35. Slightly higher values were obtained for 27 March due to the increase in aerosol optical thickness. Radiative heating/cooling rates in the shortwave and longwave bands were also examined. Shortwave heating rate reached a maximum value of 2 K day-1 between 3 and 5 km, dropped to 1.5 K day-1 at 6 km and diminished at 8 km. Longwave radiation initially heated the lower atmosphere by a maximum value of 0.2 K day-1 at surface level, declined sharply at increasing altitude and diminished at 4 km. Above 4 km longwave radiation started to cool the atmosphere slightly reaching a maximum rate of -0.1 K day-1 at 6 km.

  10. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    characteristics and composition of aerosols. These processes, together with other physical properties (i.e., size, density, and refractive index), determine the atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their radiative forcing. To better represent physical properties of aerosols, we adapted an aerosol microphysics model that simulates aerosol size distribution. Work toward this goal was done in collaboration with Professor Anthony Wexler of University of California at Davis. Professor Wexler's group has developed sectional models of atmospheric aerosol dynamics that include an arbitrary number of size sections and chemical compounds or compound classes. The model, AIM (Aerosol Inorganic Model), is designed to predict the mass distribution and composition of urban and regional particulate matter (''Sun and Wexler'', 1998a, b). This model is currently incorporated into EPA's Models-3 air quality modeling platform/CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) to test its performance with previous simulations of CMAQ over the continental US.

  11. Chemical and physical characteristics of aerosol particles at a remote coastal location, Mace Head, Ireland, during NAMBLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Bower, K. N.; Flynn, M. J.; McFiggans, G. B.; Topping, D. O.; Williams, P. I.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol number concentrations and size distributions from 3 nm to 20 µm diameter were measured at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland, a coastal site on the eastern seaboard of the north Atlantic Ocean. Both on and offline size resolved aerosol composition measurements were also made using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and ion chromatographic analysis of daily samples collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Particle number concentrations, size distributions and AMS measurements were determined at 7 and 22 m above ground level to investigate local effects on the aerosol size distribution induced by the tidal zone. During periods of new particle formation ultrafine particle number concentrations are large and variable, however, outside these periods no variability in particle number was observed at any size, nor was the particle composition variable. Analysis of particle size distributions show that within each air mass observed particle number concentrations were very consistent. During anticyclonic periods and conditions of continental outflow Aitken and accumulation mode were enhanced by a factor of 5 compared to the marine sector, whilst coarse mode particles were enhanced during westerly conditions. Baseline marine conditions were rarely met at Mace Head during NAMBLEX and high wind speeds were observed for brief periods only. Loss rates of gaseous species to aerosol surfaces were calculated for a range of uptake coefficients. Even when the accommodation coefficient is unity, lifetimes of less than 100 s were never observed and rarely were lifetimes less than 500 s. Diffusional limitation to mass transfer is important in most conditions as the coarse mode is always significant, we calculate a minimum overestimate of 50% in the loss rate if this is neglected and so it should always be considered when calculating loss rates of gaseous species to particle surfaces. HO2 and HOI have accommodation

  12. Physical and Optical/Radiative Characteristics of Aerosol and Cloud Particles in Tropical Cirrus: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; Foster, T. C.; Hallett, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the relative importance of the cloud shortwave albedo effect and the cloud thermal greenhouse effect. Both are determined by the distribution of ice condensate with cloud particle size. The microphysics instrument package flown aboard the NASA DC-8 in TOGA/COARE included an ice crystal replicator, a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe. In combination, the electro-optical instruments permitted particle size measurements between 0.5 micrometer and 2.6 millimeter diameter. Ice crystal replicas were used to validate signals from the electrooptical instruments. Both optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to analyze aerosol and ice particle replicas between 0.1 micrometer and several 100 micrometer diameter. In first approximation, the combined aerosol-cloud particle spectrum in several clouds followed a power law N alpha D(sup -2.5). Thus, large cloud particles carried most of the condensate mass, while small cloud and aerosol particles determined the surface area. The mechanism of formation of small particles is growth of (hygroscopic, possibly ocean-derived) aerosol particles along the Kohler curves. The concentration of small particles is higher and less variable in space and time, and their tropospheric residence time is longer, than those of large cloud particles because of lower sedimentation velocities. Small particles shift effective cloud particle radii to sizes much smaller than the mean diameter of the cloud particles. This causes an increase in shortwave reflectivity and IR emissivity, and a decrease in transmissivity. Occasionally, the cloud reflectivity increased with altitude (decreasing temperature) stronger than did cloud emissivity, yielding enhanced radiative cooling at higher altitudes. Thus, cirrus produced by deep convection in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm

  13. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  14. Optical Absorption Characteristics of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-11

    properties of the powder as well as the thickness of the layer. For a layer that is thick enough so that no light is transmitted, the Kubelka -- Munk theory...which is a two stream radiative transfer model, relates the reflectance to the ratio of the absorption to the scattering. The Kubelka - Munk theory has...of the aerosol material is known. Under the assumptions of the Kubelka - Munk . theory, the imaginary component of the refractive index is deter- mined

  15. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  16. The investigation of advanced remote sensing techniques for the measurement of aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques and inversion methods for the measurement of characteristics of aerosol and gaseous species in the atmosphere were investigated. Of particular interest were the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, such as their size distribution, number concentration, and complex refractive index, and the vertical distribution of these properties on a local as well as global scale. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring of tropospheric aerosols were developed as well as satellite monitoring of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Computer programs were developed for solving multiple scattering and radiative transfer problems, as well as inversion/retrieval problems. A necessary aspect of these efforts was to develop models of aerosol properties.

  17. Aerosol optical depth characteristics in Yinchuan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaya; Mao, Jiandong; Rao, Zhimin; Zhang, Fan

    2013-08-01

    Sand dust aerosol is the main component of aerosol in troposphere atmosphere of East Asia, which can produce the extensive influence on the ecosystem, atmosphere environment and atmosphere chemistry through intensive sand dust weather process. For investigation of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its temporal-spatial evolution over this area, a series of observation experiments were carried out by a sun photometer CE-318 located at Beifang University of Nationality( 106°E, 38°29'N ), Yinchuan Ningxia province of China from September 2012 to April 2013 and many direct solar radiation datum were obtained. The experiments results were analyzed in detail and some conclusions are obtained as follows: (1) For daily evolution of AOD, the variation trend are divided into four types: ①the AOD values are relatively steady in whole day; ② the AOD values increase from morning to afternoon; ③ the AOD values are greater at noon than that in the morning and afternoon; ④there is a peak in the variation trends of AOD from 9:00~12:00 in the morning, but it is small at other time. (2) For month evolution, the minimum AOD average value appears in September and the maximum one appears in April. (3) For the seasonal changes trend, the average AOD values in the April are bigger than that in the autumn. (4) In addition, during the observation period, one dust weather process was observed and the change characteristic of AOD of dust aerosol was obtained and analyzed.

  18. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    Ice particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere existing as the sole constituents of glaciated cirrus clouds or coexisting with supercooled liquid droplets in mixed-phase clouds. Aerosol particles serving as heterogeneous ice nuclei for ice crystal formation impact the global radiative balance by modification of cloud radiative properties, and thus climate. Atmospheric ice formation is not a well understood process and represents great uncertainty for climate prediction. The oceans which cover the majority of the earth's surface host nearly half the total global primary productivity and contribute to the greatest aerosol production by mass. However, the effect of biological activity on particle aerosolization, particle composition, and ice nucleation is not well established. This dissertation investigates the link between marine biological activity, aerosol particle production, physical/chemical particle characteristics, and ice nucleation under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions of particles from bursting bubbles generated by plunging water jets and aeration through frits in a seawater mesocosm containing bacteria and/or phytoplankton cultures, were measured as a function of biological activity. Total particle production significantly increases primarily due to enhanced aerosolization of particles ≤100 nm in diameter attributable to the presence and growth of phytoplankton. Furthermore, hygroscopicity measurements indicate primary organic material associated with the sea salt particles, providing additional evidence for the importance of marine biological activity for ocean derived aerosol composition. Ice nucleation experiments show that these organic rich particles nucleate ice efficiently in the immersion and deposition modes, which underscores their importance in mixed-phase and cirrus cloud formation processes. In separate ice nucleation experiments employing pure cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nannochloris

  19. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate.

  20. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Q.; Han, Y. X.; Zhao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols.

  1. Inorganic and carbonaceous aerosols during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) experiment: Chemical characteristics, physical properties, and emission data for smoke from African biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Elbert, W.; Maenhaut, W.; Haywood, J.; Osborne, S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2003-07-01

    We collected filter samples of the atmospheric aerosol during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) experiment onboard the UK Met Office C-130 aircraft. The main operational area was the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Namibia and Angola, where biomass-smoke haze at least 1-2 days old was widespread. The size-fractionated aerosol samples were analyzed for the major inorganic ions, carbonaceous material (elemental and organic carbon), and elements with atomic numbers between 11 (Na) and 82 (Pb). The regional haze aerosol was composed mostly of carbonaceous aerosols (on the average, 81% of the submicron mass), with secondary inorganic aerosols (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) accounting for another 14%. K+ and Cl-, typical pyrogenic species, constituted only 2% of the mass. The aerosol chemical data were used to estimate mass emission fluxes for various aerosol components. For African savanna/grassland burning, the estimated emission flux of carbonaceous particles (particulate organic matter plus elemental carbon) is 14 ± 1 Tg yr-1, and that of the nitrogen species (nitrate and ammonium) is 2 ± 2 Tg yr-1. For the flight segments in regional haze, the mean particle scattering coefficient at 550 nm was σs = 101 ± 56 Mm-1 and the mean particle absorption coefficient σa at 565 nm averaged 8 ± 5 Mm-1 (mean single scattering albedo of 0.93 ± 0.06 at 550 nm). The dry mass scattering efficiency αs, calculated from the linear regression of the mean scattering versus the estimated submicron mass, is estimated to be between 4.2 ± and 4.6 ± 0.6 m2 g-1, depending on the assumptions made in calculating the aerosol mass. The dependence of the scattering enhancement ratios Δσs/ΔCO on the distance from the burning regions suggests that the evolution of particle size with time influences the light scattering efficiency. Fresh smoke was sampled during a dedicated flight in the proximity and within the plume of an active biomass burning fire. Here the

  2. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  3. Aerosol physical properties and their impact on climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Piskozub, Jacek; Drozdowska, Violetta; Gutowska, Dorota; Rozwadowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensing. Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies, and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. It was one of the reasons for the growth in the number of research programs dealing with marine aerosols. Sea salt aerosols are among the most abundant components of the atmospheric aerosol, and thus it exerts a strong influence on radiation, cloud formation, meteorology and chemistry of the marine atmosphere. An accurate understanding and description of these mechanisms is crucial to modeling climate and climate change. This work provides information on combined aerosol studies made with lidars and sun photometers onboard the ship and in different coastal areas. We concentrate on aerosol optical thickness and its variations with aerosol advections into the study area. We pay special attention to the problem of proper data collection and analyses techniques. We showed that in order to detect the dynamics of potential aerosol composition changes it is necessary to use data from different stations where measurements are made using the same techniques. The combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides comprehensive picture of aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01

  4. Transport characteristics of aerosol from urban point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Daniel; Lawrence, Mark G.; Kerkweg, Astrid; Tost, Holger; Jöckel, Patrick; Borrmann, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Urban aerosols are an important source of regional and global air pollution. The local buildup, long-range transport, and dry and wet deposition of aerosols depend strongly on the aerosol size distribution and on the regional meteorological characteristics. We examine the characteristics of urban aerosol dispersion based on simulations of monodisperse passive aerosol tracers with sizes of 0.1, 1.0, 2.5, and 10.0 μm, performed with the global chemistry circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5-MESSy-Atmospheric-Chemistry). 39 point sources were selected for the analysis, originating from major population centers (MPCs) around the world. All tracers, one for each source and size, have the same total, constant emission flux, and undergo dry and wet aerosol deposition. Sensitivity simulations are performed in which either there is no activation of the aerosol as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), or all aerosol is activated as CCN. Using the same constant emission rate for each MPC allows us to compare how different large point sources pollute the atmosphere and the surface on different horizontal scales. The transport and deposition of the aerosol tracers from each MPC are quantitatively compared by the application of metrics. The analysis focuses on: the efficiency of short- and long-range horizontal transport; the fraction of tracer transported to the upper troposphere; and the fractions which are dry or wet deposited. Smaller particles with longer lifetimes (two to 14 days) are more effective at polluting remote locations (horizontal and vertical) and are deposited mostly by scavenging, while larger particles, with shorter lifetimes (several hours to a couple of days) more effectively pollute the environment nearby their source, and are most strongly removed by dry deposition from the atmosphere. By means of considering the same emission for each city, the presentation provides a detailed view of how aerosol tracers disperse and deposit on different spatial scales, depending

  5. Influence of semi-volatile aerosol on physical and optical properties of aerosol in Kathmandu valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Shrestha, Kundan; Panday, Arnico

    2016-04-01

    A field study was conducted in the urban atmosphere of Kathmandu valley to study the influence of the semi-volatile aerosol fraction on physical and optical properties of aerosols. The study was carried out during the 2015 pre-monsoon period. Experimental setup consisted of air from an ambient air inlet being split to two sets of identical sampling instruments. The first instrument received the ambient sample directly, while the second instrument received the air sample through a thermodenuder (TDD). Four sets of experiments were conducted to understand aerosol number, size distribution, scattering and absorption properties using Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Aethalometer (AE33) and Nephelometer. The influence of semi-volatile aerosols was calculated from the fraction of particles evaporated in the TDD at set temparetures: room temperature, 50°C, 100°C, 150°C, 200°C, 250°C and 300°C. Results show that, with increasing temperature, the evaporated fraction of semi-volatile aerosol also increased. At room temperature the fraction of semi-volatile aerosols was 12% while at 300°C it was as high as to 49%. Aerosol size distribution analysis shows that with an increase in TDD temperature from 50°C to 300°C, peak mobility diameter of particles shifted from around 60nm to 40nm. However we found little change in effective diameter of aerosol size distribution with increase in set TDD temperature. The change in size of aerosols due to loss of semi-volatile component has a stronger influence (~70%) in higher size bins when compared to at lower size bins (~20%). Studies using the AE33 showed that absorption by black carbon (BC) is amplified due to influence of semi-volatile aerosols by upto 37% at 880nm wavelength. Similarly nephelometer measurements showed that upto 71% of total scattering was found to be contributed by semi-volatile aerosol fraction. The scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) of semi-volatile aerosol

  6. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  7. Characteristics and Sampling Efficiencies of OMNI 3000 Aerosol Samplers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    they impact on walls and on the slit and not reaching the inside of the contactor, compared to PSL particles that bounce off surfaces. The Omni...SAMPLING EFFICIENCIES OF OMNI 3000 AEROSOL SAMPLERS Jana S. Kesavan RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE Deborah R. Schepers MITRETEK SYSTEMS, INC. Falls...2006 Final Feb 2006 - Mar 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Characteristics and Sampling Efficiencies of Omni 3000 Aerosol Samplers 5b

  8. Analysis of the Impact of Major Dust Events on the Aerosols Characteristics over Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Hariri, Mustafa M.

    2015-04-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust storms blow up and significantly affect human activities, airports and citizens' health. Aerosols optical and physical characteristics are influenced by major dust storms outbreaks. In this, paper, ground based AERONET measurements are integrated with space-borne sensors, namely MODIS and CALIPSO to analyze aerosols' characteristics during March - May of 2009 where a massive dust storm blew up and caused a widespread heavy atmospheric dust load over Saudi Arabia and the same period during 2010, where less dust activities were reported. The MODIS Deep Blue AOD analysis showed similar aerosols pattern over the land, however a substantial variance in aerosol loading during March - May 2009 compared with the same period in 2010 was observed. The angstrom exponent analysis showed that the majority of aerosol measurements in 2009 and 2010 are dominated by coarse-mode particles with angstrom exponent < 0.5. Detailed analysis of aerosol optical properties shows significant influence of coarse mode particles in the enhanced aerosol loading in 2009. The volume depolarization rations (VDR) derived from CALIPSO backscattering measurements is used to find latitudinal profile of mean aerosol optical depth to indicate the type of particles and to discriminate spherical aerosols with non-spherical particles. Acknowledgement The authors would like to acknowledge the support provided by the King Abdel Aziz City for Science & Technology (KACST) for funding this work under grant No. (MT-32-76). The support provided by the Deanship of Research at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  10. Quantitative determination of stratospheric aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingey, D. L.; Potter, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In the S192 data, a peak was apparent in the lower altitudes that was not present in the shorter wavelengths and grew with increasing wavelength beginning with band 7. For ten S192 wavelengths, the relative altitude increment was determined by knowledge of the relative position of the highest point in the scan arc. Using this scheme, results of scaling and inverting data for passes 47 and 61 were put into two models. Each result had three chart representations: (1) limb brightness measurement, (2) attenuation coefficients, and (3) ratio of the aerosol and Rayleigh coefficients to accentuate layers.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of sulfuric acid/water aerosols: Freezing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M. L.; Niedziela, R. F.; Richwine, L. J.; Dransfield, T.; Miller, R. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    1997-04-01

    A low-temperature flow cell has been used in conjunction with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer to study sulfuric acid/water aerosols. The aerosols were generated with a wide range of composition (28 to 85 wt%), including those characteristic of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, and studied over the temperature range from 240 K to 160 K. The particles exhibited deep supercooling, by as much as 100 K below the freezing point in some cases. Freezing of water ice was observed in the more dilute (<40 wt% sulfuric acid) particles, in agreement with the predictions of Jensen et al. and recent observations by Bertram et al. In contrast with theoretical predictions, however, the entire particle often does not immediately freeze, at least on the timescale of the present experiments (seconds to minutes). Freezing of the entire particle is observed at lower temperatures, well below that characteristic of the polar stratosphere.

  12. Characteristics of microbial aerosols released from chicken and swine feces.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Chen, Chiou-Jong; Lin, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Chien, Yu-Ching

    2011-08-01

    Bioaerosols generated during livestock and poultry production are significant occupational hazards. This study investigates the characteristics of bioaerosols released from animal feces. Fresh feces from pigs and chickens were obtained and tested in a controlled-environment facility. Airborne viable (culturable) bacteria and fungi were sampled hourly for 48 hr. The predominant species were identified via polymerase chain reaction analysis. The number of bacterial colonies released from chicken feces increased gradually, peaked at approximately 20 hr, and remained relatively constant to test end; however, the bacterial colonies released from swine feces did not increase significantly. The chicken feces released significantly (P < 0.05) more bacterial aerosols than swine feces over 40 hr, by approximately 1 order of magnitude. However, the difference in total fungal aerosols released from the two feces types was relatively small (30-40%) and insignificant (P > 0.05). Aerosols sized between approximately 0.65 and 1.1 microm were predominant for bacteria, whereas aerosols sized between approximately 2.1 and 3.3 microm prevailed for fungi. Genera Stenotrophomonas were the predominant bacterial aerosols, whereas Cladosporium and Acremonium accounted for the greatest amounts of fungi from chicken and swine feces, respectively. More than 1000 culturable bacterial colonies can be released from 1 g of chicken feces per hour, and approximately 80% of these bioaerosols are respirable. Most bacterial aerosols released from swine and chicken feces were opportunistic human pathogens; thus, the significance of their presence warrants further investigations.

  13. Aerosol characteristics of different types of episode.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Lin, Yan-Ruei; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Chou, Chun-Hung

    2013-12-01

    Daily and hourly average data from nine air-quality monitoring stations distributed across central Taiwan, which include ten items (i.e., PM₁₀, PM₂.₅, wind direction, wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, SO₂, NO₂, NO, and CO), were collected from 2005 to 2009. Four episode types: long-range transport with dust storms (DS), long-range transport with frontal pollution (FP), river dust (RD), and stagnant weather (SW), and one mixed type of episode were identified. Of these four episode types, the SW was the dominant type, averaging about 70%. The mean ratio of PM₂.₅/PM₁₀ was the lowest during the RD episodes (0.42), while the mean ratio of PM₂.₅/PM₁₀ was the highest during the SW episodes (0.64). Fine aerosol (PM₂.₅) and coarse aerosol (PM₁₀-₂.₅) samples were collected by high-volume samplers for chemical composition analysis, from only three stations (Douliou, Lunbei, and Siansi) during the days of SW, RD, DS, and FP. The concentrations of PM₂.₅ and three ionic species (NH₄⁺, NO₃⁻, and SO₄²⁻) all showed significant differences among the four episode types. The highest levels of NO₃⁻ (12.1 μg/m(3)) and SO₄²⁻ (20.5 μg/m(3)) were found during the SW and FP episodes, respectively. A comparison on the spatial similarity of aerosol compositions among the episodes and/or non-episodes (control) was characterized by the coefficient of divergence (CD). The results showed higher CD values in PM₁₀-₂.₅ than in PM₂.₅, and the CD values between RD episodes and the other three episodes were higher than those between two types of episode for the other three episodes. The ratios of SOR (sulfur oxidation ratio), SO₄²⁻/EC (elemental carbon), NOR (nitrogen oxidation ratio), and NO₃⁻/EC showed that sulfate formation was most rapid during the FP, while nitrate formation was most rapid during the SW.

  14. A physical model of Titan's aerosols.

    PubMed

    Toon, O B; McKay, C P; Griffith, C A; Turco, R P

    1992-01-01

    Microphysical simulations of Titan's stratospheric haze show that aerosol microphysics is linked to organized dynamical processes. The detached haze layer may be a manifestation of 1 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes above 300 km. The hemispherical asymmetry in the visible albedo may be caused by 0.05 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes of 150 to 200 km, we predict contrast reversal beyond 0.6 micrometer. Tomasko and Smith's (1982, Icarus 51, 65-95) model, in which a layer of large particles above 220 km altitude is responsible for the high forward scattering observed by Rages and Pollack (1983, Icarus 55, 50-62), is a natural outcome of the detached haze layer being produced by rising motions if aerosol mass production occurs primarily below the detached haze layer. The aerosol's electrical charge is critical for the particle size and optical depth of the haze. The geometric albedo, particularly in the ultraviolet and near infrared, requires that the particle size be near 0.15 micrometer down to altitudes below 100 km, which is consistent with polarization observations (Tomasko and Smith 1982, West and Smith 1991, Icarus 90, 330-333). Above about 400 km and below about 150 km Yung et al.'s (1984, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 55, 465-506) diffusion coefficients are too small. Dynamical processes control the haze particles below about 150 km. The relatively large eddy diffusion coefficients in the lower stratosphere result in a vertically extensive region with nonuniform mixing ratios of condensable gases, so that most hydrocarbons may condense very near the tropopause rather than tens of kilometers above it. The optical depths of hydrocarbon clouds are probably less than one, requiring that abundant gases such as ethane condense on a subset of the haze particles to create relatively large, rapidly removed particles. The wavelength dependence of the optical radius is calculated for use in analyzing observations of the geometric albedo. The lower

  15. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed with a brief comment as to the research performed. The publications titles are: The effects of particle size and nitric acid uptake on the homogenous freezing of sulfate aerosols; Parameterization of an aerosol physical chemistry model (APCM) for the NH3/H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system at cold temperatures; and The onset, extent and duration of dehydration in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex.

  16. Characteristics of trace elements in aerosols collected in Northern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellouz, F.; Masmoudi, M.; Quisefit, J. P.; Medhioub, K.

    In order to investigate the chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols, the sources and variability of atmospheric inputs, aerosols samples were collected during April 2006 and June 2007 in the coastal area of Boumhel, Tunisia. The samples were analysed for thirteen elements including Ca, Fe, Al, Si, Ti, Mg, Mn, K, Na, Cl, S, Zn and Pb using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. All elements measured in the aerosols of Boumhel revealed differences between the two seasons: the concentrations of all elements were the highest in June and the lowest in April due to the importance of meteorological conditions. The cascade impactor provided mass distributions indicate that Al, Fe, Si, Ti, Na, Cl and S are concentrated in coarse particles. The enrichment factors (EFs) of all elements indicate that Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti are mainly derived from soil sources. Na, S and Cl are mostly due to sea salts.

  17. Aerosols physical properties at Hada Al Sham, western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M. A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Hussein, T.; Aaltonen, V.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Almazroui, M.; Almehmadi, F. M.; Al Zawad, F. M.; Hakala, J.; Khoder, M.; Neitola, K.; Petäjä, T.; Shabbaj, I. I.; Hämeri, K.

    2016-06-01

    This is the first time to clearly derive the comprehensive physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia. Aerosol measurements station was established at a rural background area in the Western Saudi Arabia to study the aerosol properties. This study gives overview of the aerosol physical properties (PM10, PM2.5, black carbon and total number concentration) over the measurement period from November 2012 to February 2015. The average PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were 95 ± 78 μg m-3 (mean ± STD, at ambient conditions) and 33 ± 68 μg m-3 (at ambient conditions), respectively. As expected PM10 concentration was dominated by coarse mode particles (PM10-PM2.5), most probably desert dust. Especially from February to June the coarse mode concentrations were high because of dust storm season. Aerosol mass concentrations had clear diurnal cycle. Lower values were observed around noon. This behavior is caused by wind direction and speed, during night time very calm easterly winds are dominating whereas during daytime the stronger westerly winds are dominating (sea breeze). During the day time the boundary layer is evolving, causing enhanced mixing and dilution leading to lower concentration. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were comparable to values measured at close by city of Jeddah. Black carbon concentration was about 2% and 6% of PM10 and PM2.5 mass, respectively. Total number concentration was dominated by frequent new particle formation and particle growth events. The typical diurnal cycle in particle total number concentration was clearly different from PM10 and PM2.5.

  18. Background aerosol over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: observed characteristics of aerosol mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cong, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Xin, Jinyuan; Wan, Xin; Pan, Yuepeng; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Zhongyan; Wang, Yongjie; Kang, Shichang

    2017-01-01

    barren to forest, in inverse relation to the PM2.5 ratios. The seasonality of aerosol mass parameters was land-cover dependent. Over forest and grassland areas, TSP mass, PM2.5 mass, MISR-AOD and fine-mode AOD were higher in spring and summer, followed by relatively lower values in autumn and winter. At the barren site (the QOMS station), there were inconsistent seasonal patterns between surface TSP mass (PM2.5 mass) and atmospheric column AOD (fine-mode AOD). Our findings implicate that HTP aerosol masses (especially their regional characteristics and fine-particle emissions) need to be treated sensitively in relation to assessments of their climatic effect and potential role as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei.

  19. Aerosol optical and physical properties during winter monsoon pollution transport in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Bhanja, S N; Pani, S K; Misra, A

    2014-04-01

    We analysed aerosol optical and physical properties in an urban environment (Kolkata) during winter monsoon pollution transport from nearby and far-off regions. Prevailing meteorological conditions, viz. low temperature and wind speed, and a strong downdraft of air mass, indicated weak dispersion and inhibition of vertical mixing of aerosols. Spectral features of WinMon aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed larger variability (0.68-1.13) in monthly mean AOD at short-wavelength (SW) channels (0.34-0.5 μm) compared to that (0.28-0.37) at long-wavelength (LW) channels (0.87-1.02 μm), thereby indicating sensitivity of WinMon AOD to fine aerosol constituents and the predominant contribution from fine aerosol constituents to WinMon AOD. WinMon AOD at 0.5 μm (AOD 0. 5) and Angstrom parameter ( α) were 0.68-0.82 and 1.14-1.32, respectively, with their highest value in December. Consistent with inference from spectral features of AOD, surface aerosol loading was primarily constituted of fine aerosols (size 0.23-3 μm) which was 60-70 % of aerosol 10- μm (size 0.23-10 μm) concentration. Three distinct modes of aerosol distribution were obtained, with the highest WinMon concentration at a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.3 μm during December, thereby indicating characteristics of primary contribution related to anthropogenic pollutants that were inferred to be mostly due to contribution from air mass originating in nearby region having predominant emissions from biofuel and fossil fuel combustion. A relatively higher contribution from aerosols in the upper atmospheric layers than at the surface to WinMon AOD was inferred during February compared to other months and was attributed to predominant contribution from open burning emissions arising from nearby and far-off regions. A comparison of ground-based measurements with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data showed an underestimation of MODIS AOD and α values for most of the days. Discrepancy in

  20. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds, refractory brown and black carbon, heavy metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases. Aerosol organic matter normally contains semivolatile material th...

  1. Wintertime characteristics of aerosols over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: Vertical profile, transport and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Raju, M. P.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2017-01-01

    Winter-specific characteristics of airborne particulates over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) were evaluated in terms of aerosol chemical and micro-physical properties under three-dimensional domain. Emphases were made for the first time to identify intra-seasonal variations of aerosols sources, horizontal and vertical transport, effects of regional meteorology and estimating composite aerosol short-wave radiative forcing over an urban region (25°10‧-25°19‧N; 82°54‧-83°4‧E) at middle-IGP. Space-borne passive (Aqua and Terra MODIS, Aura OMI) and active sensor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) based observations were concurrently used with ground based aerosol mass measurement for entire winter and pre-summer months (December, 1, 2014 to March, 31, 2015). Exceptionally high aerosol mass loading was recorded for both PM10 (267.6 ± 107.0 μg m- 3) and PM2.5 (150.2 ± 89.4 μg m- 3) typically exceeding national standard. Aerosol type was mostly dominated by fine particulates (particulate ratio: 0.61) during pre to mid-winter episodes before being converted to mixed aerosol types (ratio: 0.41-0.53). Time series analysis of aerosols mass typically identified three dissimilar aerosol loading episodes with varying attributes, well resemble to that of previous year's observation representing its persisting nature. Black carbon (9.4 ± 3.7 μg m- 3) was found to constitute significant proportion of fine particulates (2-27%) with a strong diurnal profile. Secondary inorganic ions also accounted a fraction of particulates (PM2.5: 22.5%; PM10: 26.9%) having SO4- 2, NO3- and NH4+ constituting major proportion. Satellite retrieved MODIS-AOD (0.01-2.30) and fine mode fractions (FMF: 0.01-1.00) identified intra-seasonal variation with transport of aerosols from upper to middle-IGP through continental westerly. Varying statistical association of columnar and surface aerosol loading both in terms of fine (r; PM2.5: MODIS-AOD: 0.51) and coarse particulates (PM10: MODIS-AOD: 0.53) was

  2. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  3. Dynamical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols over IG region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish; Singh, Ramesh P.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic (IG) region are primarily dependent on the geographical settings and meteorological conditions. Detailed analysis of multi satellite data and ground observations have been carried out over three different cities i.e. Kanpur, Greater Noida and Amritsar during 2010-2013. Level-3 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) terra daily global grid product with spatial resolution of 1° × 1° shows the mean AOD at 500 nm wavelength value of 0.73, 0.70 and 0.67 with the standard deviation of 0.43, 0.39 and 0.36 respectively over Amritsar, Greater Noida and Kanpur. Our detailed analysis shows characteristic behavior of aerosols from west to east in the IG region depending upon the proximity of desert regions of Arabia. We have observed large influx of dusts from the Thar desert and Arabia peninsula during pre-monsoon season (April-June), highly affecting Amritsar which is close to the desert region.

  4. Characteristics-based sectional modeling of aerosol nucleation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, E. M. A.; Stanic, M.; Kuczaj, A. K.; Nordlund, M.; Geurts, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    A new numerical method for the solution of an internally mixed spatially homogeneous sectional model for aerosol nucleation and condensation is proposed. The characteristics method is used to predict droplet sizes within a discrete time step. The method is designed such that 1) a pre-specified number of moments of the droplet size distribution may be preserved, 2) there exists no time step stability restriction related to the condensation rate and section size, 3) highly skewed fixed sectional distributions may be used and 4) it is straightforward to extend to spatially inhomogeneous settings and to incorporate droplet coagulation and break-up. We derive, starting from mass conservation, a consistent internally mixed multi-species aerosol model. For certain condensational growth laws analytical solutions exist, against which the method is validated. Using two-moment and four-moment-preserving schemes, we find first order convergence of the numerical solution to the analytical result, as a function of the number of sections. As the four-moment-preserving scheme does not guarantee positivity of the solution, a hybrid scheme is proposed, which, when needed, locally reverts back to two-moment preservation, to prevent negativity. As an illustration, the method is applied to a complete multi-species homogeneous nucleation and condensation problem.

  5. Characteristics of Interstitial Aerosol in Cold and Warm Clouds during the Ice-T Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaniyala, S.; He, M.; Moharreri, A.; Craig, L.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate calculation of the contribution of aerosols to the radiative forcing budget requires an understanding of the aerosol role in cloud formation. From a global climate perspective, aerosol-cloud processes must be represented by simple parametric models that can relate aerosol properties to the characteristics of the clouds formed. The development and testing of such simple models requires aerosol-cloud data from a large number of clouds systems. While reasonably accurate cloud data is currently available from a large number of well-established cloud probes, information about aerosol particles in clouds is largely unavailable because of the problem of artifacts in aerosol measurements from the shatter of cloud droplets. During the recent ICE-T campaign (Summer 2011), several different interstitial aerosol inlets were deployed and aerosol measurements were made in a variety of tropical convective clouds, focused particularly on conditions that permit the formation of ice within these systems. The flight operations were based in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands and sampling was largely conducted within ~ 600 miles of this location. The use of new samplers that permit shatter-free sampling of aerosol particles in cold and clouds has allowed for the collection of significant data on interstitial aerosol in tropical convective clouds. Of particular interest are measurements of aerosol size distributions inside and outside clouds made with a fast mobility spectrometer. Size distributions were obtained at 20-30 second resolution, permitting direct measurements of the scavenged aerosol population in clouds and the differences in the scavenged fraction as a function of cloud properties. As part of this presentation, the characteristics of interstitial aerosol in various cloud conditions will be presented and the transformation of aerosol population during cloud processing will be discussed.

  6. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol as determined from AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal means and standard deviations of column-integrated aerosol optical properties (e.g. spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT), single scattering albedo, phase function, Ångström exponent, volume particle size distribution, complex refractive index, absorbing aerosol optical thickness) from several Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites located in typical aerosol source and background regions are investigated (Holben et al., 1998). The AERONET program is an inclusive network of ground-based sun-photometers that measure atmospheric aerosol optical properties (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/). The results can be used for improving the accuracy of satellite-retrieved AOT, assessments of the global aerosol models, studies of atmospheric pollution and aerosol radiative forcing on climate. We have paid a special attention to several AERONET sites that are Mexico_City (Mexico), Alta_Floresta (Brazil), Avignon (France), Solar_Village (Saudi Arabia), and Midway_Island (Pacific) representative for industrial/urban, biomass burning, rural, desert dust and oceanic aerosols, respectively. We have found that the optical and microphysical aerosol properties are highly dependent on the local aerosol emission sources and seasonal meteorological conditions.

  7. Analysis of Characteristics of Dust Aerosols in Northwest China based on Satellite Remote-sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, L.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, S.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the CloudSat data, effects of dust aerosol on cloud parameters under the circumstance of the monthly average, dusty days and dust-free days were analyzed during April, 2010. By using L2 aerosol profiles satellite data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO the aerosol extinction coefficients were analyzed over northwest China. As an important case, space distribution and transmission route of dust aerosol were investigated during the dust events occurred from April 16th to 18th in 2013 over northwest China, based on L1 data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO, a combination of multiple satellite data and models. The results show that (1) dust aerosols could cause the reduction in effective radius of particle, cloud liquid water content and cloud optical thickness, and the increase of the number concentration of liquid cloud particles as well, (2) The aerosol extinction coefficients were decreased with the increase of height. The value of the aerosol extinction coefficients in desert area was greater than that in the area of Gansu Province due to urbanization. Distribution of the aerosol extinction coefficients in spring was nearly the same as the annual average. (3) Using aerosol products of the vertical characteristics from CALIOP/CALIOPSO, aerosol was classified during dust events, and with NAPPS Global aerosol model, daily distribution of the dust aerosol concentration was given, showing the transport and diffusion of dust aerosol. With HYSPLIT trajectory model dust transportation path of the sand dust source areas was simulated and identified. During the outbreak of dust event dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface about 3km, with depolarization ratio at 0.4 and color ratio at 1.2. During the dust events were close to weak and stop, dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface under 2 km, with depolarization ratio from 0.2 to 0.3, and color ratio about 1.

  8. Analysis of Characteristics of Dust Aerosols in Northwest China based on Satellite Remote-sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Liu, D.; Zhao, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the CloudSat data, effects of dust aerosol on cloud parameters under the circumstance of the monthly average, dusty days and dust-free days were analyzed during April, 2010. By using L2 aerosol profiles satellite data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO the aerosol extinction coefficients were analyzed over northwest China. As an important case, space distribution and transmission route of dust aerosol were investigated during the dust events occurred from April 16th to 18th in 2013 over northwest China, based on L1 data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO, a combination of multiple satellite data and models. The results show that (1) dust aerosols could cause the reduction in effective radius of particle, cloud liquid water content and cloud optical thickness, and the increase of the number concentration of liquid cloud particles as well, (2) The aerosol extinction coefficients were decreased with the increase of height. The value of the aerosol extinction coefficients in desert area was greater than that in the area of Gansu Province due to urbanization. Distribution of the aerosol extinction coefficients in spring was nearly the same as the annual average. (3) Using aerosol products of the vertical characteristics from CALIOP/CALIOPSO, aerosol was classified during dust events, and with NAPPS Global aerosol model, daily distribution of the dust aerosol concentration was given, showing the transport and diffusion of dust aerosol. With HYSPLIT trajectory model dust transportation path of the sand dust source areas was simulated and identified. During the outbreak of dust event dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface about 3km, with depolarization ratio at 0.4 and color ratio at 1.2. During the dust events were close to weak and stop, dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface under 2 km, with depolarization ratio from 0.2 to 0.3, and color ratio about 1.

  9. Aerosols and the methods of determining the characteristics of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skřínská, Mária; Horák, Jiří; Danihelka, Pavel; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Kaličáková, ZdeÅka; Kubesa, Petr; Martiník, Lubomír; Drastichová, Vendula; Skřínský, Jan; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Jandačka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of aerosols by defining and dividing them in terms of their size, spatial localization and composition. The paper briefly deals with the issue of the origins and formation of aerosols. Further, it describes the trends in measuring nanoparticles based on their electric field mobility behavior, condensation, optical properties and aerosol particle acceleration in an air-stream.

  10. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  11. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  12. Characteristics of regional aerosols: Southern Arizona and eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Gouri

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the quality of our life in many direct and indirect ways. Inhalation of aerosols can have harmful effects on human health. Aerosols also have climatic impacts by absorbing or scattering solar radiation, or more indirectly through their interactions with clouds. Despite a better understanding of several relevant aerosol properties and processes in the past years, they remain the largest uncertainty in the estimate of global radiative forcing. The uncertainties arise because although aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere they are highly variable in space, time and their physicochemical properties. This makes in-situ measurements of aerosols vital in our effort towards reducing uncertainties in the estimate of global radiative forcing due to aerosols. This study is an effort to characterize atmospheric aerosols at a regional scale, in southern Arizona and eastern Pacific Ocean, based on ground and airborne observations of aerosols. Metals and metalloids in particles with aerodynamic diameter (Dp) smaller than 2.5 μm are found to be ubiquitous in southern Arizona. The major sources of the elements considered in the study are identified to be crustal dust, smelting/mining activities and fuel combustion. The spatial and temporal variability in the mass concentrations of these elements depend both on the source strength and meteorological conditions. Aircraft measurements of aerosol and cloud properties collected during various field campaigns over the eastern Pacific Ocean are used to study the sources of nitrate in stratocumulus cloud water and the relevant processes. The major sources of nitrate in cloud water in the region are emissions from ships and wildfires. Different pathways for nitrate to enter cloud water and the role of meteorology in these processes are examined. Observations of microphysical properties of ambient aerosols in ship plumes are examined. The study shows that there is an enhancement in the number

  13. Trace elemental characteristics of aerosols emitted from municipal incinerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a continuing investigation of high temperature combustion aerosols, elemental composition of size differentiated aerosols emitted from a local municipal incinerator was studied. Aerosols were aerodynamically separated into eight diameter groups ranging from 0.43 mm to 20 mm, collected, and analyzed by charged particle induced X-ray emission technique. On line data collection and reduction codes generated aerial densities for elements from Na to U with sensitivities in the ng/cu m range for most elements. From the total weights of aerosols collected per stage, their size distribution was determined to be bimodal, with one group centered at a diameter of 0.54 mm and the other at a diameter of 5.6 mm. Measured elemental concentrations in various size ranges indicate that K and S show a strong tendency to concentrate on aerosol surfaces. A weaker trend for surface preference was also observed for Mn and Ni, but other elements show no such trend.

  14. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    according to the major fraction. Thus, many of the particles classified as sulfate may have contained significant mass fractions of carbonaceous or other material. These particles for the most part did not show two physical phases, however. Nonsulfate particles were classified according to the physical and chemical characteristics of each particle, and were grouped into the major nonsulfate particle classes, including C-rich, crustal, metallic, and salts. Our UT and LS sample analyses indicate a maximum for crustal and C-rich particle abundance in the Northern Hemisphere upper troposphere, and a salt particle maximum in the Southern Hemisphere upper troposphere. Metallic particles are clearly more prevalent in the troposphere than in the stratosphere, but interhemispheric differences appear small.

  15. An analysis of the characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficients at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Eun, S.; Seo, W.; Park, J.; Ahn, J.; Moon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can scatter and absorb solar radiation and their spatial/temporal distributions are highly inhomogeneous due to short lifetimes (about a few weeks or less). Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, aerosols directly affect visibility and climate through the modification of the Earth's energy budget (Charlson et al., 1992; Yan, 2007; Wang, 2012). This study investigates long-term trends and characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficient at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo, 100 km upstream of Seoul, in Korea. Aerosol scattering coefficients were measured continuously with nephelometers. The analysis period is limited to one year of 2011. For the relationship analysis of extinction coefficients (σext) to visibility and aerosol optical depth, σsp observed at 3 p.m. have been used with help of aerosol absorption coefficients (σap) in order to remove its dependence upon relative humidity (RH), and also those of rainy period have been excluded. As expected, σext estimated are inversely proportional to visibility observation by eye. Aerosol extinction coefficients have been vertically integrated with an assumption of nearly well-mixed within an e-folding height to determine aerosol optical depth (τa), and compared with those retrieved from sunphotometer. The results show a reasonable agreement in spite of an inherent difference of each definition. We expect these findings would help to eventually understand aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on the regional climate change around Korea.

  16. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are: (1) Development of an aerosol chemistry model; (2) Utilization of satellite measurements of trace gases along with analysis of temperatures and dynamic conditions to understand ice cloud formation, dehydration and sedimentation in the winter polar regions; (3) Comparison of the HALOE and SAGE II time dependencies of the Pinatubo aerosol decay. The publications are attached.

  17. Aerosol effects on the anvil characteristics of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; Heever, S. C.; Marinescu, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    Simulations of two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment were performed to examine the impact of aerosol number concentration on the vertical distributions of liquid and ice condensate and the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of the cirrus-anvil cloud shield. Analyses indicate that for an increase in aerosol concentration from a clean continental to a highly polluted state, there was an increase in the rime collection rate of cloud water, which led to less lofted cloud water. Aerosol-induced trends in the cloud mixing ratio profiles were, however, nonmonotonic in the mixed phase region, such that a moderate increase in aerosol concentration produced the greatest reduction in cloud water. Generally, less lofted cloud water led to less anvil ice mixing ratio but more numerous, small ice crystals within the anvil. In spite of reduced anvil ice mixing ratio, the anvil clouds exhibited greater areal coverage, increased albedo, reduced cloud top cooling, and reduced net radiative flux, which led to an aerosol-induced warming (reduced cooling) effect in these squall lines.

  18. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging, and by changing in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) is compared with MOCAGE simulations and showed that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the bias (from 0.032 to 0.002) and a better correlation (from 0.062 to 0.322) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive bias in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.153 to 0.026), and a negative bias in the desert dust representation in the African dust outflow region (from -0.179 to -0.051). The updates in sedimentation produced a modest difference; the bias with MODIS data from 0.002 in the updated configuration went to

  19. Physical and chemical properties of aerosols at a coastal site Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Chand, D.; Wood, R.; Wallace, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Shaw, G. E.; Krejci, R.; Fochesatto, G. J.; Gallardo, L.

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) Regional Experiment (REx) and associated modeling program is an improved understanding of aerosol indirect effects over the southeast Pacific (SEP). Details on the program are available online at www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/. To this end, detailed aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made during REx at a coastal land site at Paposo (25o 0.4' S, 70o 27.011' W, 690 masl) in northern Chile, a site ideally positioned for studying continental aerosol sources advecting over the SEP. We present initial analysis of data from Paposo. Detailed measurements of aerosol properties were made from mid October to mid November 2008. Observations from optical particle counters (OPC), nephelometers, aethalometer, scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the chemical analysis of the submicron aerosols samples collected on teflon filters are being used in this study. Large variations in aerosols parameters were observed which corresponded with changes in meteorology, as determined using trajectory analysis. Ion Chromatograph (IC) analysis of submicron aerosol samples shows that about 41% of submicron mass is sulfate. The light scattering coefficient shows a strong non-linear correlation with aerosol size observed using an OPC. Detailed results will be presented in the AGU meeting.

  20. The NASA-AMES Research Center Stratospheric Aerosol Model. 1. Physical Processes and Computational Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Kiang, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional model of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is presented. In constructing the model, a wide range of basic physical and chemical processes are incorporated in order to avoid predetermining or biasing the model predictions. The simulation, which extends from the surface to an altitude of 58 km, includes the troposphere as a source of gases and condensation nuclei and as a sink for aerosol droplets. The size distribution of aerosol particles is resolved into 25 categories with particle radii increasing geometrically from 0.01 to 2.56 microns such that particle volume doubles between categories.

  1. Physical characteristics related to bra fit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Man; LaBat, Karen; Bye, Elizabeth

    2010-04-01

    Producing well-fitting garments has been a challenge for retailers and manufacturers since mass production began. Poorly fitted bras can cause discomfort or pain and result in lost sales for retailers. Because body contours are important factors affecting bra fit, this study analyses the relationship of physical characteristics to bra-fit problems. This study has used 3-D body-scanning technology to extract upper body angles from a sample of 103 college women; these data were used to categorise physical characteristics into shoulder slope, bust prominence, back curvature and acromion placement. Relationships between these physical categories and bra-fit problems were then analysed. Results show that significant main effects and two-way interactions of the physical categories exist in the fit problems of poor bra support and bra-motion restriction. The findings are valuable in helping the apparel industry create better-fitting bras. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Poorly fitted bras can cause discomfort or pain and result in lost sales for retailers. The findings regarding body-shape classification provide researchers with a statistics method to quantify physical characteristics and the findings regarding the relationship analysis between physical characteristics and bra fit offer bra companies valuable information about bra-fit perceptions attributable to women with figure variations.

  2. Assessment of aerosol optical and micro-physical features retrieved from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements from Skyradiometer at a high altitude station at Merak: Assessment of aerosol optical features from Merak.

    PubMed

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S; Srivastava, A K; Bagare, S P; Singh, R B; Kanawade, V P; Dorjey, Namgyal

    2015-11-01

    Optical and micro-physical features of aerosol are reported using Skyradiometer (POM-01L, Prede, Japan) observations taken from a high-altitude station Merak, located in north-eastern Ladakh of the western trans-Himalayas region during January 2011 to December 2013. The observed daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, at 500 nm) at the site varied from 0.01 to 0.14. However, 75 % of the observed AOD lies below 0.05 during the study period. Seasonal peaks of AOD occurred in spring as 0.06 and minimum in winter as 0.03 which represents the aged background aerosols at the site. Yearly mean AOD at 500 nm is found to be around 0.04 and inter-annual variations of AOD is very small (nearly ±0.01). Angstrom exponent (a) varied seasonally from 0.73 in spring to 1.5 in autumn. About 30 % of the observed a lies below 0.8 which are the indicative for the presence of coarse-mode aerosols at the site. The station exhibits absorbing aerosol features which prominently occurred during spring and that may be attributed by the transported anthropogenic aerosol from Indo-Gangatic Plain (IGP). Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectory analysis. Furthermore, seasonal mean of single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) varied from of 0.94 to 0.98 and a general increasing trend is noticed from 400 to 870 nm wavelengths. These features are apparently regional characteristics of the site. Aerosol asymmetry factor (AS) decreases gradually from 400 to 870 nm and varied from 0.66 to 0.69 at 500 nm across the seasons. Dominance of desert-dust aerosols, associated by coarse mode, is indicated by tri-modal features of aerosol volume size distribution over the station during the entire seasons.

  3. A New, Physically Based Algorithm, for Retrieving Aerosol Properties over Land from MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Mattoo, S.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2004-12-01

    The MODerate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) has been successfully retrieving aerosol properties, beginning in early 2000 from Terra and from mid 2002 from Aqua. Over land, the retrieval algorithm makes use of three MODIS channels, in the blue, red and infrared wavelengths. As part of the validation exercises, retrieved spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT) has been compared via scatterplots against spectral AOT measured by the global Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). On one hand, global and long term validation looks promising, with two-thirds (average plus and minus one standard deviation) of all points falling between published expected error bars. On the other hand, regression of these points shows a positive y-offset and a slope less than 1.0. For individual regions, such as along the U.S. East Coast, the offset and slope are even worse. Here, we introduce an overhaul of the algorithm for retrieving aerosol properties over land, to include more physical, less empirical assumptions. The new algorithm will include surface type information, instead of assuming globally fixed ratios of visible to infrared surface reflectance. It will include updated aerosol optical properties to reflect the growing aerosol retrieved from eight-plus years of AERONET operation. The effects of polarization will be including during lookup table creation, using vector RT calculations. Most importantly, the new algorithm does not assume that aerosol is transparent in the infrared channel. This new formulation will invert reflectance observed in the three channels (blue, red, and infrared), rather than performing iterative single channel retrievals.

  4. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-10-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP throughout the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is maybe partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental aerosol and smoke are also investigated, based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at an altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high-altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  5. Sources and characteristics of sub-micron aerosols in the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brioude, J.; Brock, C. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Hall, K.; Holloway, J. S.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    The NOAA WP-3D aircraft performed several flights in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), California during the CalNex-2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field project in May-June 2010. SJV is generally a rural valley, with a high concentration of feedlots and agricultural sites as well as urbanized centers such as Fresno and Bakersfield. Preliminary results on size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micron aerosols measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measurements of trace gases affecting secondary production of aerosols, and FLEXPART back trajectory analyses are presented in order to identify sources of aerosols transported to or produced in the valley. Observed enhancements in various trace gases and aerosol species indicate a mixed influence from urban, industrial, and animal feedlots in the SJV. Three distinct observations suggest a complex transport pattern of pollutants with different origins to and within the valley: 1) CO and NOx mixing ratios were prominent downwind of the urban areas in the valley; 2) SO2, aerosol organics and sulfate were higher closer to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on the east of the valley; 3) high concentration of aerosol phase ammonium and nitrate were observed in NH3-rich air masses, directly downwind of the feedlots in the central part of the valley. Aerosol enhancements in each of these air mass categories relative to the background determine the relative contribution and significance of different sources to aerosol loadings in the valley. Differences in VOC measurements and meteorology will be explored to investigate the observed variation in characteristics of organics on different days.

  6. New biometric modalities using internal physical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortenson, Juliana (Brooks)

    2010-04-01

    Biometrics is described as the science of identifying people based on physical characteristics such as their fingerprints, facial features, hand geometry, iris patterns, palm prints, or speech recognition. Notably, all of these physical characteristics are visible or detectable from the exterior of the body. These external characteristics can be lifted, photographed, copied or recorded for unauthorized access to a biometric system. Individual humans are unique internally, however, just as they are unique externally. New biometric modalities have been developed which identify people based on their unique internal characteristics. For example, "BoneprintsTM" use acoustic fields to scan the unique bone density pattern of a thumb pressed on a small acoustic sensor. Thanks to advances in piezoelectric materials the acoustic sensor can be placed in virtually any device such as a steering wheel, door handle, or keyboard. Similarly, "Imp-PrintsTM" measure the electrical impedance patterns of a hand to identify or verify a person's identity. Small impedance sensors can be easily embedded in devices such as smart cards, handles, or wall mounts. These internal biometric modalities rely on physical characteristics which are not visible or photographable, providing an added level of security. In addition, both the acoustic and impedance methods can be combined with physiologic measurements such as acoustic Doppler or impedance plethysmography, respectively. Added verification that the biometric pattern came from a living person can be obtained. These new biometric modalities have the potential to allay user concerns over protection of privacy, while providing a higher level of security.*

  7. Characteristics and Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols in Phimai, Central Thailand During BASE-ASIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; Bell, Shaun W.

    2012-01-01

    Popular summary: Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in the Earth's climate system, and can also have adverse effects on air quality and human health. The environmental impacts of aerosols, on the other hand, are highly regional, since their temporal/spatial distribution is inhomogeneous and highly depends on the regional emission sources. To better understand the effects of aerosols, intensive field experiments are necessary to characterize the chemical and physical properties on a region-by-region basis. From late February to early May in 2006, NASA/GSFC's SMARTLabs facility was deployed at a rural site in central Thailand, Southeast Asia, to conduct a field experiment dubbed BASE-ASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South East-Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment). The group was joined by scientists from the University of Hawaii and other regional institutes. Comprehensive measurements were made during the experiment, including aerosol chemical composition, optical and microphysical properties, as well as surface energetics and local . meteorology. This study analyzes part of the data from the BASE-ASIA experiment. It was found that, even for the relatively remote rural site, the aerosol loading was still substantial. Besides agricultural burning in the area, industrial pollution near the Bangkok metropolitan area, about 200 km southeast of the site, and even long-range transport from China, also contribute to the area's aerosol loading. The results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow. Abstract: Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols were made in Phimai, central Thailand (15.l83 N, 102.565 E, elevation: 206 m) during the BASE-ASIA field experiment from late February to early May in 2006. The observed aerosol loading was sizable for this rural site (mean aerosol scattering: 108 +/- 64 Mm(exp -1); absorption: 15

  8. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55% of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively), and that the overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode

  9. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.-J.; Zhu, C.-S.; Tie, X.-X.; Geng, F.-H.; Xu, H.-M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Wang, G.-H.; Han, Y.-M.; Ho, K.-F.

    2012-07-01

    An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP from Pudong (China) was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai Experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and stable C isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = -24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -25.1 ± 0.6‰) indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5, with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%: other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  10. Composition and spectral characteristics of ambient aerosol at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R. )

    1991-03-20

    Ambient aerosol particles were sampled continuously with a time resolution of {approximately}4 hours for a period of 8 days at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, in August 1986. The samples were analyzed on-site for their chemical composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra of the samples also provided data on aerosol light absorbance characteristics at 9.1 and 10.6 {mu}m - wavelengths of interest in determining aerosol backscatter coefficients for CO{sub 2} lidars. The chemical species in the ambient aerosol varied considerably during this 8-day period. The aerosol was acidic ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) rather than neutral ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) for a major fraction of the sampling time. The samples generally showed much higher absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m than at 10.6 {mu}m. Changes in the chemical composition between (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and the more acidic forms were accompanied by substantial changes in the sample's absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m but lesser changes in the absorbance at 10.6 {mu}m. These variations could have a profound effect on backscatter coefficients of atmospheric aerosol particles at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  11. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  12. Climate-relevant physical properties of molecular constituents for isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upshur, M. A.; Strick, B. F.; McNeill, V. F.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2014-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, formed from gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), contribute large uncertainties to the radiative forcing that is associated with aerosols in the climate system. Reactive uptake of surface-active organic oxidation products of BVOCs at the gas-aerosol interface can potentially decrease the overall aerosol surface tension and therefore influence their propensity to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we synthesize and measure some climate-relevant physical properties of SOA particle constituents consisting of the isoprene oxidation products α-, δ-, and cis- and trans-β-IEPOX (isoprene epoxide), as well as syn- and anti-2-methyltetraol. Following viscosity measurements, we use octanol-water partition coefficients to quantify the relative hydrophobicity of the oxidation products while dynamic surface tension measurements indicate that aqueous solutions of α- and trans-β-IEPOX exhibit significant surface tension depression. We hypothesize that the surface activity of these compounds may enhance aerosol CCN activity, and that trans-β-IEPOX may be highly relevant for surface chemistry of aerosol particles relative to other IEPOX isomers.

  13. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P. D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET, EMEP), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10) and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16), and a negative MNMB in the desert

  14. Filter and electrostatic samplers for semivolatile aerosols: physical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Adsorptive and evaporative artifacts often bias measurements of semivolatile aerosols. Adsorption occurs when the sampling method disrupts the gas-particle partitioning equilibrium. Evaporation occurs because concentrations of semivolatiles are rarely constant over time. Filtration is subject to both adsorptive and evaporative artifacts. By comparison, electrostatic precipitation reduces these artifacts by minimizing the surface area of collected particles without substantially disrupting the gas-particle equilibrium. The extent of these artifacts was determined for filter samplers and electrostatic precipitator samplers for semivolatile alkane aerosols in the laboratory. Adsorption of gas-phase semivolatiles was lower in electrostatic precipitators by factors of 5-100 compared to the filter method. Particle evaporation from the electrostatic sampler was 2.3 times lower than that from TFE-coated glass-fiber filters. Use of a backup filter to correct for compound-specific adsorption artifacts can introduce positive or negative errors to the measured particle-phase concentration due to competition among the adsorbates for available adsorption sites. Adsorption of evaporated particles from the front filter onto the backup filter increased the measured evaporative artifact by a factor of 1.5-2.

  15. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Ma, Yaoming; You, Chao; Zhu, Zhikun

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35°N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  16. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were < 20% in low-energy input operation areas (ore crushing, hydroxide product drumming) and > 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to

  17. Physical characteristics of Eurasian winter temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Son, Seok-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Despite the on-going global warming, recent winters in Eurasian mid-latitudes were much colder than average. In an attempt to better understand the physical characteristics for cold Eurasian winters, major sources of variability in surface air temperature (SAT) are investigated based on cyclostationary EOF analysis. The two leading modes of SAT variability represent the effect of Arctic amplification (AA) and the Arctic oscillation (AO), respectively. These two modes are distinct in terms of the physical characteristics, including surface energy fluxes and tropospheric circulations, and result in significantly different winter SAT patterns over the Eurasian continent. The AA-related SAT anomalies are dipolar with warm Arctic, centered at the Barents-Kara Seas, and cold East Asia. In contrast, the negative AO-related SAT anomalies are characterized by widespread cold anomalies in Northern Eurasia. Relative importance of the AA and the negative AO contributions to cold Eurasian winters is sensitive to the region of interest.

  18. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  19. [Pollution characteristics of microbial aerosols generated from a municipal sewage treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiong-Hui; Li, Yan-Peng; Niu, Tie-Jun; Li, Mei-Ling; Ma, Zhi-Hui; Miao, Ying; Wang, Xiang-Jun

    2012-07-01

    To characterize the pollution characteristics of microbial aerosols emitted from municipal sewage treatment plants, microbial aerosols were sampled with an Andersen 6-stage impactor at different treatment units of a Xi'an sewage treatment plant between June 2011 and July 2011. The plate-culture and colony-counting methods were employed to determine the concentrations, particle size distributions and median diameters of the airborne bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. The results showed that the highest concentrations of bacteria (7 866 CFU x m(-3) +/- 960 CFU x m(-3)) and actinomycetes (2 139 CFU x m(-3) +/- 227 CFU x m(-3)) were found in the sludge-dewatering house while the highest fungi concentration (2156 CFU x m(-3) +/- 119 CFU x m(-3)) in the oxidation ditch. The airborne bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes all showed a skewed distribution in particle size. The peaks of bacteria and fungi were in the size range of 2.1-3.3 microm, whereas the peak of airborne actinomycetes was between 1. 1-2.1 microm in size. In general, the order of the median diameters of different microbial aerosols generated from the sewage treatment plant was airborne bacteria > airborne fungi > airborne actinomycetes. In addition, the spatial variation characteristics of microbial aerosols showed that the larger the particle size of the microorganism, the faster the reducing rate of the aerosol concentration. The variations in the reducing rate of concentration with particle sizes can be ordered as airborne bacteria > airborne fungi > airborne actinomycetes.

  20. Removal characteristics of sulfuric acid aerosols from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Danping; Yang, Linjun; Wu, Hao; Huang, Rongting

    2017-03-01

    With increasing attention on sulfuric acid emission, investigations on the removal characteristics of sulfuric acid aerosols by the limestone gypsum wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) system and the wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) were carried out in two coal-fired power plants, and the effects of the WFGD scrubber type and the flue gas characteristics were discussed. The results showed that it was necessary to install the WESP device after desulfurization, as the WFGD system was inefficient to remove sulfuric acid aerosols from the flue gas. The removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosols in the WFGD system with double scrubbers ranged from 50% to 65%, which was higher than that with a single scrubber, ranging from 30% to 40%. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of WESP on the sulfuric acid aerosols was from 47.9% to 52.4%. With increased concentrations of SO3 and particles in the flue gas, the removal efficiencies of the WFGD and the WESP on the sulfuric acid aerosols were increased.

  1. Continuous measurements of Arctic boundary layer aerosol physical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Lihavainen, H.; Laurila, T. J.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Reshetnikov, A.; Ivakhov, V.; Uttal, T.; Makshtas, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic and northern boreal regions of Eurasia are experiencing rapid environmental changes due to pressures by human activities. The largest anthropogenic climate forcings are due to aerosol particles and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Arctic environment is highly sensitive to changes in aerosol concentrations or composition, largely due to the high surface reflectance for the most part of the year. Concentrations of aerosols in winter and spring Arctic are affected by 'Arctic Haze', a phenomenon suggested to arise from the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes and further strengthened by the strong stratification of the Arctic wintertime atmosphere. Sources and transport patterns of aerosols into the Arctic are, however, not fully understood. In order to monitor the changes within the Arctic region, as well as to understand the sources and feedback mechanisms, direct measurements of aerosols within the Arctic are needed. So far, direct year-round observations have been inadequate especially within the Russian side of the Arctic. This is the reason why a new climate observatory was founded on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, in Tiksi, Russia. Tiksi meteorological observatory in northern Siberia (71_360N; 128_530E) has been operating since 1930s. Recently, it was upgraded and joint in the network of the IASOA, in the framework of the International Polar Year Activity project. The project is run in collaboration between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Roshydromet (AARI and MGO units), government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The research activities of FMI in Tiksi include e.g. continuous long-term measurements of aerosol particle physical and optical properties. Measurements were initiated in summer 2010 and further extended in summer 2013. Together with the FMI measurements in Pallas GAW station in northern Finland since 1999

  2. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.-J.; Zhu, C.-S.; Tie, X.-X.; Geng, F.-H.; Xu, H.-M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Wang, G.-H.; Han, Y.-M.; Ho, K.-F.

    2013-01-01

    An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP (total suspended particles) from Pudong (China) was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai (Megacities Impact on Regional and Global Environment) experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and stable carbon isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = -24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -25.1 ± 0.6‰) indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter), with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%; other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  3. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  4. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m-3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (<20 μg m-3), since the air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (<30 nm) at this stage, which can be explained by the new particle formation. In the succeeding days, both the particle mass and size continuously increased. The PM2.5concentration increased rapidly by >60 μg day-1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm-3, which is considered as external mixed organic particles or aged

  5. On the Physics of Fizziness: How liquid properties control bursting bubble aerosol production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Josserand, Christophe; Seon, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Either in a champagne glass or at the oceanic scales, the tiny capillary bubbles rising at the surface burst in ejecting myriads of droplets. Focusing on the ejected droplets produced by a single bubble, we investigate experimentally how liquid properties and bubble size affect their characteristics: number, ejection velocities, sizes and ejection heights. These results allow us to finely tune the bursting bubble aerosol production. In the context of champagne industry, aerosols play a major role by spreading wine aroma above the glass. We demonstrate that this champagne fizz can be enhanced by selecting the wine viscosity and the bubble size, thanks to specially designed glass.

  6. Modelling multi-component aerosol transport problems by the efficient splitting characteristic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong; Fu, Kai; Wang, Wenqia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a splitting characteristic method is developed for solving general multi-component aerosol transports in atmosphere, which can efficiently compute the aerosol transports by using large time step sizes. The proposed characteristic finite difference method (C-FDM) can solve the multi-component aerosol distributions in high dimensional domains over large ranges of concentrations and for different aerosol types. The C-FDM is first tested to compute the moving of a Gaussian concentration hump. Comparing with the Runge-Kutta method (RKM), our C-FDM can use very large time step sizes. Using Δt = 0.1, the accuracy of our C-FDM is 10-4, but the RKM only gets the accuracy of 10-2 using a small Δt = 0.01 and the accuracy of 10-3 even using a much smaller Δt = 0.002. A simulation of sulfate transport in a varying wind field is then carried out by the splitting C-FDM, where the sulfate pollution is numerically showed expanding along the wind direction and the effects of the different time step sizes and different wind speeds are analyzed. Further, a realistic multi-component aerosol transport over an area in northeastern United States is studied. Concentrations of PM2.5 sulfate, ammonium, nitrate are high in the urban area, and low in the marine area, while sea salts of sodium and chloride mainly exist in the marine area. The normalized mean bias and the normalized mean error of the predicted PM2.5 concentrations are -6.5% and 24.1% compared to the observed data measured at monitor stations. The time series of numerical aerosol concentration distribution show that the strong winds can move the aerosol concentration peaks horizontally for a long distance, such as from the urban area to the rural area and from the marine area to the urban and rural area. Moreover, we also show the numerical time duration patterns of the aerosol concentration distributions due to the affections of the turbulence and the deposition removal. The developed splitting C-FDM algorithm

  7. Vegetation fires, absorbing aerosols and smoke plume characteristics in diverse biomass burning regions of Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Vadrevu, Krishna; Lasko, Kristofer; Giglio, Louis; Justice, Chris

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we explored the relationships between the satellite-retrieved fire counts (FC), fire radiative power (FRP) and aerosol indices using multi-satellite datasets at a daily time-step covering ten different biomass burning regions in Asia. We first assessed the variations in MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depths (AOD’s) in agriculture, forests, plantation and peat land burning regions and then used MODIS FC and FRP (hereafter FC/FRP) to explain the variations in AOD characteristics. Results suggest that tropical broadleaf forests in Laos burn more intensively than the other vegetation fires. FC/FRP-AOD correlations in different agricultural residue burning regions did not exceed 20% whereas in forest regions they reached 40%. To specifically account for absorbing aerosols, we used Ozone Monitoring Instrument-derived aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and UV aerosol index (UVAI). Results suggest relatively high AAOD and UVAI values in forest fires compared with peat and agriculture fires. Further, FC/FRP could explain a maximum of 29% and 53% of AAOD variations, whereas FC/FRP could explain at most 33% and 51% of the variation in agricultural and forest biomass burning regions, respectively. Relatively, UVAI was found to be a better indicator than AOD and AAOD in both agriculture and forest biomass burning plumes. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations data showed vertically elevated aerosol profiles greater than 3.2-5.3 km altitude in the forest fire plumes compared to 2.2-3.9 km and less than 1 km in agriculture and peat-land fires, respectively. We infer the need to assimilate smoke plume height information for effective characterization of pollutants from different sources.

  8. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode dominated by organics. Particulate NH4NO3 and (NH4)2SO4 appear to be NH3-limited in regimes I and II, but a significant excess of particulate NH4+ in the hot, dry regime III suggests less SO42- and the presence of either organic amines or NH4+-associated organic acids. C-ToF-AMS data were analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which resolved three factors, corresponding to a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), semivolatile OOA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). HOA appears to be a periodic plume source, while SV-OOA exhibits a strong diurnal pattern correlating with ozone. Peaks in SV-OOA concentration correspond to peaks in DMA number concentration and the appearance of a fine organic mode. LV-OOA appears to be an aged accumulation mode constituent that may be associated with aqueous-phase processing, correlating strongly with sulfate and representing the dominant background organic component. Periods characterized by high SV-OOA and LV-OOA were analyzed by filter analysis, revealing a complex mixture of species during periods dominated by SV-OOA and LV-OOA, with LV-OOA periods characterized by shorter-chain dicarboxylic acids (higher O:C ratio), as well as appreciable amounts of nitrate- and sulfate-substituted organics. Phthalic acid was ubiquitous in filter samples, suggesting that PAH photochemistry may be an important SOA pathway in Los Angeles. Aerosol composition was related to water uptake characteristics, and it is concluded that hygroscopicity is largely controlled by organic mass fraction (OMF). The hygroscopicity parameter κ averaged 0.31 ± 0.08, approaching 0.5 at low OMF and 0.1 at high OMF, with increasing OMF suppressing hygroscopic growth and increasing critical dry diameter for CCN activation (Dd). An experiment-averaged κorg of 0.14 was calculated, indicating that the highly-oxidized organic fraction of aerosol in Los Angeles is appreciably

  9. Explicit Simulation of Aerosol Physics in a Cloud-Resolving Model: Aerosol Transport and Processing in the Free Troposphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, Annica M. L.; Wang, Chien; Ström, Johan; Krejci, Radovan

    2006-02-01

    Large concentrations of small aerosols have been previously observed in the vicinity of anvils of convective clouds. A 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) including an explicit size-resolving aerosol module has been used to examine the origin of these aerosols. Five different types of aerosols are considered: nucleation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 0 d 5.84 nm), Aitken mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 5.84 nm d 31.0 nm), accumulation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by d 31.0 nm), mixed aerosols, and black carbon aerosols.The model results suggest that approximately 10% of the initial boundary layer number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols and black carbon aerosols are present at the top of the convective cloud as the cloud reaches its decaying state. The simulated average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols in the cloud anvil (1.6 × 104 cm-3) is in the same order of magnitude as observations. Thus, the model results strongly suggest that vertical convective transport, particularly during the active period of the convection, is responsible for a major part of the appearance of high concentrations of small aerosols (corresponding to the Aitken mode in the model) observed in the vicinity of cloud anvils.There is some formation of new aerosols within the cloud, but the formation is small. Nucleation mode aerosols are also efficiently scavenged through impaction scavenging by precipitation. Accumulation mode and mixed mode aerosols are efficiently scavenged through nucleation scavenging and their concentrations in the cloud anvil are either very low (mixed mode) or practically zero (accumulation mode).In addition to the 3D CRM, a box model, including important features of the aerosol module of the 3D model, has been used to study the formation of new aerosols after the cloud has evaporated. The possibility of these aerosols to grow to suitable cloud condensation or ice nuclei size is also examined. Concentrations of nucleation mode aerosols

  10. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  11. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties ofBiomass Burn Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Yury; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Arnott, W.P.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, M.K.

    2008-01-29

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo ({omega}) and Angstrom absorption coefficients ({alpha}{sub ap}) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp{sup 2} hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured {omega} (0.4-1.0 at 405 nm) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0-3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp{sup 2} hybridization >80% had values of {omega} (<0.5) and {alpha}{sub ap} ({approx}1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher {omega} (>0.8) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  12. Formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high-temperature environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Du, Shan-Wen; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Jheng-Syun

    2008-05-01

    The formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high temperatures are studied experimentally. By conducting a drop-tube furnace, fuel pyrolysis processes in industrial furnaces are simulated in which three different reaction temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400 degrees C are considered. Experimental observations indicate that when the reaction temperature is 1000 degrees C, submicron particles are produced, whereas the particle size is dominated by nanoscale for the temperature of 1400 degrees C. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerosol particles stemming from the pyrolysis temperature of 1000 degrees C reveals that the thermal behavior of the aerosol is characterized by a three-stage reaction with increasing heating temperature: (1) a volatile-reaction stage, (2) a weak-reaction stage, and (3) a soot-reaction stage. However, with the pyrolysis temperature of 1400 degrees C, the volatile- and weak-reaction stages almost merge together and evolve into a chemical-frozen stage. The submicron particles (i.e., 1000 degrees C) are mainly composed of volatiles, tar, and soot, with the main component of the nanoscale particles (i.e., 1400 degrees C) being soot. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the aerosols are also analyzed. It is found that the PAH content in generated aerosols decreases dramatically as the pyrolysis temperature increases.

  13. Aerosol delivery of amphotericin B desoxycholate (Fungizone) and liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome): aerosol characteristics and in-vivo amphotericin B deposition in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruijgrok, E J; Vulto, A G; Van Etten, E W

    2000-06-01

    In the treatment or prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, it may be attractive to administer the antifungal agent amphotericin directly to the pulmonary route via aerosol inhalation. In this study, we describe the aerosol characteristics of aerosolized nonliposomal amphotericin B (Fungizone) and liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), and the in-vivo aerosol deposition. Aerosols were generated with a Collison nebulizer. Aerosol amphotericin concentrations and mass median diameters were measured. In-vivo pulmonary deposition was evaluated by measuring amphotericin concentrations in lungs of treated rats. Whole body aerosol deposition was determined by measuring radioactivity in tissues of rats after treatment with radiolabelled liposomes. For Fungizone and AmBisome, aerosol amphotericin concentrations were 24.5+/-4.9 and 23.8+/-3.0 microg L(-1), respectively. The values for the median mass diameter were 1.38 and 2.26 microm for Fungizone and 2.43 and 1.97 microm for AmBisome. Amphotericin concentrations in lungs after 60-min nebulization of Fungizone or AmBisome were 24.2+/-6.4 and 21.7+/-2.6 microg g(-1), respectively. After nebulization of radiolabelled liposomes, no radioactivity was retrieved from tissues other than the lungs or the gastrointestinal tract. Nebulization of either Fungizone or AmBisome leads to respirable aerosols and results in a substantial lung tissue concentration of amphotericin and low systemic exposure of amphotericin B. Aerosol administration of either Fungizone or AmBisome may be an attractive approach to prevent or treat pulmonary aspergillosis.

  14. In situ observations of aerosol physical and optical properties in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Hyvarinen, A.; Hooda, R. K.; Raatikainen, T. E.; Sharma, V.; Komppula, M.

    2012-12-01

    The southern Asia, including India, is exposed to substantial quantities of particulate air pollution originating mainly from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Besides serious adverse health effects, these aerosols cause a large reduction of solar radiation at the surface accompanied by a substantial atmospheric heating, which is expected to have significant influences on the air temperature, crop yields, livestock and water resources over the southern Asia. The various influences by aerosols in this region depend crucially on the development of aerosol emissions from household, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sectors. The main purpose of this study is to investigate several measured aerosol optical and physical properties. We take advantage of observations from two measurement stations which have been established by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and The Energy and Resources Institute. Another station is on the foothills of Himalayas, in Mukteshwar, about 350 km east of New Delhi at elevation about 2 km ASL. This site is considered as a rural background site. Measurements of aerosol size distribution (7-500 nm), PM10, PM2.5, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and weather parameters have been conducted since 2006. Another station is located at the outskirts of New Delhi, in Gual Pahari, about 35 km south of city centre. It is considered as an urban background site. Measurements of aerosol size distribution (7 nm- 10 μm), PM10, PM2.5, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, aerosol optical depth, aerosol vertical distribution (LIDAR), aerosol filter sampling for chemical characterization and weather parameters were conducted between 2008 and 2010. On the overall average PM10 and PM2.5 values were about 3-4 times higher in Gual Pahari than in Mukteshwar as expected, 216 and 126 μg m^-3, respectively. However, difference depended much on the season, so that during winter time PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were about

  15. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND HEALTH EFFECTS OF AEROSOLS FROM COLLAPSED BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne pollutants can rise to extreme levels when large buildings fall down. The terrorist attack on New York's World Trade Center (WTC) towers caused the release of an enormous quantity of pulverized building materials and combustion products into the local environment. Partic...

  16. Influence of formulation and preparation process on ambroxol hydrochloride dry powder inhalation characteristics and aerosolization properties.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yachao; Yu, Chaoqun; Meng, Kangkang; Tang, Xing

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of formulation and preparation process on ambroxol hydrochloride (AH) dry powder inhalation (DPI) characteristics and aerosolization properties. Spray-dried samples of AH, AH/leucine, and AH/leucine/mannitol were prepared from their corresponding water solutions under the same conditions to study the influence of the composition, and the AH/leucine/mannitol (2.5/0.5/1 by weight) formulation was used for investigation of the effect of the preparation process. Following spray-drying, the resulting powders were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, tapped density, and angle of repose measurements, and the aerosolization performance was determined using a twin-stage liquid impinger. AH/leucine/mannitol (2.5/0.5/1 by weight) obtained by cospray-drying improved the AH aerosolization properties. The AH/leucine/mannitol (2.5/0.5/1 by weight) preparation exhibited the following properties: 62.34% yield, 0.34 g/cm(3) tap density, 2.71 microm d(ae), 33.45 degrees angle of repose, and 30.93% respirable fraction. The influence of the preparation process on DPI characteristics and aerosolization properties was relatively small, but the influence of the composition was relatively large. Optimization of DPI can be achieved by selecting the most appropriate formulation and preparation process.

  17. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Neely, Ryan R; Martinsson, Bengt G; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations. Key Points The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer is composed of sulfate, primary organics, and secondary organics The North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer is mostly composed of sulfate and secondary organics Aerosol Optical Depth of Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer increases by 0.002 from 2000 to 2010 PMID:26709320

  18. Heterogeneity in pre-monsoon aerosol characteristics over the Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2013-10-01

    Heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics was studied at five different locations over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) region during the pre-monsoon period (April-June 2011) using concurrent measurements from sun/sky radiometer, which is hypothesized to affect the Indian monsoon circulation and also the global climate system. Based on the measured aerosol products, distribution of aerosols and the associated optical properties were examined over the entire region. The pre-monsoon mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to be maximum at Lahore (0.78) and Kanpur (0.68); however, a minimum AOD (∼0.6) was observed at Karachi, Jaipur and Gandhi College, with relatively high variability at Karachi and low at Gandhi College. On the other hand, a significant gradient in Angstrom exponent (AE) from Karachi (0.30) in the west to Gandhi College (0.98) in the east IGB region suggests relative dominance of coarse particles over the western part and fine particles at the eastern part of the IGB. Results are confirmed with the aerosol size distribution and the air mass back-trajectory analysis at all the stations. The corresponding pre-monsoon mean single scattering albedo (SSA) shows relatively higher value at Karachi (0.94), suggests relative dominance of scattering type particles. On the other hand, lower SSA, ranging from 0.85 to 0.92, was observed at the other stations, with the lowest value at Gandhi College (0.85), which suggests absorbing aerosol distributions over the region.

  19. Spectroscopic characteristics and organic carbon contents in the aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, H. J.; Kasaba, T.

    2015-12-01

    Organics in the atmospheric aerosols occupy 20 to 70% of the total mass. Since the proportion of organics is so large that it's important to understand their detailed characteristics. Polymeric compounds called HUmic-Like Substance (HULIS) are known to be present in the atmospheric aerosols. Biomass burning can be a source of HULIS. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at Cape Hedo, a northern tip of Okinawa Island, and we characterized overall features of the organics collected in different seasons. In Okinawa, continental air mass prevails in spring, fall and winter, while maritime air mass from Pacific Ocean prevails in summer. Thus, it is relatively straightforward to identify sources of organics in different seasons. We measured total organic carbon (TOC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) concentrations, and absorbance and fluorescence intensity for the aerosol samples collected during Nov 2012 and July 2014 (n=90). As a result, TOC and WSOC showed almost the same trend, higher concentrations when continental air mass prevailed in fall and winter, while lower concentrations in summer. Percentages of WSOC in TOC accounted for 33-44%. Absorption efficiency, absorbance per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, of the samples showed higher values in winter and fall, and lower values in summer. Fluorescence efficiency, normalized fluorescence with quinine sulfate per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, were also different, it is likely that different types of organics were present in the aerosols from different seasons. We are also planning to measure HULIS in the aerosols and will be discussed a link between their contribution and trans-boundary air pollution in Asia.

  20. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Andrews, Elisabeth; Earle, Michael; MacDonald, A. M.; Liu, Peter S.K.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2014-03-06

    Airborne observations from four flights during the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) are used to examine some cloud-free optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosol particles in the springtime Arctic troposphere. The number concentrations of particles larger than 0.12 μm (Na>120), important for light extinction and cloud droplet formation, ranged from 15 to 2260 cm-3, with the higher Na>120 cases dominated by measurements from two flights of long-range transported biomass burning (BB) aerosols. The two other flights examined here document a relatively clean aerosol and an Arctic Haze aerosol impacted by larger particles largely composed of dust. For observations from the cleaner case and the BB cases, the particle light scattering coefficients at low relative humidity (RH<20%) increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120, driven mostly by an increase in mean sizes of particles with increasing Na>120 (BB cases). For those three cases, particle light absorption coefficients also increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120 and linearly with increasing submicron particle volume concentration. In addition to black carbon, brown carbon was estimated to have increased light absorption coefficients by 27% (450 nm wavelength) and 14% (550 nm) in the BB cases. For the case with strong dust influence, the absorption relative to submicron particle volume was small compared with the other cases. There was a slight gradient of Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) mean volume diameter (MVD) towards smaller sizes with increasing height, which suggests more scavenging of the more elevated particles, consistent with a typically longer lifetime of particles higher in the atmosphere. However, in approximately 10% of the cases, the MVD increased (>0.4 μm) with increasing altitude, suggesting transport of larger fine particle mass (possibly coarse particle mass) at high levels over the Arctic. This may be because of transport of

  1. Fog-induced variations in aerosol optical and physical properties over the Indo-Gangetic Basin and impact to aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Jayaraman, A.; Misra, A.

    2008-06-01

    A detailed study on the changes in aerosol physical and optical properties during fog events were made in December 2004 at Hissar (29.13° N, 75.70° E), a city located in the Indo-Gangetic basin. The visible aerosol optical depth was relatively low (0.3) during the initial days, which, however, increased (0.86) as the month progressed. The increasing aerosol amount, the decreasing surface temperature and a higher relative humidity condition were found favoring the formation of fog. The fog event is also found to alter the aerosol size distribution. An increase in the number concentration of the nucleation mode (radius<0.1 μm) particles, along with a decrease in the mode radius showed the formation of freshly nucleated aerosols. In the case of accumulation mode (0.1 μmaerosol optical depth spectra are model fitted to infer the aerosol components which are further used to compute the aerosol radiative forcing. The top of the atmosphere forcing is found to increase during foggy days due to large backscattering of radiation back to space. It is also shown that during foggy days, as the day progresses the RH value decreases, which reduces the forcing value while the increasing solar elevation increases the forcing value. Thus the fog event which prolongs longer into the daytime has a stronger effect on the diurnally averaged aerosol radiative forcing than those events which are confined only to the early morning hours.

  2. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  3. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Effective Physics Teacher Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korur, Fikret; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: What do teachers and students in Turkey perceive as the common characteristics of effective physics teachers? Purpose of Study: The first aim was to investigate the common characteristics of effective physics teachers by asking students and teachers about the effects of teacher characteristics on student physics achievement and…

  4. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  5. Comparing Organic Aerosol Composition from Marine Biogenic Sources to Seawater and to Physical Sea Spray Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Sanchez, K.; Massoli, P.; Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2015-12-01

    In much of the marine atmosphere, organic components in aerosol particles have many sources other than sea spray that contribute organic constituents. For this reason, physical sea spray models provide an important technique for studying the organic composition of particles from marine biogenic sources. The organic composition of particles produced by two different physical sea spray models were measured in three open ocean seawater types: (i) Coastal California in the northeastern Pacific, which is influenced by wind-driven, large-scale upwelling leading to productive or eutrophic (nutrient-rich) seawater and high chl-a concentrations, (ii) George's Bank in the northwestern Atlantic, which is also influenced by nutrient upwelling and eutrophic seawater with phytoplankton productivity and high chl-a concentrations, and (iii) the Sargasso Sea in the subtropical western Atlantic, which is oligotrophic and nutrient-limited, reflected in low phytoplankton productivity and low chl-a concentrations. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides information about the functional group composition that represents the marine organic fraction more completely than is possible with techniques that measure non-refractory mass (vaporizable at 650°C). After separating biogenic marine particles from those from other sources, the measured compositions of atmospheric marine aerosol particles from three ocean regions is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. The organic composition of atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol particles is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles from bubbled seawater. Variability in productive and non-productive seawater may be caused by the presence of surfactants that can stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components without substantial changes in overall group composition

  6. Physicochemical and Toxicological Characteristics of Semi-volatile Components of Atmospheric Aerosols in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V.; Pakbin, P.; Cheung, K. L.; Cho, A. K.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Kleinman, M. T.; Sioutas, C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent toxicological studies have confirmed the oxidative properties of atmospheric aerosols and their capability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems (Chen and Lippmann, 2009). While the links between aerosol toxicity and refractory transition metals present in ambient particulate matter (PM) have been documented, there are limited studies investigating the oxidative characteristics of semi-volatile species. The goal of present study is to examine the contribution of semi-volatile compounds in the oxidative potential of atmospheric aerosols. Concentrated ambient and thermodenuded quasi-ultrafine particles (<180 nm) were collected using the versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES) at an urban site near downtown Los Angeles. A thermodenuder (TD) was used to selectively remove the semi-volatile components of these aerosols over the temperature range of 50-200 oC. The oxidative potential of PM was measured by means of the DTT (dithiothreitol) assay. Detailed chemical analyses of PM samples, including organic and elemental carbon, water soluble elements, inorganic ions and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were conducted to quantify the volatility profiles of different PM species, and also to investigate their effect on the measured oxidative potential. Refractory constituents, such as metals and elemental carbon, were marginally affected by heating, while labile species such as organic carbon and PAHs showed progressive loss in concentration with increase in TD temperature. The DTT-measured oxidative potential of PM was significantly decreased as the aerosols were heated and their semi-volatile components were progressively removed (42 %, 47 % and 66 % decrease in DTT activity at 50, 100 and 200 oC, respectively). Regression analysis performed between chemical constituents and DTT activity showed that the oxidative potential was strongly correlated with organic carbon and PAHs (R≥0.80; p≤0.05). Thus, semi

  7. Remote continental aerosol characteristics in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ezra J. T.

    The Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming enjoy some of the cleanest air in the United States, with few local sources of particulate matter or its precursors apart from fire emissions, windblown dust, and biogenic emissions. However, anthropogenic influences are also present with sources as diverse as the populated Front Range, large isolated power plants, agricultural emissions, and more recently emissions from increased oil and gas exploration and production. While long-term data exist on the bulk composition of background fine particulate matter at remote sites in the region, few long-term observations exist of aerosol size distributions, number concentrations and size resolved composition, although these characteristics are closely tied to important water resource issues through the potential aerosol impacts on clouds and precipitation. Recent modeling work suggests sensitivity of precipitation-producing systems to the availability of aerosols capable of serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN); however, model inputs for these aerosols are not well constrained due to the scarcity of data. In this work I present aerosol number and volume concentrations, size distributions, chemical composition and hygroscopicity measurements from long-term field campaigns. I also explore the volatility of organic material from biomass burning and the potential impacts on aerosol loading. Relevant aerosol observations were obtained in several long-term field studies: the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur study (RoMANS, Colorado), the Grand Tetons Reactive Nitrogen Deposition Study (GrandTReNDS, Wyoming) and as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen project (BEACHON, Colorado). Average number concentrations (0.04 < Dp < 20 mum) measured during the field studies ranged between 1000 -- 2000 cm-3 during the summer months and decreased to 200 -- 500 cm-3 during the winter. These seasonal changes in aerosol

  8. Concentration characteristics of bromine and iodine in aerosols in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunchuan; Sun, Mingxing; Wu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongdi; Guo, Yaqi; Wu, Ji

    2010-11-01

    Aerosol samples (TSP and PM 10) during each season were collected at a national monitoring point in Shanghai in 2008. Halogens (Br, I) were determined in samples along with sodium (Na) by ICP-MS and ICP-OES after microwave digestion. In this report we focused on the concentration characteristics of halogen elements Br and I and their seasonal distributions. The mean annual concentrations of total Br and I were 24 ng m -3 and 12 ng m -3 for TSP, 21 ng m -3 and 9 ng m -3 for PM 10, respectively. Concentrations of Br and I in TSP and PM 10 were lowest in summer but an increase occurred in autumn and winter. Water-soluble Br and I accounted for about 32% of the total Br and I in aerosols, and about 68% of Br and I was non soluble which may be non-soluble organic species. These non-soluble organic species are present in aerosols in the possible binding forms as mineral dust, natural organic matter, and adsorption to black carbon or mineral material such as iron oxides. Soluble Br and I in PM 10 extracted by a dilute acid solution (HNO 3 + H 2SO 4) increased by 22% and 18%, respectively, compared with water-soluble Br and I. A positive correlation with Na and sea water enrichment factors for Br and I indicated that bromine and iodine in aerosols originated mostly from marine sources in Shanghai.

  9. Pesticide aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of an agricultural vehicle cab during application.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Fismes, Joelle; Subra, Isabelle; Blachère, Veronique; Protois, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Pesticide spraying for crop protection leads to the formation of a mist of droplets, part of which is dispersed into the atmosphere. The characteristics of this aerosol, namely its particle size distribution and concentration, were measured during five campaigns involving cereal crop growing, wine grape culture, and orcharding. The measurement method incorporated a tracer product (fluorescein) with the treatment product; the pesticide aerosol concentration was then deduced from the tracer concentration. This method was validated by comparing the pesticide concentration determined by tracing with the concentration determined by direct measurement of the active substance of the pesticide. Concentration was measured using sampling filters, and particle size distribution was measured using cascade impactors. Instruments were mounted on an agricultural vehicle cab to optimize aerosol characterization, and then the cab's confinement efficiency was determined. Aerosols analyzed were fine, featuring mass median diameters between 4 microm and 15 microm; they are therefore highly dispersive. Their concentration is sufficiently high to justify operator protection by an efficient, filtered-air, pressurized cab, especially in wine grape culture and orcharding, which are the sectors where the highest pesticide transfers have been observed.

  10. Physical characteristics of cinnamon oil microcapsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanto, R. F.; Khasanah, L. U.; Kawiji; Atmaka, W.; Manuhara, G. J.; Utami, R.

    2016-02-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii) oil products can be obtained from the bark by steam distillation. Essential oils are susceptible to high temperatures, oxidation, UV light, and humidity. Microencapsulation may change essential oils into powder, protect the sensitive core material and reduce the amount of flavor which lost during storage. In the microencapsulation, one of the important factors is the type of coating agent. The objective of this work was to characterize the cinnamon oil microcapsule. Ratio variations of coating agent maltodextrin and gum arabic were (1:0); (0:1); (1:1); (2:3). Physical characteristics such as water content, solubility, bulk density, surface oil, and microencapsulation efficiency of samples were investigated. Results showed that the ratio variations of the coating agent significantly affected the water content, bulk density, surface oil and microencapsulation efficiency but significantly affected the water solubility. Characteristics of selected microcapsule were 6.13% water content; 96.33% solubility; 0.46 g/cm3 bulk density; 2.68% surface oil; 70.68% microencapsulation efficiency and microstructures were rather good.

  11. Physical Characteristics Underpinning Repetitive Lunging in Fencing.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anthony N; Marshall, Geoff; Phillips, James; Noto, Angelo; Buttigieg, Conor; Chavda, Shyam; Downing, William; Atlay, Nathan; Dimitriou, Lygeri; Kilduff, Laim

    2016-11-01

    Turner, AN, Marshall, G, Phillips, J, Noto, A, Buttigieg, C, Chavda, S, Downing, W, Atlay, N, Dimitriou, L, and Kilduff, L. Physical characteristics underpinning repetitive lunging in fencing. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3134-3139, 2016-Given the repetitive demand to execute lunging and changes in direction within fencing, the ability to sustain these at maximal capacity is fundamental to performance. The aim of this study was threefold. First, to provide normative values for this variable referred to as repeat lunge ability (RLA) and second to identify the physical characteristics that underpin it. Third, was to establish if a cause and effect relationship existed by training the associated characteristics. Assessment of lower-body power, reactive strength, speed, change of direction speed (CODS), and a sport-specific RLA were conducted on senior and junior elite male fencers (n = 36). Fencers were on average (±SD) 18.9 ± 3.2 years of age, 174.35 ± 10.42 cm tall, 70.67 ± 7.35 kg in mass, and 8.5 ± 4.2 years fencing experience. The RLA test had average work times of 16.03 ± 1.40 seconds and demonstrated "large" to "very large" associations with all tested variables, but in particular CODS (r = 0.70) and standing broad jump (SBJ; r = -0.68). Through linear regression analysis, these also provided a 2-predictor model accounting for 61% of the common variance associated with RLA. A cause and effect relationship with SBJ and CODS was confirmed by the training group, where RLA performance in these fencers improved from 15.80 ± 1.07 to 14.90 ± 0.86 seconds, with the magnitude of change reported as "moderate" (effect size (ES) = 0.93). Concurrent improvements were also noted in both SBJ (216.86 ± 17.15 vs. 221.71 ± 17.59 cm) and CODS (4.44 ± 0.29 vs. 4.31 ± 0.09 seconds) and while differences were only significant in SBJ, magnitudes of change were classed as "small" (ES = 0.28) and "moderate" (ES = 0.61), respectively. In conclusion, to improve RLA strength

  12. Summertime characteristics of aerosol composition at Cheju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Baik, Nam Jun; Kim, Jin Young; Shim, Shang-Gyoo; Kang, Chang-Hee

    To understand the characteristics of air quality during summer in Northeastern Asia, an intensive field study had been carried out at Cheju Island, Korea during the period of 20 July to 10 August 1994. Total suspended particles and PM 2.5 particles were collected and their mass and ion concentrations were analyzed. Along with PM 2.5, gaseous species were collected on impregnated filters. Also, another low volume sampler collected carbonaceous species analysis. The sampling period could be classified into two distinctive periods, with a highly polluted period between 20 July and 1 August and an unpolluted period between 2 and 10 August. During the polluted period, the mean non sea-salt sulfate concentrations in TSP and PM 2.5 were 16.6 and 13.4 μg m -3, respectively. Backward trajectory analysis showed that air parcels arriving at the sampling site during the former period were mainly from Korea and Japan while air parcels during the latter period were from the North Pacific Ocean. It was suggested that the air pollutant levels during the latter period could be considered as marine background concentrations in the region during summer.

  13. Contribution of long-range transported aerosols to aerosol optical and physical properties: 3-year measurements at Gosan, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, J.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Ogren, J. A.; Yoon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, more attentions have been paid to air quality in East Asia due to the enhanced loading of atmospheric pollutants related to rapid industrialization. Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO), Korea is regarded as an ideal site to study the transport of atmospheric pollutants because it is frequently influenced by various airmasses from China, Korea, Japan and Pacific Ocean. In order to understand aerosol optical and physical properties according to airmass transport routes, three-year (2012-2014) continuous measurements of aerosol scattering/absorption coefficient and number size distribution were analyzed, together with 48-hour backward trajectory calculations. The averaged aerosol absorption (σa) and scattering coefficient (σs) for airmasses transported from North China (NC; 36% of all trajectories) were 6.65 Mm-1 and 94.72 Mm-1 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively, which were similar to those for stagnant airmasses (ST; 22% of all trajectories; σa: 6.26 Mm-1, σs: 93.99 Mm-1). The highest values of σa (7.03 Mm-1) and σs (108.34 Mm-1) were observed when airmasses were traveled from South China (SC; 11% of all trajectories). σa and σs for airmasses from Korean Peninsula (KP; 7% of all trajectories) and Pacific Ocean (PO; 14% of all trajectories; in parenthesis) were 5.63 (2.76) Mm-1 and 73.63 (50.93) Mm-1, respectively. Compared to other airmasses, the higher values of Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) for ST (1.65) is thought to be the build-up of anthropogenic fine particulate pollutants. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.32 for NC airmass and 1.02 for SC airmass. Over the study period, 130 days of total 557 days were identified as new particle formation and growth event (NPF) from Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measurements by Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) approach. Especially, 55.4% (72 days) of total 130 NPF days were found when a cold and dry airmass comes from NC after passing the frontal

  14. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  15. Aerosol Characteristics during the CLAMS Experiment: in situ and Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J.; Remer, L.; Castanho, A.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R.; Kleidman, R.; Hobbs, P. V.; Plana-Fattori, A.; Yamasoe, M.; Redemann, J.

    2002-05-01

    Remote sensing measurements of aerosol properties were performed with MODIS on the Terra satellite, and with the MAS (MODIS Airborne Simulator) on the ER-2 aircraft during the CLAMS experiment. Remote sensing measurements were validated and complemented by in situ observations. MODIS measurements were operationally obtained over the dark ocean and were explored experimentally over the sun glint. During the experiment, MODIS results indicated episodes of long range transport of large aerosol particles over the CLAMS region. These particles were also identified in the in situ aerosol measurements and by aeronet size distributions. In situ aerosol measurements were performed aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 Research Aircraft, on the Cheasapeake Lighthouse (about 25km from the coast), and on Wallops Island. Spectral absorption measurements performed on Nuclepore filters showed relatively low absorption efficiencies (about 0.21+/-0.08m2/g at 0.55um and 0.052+/-0.023m2/g at 2.1um at the Wallops Island station) and a spectral dependence close to 1/lambda or stronger. The spectral absorption shows characteristics of small black carbon (BC) particles (spectral dependence around 1/lambda) and soil dust-like particles (stronger absorption in the blue). Electron Microscopy pictures show cluster aggregates typically composed by black carbon particles and medium to large dust-like particles. The elemental composition of the particles measured on the Nuclepore filters also indicated the presence of dust-like particles on certain days of the experiment. The average absorption efficiency found in the area was significantly lower (by about one order of magnitude) than the absorption efficiency of biomass burning particles or urban pollution from developing countries. The complementarities of remote sensing and in situ measurements in the interpretation of the aerosol over the region will be discussed and explored.

  16. The impact of marine aerosols on atmospheric characteristics over ocean surface in frontal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Hanna; Palamarchuk, Iuliia; Ruban, Igor; Ivanov, Sergiy

    2015-04-01

    Ocean-derived aerosols are particles produced from the ocean surface and remaining suspended in the atmosphere during a certain period of time. Aerosols act as climate forcers both directly (by scattering and absorbing solar radiation) and indirectly (by affecting cloud microphysics as cloud condensation nuclei). To evaluate the degree of marine aerosols impact on weather conditions the numerical experiments with the HARMONIE model were conducted with the model domain covering area over the North Atlantic. The results showed that marine aerosols have a significant impact on characteristics of the atmosphere (such as air temperature, specific humidity, precipitation, and vertical velocity) over the ocean surface. The most significant differences occur along the frontal zones with high gradients at all vertical levels in the atmosphere for all variables. Change in radiative fluxes leads to changes in temperature of the atmosphere. These anomalies appear as mesoscale cells of opposite signs alternating each other. It can be assumed that they are formed as a result of a chain of factors. Thus, the absorption and scattering of solar radiation in the upper troposphere during daytime, increasing of moisture content and subsequent increase in thermal inertia of the air, and enhanced greenhouse effect at nighttime are acting in different directions on formation of vertical structure and convection conditions. This leads to a strengthening/weakening of the updrafts and compensatory movements, and eventually to the changes in processes of precipitation formation. Thus, the simulation of weather conditions in frontal zones over the ocean requires considering the effect of the marine aerosols presence.

  17. Aircraft observations of the physical and radiative properties of biomass aerosol particles during SAFARI-2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, S. R.; Haywood, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    An initial analysis will be shown from the ~80 h of data collected between 2--18 September 2000 by the UK Met Office C-130 aircraft during the dry season campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000). The talk will concentrate on the physical and optical properties of the biomass aerosol. The evolution of the particle size spectrum and its optical properties at emission and after ageing will be shown. The vertical distribution of the biomass plume over the land and sea will be compared in view of the local meteorology. A generalised three log-normal model is shown to represent aged biomass aerosol over the sea areas, both in terms of the number and mass particle size spectra, but also derived optical properties (e.g. asymmetry factor, single scatter albedo (ω 0) and extinction coefficient) as calculated using Mie theory and appropriate refractive indices. ω 0 was determined independently using a particle soot absorption photometer (giving the absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 0.567 μ m) and a nephelometer (giving the scattering coefficients at 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65 μ m). Good agreement was found between the measurements and those obtained from the Mie calculations and observed size distributions. A typical value of ω 0 at 0.55 μ m for aged biomass aerosol was 0.90. The radiative properties of the biomass aerosol over both land and sea will be summarised. Stratocumulus cloud was present on some of the days over the sea and the surprising lack of interaction between the elevated biomass plume (containing significant levels of cloud condensation nuclei) and the cloud capping the marine boundary layer will be illustrated. Using the cloud-free and cloudy case studies we can begin to elucidate the levels of direct and indirect forcing of the biomass aerosol on a regional scale. >http://www.mrfnet.demon.co.uk/africa/SAFARI2000.htm

  18. Chemical and Physical Properties of Bulk Aerosols within Four Sectors Observed during TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Fuelberg, E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Kiley, C. M.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical aerosol data collected on the DC-8 during TRACE-P were grouped into four sectors based on back trajectories. The four sectors represent long-range transport from the west (WSW), regional circulation over the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (SE Asia), polluted transport from Northern Asia with substantial sea salt at low altitudes (NNW) and a substantial amount of dust (Channel). WSW has generally low mixing ratios at both middle and high altitudes, with the bulk of the aerosol mass due to non-sea-salt water-soluble inorganic species. Low altitude SE Asia also has low mean mixing ratios in general, with the majority of the aerosol mass comprised of non-sea-salts, however, soot is also relatively important m this region. "w had the highest mean sea salt mixing ratios, with the aerosol mass at low altitudes (a km) evenly divided between sea salts, mm-sea-salts, and dust. The highest mean mixing ratios of water-soluble ions and soot were observed at the lowest altitudes (a km) in the Channel sector. The bulk of the aerosol mass exported from Asia emanates h m Channel at both low and midaltitudes, due to the prevalence of dust compared to other sectors. Number densities show enhanced fine particles for Channel and NNW, while their volume distributions are enhanced due to sea salt and dust Low-altitude Channel exhibits the highest condensation nuclei ((34) number densities along with enhanced scattering coefficients, compared to the other sectors. At midaltitudes (2-7 km), low mean CN number densities coupled with a high proportion of nonvolatile particles (265%) observed in polluted sectors (Channel and NNW) are attributed to wet scavenging which removes hygroscopic CN particles. Low single scatter albedo m SE Asia reflects enhanced soot

  19. Correlation between meteorological conditions and aerosol characteristics at an East-Mediterranean coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, Mossad; Alfaro, Stephane C.

    2013-10-01

    Since May 2011 Microtops sun-photometer measurements aiming to determine the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its spectral dependence (Ångström exponent, α440/675) are performed routinely at the experimental station of the Port Said (Egypt) University (Lat.: 31.267°, Lon.: 32.26°, alt.: 21 masl). In parallel, an automated weather station is used to monitor the surface meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, temperature, pressure…). This work uses the first year of original data (971 point measurements) with the double objective of determining the 1) seasonal variability of the aerosol at a site of the Egyptian Mediterranean coast, and 2) the potential correlation linking the aerosol characteristics to the surface meteorological conditions. The 3-modal nature of the statistical distribution of the Ångström exponents measured during the year shows that 3 main types of aerosols can be distinguished. The most frequent observations (54% of all cases) correspond to fine particles associated with the largest (1.41 ± 0.23) α440/675 values. The probability of observing this fine aerosol increases in low wind conditions and when the air masses come either from the south-west, which is to say from the densely populated Nile delta, or from the north, which is to say from the more distant European pollution sources. This strongly suggests an anthropogenic origin for these fine particles. At the opposite side of the size-spectrum, coarse particles associated with the lowest mode of α440/675 (0.48 ± 0.22) predominate in 33% of the observations. The probability of observing them increasing in spring when the dry and strong (> 6 m/s) desert-winds become more frequent suggests that these coarse particles are desert dust released by the wind erosion of arid surfaces. These particles are also responsible for the largest individual and monthly averaged (AOD500 = 0.50, in April) optical depths measured at the experimental site. Finally, by

  20. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  1. Absorption characteristics of aerosols over the northwestern region of India: Distinct seasonal signatures of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Suresh Babu, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Manoj, M. R.; Chaubey, Jai Prakash

    2013-07-01

    Continuous measurements of aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations made over a period of 3 years from a semi-arid, near-coastal, remote and sparsely inhabited location along with satellite-based data of aerosol absorption index, optical depth and extinction profiles in western India are used to characterize the distinct nature of aerosols near the surface and in the free troposphere and their seasonality. Despite being far remote and sparsely inhabited, significant levels of BC are observed in the ambient during winter (1.45 ± 0.71 μg m-3) attributed to biomass burning aerosols, advected to the site from the north and west; while during summer the concentrations are far reduced (0.23 ± 0.11 μg m-3) and represent the apparent background concentrations. The spectral absorption coefficients suggest the BC during summer be mostly of fossil fuel combustions. The strong convective boundary layer dynamics produces significant diurnal variation during winter and modulates to a lesser extent the seasonal variation. Examination of aerosol (absorption) index from OMI data for the study period showed a seasonal pattern that is almost opposite to that seen at the surface; with high aerosol index in summer, showing a significant difference between the surface and columnar aerosol types in summer. MISR and MODIS-derived columnar AOD follow the OMI pattern. Analysis of the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and volume depolarization ratio (VDR), derived from CALIPSO data indicates the presence of strong dust layers with VDR ˜ 0.3 in the altitude region 4-6 km, contributing to the high aerosol index in the OMI data, while the surface measurements show absorptive properties representing fossil fuel BC aerosols.

  2. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  3. Changes in Antarctic stratospheric aerosol characteristics due to volcanic eruptions as monitored by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, V. K.; Anderson, John; Lin, N.-H.

    1995-08-01

    An estimated 20-30 megatons of SO2 and crustal material was injected into the stratosphere during June 12-16, 1991, by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo (15.1°N, 120.4°E). The impact on Antarctic aerosol characteristics is of utmost concern owing to the seasonality in the observed ozone depletion and climate implications. This study focuses on Antarctic stratospheric aerosol characteristics during three temporal periods: September 23-30, September 30 to October 13, and November 13-27, 1991, at latitudes poleward of 60°S for vertically averaged characteristics, and at latitudes poleward of 50°S for temporal and spatial characteristics. Stratospheric aerosol characteristics are inferred from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements using a modified randomized minimization search technique (RMST). Aerosol characteristics such as size distribution, number concentration, mass loading, surface area concentration, and radial characteristics are derived between 15 and 30 km for particles having radii between 0.1 and 0.8 μm. Results indicate that aerosol size distributions between 15 and 30 km are bimodal in several instances for all three time periods and can be fitted with the sum of two lognormal distributions. Larger concentrations are observed for particles of all sizes between 18 and 30 km during November 1991, signaling the arrival of the Mount Pinatubo plume. An order of magnitude increase in concentration is observed for particles with radii between 0.1 and 0.2 μm and between 0.7 and 0.8 μm. Vertical aerosol profiles show that the peak in aerosol concentration shifted to a higher altitude between 21 and 26 km as compared to the preplume peak between 15 and 18 km. Using the displacement as a function of time for a mass loading of 1.7 μg m-3 isopleth, we estimated meridional velocity ≈0.9 m s-1, zonal velocity ≈16 m s-1, and downward vertical velocity of 0.5 cm s-1 during September to mid-October, 1991, and 0.3 cm s-1 during mid to

  4. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: Properties overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds and fragments, refractory carbon, metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases and substituents [Hays et al., 2004]. Aerosol organic matter no...

  5. Spatial heterogeneity in near surface aerosol characteristics across the Brahmaputra valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Borgohain, Arup; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar; Kundu, Shyam Sundar; Sudhakar, S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    In order to examine the spatial variability of the aerosol characteristics across the Brahmaputra valley, a land campaign was conducted during late winter (February 3-March 2) 2011. Measurements of particulate matter (PM, PM10, PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were made onboard an interior redesigned vehicle. The length of the campaign trail stretched about 700 km, covering the longitude belt of 89.97°-95.55°E and latitude belt of 26.1°-27.6°N, comprising 13 measurement locations. The valley is divided into three sectors longitudinally: western sector (R1: 89.97°-91.75°E), middle sector (R2: 92.5°-94.01°E) and eastern sector (R3: 94.63°-95.55°E). Spatial heterogeneity in aerosol distribution has been observed with higher PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at the western and middle sectors compared to the eastern sector. The locations in the western sector are found to be rich in BC compared to the other two sectors and there is a gradual decrease in BC concentrations from west to east of the Brahmaputra valley. Two hotspots within the western and middle sectors with high PM and BC concentrations have been identified. The associated physico-optical parameters of PM reveal abundance of PM2.5 aerosols along the entire valley. High population density in the western and middle sectors, together with the contribution of remote aerosols, leads to higher anthropogenic aerosols over those regions. Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) slightly underestimates the measured PM10 and PM2.5 at the eastern sector while the model overestimates the measurements at a number of locations in the western sector. In general, BC is underestimated by the model. The variation of BC within the campaign trail has not been adequately captured by the model leading to higher variance in the western locations as compared to the middle and eastern locations.

  6. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  7. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  8. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, M.; Wang, H. B.; Chen, Y.; Yang, F. M.; Zhang, X. H.; Zou, Q.; Zhang, R. Q.; Ma, Y. L.; He, K. B.

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive measurement was carried out to analyze the heavy haze events in Suzhou in January 2013 when extremely severe haze pollution occurred in many cities in China especially in the East. Hourly concentrations of PM2.5, chemical composition (including water-soluble inorganic ions, OC, and EC), and gas-phase precursors were obtained via on-line monitoring system. Based on these data, detailed aerosol composition, light extinction and gas-phase precursors were analyzed to understand the characteristics of the haze events, moreover, the formation mechanism of nitrate and sulfate in PM2.5 and the regional sources deduced from trajectory and PSCF were discussed to explore the origin of the heavy aerosol pollution. The results showed that frequent haze events were occurred on January 2013 and the concentrations of PM2.5 often exceeded 150 μg m-3 during the haze occurrence, with a maximum concentration of 324 μg m-3 on 14 January 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions (high RH, and low rainfall, wind speed and atmospheric pressure), high concentration of secondary aerosol species (including SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and SOC) and precursors were observed during the haze events. Additionally, OM, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 were demonstrated to be the major contributors to the visibility impairment but the share differed from haze events. This study also found that the high concentration of sulfate might be explained by the heterogeneous reactions in the aqueous surface layer of pre-existing particles or in cloud processes while nitrate might be mainly formed through homogeneous gas-phase reactions. The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method manifested that aerosol pollutions in the studied areas were mainly affected by local activities and surrounding sources transported from nearby cities.

  9. Emissions and Characteristics of Ice Nucleating Particles Associated with Laboratory Generated Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, C. S.; Hill, T. C. J.; Beall, C.; Sultana, C. M.; Moore, K.; Cornwell, G.; Lee, C.; Al-Mashat, H.; Laskina, O.; Trueblood, J.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate emission rates and activity spectra of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) are required for proper representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in atmospheric modeling studies. However, few investigations have quantified or characterized oceanic INP emissions. In conjunction with the Center for Aerosol Impacts on the Climate and the Environment, we have directly measured changes in INP emissions and properties of INPs from nascent sea spray aerosol (SSA) through the evolution of phytoplankton blooms. Multiple offline and online instruments were used to monitor aerosol chemistry and size, and bulk water characteristics during two phytoplankton bloom experiments. Two methods were utilized to monitor the number concentrations of INPs from 0 to -34 °C: The online CSU continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and collections processed offline using the CSU ice spectrometer. Single particle analyses were performed on ice crystal residuals downstream of the CFDC, presumed to be INPs, via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman microspectroscopy. Preliminary results indicate that laboratory-generated nascent SSA corresponds to number concentrations of INPs that are generally consistent with open ocean regions, based on current knowledge. STEM analyses revealed that the sizes of ice crystal residuals that were associated with nascent SSA ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 μm. Raman microspectroscopy analysis of 1 μm sized residuals found a variety of INP identities, including long chain organics, diatom fragments and polysaccharides. Our data suggest that biological processes play a significant role in ocean INP emissions by generating the species and compounds that were identified during these studies.

  10. Aerosol Characteristics on the Alboran Sea, 9-18 October 1982

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    8217FALO NY AerosDi Characteristics on tne Aiboran Sea, 9—13 Q c t o d e r 19 S 2» (u) tractor rspc, 1/ bep ti’Z—/ cisp S-::-, u...Boundary Layer in the Gulf of Mexico ," Calspan Report, 64 pp. 11. Mack, E.J., R.J. Anderson, C.K. Akers, and T.A. Niziol, 1978: "Aerosol...COMMANDER & DIRECTOR ATTN: DELAS-AS-P U.S. ARMY ATMOS. SCI. LAB WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, NEW MEXICO 88002 USAFETAC/TS SCOTT AFB, IL 62225

  11. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  12. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission plume characteristics mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the greater Paris region in July 2009 and January/February 2010 within the EU FP7 MEGAPOLI project. The deployed instruments measured physical and chemical properties of sub-micron aerosol particles, gas phase constituents of relevance for urban air pollution studies and meteorological parameters. The emission plume was identified based on fresh pollutant (e.g. particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, CO2 and NOx) concentration changes in combination with wind direction data. The classification into megacity influenced and background air masses allowed a characterization of the emission plume during summer and winter environmental conditions. On average, a clear increase of fresh pollutant concentrations in plume compared to background air masses was found for both seasons. For example, an average increase of 190% (+8.8 ng m-3) in summer and of 130% (+18.1 ng m-3) in winter was found for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plume air masses. The aerosol particle size distribution in plume air masses was influenced by nucleation and growth due to coagulation and condensation in summer, while in winter only the second process seemed to be initiated by urban pollution. The observed distribution of fresh pollutants in the emission plume - its cross sectional Gaussian-like profile and the exponential decrease of pollutant concentrations with increasing distance to the megacity - are in agreement with model results. Differences between model and measurements were found for plume center location, plume width and axial plume extent. In general, dilution was identified as the dominant process determining the axial variations within the Paris emission plume. For in-depth analysis of transformation processes occurring in the advected plume, simultaneous measurements at a suburban measurement site and a stationary

  13. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission plume characteristics mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the greater Paris region in July 2009 and January-February 2010 within the EU FP7 MEGAPOLI project (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation). The deployed instruments measured physical and chemical properties of sub-micron aerosol particles, gas phase constituents of relevance for urban air pollution studies and meteorological parameters. The emission plume was identified based on fresh pollutant (e.g., particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, CO2 and NOx) concentration changes in combination with wind direction data. The classification into megacity influenced and background air masses allowed a characterization of the emission plume during summer and winter environmental conditions. On average, a clear increase of fresh pollutant concentrations in plume compared to background air masses was found for both seasons. For example, an average increase of 190% (+ 8.8 ng m-3) in summer and of 130% (+ 18.1 ng m-3) in winter was found for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plume air masses. The aerosol particle size distribution in plume air masses was influenced by nucleation and growth due to coagulation and condensation in summer, while in winter only the latter process (i.e., particle growth) seemed to be initiated by urban pollution. The observed distribution of fresh pollutants in the emission plume - its cross sectional Gaussian-like profile and the exponential decrease of pollutant concentrations with increasing distance to the megacity - are in agreement with model results. Differences between model and measurements were found for plume center location, plume width and axial plume extent. In general, dilution was identified as the dominant process determining the axial variations within the Paris

  14. Effects of crop residue burning on aerosol properties, plume characteristics, and long-range transport over northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kumar, S.; Sharma, D.; Singh, R. P.; Kharol, S. K.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, S.; Singh, Atinderpal; Singh, D.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol emissions from biomass burning are of specific interest over the globe due to their strong radiative impacts and climate implications. The present study examines the impact of paddy crop residue burning over northern India during the postmonsoon (October-November) season of 2012 on modification of aerosol properties, as well as the long-range transport of smoke plumes, altitude characteristics, and affected areas via the synergy of ground-based measurements and satellite observations. During this period, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images show a thick smoke/hazy aerosol layer below 2-2.5 km in the atmosphere covering nearly the whole Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). The air mass trajectories originating from the biomass-burning source region over Punjab at 500 m reveal a potential aerosol transport pathway along the Ganges valley from west to east, resulting in a strong aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradient. Sometimes, depending upon the wind direction and meteorological conditions, the plumes also influence central India, the Arabian Sea, and the Bay of Bengal, thus contributing to Asian pollution outflow. The increased number of fire counts (Terra and Aqua MODIS data) is associated with severe aerosol-laden atmospheres (AOD500 nm > 1.0) over six IGP locations, high values of Ångström exponent (>1.2), high particulate mass 2.5 (PM2.5) concentrations (>100-150 µgm-3), and enhanced Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index gradient (~2.5) and NO2 concentrations (~6 × 1015 mol/cm2), indicating the dominance of smoke aerosols from agricultural crop residue burning. The aerosol size distribution is shifted toward the fine-mode fraction, also exhibiting an increase in the radius of fine aerosols due to coagulation processes in a highly turbid environment. The spectral variation of the single-scattering albedo reveals enhanced dominance of moderately absorbing aerosols, while the aerosol properties, modification, and mixing atmospheric

  15. In situ physical and chemical characterisation of the Eyjafjallajökull aerosol plume in the free troposphere over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Decesari, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Chiari, M.; Calzolai, G.; Canepari, S.; Perrino, C.; Facchini, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous measurements of physical and chemical properties at the Mt. Cimone (Italy) GAW-WMO (Global Atmosphere Watch, World Meteorological Organization) Global Station (2165 m a.s.l.) have allowed the detection of the volcanic aerosol plume resulting from the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland) eruption of spring 2010. The event affected the Mt. Cimone site after a transport over a distance of more than 3000 km. Two main transport episodes were detected during the eruption period, showing a volcanic fingerprint discernible against the free tropospheric background conditions typical of the site, the first from April 19 to 21 and the second from 18 to 20 May 2010. This paper reports the modification of aerosol characteristics observed during the two episodes, both characterised by an abrupt increase in fine and, especially, coarse mode particle number. Analysis of major, minor and trace elements by different analytical techniques (ionic chromatography, particle induced X-ray emission-particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIXE-PIGE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) were performed on aerosols collected by ground-level discrete sampling. The resulting database allows the characterisation of aerosol chemical composition during the volcanic plume transport and in background conditions. During the passage of the volcanic plume, the fine fraction was dominated by sulphates, denoting the secondary origin of this mode, mainly resulting from in-plume oxidation of volcanic SO2. By contrast, the coarse fraction was characterised by increased concentration of numerous elements of crustal origin, such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Ca, Na, and Mg, which enter the composition of silicate minerals. Data analysis of selected elements (Ti, Al, Fe, Mn) allowed the estimation of the volcanic plume's contribution to total PM10, resulting in a local enhancement of up to 9.5 μg m-3, i.e. 40% of total PM10 on 18 May, which was the most intense of the two episodes. These results appear

  16. Radiative characteristics of aerosol during extreme fire event over Siberia in summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana B.; Kabanov, Dmitriy M.; Nasrtdinov, Ilmir M.; Russkova, Tatiana V.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.

    2017-01-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol were studied during a mega-fire event in summer 2012 over Siberia using ground-based measurements of spectral solar radiation at the AERONET site in Tomsk and satellite observations. The data were analysed using multi-year (2003-2013) measurements of aerosol characteristics under background conditions and for less intense fires, differing in burning biomass type, stage of fire, remoteness from observation site, etc. (ordinary smoke). In June-August 2012, the average aerosol optical depth (AOD, 500 nm) had been 0.95 ± 0.86, about a factor of 6 larger than background values (0.16 ± 0.08), and a factor of 2.5 larger than in ordinary smoke. The AOD values were extremely high on 24-28 July and reached 3-5. A comparison with satellite observations showed that ground-based measurements in the region of Tomsk not only reflect the local AOD features, but are also characteristic for the territory of Western Siberia as a whole. Single scattering albedo (SSA, 440 nm) in this period ranged from 0.91 to 0.99 with an average of ˜ 0.96 in the entire wavelength range of 440-1020 nm. The increase in absorptance of aerosol particles (SSA(440 nm) = 0.92) and decrease in SSA with wavelength observed in ordinary smoke agree with the data from multi-year observations in analogous situations in the boreal zone of USA and Canada. Volume aerosol size distribution in extreme and ordinary smoke had a bimodal character with significant prevalence of fine-mode particles, but in summer 2012 the mean median radius and the width of the fine-mode distribution somewhat increased. In contrast to data from multi-year observations, in summer 2012 an increase in the volume concentration and median radius of the coarse mode was observed with growing AOD. The calculations of the average radiative effects of smoke and background aerosol are presented. Compared to background conditions and ordinary smoke, under the extreme smoke conditions the

  17. Pre-monsoon aerosol characteristics over the Indo-Gangetic Basin: implications to climatic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Tiwari, S.; Devara, P. C. S.; Bisht, D. S.; Srivastava, Manoj K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Goloub, P.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-05-01

    Sun/sky radiometer observations over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) region during pre-monsoon (from April-June 2009) have been processed to analyze various aerosol characteristics in the central and eastern IGB region, represented by Kanpur and Gandhi College, respectively, and their impacts on climate in terms of radiative forcing. Monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD at 500 nm) and corresponding Angstrom Exponent (AE at 440-870 nm, given within the brackets) was observed to be about 0.50 (0.49) and 0.51 (0.65) in April, 0.65 (0.74) and 0.67 (0.91) in May and 0.69 (0.45) and 0.77 (0.71) in June at Kanpur and Gandhi College, respectively. Results show a positive gradient in AOD and AE from central to eastern IGB region with the advancement of the pre-monsoon, which may be caused due to diverse geographical location of the stations having different meteorological conditions and emission sources. Relatively lower SSA was observed at the eastern IGB (0.89) than the central IGB (0.92) region during the period, which suggests relative dominance of absorbing aerosols at the eastern IGB as compared to central IGB region. The absorbing aerosol optical properties over the station suggest that the atmospheric absorption over central IGB region is mainly due to dominance of coarse-mode dust particles; however, absorption over eastern IGB region is mainly due to dominance of fine-particle pollution. The derived properties from sun/sky radiometer during pre-monsoon period are used in a radiative-transfer model to estimate aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface over the IGB region. Relatively large TOA and surface cooling was observed at the eastern IGB as compared to the central IGB region. This translates into large heating of the atmosphere ranging from 0.45 to 0.55 K day-1 at Kanpur and from 0.45 to 0.59 K day-1 at Gandhi College.

  18. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini v. Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas-liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D3,2) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D3,2), within a span of 0.07-0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined.

  19. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: An AQMEII-2 perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, G.; Hogrefe, C.; Bianconi, R.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Brunner, D.; Forkel, R.; Giordano, L.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Knote, C.; Langer, M.; Makar, P. A.; Pirovano, G.; Pérez, J. L.; San José, R.; Syrakov, D.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Wolke, R.; Žabkar, R.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model intercomparison, we used the bulk mass profiles of aerosol chemical species sampled over the locations of AERONET stations across Europe and North America to calculate the aerosol optical properties under a range of common assumptions for all models. Several simulations with parameters perturbed within a range of observed values are carried out for July 2010 and compared in order to infer the assumptions that have the largest impact on the calculated aerosol optical properties. We calculate that the most important factor of uncertainty is the assumption about the mixing state, for which we estimate an uncertainty of 30-35% on the simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The choice of the core composition in the core-shell representation is of minor importance for calculation of AOD, while it is critical for the SSA. The uncertainty introduced by the choice of mixing state choice on the calculation of the asymmetry parameter is the order of 10%. Other factors of uncertainty tested here have a maximum average impact of 10% each on calculated AOD, and an impact of a few percent on SSA and g. It is thus recommended to focus further research on a more accurate representation of the aerosol mixing state in models, in order to have a less uncertain simulation of the related optical properties.

  20. Chemical, Physical and Optical Properties of Saharan Dust Aerosols at a Marine Site in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Montalvo, D. L.; Mayol Bracero, O. L.; Morales, F.; Sheridan, P.; Ogren, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric dust particles blown from the Sahara across the Atlantic into the Caribbean have an impact on its climate and public health. These particles may play a significant role in radiative forcing, affecting the extinction of solar radiation and thus having an influence on climate. About half of the dust that travels from Africa contains particles that are small enough to inhale. Human breathe them into the respiratory system and they settle in the lungs causing respiratory problems. To have a better understanding of these effects, information is needed on the properties of these aerosols. As part of this study, chemical, physical and optical characterization is being performed on aerosol samples collected at a marine site on the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico (Cabezas de San Juan, Fajardo), during periods with and without Saharan incursions. Stacked-filter units (SFU) are used to collect particles with diameters smaller than 1.7 μm, using Nuclepore, quartz and Teflon filters. These filter samples are analyzed to obtain the chemical composition of the particles. Initially we are focusing on the carbonaceous fraction (elemental and organic carbon, EC, and OC) of the aerosol using thermal/optical analysis. Online measurements of total particle number concentrations and aerosol light scattering coefficients are performed using a condensation particle counter and an integrating nephelometer, respectively. In addition, a sunphotometer, part of AERONET (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/), is used to obtain the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Preliminary results include only samples collected from air masses under the influence of Saharan dust, as signified by AOT satellite images from MODIS and the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. In terms of the chemical composition, EC concentrations were at low-to-undetectable levels, indicating that OC concentrations

  1. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean, a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition, small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions, could be identified in the particle phase

  2. Modelling and evaluation of size-resolved aerosol characteristics in the Eastern Mediterranean during the SUB-AERO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyridaki, A.; Lazaridis, M.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Smolik, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Aleksandropoulou, V.

    The mesoscale air-quality modelling system UAM-AERO has been applied to study the dynamics of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean area. The objective of the current work is to validate the model against extensive field aerosol data for the realistic determination of the aerosol size distribution/chemical composition. The model has been studied against comprehensive aerosol size distribution data during the periods July 2000 and January 2001 at the Eastern Mediterranean area. Comparison of the model results with the field data shows that the model predicts a bimodal size distribution for the aerosol mass, which is in agreement with the experimental data, but underpredicts the total mass during the summer period, whereas the agreement for the total aerosol mass is better during the winter period. The model is capable of reproducing the size distribution characteristics of sulphate, ammonium and nitrate, but discrepancies have occurred in relation to their mass concentration during the period 26-30 July 2000. Discrepancies have also been observed in the determination of the size distribution characteristics of crustal aerosol mass and sea salt. The disagreement between the modelled results and the field data is attributed to uncertainties in the primary aerosol emissions such as sea salt and resuspended dust, and unresolved emissions from sources such as forest fires and Saharan dust episodes. It is evident that the use of the mesoscale model UAM-AERO in the Mediterranean area requires the parallel use of a regional model, which needs to incorporate emissions of Saharan dust and forest fires.

  3. Physics-Based Modeling of Permeation: Simulation of Low-Volatility Agent Permeation and Aerosol Vapor Liquid Assessment Group Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    PHYSICS-BASED MODELING OF PERMEATION: SIMULATION OF LOW-VOLATILITY AGENT PERMEATION AND AEROSOL VAPOR LIQUID...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jan 2014 – Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Physics-Based Modeling of Permeation: Simulation of Low...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Physics-based models were developed to predict agent

  4. Self-Consciousness, Evaluation of Physical Characteristics, and Physical Attractiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Robert G.; Gilliland, LuNell

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between public self-consciousness and speed of processing information about self. Results indicated that high public self-conciousness subjects required less time to report evaluations of their physical features. In a second study high public self-conciousness was shown to be positively related to judged physical…

  5. [Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol concentration in snow and ice of glaciers in Tianshan Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Wang, Fei-Teng; Li, Zhong-Qin

    2012-03-01

    The snow and ice samples, collected at Glacier No. 1 at the headwaters of Urumqi River (UG1) and Glacier No. 51 at Haxilegen of Kuytun River (HG51) in 2002 and 2004, were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC) by thermal/ optical reflectance (TOR). The spatio-temporal characteristics and environmental significance of OC and EC concentration were discussed in details. The concentration order of total carbon (TC) was: snowpack of west branch on UG1 (1 943 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of east branch on UG1 (989 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of HG51 (150 ng x g(-1)) > glacier ice of east branch on UG1 (77 ng x g(-1)), and the concentration order of OC and EC lay similar as TC. The concentration of OC and EC in snowpack of Tianshan Mountains were 557 ng x g(-1) and 188 ng x g(-1), respectively. Concentration peak of carbonaceous aerosol usually appeared near the dust layer at the bottom section of snowpack, but the some sudden events could increase the concentration in the surface snow. Because of the seasonality of carbon emission (e. g. heating and agricultural activities) and transportation (e. g. atmospheric circulation), the concentration of carbonaceous aerosol increased from July to November with fluctuations. Difference on the order of magnitude might exist between the concentration in snow (firn) and glacier ice, which was influenced by the glacier surroundings, sampling situation and other factors. EC on the surface snow affected the albedo significantly, and an average albedo reduction of 0.22 in the wavelength of 300-700 nm was simulated by SNICAR (snow, ice, and aerosol radiative) model.

  6. Carbonaceous aerosol and its characteristics observed in Tokyo and south Kanto region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoura, Hiroaki; Morikawa, Tazuko; Mizohata, Akira; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-12-01

    Due to enforcing vehicle emission reduction requirements in Japan, particulate matter (PM) concentration, especially elemental carbon (EC) concentration in roadside atmosphere, obviously decreased in the last decade. In spite of the previous vehicle emission reduction, EC concentration was not shown a clear decrease, recently. To achieve the PM2.5 environmental standard, measurements based on emission source contribution are desirable. However, source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol was ambiguous because chemical components are complicated, and the components change through photochemical reaction. The goal of this study is to determine source apportionment for carbonaceous aerosols. Examination of PM2.5 was performed in south Kanto including Tokyo in the summer of 2008 and the winter of 2009. Emissions from the industrial area around Tokyo Bay and the agricultural northern area showed transportation and accumulation due to the seasonal prevailing wind. The emissions formed a geographical distribution due to photochemical reactions. The characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol were obtained using carbon profile analysis and carbon isotope analysis, including the source information such as fossil fuel emission origin, vegetation origin, and combustion product, photochemical reaction product, etc. Soot-EC was found as a substance with fossil fuel origin which did not contain biomass combustion matter, and since it is stable, there was no observed difference by site and a uniform concentration was observed in winter. It became apparent from the carbon isotope analysis using 14C that the carbon from the biomass origin involved 29% in total carbon in the summer, and 48% in winter even at Kudan of central Tokyo.

  7. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal aerosols during the autumn haze days in Xi'an, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanpeng; Fu, Honglei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Meng, Qinglong; Wang, Wenke

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, haze pollution has become one of the most critical environmental issues in Xi'an, China, with particular matter (PM) being one of the top pollutants. As an important fraction of PM, bioaerosols may have adverse effects on air quality and human health. In this study, to better understand the characteristics of such biological aerosols, airborne microbial samples were collected by using an Andersen six-stage sampler in Xi'an from October 8th to 22nd, 2014. The concentration, size distribution and genera of airborne viable bacteria and fungi were comparably investigated during the haze days and non-haze days. Correlations of bioaerosol levels with meteorological parameters and PM concentrations were also examined. The results showed that the daily average concentrations of airborne viable bacteria and fungi during the haze days, 1102.4-1736.5 and 1466.2-1703.9 CFU/m3, respectively, were not only much higher than those during the non-haze days, but also exceeded the recommended permissible limit values. Comparing to size distributions during the non-haze days, slightly different patterns for bacterial aerosols and similar single-peak distribution pattern for fungal aerosols were observed during the haze days. Moreover, more allergic and infectious genera (e.g. Neisseria, Aspergillus, and Paecilomyces) in bioaerosols were identified during the haze days than during non-haze days. The present results reveal that bioaerosols may have more significant effects on public health and urban air quality during the haze days than during non-haze days.

  8. HCl in rocket exhaust clouds - Atmospheric dispersion, acid aerosol characteristics, and acid rain deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Both measurements and model calculations of the temporal dispersion of peak HCl (g + aq) concentration in Titan III exhaust clouds are found to be well characterized by one-term power-law decay expressions. The respective coefficients and decay exponents, however, are found to vary widely with meteorology. The HCl (g), HCl (g + aq), dewpoint, and temperature-pressure-altitude data for Titan III exhaust clouds are consistent with accurately calculated HCl/H2O vapor-liquid compositions for a model quasi-equilibrated flat surface aqueous aerosol. Some cloud evolution characteristics are also defined. Rapid and extensive condensation of aqueous acid clearly occurs during the first three min of cloud rise. Condensation is found to be intensified by the initial entrainment of relatively moist ambient air from lower levels, that is, from levels below eventual cloud stabilization. It is pointed out that if subsequent dilution air at stabilization altitude is significantly drier, a state of maximum condensation soon occurs, followed by an aerosol evaporation phase.

  9. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs.

  10. Dry Lung as a Physical Model in Studies of Aerosol Deposition.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Victor N; Kanev, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    A new physical model was developed to evaluate the deposition of micro- and nanoaerosol particles (NAPs) into the lungs as a function of size and charges. The model was manufactured of a dry, inflated swine lung produced by Nasco company (Fort Atkinson, WI). The dry lung was cut into two lobes and a conductive tube was glued into the bronchial tube. The upper 1-2-mm-thick layer of the lung lobe was removed with a razor blade to expose the alveoli. The lobe was further enclosed into a plastic bag and placed within a metalized plastic box. The probability of aerosol deposition was calculated by comparing the size distribution of NAPs passed through the lung with that of control, where aerosol passed through a box bypassing the lung. Using this new lung model, it was demonstrated that charged NAPs are deposited inside the lung substantially more efficiently than neutral ones. It was also demonstrated that deposition of neutral NAPs well fits prediction of the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model developed by the Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA).

  11. Chemical characteristics of PM2.5 aerosol in Incheon, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Kyu; Heo, Jong-Bae; Ban, Soo-Jin; Yi, Seung-Muk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2012-12-01

    We examined the characteristics, sources, and distribution of PM2.5 and carbonaceous species in particulate samples collected from June 2009 to May 2010 in Incheon, Korea. The average PM2.5 concentration (41.9 ± 9.0 μg m-3) exceeded the annual level set by the United States' National Ambient Air Quality Standards (15 μg m-3). The major fraction of PM2.5 consisted of ionic species (accounting for 38.9 ± 8.8%), such as NO3-, SO42-, and NH4+, as well as organic carbon (OC) (accounting for 18.9 ± 5.1%). We also analyzed the seasonal variation in PM2.5 and secondary aerosols such as NO3- and SO42- in PM2.5. While SO42- concentrations were higher in spring and summer, the concentration of PM2.5 and NO3- were the highest in winter. SO42- concentrations were higher during the spring and summer, but PM2.5 and NO3- were highest during the winter. As an important aerosol indicator, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) (mean 4.7 ± 0.8 μg m-3, 58.9 ± 10.7% of total OC) showed a strong relationship with NO3-, SO42-, and SOC (R2 = 0.56, 0.67, and 0.65, respectively), which was indicative of favorable conditions for SOC formation during the sampling period. Among the individual organic aerosols measured, n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, levoglucosan, and phthalates were major components, whereas PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), oxy-PAHs, hopanes, and cholestanes were minor components. The concentration of organic compounds during smoggy periods was higher than during non-event periods. The n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid species during the smoggy periods were 10-14 times higher than during the normal period. Using principal component analysis coupled with multiple linear regression analysis, we identified the primary sources of PM2.5 to be motor vehicle/sea salt, secondary organic aerosols, combustion, biogenic/meat cooking, and soil sources.

  12. Characteristics of major secondary ions in typical polluted atmospheric aerosols during autumn in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Chou, Charles-C K; Wu, Yun-Jui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Tzu; Wu, Tsai-Lin

    2011-06-01

    In autumn of 2008, the chemical characteristics of major secondary ionic aerosols at a suburban site in central Taiwan were measured during an annually occurring season of high pollution. The semicontinuous measurement system measured major soluble inorganic species, including NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and SO(4)(2-), in PM(10) with a 15 min resolution time. The atmospheric conditions, except for the influences of typhoons, were dominated by the local sea-land breeze with clear diurnal variations of meteorological parameters and air pollutant concentrations. To evaluate secondary aerosol formation at different ozone levels, daily ozone maximum concentration (O(3,daily max)) was used as an index of photochemical activity for dividing between the heavily polluted period (O(3,daily max) ≧80 ppb) and the lightly polluted period (O(3,daily max)<80 ppb). The concentrations of PM(10), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), NH(4)(+) and total major ions during the heavily polluted period were 1.6, 1.9, 2.4, 2.7 and 2.3 times the concentrations during the lightly polluted period, respectively. Results showed that the daily maximum concentrations of PM(10) occurred around midnight and the daily maximum ozone concentration occurred during daytime. The average concentration of SO(2) was higher during daytime, which could be explained by the transportation of coastal industry emissions to the sampling site. In contrast, the high concentration of NO(2) at night was due to the land breeze flow that transport inland urban air masses toward this site. The simulations of breeze circulations and transitions were reflected in transports and distributions of these pollutants. During heavily polluted periods, NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) showed a clear diurnal variations with lower concentrations after midday, possibly due to the thermal volatilization of NH(4)NO(3) during daytime and transport of inland urban plume at night. The diurnal variation of PM(10) showed the similar pattern to that of NO(3)(-) and NH(4

  13. Climate-relevant physical properties of molecular constituents relevant for isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upshur, M. A.; Strick, B. F.; McNeill, V. F.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2014-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, formed from gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), contribute large uncertainties to the radiative forcing that is associated with aerosols in the climate system. Reactive uptake of surface-active organic oxidation products of BVOCs at the gas-aerosol interface can potentially decrease the overall aerosol surface tension and therefore influence their propensity to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we synthesize and measure some climate-relevant physical properties of SOA particle constituents consisting of the isoprene oxidation products α-, δ-, and cis- and {trans-β-IEPOX (isoprene epoxide), as well as syn- and anti-2-methyltetraol. Following viscosity measurements, we use octanol-water partition coefficients to quantify the relative hydrophobicity of the oxidation products while dynamic surface tension measurements indicate that aqueous solutions of α- and trans-β-IEPOX exhibit significant surface tension depression. We hypothesize that the surface activity of these compounds may enhance aerosol CCN activity, and that trans-β-IEPOX may be highly relevant for surface chemistry of aerosol particles relative to other IEPOX isomers.

  14. The effect of water to ethanol feed ratio on physical properties and aerosolization behavior of spray dried cromolyn sodium particles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Kambiz; Najafabadi, Abdolhossien Rouholamini; Barghi, Mohammadali; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza

    2005-05-01

    Cromolyn sodium (CS) was spray dried under constant operation conditions from different water to ethanol feed ratios (50:50-0:100). The spray dried CS samples were characterized for their physicochemical properties including crystallinity, particle size distribution, morphology, density, and water/ethanol content. To determine quantitatively the crystallinity of the powders, an X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was developed using samples with different crystallinity prepared by physical mixing of 100% amorphous and 100% crystalline CS materials. The aerodynamic behavior of the CS samples was determined using an Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) with a Spinhaler at an air flow of 60 L/min. Binary mixtures of each spray dried CS powder and Pharmatose 325, a commercial alpha-lactose monohydrate available for DPI formulations, were prepared and in vitro aerosol deposition of the drug from the mixtures was analyzed using ACI to evaluate the effect of carrier on deposition profiles of the spray dried samples. CS spray dried from absolute ethanol exhibited XRD pattern characteristic for crystalline materials and different from patterns of the other samples. The crystallinity of spray dried CS obtained in the presence of water varied from 0% to 28.37%, depending on the ratio of water to ethanol in the feed suspensions. All samples presented different particle size, water/ethanol content, and bulk density values. CS particles spray dried from absolute ethanol presented uniform elongated shape whereas the other samples consisted mainly of particles with irregular shape. Overall, fine particle fraction increased significantly (p < 0.01) with decreasing d50% and water and ethanol content of spray dried CS samples. Significant difference (p < 0.01) in deposition profiles of the drug were observed between corresponding carrier free and carrier blended formulations. The difference in deposition profiles of CS aerosolized from various spray dried samples were described according to

  15. At-Sea Evaluation of the Obscuration Characteristics of a Hygroscopic Aerosol Smoke Produced by the CY85A Pyrotechnic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    and IiWIU* by block nmber) Salty Dog Obscuration .2Hygroscopic aerosol Extinction ISmoke Pyrotechnically Generated ’For the past six years, Calapan, in...Extinction Characteristics for Salty Dog , NWC 29 and NWC 78 Pyrotechnics,", Calspan Report No. 6663-M-l, 40 pp, Calspan Corporation, Buffalo, NY 14225. 4

  16. Summary of long-term data on latitudinal dependence of the near-water aerosol microphysical characteristics in eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol'kin, Viktor V.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Pol'kin, Vasily V.; Turchinovich, Ury S.; Terpugova, Swetlana A.; Tikhomirov, Aleksey B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.

    2015-11-01

    Latitudinal dependences of aerosol microphysical characteristics are analyzed. The data were obtained in the Russian Antarctic Expedition (RAE) onboard the expedition vessels "Akademik Fedorov" and "Akademik Treshnikov" in 2006- 2014, as well as the research vessel "Akademik Sergey Vavilov" in 2004.

  17. IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M-J.; Lee, J-K.; Yoo, D-H.; Ho, K.

    2004-10-05

    The radiation effects on the physical characteristic of the sewage sludge were studied in order to obtain information which will be used for study on the enhancement of the sludge's dewaterability. Water contents, capillary suction time, zeta potential, irradiation dose, sludge acidity, total solid concentration, sludge particle size and microbiology before and after irradiation were investigated. Irradiation gave an effect on physical characteristics sludge. Water content in sludge cake could be reduced by irradiation at the dose of 10kGy.

  18. The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

  19. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high

  20. Salience of physical appearance characteristics among young women in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rongmuang, Daravan; Corte, Colleen; McCreary, Linda L; Park, Chang G; Miller, Arlene; Gallo, Agatha

    2011-09-01

    Our aim in the present study was to identify key components of physical appearance among young Thai women. Free listings, focus groups and pile sorting were used. One-hundred twenty young women generated 78 unique physical appearance characteristics. Ninety-four nursing students validated these characteristics in focus groups and then sorted them into piles that reflected separate domains of physical appearance and labeled them. Salience analysis revealed that facial appearance (e.g., bright facial skin, high nose bridge, big eyes) was the most important domain, followed by body weight and shape, skin color and texture, hair (color, texture, length), and 'other' physical appearance (e.g., slender neck, slim fingers). This is the first study to identify aspects of physical appearance that are most salient to young Thai women and that may differ from women in other cultural contexts. These findings could be used to develop culturally grounded measures of physical appearance in Thai women.

  1. Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in Aerosol Particles in Jingjinji-Mega Typical Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol has important effects on climate, environment and human health and water-soluble ions are important chemical composition in aerosol. It is important to study concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water-soluble ions in aerosol. In recent years, with the increasing of energy consumption and the amount of automobile, regional pollution has become more serious in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. Especially since the haze happened frequently in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, it is an imminent study about water-soluble ions in aerosol.To investigate the concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI), size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using Andersen cascade sampler from Aug2010to Aug2011in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding. The WSI were analyzed by ion chromatography(IC).The results indicated that the order of total WSI (TWSI) concentration of TSP in the region was Tianjin-Baoding-Beijing-Tangshan. The order of TWSI of the fine particles in the region was Baoding-Tianjin-Beijing-Tangshan. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the coarse mode were 41.36±15.76,48.04±15.79,39.40±11.03,40.49±13.32μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the fine mode were 66.54±47.95,69.12±34.85, 61.80±44.63,71.73±45.12μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. All the annual mean concentrations of TWSIin the fine mode in the four sites had exceeded averaged concentration of PM2.5in the environmental quality standards (35μg m-3), which indicated that the pollution of TWSI was serious. Secondary water-soluble ions (SWSI)(SO42-, NO3-and NH4+) and Cl-were the main components, and were mainly found in the fine particles in the four sites of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In the coarse particles, NO3-Ca2+ and SO42-were the dominant contributions to WSI. Almost all water-soluble ions in fine particles are similar

  2. OZONE-ISOPRENE REACTION: RE-EXAMINATION OF THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of ozone and isoprene has been studied to examine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Using a scanning mobility particle sizer, the volume distribution of the aerosol was found in the range 0.05 - 0.2 µm. The aerosol yield w...

  3. Aerosol and Surface Deposition Characteristics of Two Surrogates for Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Alistair H; Stapleton, Helen L

    2016-11-15

    that can be used to replicate the dispersal characteristics of the threat agent accurately. This work compares the aerosol dispersal and deposition behaviors of the surrogates Btcry- and B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii Btcry- spores remained in the air for a shorter time, and were markedly more likely to adhere to vertical surfaces, than B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores.

  4. Marine Primary Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: physical and chemical properties from a mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Sellegri, K.; Charriere, B.; Sempere, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; R'Mili, B.; Schwier, A. N.; Rose, C.

    2013-12-01

    m. The hygroscopic properties were investigated by a CCN device. On-line chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction was performed by a c-TOF-AMS. Off-line analysis of the SSA generated included TEM-EDX , LC-MS and IC, Thermo-optical analysis of EC-OC. The objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of water chemical and biological composition and biological activity on physical and chemical properties of the primary generated aerosol.

  5. Temporal asymmetry in aerosol optical characteristics: A case study at a high-altitude station, Hanle, in Ladakh region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Bagare, S. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Kanawade, V. P.; Singh, Rajendra B.; Padhy, Sangita K.

    2014-12-01

    Diurnal features of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at a high-altitude station, Hanle (4500 m amsl) in the western Himalayas, were studied using direct/diffuse solar irradiance measurement from a Skyradiometer (Prede) during October 2007 to December 2010. The study reveals a diurnal asymmetry in the measured aerosol characteristics, with three types of diurnal variation in AOD. Among them, Types I and II are prominent during pre-monsoon, while Type III dominates during post-monsoon. Type I appears to be associated with new-particle formation process from gaseous precursors, in addition to the combination of anthropogenic and desert-dust aerosols, probably brought by the prevailing westerly/south-westerly winds during the pre-monsoon season. The diurnal feature of the Type II may be attributed by the transported desert-dust aerosols brought by the prevailing winds. Further, Type III may be associated with the aged background aerosols over the region, pertaining to a small contribution from gaseous precursors.

  6. Aerosolization properties, surface composition and physical state of spray-dried protein powders.

    PubMed

    Bosquillon, Cynthia; Rouxhet, Paul G; Ahimou, François; Simon, Denis; Culot, Christine; Préat, Véronique; Vanbever, Rita

    2004-10-19

    Powder aerosols made of albumin, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a protein stabilizer (lactose, trehalose or mannitol) were prepared by spray-drying and analyzed for aerodynamic behavior, surface composition and physical state. The powders exited a Spinhaler inhaler as particle aggregates, the size of which depending on composition, spray-drying parameters and airflow rate. However, due to low bulk powder tap density (<0.15 g/cm3), the aerodynamic size of a large fraction of aggregates remained respirable (<5 microm). Fine particle fractions ranged between 21% and 41% in an Andersen cascade impactor operated at 28.3 l/min, with mannitol and lactose providing the most cohesive and free-flowing powders, respectively. Particle surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed a surface enrichment with DPPC relative to albumin for powders prepared under certain spray-drying conditions. DPPC self-organized in a gel phase in the particle and no sugar or mannitol crystals were detected by X-ray diffraction. Water sorption isotherms showed that albumin protected lactose from moisture-induced crystallization. In conclusion, a proper combination of composition and spray-drying parameters allowed to obtain dry powders with elevated fine particle fractions (FPFs) and a physical environment favorable to protein stability.

  7. Characteristics and Global Impact of Aerosols from Southern Africa and Eastern Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2004-01-01

    Supported mainly by the NASA GACP and ACMAP, we have made significant progress in the global modeling of tropospheric aerosols and their precursors in the past few years, especially in the development of the GOCART model, simulation of anthropogenic and natural aerosols, data analysis of field observations and satellite retrievals, assessment of global and regional budgets, estimate of aerosol direct radiative forcing, and aerosol forecasting and data analysis for the ACE-Asia field experiment. Our results and findings are summarized in Chin et al. Model calculated multiple-year optical thickness for individual and total aerosols are at internet. These results have been frequently used by other groups, for example, to impose initial conditions for regional models, provide dust source functions for other global models, supply aerosol fields for chemistry and climate models, help data group interpret their measurements, select monitoring sites for ground observation network, and assist satellite retrievals.

  8. Planetary isophotes as a clue to aerosol characteristics. II - Observations of Venus from spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Contrary to published reports, the limb-darkening observed by Mariner 10 is consistent with the sulfuric-acid aerosol scattering that explains the polarization and spectroscopic features of Venus. A combination of both geometric and photometric systematic errors explains the previously reported discrepancy. Although the aerosol model cannot be distinguished from isotropic scattering at the Mariner 10 phase angle, Venera 9 data at larger phases clearly favor the aerosol model. There is no evidence for isotropic scattering in the clouds of Venus.

  9. In-situ physical and chemical characterization of the Eyjafjallajökull aerosol plume in the free troposphere over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Chiari, M.; Calzolai, G.; Canepari, S.; Perrino, C.

    2013-08-01

    Continuous measurements of physical and chemical properties at the Mt. Cimone GAW-WMO Global Station (2165 m a.s.l.) allowed the detection of the volcanic aerosol plume resulting from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption of spring 2010. The event affected the site after a transport over a distance of more than 3000 km. Two main transport episodes were detected during the eruption period, showing a volcanic fingerprint discernible against the free tropospheric background conditions typical of the site, the first from 19 to 21 April and the second from 18 to 20 May 2010. The paper reports the modification of aerosol characteristics observed during the two episodes, both characterized by an abrupt increase in fine and, especially, coarse mode particle number. Analysis of major, minor and trace elements by different analytical techniques (Ionic Chromatography, PIXE-PIGE and ICP-MS) were performed on aerosols collected by ground level discrete sampling. The resulting database allows the characterization of aerosol chemical composition during the volcanic plume transport and in background conditions. During the passage of the volcanic plume, the fine fraction was dominated by sulphates, denoting the secondary origin of this mode, mainly resulting from in-plume oxidation of volcanic SO2. By contrast, the coarse fraction was characterized by increased concentration of numerous elements of crustal origin, such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Ca, Na, and Mg, which enter the composition of silicate minerals. Data analysis of selected elements (Ti, Al, Fe, Mn) allowed the estimation of the volcanic plume's contribution to total PM10, resulting in a local enhancement of up to 9.5 μg m-3, i.e. 40% of total PM10, on 18 May, which was the most intense of the two episodes. These results appear significant, especially in the light of the huge distance of Mt. Cimone from the source, confirming the widespread diffusion of the Eyjafjallajokull ashes over Europe.

  10. Aerosol size distribution characteristics of organosulfates in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Bin Yu; Lin, Peng; Hu, Min; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Organosulfates (OSs) have been detected in various atmospheric environments, but their particle size distribution characteristics are unknown. In this work, we examined their size distributions in ambient aerosols to gain insights into the formation processes. Size-segregated aerosol samples in the range of 0.056-18 μm were collected using a ten-stage impactor at a receptor site in Hong Kong in both summer and winter and in Nansha in the Pearl River Delta in winter. The humic-like substances fraction in the size-segregated samples was isolated and analyzed using electrospray ionization coupled with an Orbitrap Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometer. Through accurate mass measurements, ∼190 CHOS and ∼90 CHONS formulas were tentatively identified to be OS compounds. Among them, OS compounds derived from isoprene, α-/β-pinene, and limonene and alkyl OSs having low double bond equivalents (DBE = 0,1) and 0-2 extra O beyond those in -OSO3 were found with high intensity. The biogenic volatile organic compounds-derived OS formulas share a common characteristic with sulfate in that the droplet mode dominated, peaking in either 0.56-1.0 or 1.0-1.8 μm size bin, reflecting sulfate as their common precursor. Most of these OSs have a minor coarse mode, accounting for 0-45%. The presence of OSs on the coarse particles is hypothesized to be a result of OSs on small particle (<0.32 μm) coagulating with coarse particles, as the abundance ratios of OS to non-sea-salt sulfate present on the coarse particles were similar to those on particles <0.32 μm. Among a few pairs of CHONS and CHOS that could be linked up through hydrolysis of a nitrooxy group in the CHONS form (e.g., m/z 294: C10H16O7NS- vs. m/z 249 C10H17O5S- from α/β-pinene, differing by (+H2O-HNO3)), the CHONS compounds had an enhanced coarse mode presence. This could be interpreted as a result of slower hydrolysis of the CHONS compounds on the alkali coarse particles. The low DBE alkyl OS compounds have a

  11. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported over the main body of the TP across the northeastern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be because the altitude is much lower at the northeastern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A natural boundary seems to extend to an altitude of 6-8 km a.s.l., which may act as a dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP, especially in spring and summer. This boundary appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that this natural boundary extending to upper troposphere is consistent with the spatial pattern of aerosol loading. The whole TP blocks the atmospheric aerosols transported from surrounding regions, and the extreme high mountains on the TP also cause an obstruction to the transport of aerosols. The aerosol distribution patterns are primarily driven by atmospheric

  12. Characteristics of Missing Physical Activity Data in Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Huang, Liang; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie; Fan, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of missing physical activity (PA) data of children and youth. Method: PA data from the Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study ("N" = 2,758; 1,438 boys and 1,320 girls; aged 9-17 years old) were used for the study. After the data were sorted by the…

  13. Influence of temperature and artificially-created physical barriers on the efficacy of synergized pyrethrin aerosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour mills in the United States are utilizing synergized pyrethrin aerosol for management of stored product insects. However, the dispersal of the aerosol within a facility may be hampered by barriers created from machinery and other equipment that block dispersion. Additionally, seasonal temperatu...

  14. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  15. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  16. Modeling analysis of secondary inorganic aerosols over China: pollution characteristics, and meteorological and dust impacts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Wang, Shuxiao; Chang, Xing; Cai, Siyi; Xing, Jia; Hao, Jiming

    2016-10-26

    Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) are the predominant components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and have significant impacts on air quality, human health, and climate change. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) was modified to incorporate SO2 heterogeneous reactions on the surface of dust particles. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal characteristics of SIA over China and analyze the impacts of meteorological factors and dust on SIA formation. Including the effects of dust improved model performance for the simulation of SIA concentrations, particularly for sulfate. The simulated annual SIA concentration in China was approximately 10.1 μg/m(3) on domain average, with strong seasonal variation: highest in winter and lowest in summer. High SIA concentrations were concentrated in developed regions with high precursor emissions, such as the North China Plain, Yangtze River Delta, Sichuan Basin, and Pearl River Delta. Strong correlations between meteorological factors and SIA pollution levels suggested that heterogeneous reactions under high humidity played an important role on SIA formation, particularly during severe haze pollution periods. Acting as surfaces for heterogeneous reactions, dust particles significantly affected sulfate formation, suggesting the importance of reducing dust emissions for controlling SIA and PM2.5 pollution.

  17. Modeling analysis of secondary inorganic aerosols over China: pollution characteristics, and meteorological and dust impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Wang, Shuxiao; Chang, Xing; Cai, Siyi; Xing, Jia; Hao, Jiming

    2016-10-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) are the predominant components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and have significant impacts on air quality, human health, and climate change. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) was modified to incorporate SO2 heterogeneous reactions on the surface of dust particles. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal characteristics of SIA over China and analyze the impacts of meteorological factors and dust on SIA formation. Including the effects of dust improved model performance for the simulation of SIA concentrations, particularly for sulfate. The simulated annual SIA concentration in China was approximately 10.1 μg/m3 on domain average, with strong seasonal variation: highest in winter and lowest in summer. High SIA concentrations were concentrated in developed regions with high precursor emissions, such as the North China Plain, Yangtze River Delta, Sichuan Basin, and Pearl River Delta. Strong correlations between meteorological factors and SIA pollution levels suggested that heterogeneous reactions under high humidity played an important role on SIA formation, particularly during severe haze pollution periods. Acting as surfaces for heterogeneous reactions, dust particles significantly affected sulfate formation, suggesting the importance of reducing dust emissions for controlling SIA and PM2.5 pollution.

  18. Modeling analysis of secondary inorganic aerosols over China: pollution characteristics, and meteorological and dust impacts

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao; Wang, Shuxiao; Chang, Xing; Cai, Siyi; Xing, Jia; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) are the predominant components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and have significant impacts on air quality, human health, and climate change. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) was modified to incorporate SO2 heterogeneous reactions on the surface of dust particles. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal characteristics of SIA over China and analyze the impacts of meteorological factors and dust on SIA formation. Including the effects of dust improved model performance for the simulation of SIA concentrations, particularly for sulfate. The simulated annual SIA concentration in China was approximately 10.1 μg/m3 on domain average, with strong seasonal variation: highest in winter and lowest in summer. High SIA concentrations were concentrated in developed regions with high precursor emissions, such as the North China Plain, Yangtze River Delta, Sichuan Basin, and Pearl River Delta. Strong correlations between meteorological factors and SIA pollution levels suggested that heterogeneous reactions under high humidity played an important role on SIA formation, particularly during severe haze pollution periods. Acting as surfaces for heterogeneous reactions, dust particles significantly affected sulfate formation, suggesting the importance of reducing dust emissions for controlling SIA and PM2.5 pollution. PMID:27782166

  19. Determining the basic characteristics of aerosols suitable for studies of deposition in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Legáth, L; Naus, A; Halík, J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of aerosol particle deposition in the respiratory tract requires experimental inhalation of artificial model aerosols. The paper formulates some of the most important requirements for the properties of such aerosols. Several suitable fractions were prepared as part of a research project dealing with the use of microporous polymers for diagnostic purposes. 5 fractions of the polymer designated G-gel 60 with the particle size as stated by the manufacturer, ranging from 3 to 7 micron were evaluated using a 16-channel particle dispersity analyzer HIAC/ROYCO MT 3210 with the sensor 1200 and operated by a microprocessor, the equipment being coupled to an APPLE IIe computer. G-gel 60 particles introduced into the aerosol were characterized by the parameters CMAD, MMAD and sg both numerically and graphically. The measurement procedure was found to be very sensitive with respect to all fractions in evaluating the subtile differences between different lot numbers of the aerosol. G-gel 60 fractions characterized both numerically and graphically were compared with the known aerosols from paraffin oil and atmospheric air. The equipment MT 3210 enables prompt determination of the percentages of aerosol particles distribution by size class. The authors conclude that the procedure, both in its numerical and graphical versions, is particularly suitable for the diagnosis of aerosol particles deposition in the respiratory tract, offering a new application for HIAC/ROYCO in the field of medicine. In evaluating atmospheric aerosol in exhaled air, the number of particles was found to be below that in inhaled air, the difference being dependent on the choice of investigation methods. Percentual distribution of deposited particles following one minute ventilation proved to be at its maximum, as regards atmospheric aerosol, in the 0.30-0.50 micron range. The deposition curve was similar to already published curves, being characterized by an S-shaped pattern with maximum deposition

  20. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was dominated by organics that appeared to be internally mixed with nitrate or sulfate. The sulfate was most likely formed via heterogeneous reactions, because the SOR was constant under dry conditions (RH < 50%) and began to increase when RH > 50%, suggesting an important contribution from heterogeneous reactions with abundant aerosol water under wet conditions. Finally, the correlations between [NO3-]/[SO42 -] and [NH4+]/[SO42 -] suggest that the homogenous reaction between HNO3 and NH3 dominated the formation of nitrate under conditions of

  1. Interrelationships Between Aerosol Characteristics and Light Scattering During Late-winter in a Eastern Mediterranean Arid Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Schebeske, G.; Formenti, P.; Maenhaut, W.; Cafmeyer, J.; Ptasinski, J.; Karnieli, A.; Orlovsky, L.

    1999-01-01

    An intensive field campaign involving measurement of various aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative properties was conducted at Sde Boker in the Negev Desert of Israel, from 18 February to 15 March 1997. Nephelometer measurements gave average background scattering coefficient values of about 25 M/m at 550 nm wavelength, but strong dust events caused the value of this parameter to rise up to about 800 M/m Backscattering fractions did not depend on aerosol loading, and generally fell in the range of 0.1 to 0.25, comparable to values reported for marine and Arctic environments. Chemical analysis of the aerosol revealed that, in the coarse size range (2 - 10 micrometer equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD)), calcium (Ca) was by far the most abundant element followed by silicon (Si), both of which are indicators for mineral dust. In the fine size fraction (< 2 micrometers EAD), sulfur (S) generally was the dominant element, except during high dust episodes when Ca and Si were again the most abundant. Furthermore, fine black carbon (BC) correlates with S, suggesting that they may have originated from the same sources or source regions. An indication of the short-term effect of aerosol loading on radiative forcing was provided by measurements of global and diffuse solar radiation, which showed that during high turbidity periods (strong dust events) almost all of the solar radiation reaching the area is scattered or absorbed.

  2. Analysis of Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohno, S.; Hoeller, R.; Ito, K.; Onishi, Y.; Ma, C. J.; Kasahara, M.; Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S.

    2001-12-01

    During springtime the Japanese archipelago is periodically influenced by haze events originating from the Asian continent. The sources of these materials include both anthropogenic and natural aerosol, including the well-known yellow sand (Kosa) events, which can be recognized at places as far as Hawaii and the west coast of the United States. But there is also strong evidenced, which we want to support in this study, that these Kosa events are accompanied by strongly absorbing material as well as sulfates and organics. The springtime of 2001 was characterized by several strong dust events, which happened to be during the international ACE-Asia campaign. We participated in the ACE observation network by setting up a monitoring station during the period March 19 to April 6, 2001 for the measurement of aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties as well as observations of sky radiation. The measurement site is located on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture). Tango was chosen as an observation site, since it is relatively unpolluted and can therefore serve as a background site for studies of the direct impact of the mainland Asian outflow on the western Pacific area. The purpose of this work is to perform local and column closure experiments on aerosol properties, and to distinguish the anthropogenic part of the aerosol from the natural one. For this purpose, backward air-mass trajectories are calculated to identify potential sources of the observed aerosol. For measurements of aerosol mass-size distributions we used 12-stage low-pressure impactors, which were subsequently analyzed for elemental and ionic concentrations by PIXE, and Ion-chromatography, respectively. In addition, to get both the necessary time- and size-resolution, a DRUM sampler was operated with continuous collection and analysis for mass and optical transmission from 320 nm to 850 nm. Analysis is scheduled by synchrotron-XRF to < 0.1 ng/m3 for trace elemental

  3. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 1: Study of physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisok, J.; Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Makuch, P.; Petelski, T.; Chilinski, M.; Kaminski, J. W.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Rozwadowska, A.; Jefimow, M.; Markuszewski, P.; Neuber, R.; Pakszys, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Struzewska, J.; Zielinski, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties during iAREA2014 campaign that took place on Svalbard between 15th of Mar and 4th of May 2014. With respect to field area, the experiment consisted of two sites: Ny-Ålesund (78°55‧N, 11°56‧E) and Longyearbyen (78°13‧N, 15°33‧E) with further integration of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station in Hornsund (77°00‧N, 15°33‧E). The subject of this study is to investigate the in-situ, passive and active remote sensing observations as well as numerical simulations to describe the temporal variability of aerosol single-scattering properties during spring season on Spitsbergen. The retrieval of the data indicates several event days with enhanced single-scattering properties due to the existence of sulphate and additional sea-salt load in the atmosphere which is possibly caused by relatively high wind speed. Optical results were confirmed by numerical simulations made by the GEM-AQ model and by chemical observations that indicated up to 45% contribution of the sea-salt to a PM10 total aerosol mass concentration. An agreement between the in-situ optical and microphysical properties was found, namely: the positive correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient measured by the nephelometer and effective radius obtained from laser aerosol spectrometer as well as negative correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent indicated that slightly larger particles dominated during special events. The in-situ surface observations do not show any significant enhancement of the absorption coefficient as well as the black carbon concentration which might occur during spring. All of extensive single-scattering properties indicate a diurnal cycle in Longyearbyen, where 21:00-5:00 data stays at the background level, however increasing during the day by the factor of 3-4. It is considered to be highly connected with local emissions originating

  4. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Lee, Yunha; Shindell, Drew T.; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Kipling, Zak; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascent (ω500 < -25 hPa day-1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day-1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  5. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, A.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Shindell, D. T.; Partridge, Daniel; Stier, P.; Kipling, Z.; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-04

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascend (ω500 < -25 hPa/d) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. 42" It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm/d) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64% to nearly 100%). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  6. Aerosol physical and chemical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements during heavy haze days in Beijing winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Gu, X.; Wang, L.; Li, D.; Xie, Y.; Li, K.; Dubovik, O.; Schuster, G.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, Y.; Li, L.; Ma, Y.; Xu, H.

    2013-10-01

    With the increase in economic development over the past thirty years, many large cities in eastern and southwestern China are experiencing increased haze events and atmospheric pollution, causing significant impacts on the regional environment and even climate. However, knowledge on the aerosol physical and chemical properties in heavy haze conditions is still insufficient. In this study, two winter heavy haze events in Beijing that occurred in 2011 and 2012 were selected and investigated by using the ground-based remote sensing measurements. We used a CIMEL CE318 sun-sky radiometer to retrieve haze aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol fractions identified as black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), mineral dust (DU), ammonium sulfate-like (AS) components and aerosol water content (AW). The retrieval results from a total of five haze days showed that the aerosol loading and properties during the two winter haze events were comparable. Therefore, average heavy haze property parameters were drawn to present a research case for future studies. The average AOD is about 3.0 at 440 nm, and the Ångström exponent is 1.3 from 440 to 870 nm. The fine-mode AOD is 2.8 corresponding to a fine-mode fraction of 0.93. The coarse particles occupied a considerable volume fraction of the bimodal size distribution in winter haze events, with the mean particle radius of 0.21 and 2.9 μm for the fine and coarse modes respectively. The real part of the refractive indices exhibited a relatively flat spectral behavior with an average value of 1.48 from 440 to 1020 nm. The imaginary part showed spectral variation, with the value at 440 nm (about 0.013) higher than the other three wavelengths (about 0.008 at 675 nm). The aerosol composition retrieval results showed that volume fractions of BC, BrC, DU, AS and AW are 1, 2, 49, 15 and 33%, respectively, on average for the investigated

  7. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-02-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particle, changes the overall net aerosol radiative forcing from negative to positive. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Black carbon absorption is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings, but even more strongly by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative forcing when sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to climate benefits.

  8. 40 CFR 161.190 - Physical and chemical characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical and chemical characteristics. 161.190 Section 161.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry...

  9. 40 CFR 161.190 - Physical and chemical characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physical and chemical characteristics. 161.190 Section 161.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry...

  10. Effect of adjuvant physical properties on spray characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of adjuvant physical properties on spray characteristics were studied. Dynamic surface tension was measured with a Sensa Dyne surface tensiometer 6000 using the maximum bubble pressure method. Viscosity was measured with a Brookfield synchro-lectric viscometer model LVT using a UL adap...

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation. Physical Characteristics and National Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, Patricia Dreyer; Joan, F. Hughes

    2006-10-09

    The topology, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions. The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR.

  12. Composition and Characteristics of Aerosols in the Southern High Plains of Texas (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Thomas E.; Stout, John E.; Peinado, Porfirio

    2009-03-10

    Aerosol samples on polycarbonate filters were collected daily for several years in the Southern High Plains region of western Texas. Selected samples representing a variety of size modes, locations, and air quality conditions were analyzed by PIXE. Silicon and other crustal elements dominated during dust storms and in the coarse mode; sulfur dominated during anthropogenic pollution episodes and in the fine mode. A mixture of both aerosol types was present even during 'clear' conditions. The Al/Si ratio in dust events increases with wind speed. These data provide an initial assessment of aerosol chemistry in the West Texas plains.

  13. Distinguishing molecular characteristics of aerosol water soluble organic matter from the 2011 trans-North Atlantic US GEOTRACES cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Willoughby, A. S.; Gurganus, S. C.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2014-08-01

    The molecular characteristics of aerosol organic matter (OM) determines to a large extent its impacts on the atmospheric radiative budget and ecosystem function in terrestrial and aquatic environments, yet the OM molecular details of aerosols from different sources are not well established. Aerosol particulate samples with North American-influenced, North African-influenced, and marine (minimal recent continental influence) air mass back trajectories were collected as part of the 2011 trans-North Atlantic US GEOTRACES cruise and analyzed for their water soluble OM (WSOM) molecular characteristics using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples into five groups defined by distinct molecular formula characteristics. An abundance of nitrogen containing compounds with molecular formulas consistent with amino acid derivatives defined the two samples comprising the primary marine group (henceforth referred to as Primary Marine), which suggest a primary marine biological source to their WSOM in spite of their North American-influenced air mass trajectories. A second group of samples (aged marine, henceforth referred to as Aged Marine) with marine air mass trajectories was characterized by an abundance of low O / C (0.15-0.45) sulfur containing compounds consistent with organosulfate compounds formed via secondary aging reactions in the atmosphere. Several samples having North American-influenced air mass trajectories formed another group again characterized by organosulfate and nitrooxyorganosulfate type compounds with higher O / C ratios (0.5-1.0) than the Aged Marine samples reflecting the combustion influence from the North American continent. All the samples with North African-influenced air mass trajectories were grouped together in the PCA and were characterized by a lack of heteroatom (N, S, P) containing molecular formulas covering a wide O / C range (0

  14. Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wei-yang; Min, Shermann

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc.

  15. Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods

    DOEpatents

    Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

    1998-09-08

    A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

  16. New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Matthew Todd

    Aerosols affect the lives of people every day. They can decrease visibility, alter cloud formation and cloud lifetimes, change the energy balance of the earth and are implicated in causing numerous health problems. Measuring the physical and chemical properties of aerosols is essential to understand and mitigate any negative impacts that aerosols might have on climate and human health. Aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) is a technique that measures the size and chemical composition of individual particles in real time. The goal of this dissertation is to develop new and useful approaches for measuring the physical and/or chemical properties of particles using ATOFMS. This has been accomplished using laboratory experiments, ambient field measurements and sometimes comparisons between them. A comparison of mass spectra generated from petrochemical particles was made to light duty vehicle (LDV) and heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) particle mass spectra. This comparison has given us new insight into how to differentiate between particles from these two sources. A method for coating elemental carbon (EC) particles with organic carbon (OC) was used to generate a calibration curve for quantifying the fraction of organic carbon and elemental carbon on particles using ATOFMS. This work demonstrates that it is possible to obtain quantitative chemical information with regards to EC and OC using ATOFMS. The relationship between electrical mobility diameter and aerodynamic diameter is used to develop a tandem differential mobility analyzer-ATOFMS technique to measure the effective density, size and chemical composition of particles. The method is applied in the field and gives new insight into the physical/chemical properties of particles. The size resolved chemical composition of aerosols was measured in the Indian Ocean during the monsoonal transition period. This field work shows that a significant fraction of aerosol transported from India was from biomass

  17. Hygroscopicity and CCN activity of atmospheric aerosol particles and their relation to organics: Characteristics of urban aerosols in Nagoya, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-04-01

    The size-resolved distributions of hygroscopic growth factor g and the ratios of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to condensation nuclei of atmospheric aerosols were investigated in Nagoya, Japan. The average of the distributions of g at 85% relative humidity was bimodal. The size-resolved mean κ derived from g showed an increasing trend with diameter: 0.17-0.33 at 24-359 nm. The κ values calculated from CCN activation curves were 37% higher than those derived from g. Only 9% of the 37% difference is explained by the difference in the κ of inorganics under subsaturated and supersaturated conditions, suggesting a contribution of organics to the remaining 28% difference. The size-averaged κ of organics (κorg) was calculated as 0.14 and 0.19 by two different methods. The number fractions of CCN predicted from the hygroscopicity data over the range of 24-359 nm are loosely consistent with those observed if the size- and time-averaged g is applied to all particles (differences: -30% to +10%). This consistency improves if size- and time-resolved g and g distribution are used (differences: -19% to -3%). Whereas the number fractions of CCN predicted from the composition data are greatly underestimated if organics are assumed to be insoluble (differences: -64% to -45%), they are more consistent if κorg of 0.14 or 0.19 is applied (differences: -10% to +14%). The results demonstrate the importance of the dependence of the g of particles on time and particle size and the hygroscopicity of organics for CCN number concentrations in the urban atmosphere.

  18. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with continental, urban and marine air masses at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions could be identified in the particle phase. In all

  19. Aerosol characteristics and sources for the Amazon basin during the wet season

    SciTech Connect

    Artaxo, P. ); Maenhaut, W. ); Storms, H.; Van Grieken, R. )

    1990-09-20

    Fine (< 2.0 {mu}m) and coarse (2.0 - 15 {mu}m) aerosol fractions were collected using stacked filter units, at three sites under the forest canopy and at three levels of a tower inside the jungle. Particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure concentrations Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. Morphological and trace element measurements of individual particles were carried out by automated electron probe x-ray microanalysis. Gravimetric analysis was performed to obtain the fine and coarse aerosol mass concentration. The concentrations of soil dust related elements (Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Mn) were 5 times larger in the wet season compared to the 1985 ABLE 2A dry season experiment. Biogenic aerosol related elements in the fine fraction showed lower concentrations in the wet season. Fine aerosol mass concentration averaged only 2.1 {plus minus} 0.7 {mu}g m{sup {minus}3}, while the average coarse mass concentration was 6.1 {plus minus} 1.8 {mu}g m{sup {minus}3}. Sulfur concentrations averaged 76 {plus minus} 14 ng m{sup {minus}3} in the fine fraction and 37 {plus minus} 9 ng m{sup {minus}3} in the coarse fraction. Only two factors explained about 90% of the data variability for the fine and coarse aerosol fractions. These were soil dust (represented mainly by Al, Si, Ti, Mn, and Fe) and biogenic aerosol (represented by K, P, Cl, S, Zn, and the aerosol mass concentration). Biogenic particles account for 55-95% of the airborne concentrations and consisted of leaf fragments, pollen grains, fungi, algae, and other types of particles. It is possible that biogenic particles can play an important role in the global aerosol budget and in the global biogeochemical cycles of various elements.

  20. Elemental characteristics of aerosols emitted from a coal-fired heating plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Size differentiated aerosols were collected downstream from a heating plant fueled with eastern coal and analyzed using particle induced X-ray emission technique. Based on aerosol masses collected in various size ranges, the aerosol size distribution is determined to be trimodal, with the three peaks centered at 0.54 microns, 4.0 microns, and 11.0 microns, respectively. Of the various trace elements present in the aerosols, sulphur is the only element that shows very strong concentration in the smallest size group. Iron is strongly concentrated in the 4.0 micron group. Potassium, calcium, and titanium also exhibit stronger concentration in the 4.0 micron group than any other group. Other trace elements - vanadium, chromium, manganese, nickel, copper, and barium - are equally divided between the 0.54 microns and the 4.0 microns groups. Apparently, all of the trace elements - except S - enter aerosols during the initial formation and subsequent condensation phases in the combustion process. Excess concentration of sulphur in the 0.54 microns group can only be accounted for by recondensation of sulphur vapors on the combustion aerosols and gas-to-particle phase conversion of sulfate vapors at the stack top.

  1. Hydrogen chloride and aerosol ground cloud characteristics resulting from Space Shuttle launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Cofer, W. R., III; Woods, D. C.; Maddrea, G. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Airborne measurements of gaseous HCl, gaseous and aerosol HCl, particulates, relative humidity and temperature were obtained in ground clouds produced during three Space Shuttle launches. Partitioning of HCl between HCl aerosol and gaseous HCl was investigated as the solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with ambient air to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions for aqueous HCl aerosol formation generally agree with the measured HCl partitioning over HCl concentrations from 0.5 to 36 ppm. HCl concentration dispersion within four cloud segments at time t (min) was evaluated using the expression C = C(0) (t to the alpha power) where C(0) varied from 145 to 2250 ppm and alpha varied from -1.14 to -1.73. Aerosol fallout from the exhaust clouds was measured with time by monitoring HCl concentrations and aerosol distributions 100 m below the cloud as it drifted away from the launch site. Significant amounts of HCl were found to be removed by fallout of particles in the 80-220 micron diameter range up to 30 min after launch.

  2. Monitoring of Sahelian aerosol and Atmospheric water vapor content characteristics from sun photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizoun, C. A.; Podaire, A.; Dedieu, G.

    1994-11-01

    Atmospheric measurements in two Sahelian sites in West Africa are presented and analyzed. The measurements were performed using a sun photometer with five bands in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum. This instrument measures spectral values of the solar irradiances that are used to derive the aerosol optical thickness in three bands; the two other bands are used to derive the integrated atmospheric water vapor content using a differential absorption method. The Angstroem exponent, which is an estimate of the aerosol particle size, is derived from the spectral dependence of the optical thickness. Although the sites were located far from Sahara Desert aerosol sources, the observed aerosol optical thicknesses were high, with a mean annual value of 0.5 at 550 nm. The spectral dependence of aerosol optical thickness is generally low, with a mean annual value of Angstroem exponent of 0.4. The aerosol optical thickness and the atmosphereic water vapor content are both characterized by high temporal variability and exhibit seasonal cycles. From these measurements, climatological values and associated probability distribution laws are proposed.

  3. Micro-physical properties of carbonaceous aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Tápai, Cs.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the authors propose laser ablation as a highly versatile tool for carbonaceous aerosol generation. The generated carbonaceous particles can be used as a model aerosol for atmospheric black carbon. Various microphysical properties including mass concentration, size distribution and morphology of aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a high purity graphite sample were investigated in detail. These measurements proved that the proposed method can be used to generate both primary particles and fractal aggregates with a high yield. As a further advantage of the method the size distribution of the generated aerosol can cover a wide range, and can be tuned accurately with laser fluence, the ambient composition or with the volumetric flow rate of the carrier gas.

  4. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: State of the art.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of combustion aerosols on human health is well documented byepidemiological studies, however the effect of low concentrations of ultrafineparticles on the human lung are not yet fully understood. With the advent ofnovel measurement technologies for simultaneous charact...

  5. Sensitivity of thermal infrared sounders to the chemical and micro-physical properties of UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulphate aerosols and their chemical and micro-physical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact to the UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealized UTLS sulphate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulphuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interferring parameters like the ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile

  6. Application of both a physical theory and statistical procedure in the analyses of an in vivo study of aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.H.; Swift, D.L.; Yang, Y.H.

    1995-12-01

    Regional deposition of inhaled aerosols in the respiratory tract is a significant factor in assessing the biological effects from exposure to a variety of environmental particles. Understanding the deposition efficiency of inhaled aerosol particles in the nasal and oral airways can help evaluate doses to the extrathoracic region as well as to the lung. Dose extrapolation from laboratory animals to humans has been questioned due to significant physiological and anatomical variations. Although human studies are considered ideal for obtaining in vivo toxicity information important in risk assessment, the number of subjects in the study is often small compared to epidemiological and animal studies. This study measured in vivo the nasal airway dimensions and the extrathoracic deposition of ultrafine aerosols in 10 normal adult males. Variability among individuals was significant. The nasal geometry of each individual was characterized at a resolution of 3 mm using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and acoustic rhinometry (AR). The turbulent diffusion theory was used to describe the nonlinear nature of extrathoracic aerosol deposition. To determine what dimensional features of the nasal airway were responsible for the marked differences in particle deposition, the MIXed-effects NonLINear Regression (MIXNLIN) procedure was used to account for the random effort of repeated measurements on the same subject. Using both turbulent diffusion theory and MIXNLIN, the ultrafine particle deposition is correlated with nasal dimensions measured by the surface area, minimum cross-sectional area, and complexity of the airway shape. The combination of MRI and AR is useful for characterizing both detailed nasal dimensions and temporal changes in nasal patency. We conclude that a suitable statistical procedure incorporated with existing physical theories must be used in data analyses for experimental studies of aerosol deposition that involve a relatively small number of human subjects.

  7. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  8. Composition and Size Characteristics of Aerosols at Gosan Super-site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Kang, K.

    2008-12-01

    To examine the characteristics of size and compositions of particles at Gosan, ABC and ACE-Asia Super site, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 aerosols were collected using Cyclone from August 2007 to June 2008. The 37mm Teflon filters and Quarts filters were used for water-soluble ions, and elemental ad organic carbon analysis. In total, 37 sets of daily sample were obtained and analyzed. The average (minimum, maximum) mass concentrations of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 were respectably 29.0(7.5, 69.8), 18.2(3.9, 52.9) and 14.2(1.3, 29.5) ug/m3, respectably. The maximum concentration of PM10 mass was the highest in May, which was mainly due to Asian dust events. On the other hand, the maximum mass of PM2.5 and PM1.0 was observed in February, which seemed to be affected by pollution plumes. The median concentration of PM2.5 mass was, however, the highest in June, which is ascribed to strong photochemical activity. The average mass concentrations of NO3-, SO42- and NH4+ were 8.87, 14.41 and 2.99 ug/m3 for PM10. 8.36, 7.23 and 4.17 ug/m3 for PM2.5. 4.41, 10.67 and 2.81 ug/m3 for PM1.0. The ratio of SO42-, NH4+ and K+ concentrations to mass decreased with PM cut-off size. However NO3- showed opposite trend. The ratios of NO3- and SO42- concentrations in PM1.0 to PM10 were greater than 0.6 and less than 0.4, respectably. The results of carbonaceous measurements will be presented in the meeting.

  9. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  10. Characteristics and composition of atmospheric aerosols in Phimai, central Thailand during BASE-ASIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; Bell, Shaun W.

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols were made in Phimai, central Thailand (15.183°N, 102.565°E, elevation: 206 m) during the BASE-ASIA field experiment from late February to early May in 2006. The observed aerosol loading was sizable for this rural site (mean aerosol scattering: 108 ± 64 Mm-1; absorption: 15 ± 8 Mm-1; PM10 concentration: 33 ± 17 μg m-3), and dominated by submicron particles. Major aerosol compounds included carbonaceous (OC: 9.5 ± 3.6 μg m-3; EC: 2.0 ± 2.3 μg m-3) and secondary species (SO42-: 6.4 ± 3.7 μg m-3, NH4+: 2.2 ± 1.3 μg m-3). While the site was seldom under the direct influence of large forest fires to its north, agricultural fires were ubiquitous during the experiment, as suggested by the substantial concentration of K+ (0.56 ± 0.33 μg m-3). Besides biomass burning, aerosols in Phimai during the experiment were also strongly influenced by industrial and vehicular emissions from the Bangkok metropolitan region and long-range transport from southern China. High humidity played an important role in determining the aerosol composition and properties in the region. Sulfate was primarily formed via aqueous phase reactions, and hygroscopic growth could enhance the aerosol light scattering by up to 60%, at the typical morning RH level of 85%. The aerosol single scattering albedo demonstrated distinct diurnal variation, ranging from 0.86 ± 0.04 in the evening to 0.92 ± 0.02 in the morning. This experiment marks the first time such comprehensive characterization of aerosols was made for rural central Thailand. Our results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow.

  11. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  12. Sensitivity of the remote sensing reflectance of ocean and coastal waters to uncertainties in aerosol characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Garay, M. J.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing is a powerful tool for optical oceanography and limnology to monitor and study ocean, coastal, and inland water ecosystems. However, the highly spatially and temporally variable nature of water conditions and constituents, as well as atmospheric conditions are challenging factors, especially for spaceborne observations.Here, we study the quantitative impact of uncertainties in the spectral aerosol optical and microphysical properties, namely aerosol optical depth (AOD), spectral absorption, and particle size, on the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) of simulated typical open ocean and coastal waters. Rrs is related to the inherent optical properties of the water column and is a fundamental parameter in ocean optics retrievals. We use the successive order of scattering (SOS) method to perform radiative transfer calculations of the coupled system of atmosphere and water. The optics of typical open ocean and coastal waters are simulated with bio-optical models. We derive sensitivities by comparing spectral SOS calculations of Rrs with a reference aerosol model against similar calculations performed using a different aerosol model. One particular focus of this study lies on the impact of the spectral absorption of dust and brown carbon, or similar particles with greater absorption at short wavelengths on Rrs. The results are presented in terms of the minimum expected error in Rrs due to the choice of an incorrect aerosol model during the atmospheric correction of ocean color remote sensing data from space. This study is independent of errors related to observational data or retrieval techniques.The results are relevant for quantifying requirements of aerosol retrievals to derive accurate Rrs from spaceborne observations, such as NASA's future Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission.

  13. Estimates of aerosol species scattering characteristics as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.

    The absorption of water by ambient aerosols can significantly increase the light scattering coefficient and thereby affect issues such as visibility and climate forcing. Although water absorption by inorganic compounds and mixtures of inorganic compounds can often be modeled with adequate certainty for most applications, modeling water uptake by organic aerosols at present is speculative. In this paper, we present data in the form of f (RH)=b scat(RH)/b scat,dry , where bscat(RH) is the scattering coefficient measured at some relative humidity (RH)>20% and bscat,dry is the scattering coefficient measured at RH <20%. The f(RH) has been measured at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The f(RH) curves obtained from these two sites, which show distinctly different aerosol composition and average RH values, are compared. We also present comparisons between the measured water uptake by ambient aerosol with modeled water uptake by inorganic compounds to estimate the water uptake by organic aerosol.

  14. Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Meklati, Brahim Youcef; Cecinato, Angelo

    Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated. Organic aerosol contents varied broadly among the plant units, depending upon nature of the manufactured products. The percent composition of all classes of compounds investigated in ambient atmosphere was similar to those observed indoor at industrial plant units. Organic acids, n-alkanoic as well as n-alkenoic, appeared by far the most abundant organic constituents of aerosols, both indoor and outdoor, ranging from 7.7 to 19.8 and from 12.7 to 17.1 μg m -3, respectively. The huge occurrence of acids and n-alkanes in ambient aerosols was consistent with their high levels present in oil and fat materials. Among minor components of aerosols, n-alkan-2-ones and PAH, seemed to be related to thermally induced ageing and direct combustion of raw organic material used for oil and soap production.

  15. Characteristics of atmospheric aerosols containing heavy metals measured on Fukue Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidemori, Takehiro; Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Kinugawa, Takashi; Yabushita, Akihiro; Ohashi, Masafumi; Miyoshi, Takao; Irei, Satoshi; Takami, Akinori; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yoshino, Ayako; Suzuki, Ryota; Yumoto, Yayoi; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2014-11-01

    To investigate transport and chemical compositions of fine aerosols in the East Asian region, aerosol chemical components and their mixing states were measured at Fukue Island in the spring of 2010. Off-line chemical analyses using an ion chromatographic analyzer and an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer for the aerosols sampled by a high volume sampler have also been conducted. The mixing state and temporal variation of number concentrations of the particles containing lead (Pb) and vanadium (V) were studied by using a laser ionization single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (LISPA-MS). The temporal variation of number concentrations of particles containing Pb measured by the LISPA-MS is well consistent with those obtained by the chemical analysis of the aerosols sampled by the high volume sampler. The Pb-containing particles were classified into four types from the statistical analysis on the basis of the single-particle mass spectra with assists of laboratory experiments. It is estimated that 52% of observed particles containing Pb were originated from coal combustion. The concentration-weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis suggests that these particles are mainly transported from China continent. The V-containing particles were classified into three types. The 41% of V-containing particles were internally mixed with sea salt and the result of CWT analysis suggests that the potentially anthropogenic V-containing particles possibility emitted from ships are mixing with sea salt in the region that is highly loaded with sea salt in the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Ambient measurements of chemical and physical properties of organic aerosols: Insights into formation, growth, and heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Luke D.

    Organic aerosols are a ubiquitous component of the troposphere, from heavily polluted cities to the remote Arctic. In Chapters II, III, and V of this dissertation, the formation of organic aerosol through observations of ambient size distributions is addressed. Chapter IV presents a new pathway for the formation of nitrous acid (HONO) in the urban atmosphere. In Chapter II, the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micron aerosol was measured at a suburban forested site in North Carolina. Two events were identified in which particle growth, presumably by gas-to-particle conversion, was dominated by accumulation of organic aerosol mass. Growth rates between 1.2 nm hr-1 and 4.9 nm hr-1 were observed. Using a mass-spectral deconvolution method coupled with linear regression analysis, the sub-micron organic aerosol mass observed during the campaign, and during events, was determined to have been influenced by both local and regional secondary processes with only a minor influence from combustion sources. In Chapter III, the chemical characteristics of sub-10-micron aerosol were explored as a function of ambient particle size at a coastal and inland site in New England. Average organic carbon (OC) concentrations of 4.9 microg C m-3 and 3.4 microg C m-3 were observed at the coastal site at the Isles of Shoals (IOS) and at the slightly inland site at Thompson Farm (TF), respectively. An average of 84 and 72% of OC was found to be water-soluble at IOS and TF, respectively. Size distributions indicate that the formation of dicarboxylic acids, especially oxalic acid, is driven by aqueous-phase reactions. A chemical fingerprint analysis suggests that all water-soluble OC at IOS resembles secondary organic aerosol (SOA), while WSOC at TF appears to result from mixed sources. In Chapter IV, a newly identified formation pathway for nitrous acid (HONO) is presented. HONO is an important precursor to hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere and thus contributes to the oxidative

  17. Anthropometrics, Physical Performance, and Injury Characteristics of Youth American Football

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Shane V.; Ausborn, Ashley; Diao, Guoqing; Johnson, David C.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Atkins, Rickie; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P.; Cortes, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prior research has described the anthropometric and physical performance characteristics of professional, collegiate, and high school American football players. Yet, little research has described these factors in American youth football and their potential relationship with injury. Purpose: To characterize anthropometric and physical performance measures, describe the epidemiology of injury, and examine the association of physical performance measures with injury among children participating within age-based divisions of a large metropolitan American youth football league. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Demographic, anthropometric, and physical performance characteristics and injuries of 819 male children were collected over a 2-year period (2011-2012). Injury data were collected by the league athletic trainer (AT) and coaches. Descriptive analysis of demographic, anthropometric, and physical performance measures (40-yard sprint, pro-agility, push-ups, and vertical jump) were conducted. Incidence rates were computed for all reported injuries; rates were calculated as the number of injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs). Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify whether the categories of no injury, no-time-loss (NTL) injury, and time-loss (TL) injury were associated with physical performance measures. Results: Of the 819 original participants, 760 (92.8%) completed preseason anthropometric measures (mean ± SD: age, 11.8 ± 1.2 years; height, 157.4 ± 10.7 cm; weight, 48.7 ± 13.3 kg; experience, 2.0 ± 1.8 years); 640 (78.1%) players completed physical performance measures. The mean (±SD) 40-yard sprint and pro-agility measures of the players were 6.5 ± 0.6 and 5.7 ± 0.5 seconds, respectively; the number of push-ups and maximal vertical jump height were 16.5 ± 9.3 repetitions and 42.3 ± 8.4 cm, respectively. Players assigned to different teams within age divisions demonstrated no differences in

  18. Overview of atmospheric aerosol studies in Malaysia: Known and unknown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; San Lim, Hwee; Latif, Mohd Talib; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul Amalin Fatihah; Liew, Juneng

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols particularly those originated from anthropogenic sources can affect human health, air quality and the regional climate system of Southeast Asia (SEA). Population growth, and rapid urbanization associated with economic development in the SEA countries including Malaysia have resulted in high aerosol concentrations. Moreover, transboundary smoke plumes add more aerosols to the atmosphere in Malaysia. Nevertheless, the aerosol monitoring networks and/or field studies and research campaigns investigating the various aerosol properties are not so widespread over Malaysia. In the present work, we summarize and discuss the results of previous studies that investigated the aerosol properties over Malaysia by means of various instrumentation and techniques, focusing on the use of remote sensing data to examine atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore, we identify gaps in this research field and recommend further studies to bridge these knowledge gaps. More specifically gaps are identified in (i) monitoring aerosol loading and composition over urban areas, (ii) examining the influence of dust, (iii) assessing radiative effects of aerosols, (iv) measuring and modelling fine particles and (v) quantifying the contribution of long range transport of aerosols. Such studies are crucial for understanding the optical, physical and chemical properties of aerosols and their spatio-temporal characteristics over the region, which are useful for modelling and prediction of aerosols' effects on air quality and climate system.

  19. Characteristics of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) constitutes an effective method to transport small amounts of different materials in the form of a solid aerosol. In this report, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the analysis of those aerosols produced by OC. For this purpose, materials were catapulted using a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. A second Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was used for LIBS analysis of the ejected particles. Data processing of aerosols was conducted using conditional data analysis. Also, the standard deviation method was used for the qualitative identification of the ejected particles. Two modes of interaction in OC (OC with focused or defocused pulses) have been evaluated and discussed. LIBS demonstrates that the distribution (spreading) of the ejected particles along the propagation axis increased as a function of the interpulse delay time. The mass density and the thickness of the target also play an important role in OC-LIBS.

  20. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie-Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-06-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October-May) and lower in the wet season (June-September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand.

  1. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Aerosol–cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascentmore » (ω500  <  −25 hPa day−1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day−1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.« less

  2. Characteristics and radiative impact of the aerosol generated by the Canberra firestorm of January 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. M.; O'Brien, D. M.; Campbell, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive fires in southeastern Australia in January 2003 culminated in the Canberra firestorm of 18 January. The fires generated a pall of smoke that blanketed the Canberra area for the following week and affected the region for most of the following month. Analysis of Sun photometer data shows that aerosol optical depths τ500 > 7 were observed during the week following the firestorm. During the subsequent month the smoke aerosol dispersed, although background conditions (τ500 < 0.1) did not return until after significant rain in late February. Analysis of aerosol optical properties retrieved from sky radiance scans shows remarkably high single scattering albedo (ϖ440 ˜ 0.96) with only a small depression evident in the week following the firestorm. This indicates that the aerosols were significantly less absorbing than would be expected from smoke freshly generated by flaming combustion, possibly a result of inefficient combustion due to the extreme intensity of the fire, and marks them out as quite distinct from the more absorbing biomass burning aerosols encountered in the savannas of tropical Australia. The high single scattering albedo gave rise to mean radiative forcings of -50 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and -172 W m-2 at the surface during the week following the firestorm. Maximum heating rates are depressed by a factor of two at ϖ440 = 0.96 compared with ϖ440 = 0.88. Nevertheless, for plausible atmospheric profiles the large optical depths caused heating rates peaking at more than 10 K/day near the top of the smoke layer. The layer stabilized the lower troposphere through a combination of reduced surface heating and a positive gradient in heating rate through most of the layer. The enhanced stability suppressed surface temperatures and winds during the week following the firestorm, reducing the risk of renewed fire danger, and suggesting a useful role for aerosol effects in weather prediction models.

  3. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  4. Aerosol Chemical and Physical Properties Observed over Puerto Rico in the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusino-Atresino, R.; Xia, L.; Song, F.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols that originate in Africa and are transported over the Atlantic Ocean have potential impacts over the Caribbean region. To investigate aerosol properties over this region, air sampling was conducted at San Juan Cape (18.46°N, 66.12°W), Puerto Rico during the summer months in 2006. Aerosol samples were collected by both commercial PM2.5 sampler and in-house fabricated TSP sampler. Analyses of aerosols were made through the use of the following instrumental methods: (1)Ion Chromatography for the determinations of water-soluble cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, methanesulfonate, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate); (2)Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for the concentrations of selected trace elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V); (3)Scanning Electron Microscopy for individual aerosol particle characterization. Crustal enrichment factors were calculated to determine the strength of crustal source. Preliminary results indicate that sodium (22 - 99 μg m- 3) and ammonium (1.1 - 50 μg m-3) were the major cations and chloride (1.5 - 99 μg m-3) and sulfate (35 μg m-3) were the dominant anions. Malonate (3.8 - 6.9 μg m- 3) was the most abundant organic anion. Atmospheric concentrations of iron ranged 0.30 - 3.3 ng m- 3. The elements, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V, were enriched by factors of 600 to 40,000 relative to their natural abundance in crustal soil. Principal components analysis indicates six assemblages of fifteen types of aerosol particles, dominated by Si - rich particles.

  5. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, Michael; Muñoz-Esparza, Domingo; Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Knoth, Oswald; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with ASAM (All Scale Atmospheric Model) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. This method is now also validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment) field campaign is used for both model initialization and comparisons. Several sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Additional simulation cases deal with modified surface characteristics and their impacts on the simulation results. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure and accurately reproduces the development of the daytime convective boundary layer measured by the Raman lidar.

  6. Aerosol characteristics in north-east India using ARFINET spectral optical depth measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B.; Subba, T.; Dahutia, P.; Bhuyan, P. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Gogoi, M. M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Chutia, L.; Ajay, P.; Biswas, J.; Bharali, C.; Borgohain, A.; Dhar, P.; Guha, A.; De, B. K.; Banik, T.; Chakraborty, M.; Kundu, S. S.; Sudhakar, S.; Singh, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Four years (2010-2014) of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 4 Indian Space Research Organisation's ARFINET (Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India) stations (Shillong, Agartala, Imphal and Dibrugarh) in the North-Eastern Region (NER) of India (lying between 22-30°N and 89-98°E) are synthesized to evolve a regional aerosol representation, for the first time. Results show that the columnar AOD (an indicator of the column abundance of aerosols) is highest at Agartala (0.80 ± 0.24) in the west and lowest at Imphal (0.59 ± 0.23) in the east in the pre-monsoon season due to intense anthropogenic bio-mass burning in this region aided by long-range transport from the high aerosol laden regions of the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), polluted Bangladesh and Bay of Bengal. In addition to local biogenic aerosols and pollutants emitted from brick kilns, oil/gas fields, household bio-fuel/fossil-fuel, vehicles, industries. Aerosol distribution and climatic impacts show a west to east gradient within the NER. For example, the climatological mean AODs are 0.67 ± 0.26, 0.52 ± 0.14, 0.40 ± 0.17 and 0.41 ± 0.23 respectively in Agartala, Shillong, Imphal and Dibrugarh which are geographically located from west to east within the NER. The average aerosol burden in NER ranks second highest with climatological mean AOD 0.49 ± 0.2 next to the Indo-Gangetic Plains where the climatological mean AOD is 0.64 ± 0.2 followed by the South and South-East Asia region. Elevated aerosol layers are observed over the eastern most stations Dibrugarh and Imphal, while at the western stations the concentrations are high near the surface. The climate implications of aerosols are evaluated in terms of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and consequent heating of the atmosphere in the region which follows AOD and exhibit high values in pre-monsoon season at all the locations except in Agartala. The highest ARF in the atmosphere occurs in the pre-monsoon season ranging from 48.6 Wm-2 in Agartala

  7. Characteristics of fine particle carbonaceous aerosol at two remote sites in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Schulze, Justin P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Artamonova, Maria; Chen, Boris; Imashev, Sanjar; Sverdlik, Leonid; Carmichael, Greg R.; Deminter, Jeff T.

    2011-12-01

    Central Asia is a relatively understudied region of the world in terms of characterizing ambient particulate matter (PM) and quantifying source impacts of PM at receptor locations, although it is speculated to have an important role as a source region for long-range transport of PM to Eastern Asia, the Pacific Ocean, and the Western United States. PM is of significant interest not only because of its adverse effect on public health but also due to its more recently realized role in climate change. To investigate the sources and characteristics of PM in the region, a series of PM 2.5 and PM 10 samples were collected on an every-other-day basis at two sites (termed "Bishkek" and "Teploklyuchenka") in the Central Asian nation of the Kyrgyz Republic (also known as Kyrgyzstan) for a full year from July 2008 to July 2009. These samples were analyzed using standard methods for mass, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-insoluble organic carbon by difference (OC minus WSOC) and a variety of molecular marker chemical species to be used in a chemical mass balance (CMB) model to apportion the sources of OC. These analyses indicate that approximately 19 ± 6.4% of the PM 2.5 mass at both sites throughout the year consists of OC. The carbonaceous component of PM 2.5 is dominated by OC, with OC/Total Carbon (TC) ratios being around 0.8 in the winter to almost 0.95 in the summer months. The CMB analysis indicated that mobile sources, i.e., gasoline and diesel engine exhaust, biomass combustion, and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene and α-pinene precursors in the summer months were the dominant sources of OC. A strong positive correlation was observed between non-biomass burning WSOC and the un-apportioned OC from the CMB analysis, indicating that some of this un-apportioned OC is WSOC and likely the result of SOA-forming atmospheric processes that were not estimated by the CMB analysis performed. In

  8. Characteristics of PM2.5 Carbonaceous Aerosol in Urban New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khwaja, H. A.; Dutkiewicz, V.; Briggs, R.; Siddique, A.; Regan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of carbonaceous fine aerosols, PM2.5 and size-segregated particulate samples (< 2.5 um, 2.5 - 4.2 um, 4.2 - 10 um, and 10 um) were collected during the summer in two urban sites of New York State viz., Botanical Garden (BTG), New York City and Empire State Plaza (ESP), Albany. Gas phase organic compounds were sampled with polyurethane foam (PUF) plugs. Particulate samples were acquired on quartz fiber filters using a high-volume air sampler (Hi-Vol) attached with a slotted impactor. Filters were sonicated in dichloromethane:methanol (9:1); extracts concentrated. A suite of more than 200 individual organic compounds was identified in the PM2.5 samples. Molecular markers, homologous compound series, and non-polar and polar organic compounds were detected at ng/m3 ambient concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Measurements of the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were also made. Organic compounds detected in the size-segregated samples were grouped into different classes including phthalates and adipates, n-alkanes, alkanoic acids, cyclic siloxanes, waxes, benzoates, polyethylene glycols, squalene, and 4-nitro-butylated phenol. Results indicated that these organic species were predominantly associated in the fine particle mode (< 2.5 um). Gaseous organic compounds trapped in the PUF appeared rich in phenol, 4-nitro-2,6-ditertbutylphenol, pentachlorophenol, benzoic acid, alkanoic acids (C6 - C16 ), PAHs (naphthalene to pyrene), and phthalates. The major part of the extractable and elutable organic carbon was found to correspond to a complex mixture of phthalates and adipates, benzoate esters, n-alkanes, methyl silicates, phosphate esters, aldehydes and ketones, alcohols, alkyl amines, nitrosamines, formamides, amides, morpholines, carboxylic acids, methyl and isopropyl esters, dicarboxylic acids, waxes, lactones, hopanes, ionol 2, and PAHs. The most abundant classes of compounds are

  9. Comparison of characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huizhong; Wu, Dui; Yu, Jianzhen

    2016-04-01

    Using the data on aerosol observed hourly by Marga ADI 2080 and Grimm 180, we compared the characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012. The mass concentration of aerosol appeared distinct between the two weather processes. During rainy weather, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components decreased obviously. During cold air-dust weather, the cleaning effect of cold air occurred much more suddenly and about a half day earlier than the dust effect. As a result, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components first dropped dramatically to a below-normal level and then rose gradually to an above-normal level. The ratio of PM2.5/PM10 and PM1/PM10 decreased, suggesting that dust-storm weather mainly brought in coarse particles. The proportion of Ca2+ in the total water-soluble components significantly increased to as high as 50 % because of the effect of dust weather. We further analysed the ionic equilibrium during rainy and cold air-dust weather, and compared it with that during hazy weather during the same period. The aerosol during rainy weather was slightly acidic, whereas that during hazy weather and cold air-dust weather was obviously alkaline, with that during cold air-dust weather being significantly more alkaline. Most of the anions, including SO4 2- and NO3 -, were neutralised by NH4 + during rainy and hazy weather, and by Ca2+ during cold air-dust weather.

  10. Chemical characteristics of aerosol and rain water during an El Niño and PDO influenced Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Pradhi; Rajput, Prashant; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-11-01

    According to the meteorological long-term variability pattern, year 2015 was influenced by El Niño and PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation; causes weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon). These conditions facilitate the assessment of chemical characteristics of fine-mode ambient aerosols (PM2.5; n = 48) and individual rain waters (pH: 6.4-7.6; n = 15) during the South-west monsoon (July-September 2015) in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP; Kanpur). Water-soluble ionic species (WSIS) have been measured to assess the undergoing processes (neutralization, formation and below-cloud scavenging) and estimate their dry and wet deposition fluxes. The ∑WSIS varies from 4 to 32 μg/m3 in PM2.5, whereas it ranges from 32 to 102 mg/L in rain waters. The NH4+ and SO42- are found to be predominant in PM2.5 (16-120 μg/m3), whereas HCO3- and Ca2+ are predominant in rain water samples. The difference in chemical composition of PM2.5 and rain water is largely attributed to additional contribution of coarse-mode mineral dust in rain water. The Ca2+ and Mg2+ in both aerosols and rain water samples are associated with HCO3-. The NO3- and SO42- are neutralized predominantly by NH4+ and ∑-/∑+ ratio is ≈ 1 in both aerosols and rain waters. Furthermore, co-variability of NO3- with nss-Ca2+ in PM2.5 indicates role of fine-mode mineral dust surface in the formation of ammonium nitrate. Characteristic mass ratios (HCO3-/Ca2+ and SO42-/NH4+) in rain water look quite similar to those in aerosols (PM2.5). This suggests that below-cloud scavenging is predominant mechanism of aerosols wash-out. Dry deposition fluxes of Mg2+, NH4+ and SO42- are ∼13% of their wet deposition fluxes, whereas for K+, Ca2+ and NO3- it is <6%.

  11. Composition and Characteristics of Aerosols in the Southern High Plains of Texas (USA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol samples on polycarbonate filters were collected daily for several years in the Southern High Plains region of western Texas. Selected samples representing a variety of size modes, locations, and air quality conditions were analyzed by PIXE. Silicon and other crustal elements dominated duri...

  12. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are a major sink for atmospheric aerosols. Hence it has been suggested that (i) increased tree planting in urban areas might lead to a reduction in aerosol particle concentrations and thus a reduction in respiratory conditions and heart complications, and (ii) forests may be responsible for removing a disproportionately large fraction of potentially climate-relevant fine and ultra-fine aerosol particles from the atmosphere. However, larger uncertainties remain with respect to controls on uptake rates for forests. E.g. the deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements, the influence of particle size and composition, the role of leaf surface morphology and stomatal aperture in surface uptake. Improved understanding of the relative importance of these factors and the variability across different tree species should help determine how much of a sink naturally occurring and planted forests can provide downstream of fine particle production. In this study, a sample of trees native to southern Indiana were exposed to ultra-fine aerosol particle populations in a 1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m Teflon chamber. Stable particle size distributions (PSD) with geometric mean diameters (GMD) ranging from 40 to 80 nm were generated from sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite solutions using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS). The aerosol stream was diluted using scrubbed and dried zero air to allow a variation of total number concentration across two orders of magnitude. PSD in the chamber are continuously measured using a TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) comprising an Electrostatic Classifier (EC model 3080) attached to a Long DMA (LDMA model 3081) and a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The composition of the chamber air was also monitored for carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor

  13. Development towards a global operational aerosol consensus: basic climatological characteristics of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, W. R.; Reid, J. S.; Benedetti, A.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Lu, S.; Sekiyama, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Brooks, M. E.; Eck, T. F.; Iredell, M.; Hansen, J. A.; Jorba, O. C.; Juang, H.-M. H.; Lynch, P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Moorthi, S.; Mulcahy, J.; Pradhan, Y.; Razinger, M.; Sampson, C. B.; Wang, J.; Westphal, D. L.

    2014-06-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a rapid development in the number and quality of global aerosol models intended for operational forecasting use. Indeed, most centers with global numerical weather prediction (NWP) capabilities have some program for aerosol prediction. These aerosol models typically have differences in their underlying meteorology as well as aerosol sources, sinks, microphysics and transformations. However, like similar diversity in aerosol climate models, the aerosol forecast models have fairly similar overall bulk error statistics for aerosol optical thickness (AOT)-one of the few aerosol metrics that is globally available. Experience in climate and weather prediction has shown that in situations such as this where there are several independent models, a multi-model ensemble or consensus will be top performing in many key error metrics. Further, multi-model ensembles provide a highly valuable tool for forecasters attempting to predict severe aerosol events. Here we present the first steps in developing a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble intended for eventual operational and basic research use. Drawing from members of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, five day AOT forecasts are analyzed for December 2011 through November 2012 from four institutions: ECMWF, JMA, NASA GSFC, and NRL/FNMOC. For dust, we also include the NOAA NGAC product in our analysis. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (NMMC) and UK Met office dust product have also recent become available with ICAP, but have insufficient data to be included in this analysis period. A simple consensus ensemble of member and mean AOT fields for modal species (e.g., fine and coarse mode, and a separate dust ensemble) is used to create the ICAP Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME). The ICAP-MME is run daily at 0Z for 6 hourly forecasts out to 120 h. Basing metrics on comparisons to 21 regionally

  14. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha

    Generally, industrial and transport sectors are considered as major contributors of air pollution but recently, biomass burning is also reported as a major source of atmospheric aerosols (1, 2) especially in the developing world where solid fuels such as dung cake, wood and crop residues are used in traditional cooking which are responsible for poor air quality, respiratory problems and radiative forcing etc .In India, most of the research has been focused on emission estimates from biomass burning and cooking. No effort has been made to understand the chemistry and sources of fine aerosols in rural areas during cooking hours. This study fills this knowledge gap and strengthens our understanding about abundance of various chemical constituents of atmospheric aerosols emitted during cooking hours.Aerosol samples were collected from village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (~6m). The aerosol samples were collected on 8 hourly basis at a flow rate of 1 LPM. Water extracts of these filters were analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). During cooking period, the concentration of the major ions followed the order of Ca2+> SO42-> NO3-> Cl-> K+> NH4+> Mg2+> Na2+> F-. Among anion SO42 (5 µg/m3) showed highest value and in case of cations Ca2+ (7.32µg/m3) has highest value.

  15. The Migration Characteristics of Radioactive Aerosol from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantong, Liu; Jinzhou, Du

    2014-05-01

    As a result of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident (FUNA), lots of radioactive materials were released and transported to the world. In order to assess the impacts caused by the FUNA to China, the transport pathways of aerosols arrived in China were studied in detail. The analysis data were mainly collected from the national nuclear security administration of China from 31st, March to 22nd, April 2011. The air mass trajectory figures plotted by the NOAA HYSPLIT MODEL were used to explain the aerosols' movements. Heilongjiang was the first province to report on the detection of 131I in its aerosol samples on 26th, March 2011 in China. The maximum of 131I was reported to be 8.01mBq/m3 in Jilin Province on 4th April. However, the highest activities of 137Cs and 134Cs were found to be 1.55mBq/m3 and 1.43mBq/m3 respectively in Xinjiang Province on 8th April. In addition, the statistical ratios of 131I/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs were 0-26.43 with an average of 2.57 and 0-1.8 with an average of 0.34. Based on the relationships of radionuclides' activities in aerosol between different cities (e.g. Beijing and Liaoning, Beijing and Xinjiang), using canonical correlation analysis, five routes of transmission reaching the mainland were summarized: a. from the Arctic Pole, b. from the North America, c. from the India Peninsula and India Ocean, d. from the Western Pacific Ocean and Japan, e. comprehensive influences between different cities of China. Moreover, some important meteorological factors influencing the aerosols' transportation, such as the global monsoon, rainfall, and wind direction, were also discussed.

  16. Some physical and chemical properties of the arctic winter aerosol in Northeastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaitch, W. R.; Hoff, R. M.; Melnichuk, S.; Hogan, A. W.

    1984-06-01

    The results of surface and aircraft measurments of Arctic aerosol arriving at Igoolik, Northwest Territories, Canada during late February 1982 are reported. Concentrations of Aitken nuclei and cloud condensation nuclei as well as the aerosol light-scattering coefficient were measured several times a day. Little indication of any diurnal change in particle concentration was found in the size range betwen 0.2 and 4.0 millimicrons in diameter. A clear difference was detected in the quality of the air reaching Igoolik on one day, (Feb. 23) and this was associated with a doubling of the particle concentration the apparent particulate mass increased from about 6 to about 11 mg/cu. m. Over the same period impacted aerosols were composed of 15 to 50 percent water soluble compounds before 23 February and 40-100 percent thereafter. Sulfate was the dominant chemical species in all cases. Vertical profiles of the large aerosol particles obtained with an airborned nephelometer suggest a slightly enhanced concentration at the surface and a uniform concentration in the lower troposphere.

  17. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of tar balls observed during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. L.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, A.; Day, D.; Lee, T.; Wang, C.; Carrico, C.; Carrillo, J.; Cowin, J. P.; Collett, J.; Iedema, M. J.

    2005-11-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western United States and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field-collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or "tar balls," were present in samples collected during episodes of high particle light scattering coefficients that occurred during the peak of a smoke/haze event. The highest concentrations of light-absorbing carbon from a dual-wavelength aethalometer (λ = 370 and 880 nm) occurred during periods when the particles were predominantly tar balls, indicating they do absorb light in the UV and near-IR range of the solar spectrum. Closure experiments of mass concentrations and light scattering coefficients during periods dominated by tar balls did not require any distinct assumptions of organic carbon molecular weight correction factors, density, or refractive index compared to periods dominated by other types of organic carbon aerosols. Measurements of the hygroscopic behavior of tar balls using an environmental SEM indicate that tar balls do not exhibit deliquescence but do uptake some water at high (˜83%) relative humidity. The ability of tar balls to efficiently scatter and absorb light and to absorb water has important implications for their role in regional haze and climate forcing.

  18. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  19. The Relationship of Freshmen's Physics Achievement and Their Related Affective Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gungor, Almer (Abak); Eryilmaz, Ali; Fakioglu, Turgut

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the best-fitting structural equation model between the freshmen's physics achievement and selected affective characteristics related to physics. These characteristics are students' situational interest in physics, personal interest in physics, aspiring extra activities related to physics, importance of…

  20. Titan's Aerosol and Stratospheric Ice Opacities Between 18 and 500 Micrometers: Vertical and Spectral Characteristics from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; Samuelson, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical distributions and spectral characteristics of Titan's photochemical aerosol and stratospheric ices are determined between 20 and 560 per centimeter (500-18 micrometers) from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Results are obtained for latitudes of 15 N, 15 S, and 58 S, where accurate temperature profiles can be independently determined. In addition, estimates of aerosol and ice abundances at 62 N relative to those at 15 S are derived. Aerosol abundances are comparable at the two latitudes, but stratospheric ices are approximately 3 times more abundant at 62 N than at 15 S. Generally, nitrile ice clouds (probably HCN and HC3N), as inferred from a composite emission feature at approximately 160 per centimeter, appear to be located over a narrow altitude range in the stratosphere centered at approximately 90 km. Although most abundant at high northern latitudes, these nitrile ice clouds extend down through low latitudes and into mid southern latitudes, at least as far as 58 S. There is some evidence of a second ice cloud layer at approximately 60 km altitude at 58 S associated with an emission feature at approximately 80 per centimeter. We speculate that the identify of this cloud may be due to C2H6 ice, which in the vapor phase is the most abundant hydrocarbon (next to CH4) in the stratosphere of Titan. Unlike the highly restricted range of altitudes (50-100 km) associated with organic condensate clouds, Titan's photochemical aerosol appears to be well-mixed from the surface to the top of the stratosphere near an altitude of 300 km, and the spectral shape does not appear to change between 15 N and 58 S latitude. The ratio of aerosol-to-gas scale heights range from 1.3-2.4 at about 160 km to 1.1-1.4 at 300 km, although there is considerable variability with latitude, The aerosol exhibits a very broad emission feature peaking at approximately 140 per centimeter. Due to its extreme breadth and low wavenumber, we speculate that this feature may

  1. Characteristics of physical activity in patients with critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Satoko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Kubo, Kasuya; Matsumoto, Takuya; Hishinuma, Ryo; Terabe, Yuuta; Ando, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of physical activity of the patients with critical limb ischemia consecutively in order to clarify the characteristics of physical activity of critical limb ischemia. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve patients who were eligible for the 2 months of consecutive evaluation of the amount of physical activity were enrolled in the study (men: 11; woman: 1; mean age: 64.4 [range: 44–80]). A pedometer with an accelerometer was used for the measurement of the number of steps walked as an index of the amount of physical activity. Participants were asked to lead a regular life and no instruction was given as to the number of steps. [Results] The average number of daily steps walked was 2,323 steps (range: 404–6,505). There was no clear tendency in the number of amputation site-specific steps walked. There was also no correlation between the number of steps walked and age as well as the maximum strength of the knee-extension muscle, skin perfusion pressure of the sole and the dorsum, and QOL scores. [Conclusion] The number of steps walked of the patients with critical limb ischemia was remarkably low and no significant association with health-related QOL. PMID:28174472

  2. Carbonaceous aerosol over semi-arid region of western India: Heterogeneity in sources and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, A. K.; Aslam, M. Y.; Upadhyay, M.; Rengarajan, R.; Bhushan, R.; Rathore, J. S.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC)) and water-soluble inorganic species (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -) in PM10 and PM2.5 from Ahmedabad and Jodhpur (urban and semi-urban locations, respectively) in western India were measured during May-September, 2011. Stable isotope composition of carbonaceous aerosol (δ13C of TC) in PM10 samples was also determined. Average EC concentration in PM10 at Ahmedabad was 1 μg m- 3 (range: 0.34 to 3.4 μg m- 3), almost 80% of which remained in PM2.5. Similarly, 70% of EC in PM10 (average: 0.9 μg m- 3) resided in PM2.5 at Jodhpur. Average OC concentration at Ahmedabad was 6.4 μg m- 3 and 52% of this was found in PM2.5. On the contrary, OC concentration at Jodhpur was 40 μg m- 3, 80% of which was found in coarse particles contributing substantially to aerosol mass. δ13C of TC (average: - 27.5‰, range: - 29.6 to - 25.8‰) along with WSOC/EC ratio shows an increasing trend at Jodhpur suggesting the possibility of aging of aerosol, since aging results in enrichment of heavier isotope. OC and WSOC show significant correlations with K+ and not with EC, indicating biogenic origin of OC. Different size distributions are also exhibited by WSOC at the two stations. On the other hand, δ13C exhibits an inverse trend with sea-salt constituents at Ahmedabad, indicating the influence of air masses transported from the western/south-western region on carbonaceous aerosol. These results suggest that a strong heterogeneity exists in the sources of carbonaceous aerosol over this region and potential sources of non-combustion emissions such as bio-aerosol that need further investigation.

  3. Measurement of aerosol chemical, physical and radiative properties in the Yangtze delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Bergin, M. H.; Yu, X.; Liu, G.; Zhao, J.; Carrico, C. M.; Baumann, K.

    In order to understand the possible influence of aerosols on the environment in the agricultural Yangtze delta region of China, a one-month field sampling campaign was carried out during November 1999 in Linan, China. Measurements included the aerosol light scattering coefficient at 530 nm, σsp, measured at both dry relative humidity (RH<40%) and under ambient conditions (sample RH=63±19%), and the absorption coefficient at 565 nm, σap, for aerosol particles having diameters <2.5 μm (PM 2.5). At the same time, daily filter samples of PM 2.5 as well as aerosol particles having diameters <10 μm (PM 10) were collected and analyzed for mass, major ion, organic compound (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations in order to determine which anthropogenic chemical species were primarily responsible for aerosol light extinction. The aerosol loading in the rural Yangtze delta region was comparable to highly polluted urban areas, with mean and standard deviation (S.D.) values for σsp, σap and PM 2.5 of 353 Mm -1 (202 Mm -1), 23 Mm -1 (14 Mm -1) and 90 μg m -3 (47 μg m -3), respectively. A clear diurnal pattern was observed in σsp and σap with minimum values occurring in the middle of the day, most likely associated with the maximum midday mixing height. The ratio of the change in light scattering coefficient at ambient RH to that at controlled RH (RH<40%), Fσsp (RH), indicates that condensed water typically contributed ˜40% to the light scattering budget in this region. The mass scattering efficiency of the dry aerosol, E scat_2.5, and mass absorption efficiency of EC, E abs_2.5, have mean and S.D. values of 4.0 m 2 g -1 (0.4 m 2 g -1) and 8.6 m 2 g -1 (7.0 m 2 g -1), respectively. PM 2.5 concentrations in Linan and two other locations in the Yangtze delta, Sheshan and Changshu (which have monthly mean values ranging from ˜80 to 110 μg m -3), are all significantly higher than the proposed 24-h average US PM 2.5 NAAQS of 65 μg m -3. Organic compounds are

  4. Physical Basis, Premises, and Self-Consistency Checks of Aerosol Retrievals from TRMM VIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, Alexander; Stowe, Larry

    2000-12-01

    This paper outlines the processing stream for aerosol retrievals over oceans from the visible and infrared scanner [VIRS; a five-channel radiometer similar to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)] aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, launched in November 1997. Emphasis is on 1) the applying the previously developed AVHRR second-generation aerosol retrieval algorithm to VIRS data to derive an aerosol parameter, indicative of particle size; 2) removing the unwanted `thermal leak' signal in the 1.61-m channel; 3) giving examples of the first aerosol retrievals from space at this wavelength; and 4) assessing the accuracy of the retrievals with theoretical error analyses and empirical self- and interconsistency checks. Aerosol optical depths A1 and A2 are retrieved from reflected solar radiances in VIRS channels 1 and 2 centered at wavelengths 1 = 0.63 and 2 = 1.61 m, using two independent lookup tables. When A1 and A2 exceed a certain threshold Amin an effective Ångström exponent related to particle size is derived as = ln(A1/A2)/ln(1/2). Channel 2 is contaminated by a thermal leak, originating from a secondary spectral response peak centered at 5.2 m. If uncorrected, it leads to errors in A2 of 100% or more. To minimize this error, nighttime VIRS `dark' radiances in channel 2 have been related empirically to radiances in channels 4 and 5 (10.8 and 12 m, respectively), and view angle through regression analyses. The reflected component in channel-2 daytime measurements is estimated by subtracting the empirically derived thermal component from the total signal and is used in the retrieval of A2. Theoretical error

  5. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  6. Local aerosol concentrations and optical characteristics influenced by the Indonesian forest fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Jianfei; Minomura, Mitsuo; Kuze, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    1998-08-01

    Indonesian forest fire took place on Kalimantan and Sumatera islands in 1997 and continuously influenced the atmospheric conditions of South-East Asia nearly throughout the last half of that year. The color composed images of visible, near IR and IR channels from NOAA AVHRR daily data, arbitrarily assigned to red, green and blue respectively, were synthesized for distinguishing the smoke area. The data of three periods, the beginning, mid, and ending parts of the fire, were collected and analyzed in order to show the variation of atmosphere with the development of fire. A retrieval algorithm was established by use of Mie theory calculation and the radiative transfer codes. Local aerosol concentrations and properties over ocean parts between the two islands were derived. It is found that the aerosol optical thickness increased in accordance with the exacerbation of the fires. The changes of angstrom exponents show that smaller particle amounts were raised by the effects of burning.

  7. Aerosol Characteristics in the Marine Boundary Layer Over the Straits of Gibraltar - June 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    low relative humidity inhibited the growth of aerosols into the 1 um diameter range, particularly NaCl nuclei with their 75% deliquescence threshold...wind direction. The chemical composition of the nuclei for the 24th appeared to be mostly non-oceanic type nuclei with perhaps higher deliquescence RH...3 concentration (27 cm ). The chemistry data suggest less oceanic nuclei and perhaps more continental nuclei with higher deliquescence thresholds, and

  8. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over a high-altitude Western Ghats location in Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayasoorian, C.; Jayabalakrishnan, R. M.; Suguna, A. R.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2014-10-01

    Aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations were continuously monitored over a period of 2 years (April 2010 to May 2012) from a high-altitude location Ooty in the Nilgiris Mountain range in southern India to characterize the distinct nature of absorbing aerosols and their seasonality. Despite being remote and sparsely inhabited, BC concentrations showed significant seasonality with higher values (~ 0.96 ± 0.35 μg m-3) in summer (March to May), attributed to increased vertical transport of effluents in the upwind valley regions, which might have been confined to the surrounding valley regions within the very shallow winter boundary layer. The local atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) influence in summer was further modulated by the long-range transported aerosols from the eastern locations of Ooty. During monsoon (June-August), the concentrations were far reduced (~ 0.23 ± 0.06 μg m-3) due to intense precipitation. Diurnal variations were found conspicuous mainly during summer season associated with local ABL. The spectral absorption coefficients (αabs) depicted, in general, flatter distribution (mostly < 1.0 for more than 85% of daily mean values), suggesting the relative dominance of fossil fuel combustion, though showed marginal seasonal change with higher values of αabs in summer.

  9. Seasonal asymmetry in diurnal variation of aerosol optical characteristics over Pune, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandithurai, G.; Pinker, R. T.; Devara, P. C. S.; Takamura, T.; Dani, K. K.

    2007-04-01

    There is a large day-to-day variability in aerosol optical properties due to varied meteorological conditions that exhibit different diurnal asymmetry in different synoptic seasons. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångstrom exponent (AE) measured for a period of 3 years at Pune, an urban site in western India, were analyzed to study the diurnal variation and its seasonal dependence. Mean AOD at 500 nm in the premonsoon (March-May) period was about 0.42, while in the winter (December, January, and February) it was ˜0.38. AOD departures from the daily mean showed ±20% variation (which is equivalent to AOD of 0.08) in both seasons. A systematic seasonal asymmetry in diurnal variation was found. AOD is higher in the morning and lower in the afternoon during winter, mainly because of higher relative humidities, calm winds, and associated ground-based inversions that are conducive for haze, which persists till noon. However, in premonsoon, AODs are lower in the forenoon hours and higher in the afternoon hours because of higher air temperatures, strong convection, and stronger winds raising more dust locally and transporting it from Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan regions. The difference between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua derived AOD showed similar seasonal asymmetry in forenoon-afternoon difference in aerosol loading as observed at the experimental site.

  10. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  11. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  12. Anthropometric and physical characteristics of english academy rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Till, Kevin; Tester, Emma; Jones, Ben; Emmonds, Stacey; Fahey, Jack; Cooke, Carlton

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anthropometric and physical characteristics of English academy rugby league players by annual-age category (under 16s-under 20s) and between backs and forwards. Data were collected on 133 academy players over a 6-year period (resulting in a total of 257 assessments). Player assessments comprised of anthropometric (height, body mass, sum of 4 skinfolds) and physical (vertical jump, 10- and 20-m sprint, estimated V[Combining Dot Above]O2max via the yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1, absolute 1 repetition maximum [1RM], and relative squat, bench press, and prone row) measures. Univariate analysis of variance demonstrated significant (p ≤ 0.05) increases in height, body mass, vertical jump, absolute, and relative strength measures across the 5 annual-age categories (e.g., body mass: under 16s = 75.2 ± 11.1, under 20s = 88.9 ± 8.5 kg; vertical jump: under 16s = 45.7 ± 5.2, under 20s = 52.8 ± 5.4 cm; 1RM bench press: under 16s = 73.9 ± 13.2, under 20s = 114.3 ± 15.3 kg). Independent t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences between backs and forwards for anthropometric (e.g., under 16s body mass: backs = 68.4 ± 8.6, forwards = 80.9 ± 9.7 kg) and physical (e.g., under 19s 20-m sprint: backs = 3.04 ± 0.08, forwards = 3.14 ± 0.12s; under 18s relative squat: backs = 1.65 ± 0.18, forwards = 1.51 ± 0.17 kg·kg) characteristics that were dependent on the age category and measure assessed. Findings highlight that anthropometric and physical characteristics develop across annual-age categories and between backs and forwards in academy rugby league players. These findings provide comparative data for such populations and support the need to monitor player development in junior rugby league players.

  13. Water soluble ions in aerosols (TSP) : Characteristics, sources and seasonal variation over the central Himalayas, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathee, Lekhendra; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Rupakheti, Dipesh

    2016-04-01

    Atmspheric pollutants transported from South Asia could have adverse impact on the Himalayan ecosystems. Investigation of aerosol chemistry in the Himalayan region in Nepal has been limited on a temporal and spatial scale to date. Therefore, the water-soluble ionic composition of aerosol using TSP sampler was investigated for a year period from April 2013 to March 2014 at four sites Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom characterized as an urban, rural, semi-urban and remote sites in Nepal. During the study period, the highest concentration of major cation was Ca2+ with an average concentration of 8.91, 2.17, 7.85 and 6.42 μg m-3 and the highest concentration of major anion was SO42- with an average of 10.96, 4.06, 6.85 and 3.30 μg m-3 at Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom respectively. The soluble ions showed the decrease in concentrations from urban to the rural site. Correlations and PCA analysis suggested that that SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ were derived from the anthropogenic sources where as the Ca2+ and Mg2+ were from crustal sources. Our results also suggest that the largest acid neutralizing agent at our sampling sites in the central Himalayas are Ca2+ followed by NH4+. Seasonal variations of soluble ions in aerosols showed higher concentrations during pre-monsoon and winter (dry-periods) due to limited precipitation amount and lower concentrations during the monsoon which can be explained by the dilution effect, higher the precipitation lower the concentration. K+ which is regarded as the tracer of biomss burning had a significant peaks during pre-monsoon season when the forest fires are active around the regions. In general, the results of this study suggests that the atmospheric chemistry is influenced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Thus, soluble ionic concentrations in aerosols from central Himalayas, Nepal can provide a useful database to assess atmospheric environment and its impacts on human health and ecosystem in the southern side of central

  14. Physical and chemical characteristics of pitaya fruits at physiological maturity.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T A; Takahashi, L S A

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of the maturation process of pitaya fruit (Hylocereus undatus) to identify indicators that can be used to determine the point of physiological maturity and establish the optimal timing of physiological maturity for harvesting the fruit. A completely randomized experimental design was employed and four biological repeats were performed. Physiological maturity was assessed using various physical characteristics: longitudinal length (LL), equatorial diameter (ED), pericarp thickness (PeT), pulp thickness (PuT), fruit mass (FM), pulp mass (PuM), pericarp mass (PeM), pericarp percentage (%Pe), pulp percentage (%Pu), pulp/pericarp ratio (Pu/Pe), pericarp color index (CI), hue color angle (h°), lightness index (L*), chroma (C*), blue-yellow variation (b*), and green-red variation (a*). Additionally, chemical characteristics such as soluble solid content (SS), titratable acidity (TA), SS/TA ratio, and pH were screened. The data were statistically analyzed by fitting regression models and computing Pearson's correlation coefficients (P < 0.05). Physiological maturity in pitaya fruits occurred between the 30th and 32nd days after anthesis, and this proved to be the optimal period for harvest. At this time, the fruit was completely red with high SS, and had the recommended values of TA, pH, and SS/TA ratio. During this period, ED, PuT, FM, PuM, %Pu, and Pu/Pe increased while PeT, PeM, and %Pe fell; these changes are considered desirable by producers and/or consumers. PuM was the variable that displayed more strong's association with other variables in the analysis.

  15. Overview of the chemistry and physics of the Los Angeles aerosol from CIRPAS Twin Otter deployment during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Sorooshian, A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Lathem, T. L.; Lin, J. J.; Duong, H. T.; Nenes, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Calnex Twin Otter

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft participated in the 2010 CalNex field experiment, conducting 18 research flights between 4- and 28-May. The aircraft payload included an Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, UC San Diego), Aerodyne Compact Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (c-ToF-AMS, Caltech), Particle-into-Liquid Sampler coupled with Total Organic Carbon measurement (PILS-TOC, U. of Arizona), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe (DASH-SP, Caltech), and a Scanning Flow Condensation Nuclei Analyzer (SF-CCN, Georgia Tech), as well as a suite of Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs, CIRPAS) and Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs, Caltech). Flights focused on characterizing aerosol in the Los Angeles (LA) basin, with special attention to the evolution of the aerosol from source-rich to downwind areas. Two flights also probed the aerosol in the agricultural San Joaquin/Bakersfield area. Results indicate that organics and nitrate constitute the majority of the LA aerosol, with sulfate dominating near certain point sources. Aging is evident from AMS and PILS-TOC measurements of the organic aerosol, and nitrate is significantly enhanced in downwind areas. DMA and CPC data suggest that nucleation may occur as the LA plume is transported through basin outflow areas. Hygroscopicity is strongly correlated with incidence of morning marine layer and nitrate mass fraction, suggesting a connection between cloud processing, aerosol aging, and aerosol water uptake characteristics. This talk will present an overview of the CIRPAS Twin Otter deployment during CalNex. The audience is directed to more detailed posters and talks for the Twin Otter platform.

  16. The variation of characteristics and formation mechanisms of aerosols in dust, haze, and clear days in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhuang, Guoshun; Sun, Yele; An, Zhisheng

    A 4-year campaign from 2001 to 2004 monitoring PM 2.5 and TSP in the spring season in urban Beijing, China was performed to study the variation of characteristics and the different formation mechanisms of aerosols in dust, haze, and clear days. A total of 315 aerosol samples were collected and used in this study. The aerosols were more basic in dust days and more acidic in haze days. The ions presented in the order of SO42->Ca 2+≫ NO3->Cl -> NH4+>Na + in dust days, and of SO42-> NO3-> NH4+≫Cl ->Ca 2+>K + in haze days. Ions has been classified into three groups, "Na +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+", "K +, SO42-, Cl -", and " NO3-, NH4+", representing crust, pollution-crust, and pollution species, respectively. Crust and pollution ions were the main ion fractions in dust and haze days, respectively. The variation of Ca 2+/Al showed that the increase of dust in dust and haze days was from soil and construction, respectively. "CaCO 3, CaSO 4, and (NH 4) 2SO 4" and "(NH 4) 2SO 4, NH 4NO 3, and Ca(NO 3) 2" were the major species in dust and haze days, respectively. The formation of CaSO 4 on airborne soil particles and the formation of (NH 4) 2SO 4 and NH 4NO 3 were the predominant pathways of sulfate and nitrate formations in dust and haze days, respectively. Sulfate might be mainly formed through heterogeneous reactions in the aqueous surface layer on the pre-existing particles, while nitrate mainly through homogeneous gas-phase reactions in the spring season in Beijing. The formation of sulfate and nitrate was accelerated in dust and haze days.

  17. Characteristics of wintertime polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon assemblage in aerosol of the Southern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, V. Ž.; Pfendt, P. A.; Filipović, A. J.

    2007-09-01

    Features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) assemblage in aerosol samples collected from the atmosphere of Herceg Novi during the winter months of two successive years were studied. The results showed almost the same concentration profiles of identified PAHs for samples from the two periods analyzed, generally suggesting a similar origin. Diagnostic ratios indicated combustion of wood and coal, emissions from petrol and diesel engines, and dust resuspension as sources that predominantly contributed to the atmospheric PAH concentrations. Statistical analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) in particular, allowed us to identify the impact of meteorological parameters on PAH abundance.

  18. Physical and Permeability Characteristic of Recycle Glass-Kaolin Ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Sahar, M. R.; Safwan, A. P; Noorhidayah, C. M.

    2010-07-07

    A series of Recycle Glass-Kaolin ceramic has successful been made by solid state reaction and their physical and permeability characteristic has been studied. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to characterize the effect of OH group in the sample. It is found that the bulk density is in the range of 1.785gcm{sup -3} to 2.2817gcm{sup -3} while the impact energy is 1.785gcm{sup -3} to 2.2817gcm{sup -3} depending on the cullet content. Meanwhile, the permeability coefficient is found to be 5.208x10{sup -4}cms{sup -1} to 1.812x10{sup -4}cms{sup -1} which is in the reducing trend. The IR Spectroscopy shows that the OH group decrease, the permeability decreases.

  19. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from peatland fire in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia (2): Identification of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Haruo; Tohno, Susumu; Oda, Masafumi; Iriana, Windy; Lestari, Puji

    2015-06-01

    Smoke emitted from Indonesian peatland fires has caused dense haze and serious air pollution in Southeast Asia such as visibility impairment and adverse health impacts. To mitigate the Indonesian peatland fire aerosol impacts, an effective strategy and international framework based on the latest scientific knowledge needs to be established. Although several attempts have been made, limited data exist regarding the chemical characteristics of peatland fire smoke for the source apportionment. In order to identify the key organic compounds of peatland fire aerosols, we conducted intensive field studies based on ground-based and source-dominated sampling of PM2.5 in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, during the peatland fire seasons in 2012. Levoglucosan was the most abundant compound among the quantified organic compounds at 8.98 ± 2.28% of the PM2.5 mass, followed by palmitic acid at 0.782 ± 0.163% and mannosan at 0.607 ± 0.0861%. Potassium ion was not appropriate for an indicator of Indonesian peatland fires due to extremely low concentrations associated with smoldering fire at low temperatures. The vanillic/syringic acids ratio was 1.06 ± 0.155 in this study and this may be a useful signature profile for peatland fire emissions. Particulate n-alkanes also have potential for markers to identify impact of Indonesian peatland fire source at a receptor site.

  20. Development towards a global operational aerosol consensus: basic climatological characteristics of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, W. R.; Reid, J. S.; Benedetti, A.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Lu, S.; Sekiyama, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Brooks, M. E.; Eck, T. F.; Iredell, M.; Hansen, J. A.; Jorba, O. C.; Juang, H.-M. H.; Lynch, P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Moorthi, S.; Mulcahy, J.; Pradhan, Y.; Razinger, M.; Sampson, C. B.; Wang, J.; Westphal, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first steps in developing a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble intended for eventual operational and basic research use. Drawing from members of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, 5-day aerosol optical thickness (AOT) forecasts are analyzed for December 2011 through November 2012 from four institutions: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and Naval Research Lab/Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NRL/FNMOC). For dust, we also include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NOAA NGAC) product in our analysis. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre and UK Met Office dust products have also recently become members of ICAP, but have insufficient data to be included in this analysis period. A simple consensus ensemble of member and mean AOT fields for modal species (e.g., fine and coarse mode, and a separate dust ensemble) is used to create the ICAP Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME). The ICAP-MME is run daily at 00:00 UTC for 6-hourly forecasts out to 120 h. Basing metrics on comparisons to 21 regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, all models generally captured the basic aerosol features of the globe. However, there is an overall AOT low bias among models, particularly for high AOT events. Biomass burning regions have the most diversity in seasonal average AOT. The Southern Ocean, though low in AOT, nevertheless also has high diversity. With regard to root mean square error (RMSE), as expected the ICAP-MME placed first over all models worldwide, and was typically first or second in ranking against all models at individual sites. These results are encouraging; furthermore, as more global operational aerosol models come online, we expect their inclusion in a robust

  1. Orbital and Physical Characteristics of Meter-sized Earth Impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter G.; Wiegert, Paul; Clark, David; Tagliaferri, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We have analysed the orbits and ablation characteristics in the atmosphere of more than 60 earth-impacting meteoroids of one meter in diameter or larger. Using heights at peak luminosity as a proxy for strength, we find that there is roughly an order of magnitude spread in the apparent strength of the population of meter-sized impactors at the Earth. The orbits and physical strength of these objects are consistent with the majority being asteroidal bodies originating from the inner main asteroid belt. We find ~10-15% of our objects have a probable cometary (Jupiter-Family comet and/or Halley-type comet) origin based on orbital characteristics alone. Only half this number, however, show evidence for the expected weaker than average structure compared to asteroidal bodies. Almost all impactors show peak brightness between 20-40 km altitude. Several events have exceptionally high (relative to the remainder of the population) heights of peak brightness. These are physically most consistent with high microporosity objects, though all were on asteroidal-type orbits. We also find three events, including the Oct 8, 2009 airburst near Sulawesi, Indonesia, which display comparatively low heights of peak brightness, consistent with strong monolithic stones or iron meteoroids. Based on orbital similarity, we find a probable connection among several NEOs in our population with the Taurid meteoroid complex. No other major meteoroid streams show linkages with the pre-atmospheric orbits of our meter-class impactors. Our events cover almost four orders of magnitude in mass, but no trend in height of peak brightness is evident, suggesting no strong trend in strength with size for small NEOs, a finding consistent with the results of Popova et al (2011).

  2. Physical characteristics of a full-field digital mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2004-11-01

    The physical performance characteristics of a flat-panel clinical full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system were investigated for a variety of mammographic X-ray spectral conditions. The system was investigated using 26 kVp: Mo/Mo, 28 kVp: Mo/Rh, and 30 kVp: Rh/Rh, with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) "tissue equivalent material" of thickness 20, 45, and 60 mm for each of three X-ray spectra, resulting in nine different spectral conditions. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical cascaded linear systems-based model that has been developed independently by other investigators. The FFDM imager (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) uses an amorphous silicon (aSi:H) photodiode (100 μm pixel) array directly coupled to a cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. The spatial resolution of the digital mammography system was determined by measuring the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF). The noise power spectra (NPS) of the system were measured under the different mammographic X-ray spectral conditions at an exposure of approximately 10 mR to the detector from which corresponding detective quantum efficiencies (DQE) were determined. The experimental results provide additional information on the performance of the mammographic system for a broader range of experimental conditions than have been reported in the past. The flat-panel imager exhibits favorable physical quality characteristics under the conditions investigated. The experimental results were compared with theoretical estimates under various spectral conditions and demonstrated good agreement.

  3. Assessment of physical and structural characteristics of almond gum.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mudasir; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy

    2016-12-01

    Almond gum was investigated for its physical and structural characteristics in comparison to gum arabic. Among physical properties, bulk density was found to be 0.600±0.12g/mL and 0.502±0.20g/mL for almond and gum arabic respectively. Almond gum (0.820±0.13g/mL) displayed the maximum value for tapped density. Compressibility index of exudate gum powders varied from 26.79±1.47 to 37.46±0.50% and follow the order gum arabic>almond gum. Almond gum demonstrated good flow characteristics when compared to gum arabic. True density showed significant difference (p<0.05) among the exudate samples and it was recorded higher for gum arabic. The maximum value of porosity recorded in case of gum arabic indicates the presence of large number of interstitial spaces among its particles. Almond gum had fair flow character while good for the other exudate gum powder. Almond gum had relatively higher mineral content than gum arabic. The oil holding capacity of exudate gums varied from 0.87±0.05 to 0.92±0.02g/g. Exudate powder samples were found to lie in the first quadrant of the hue angle (0-90°) corresponding to the range of reddish-purple to yellow. The absence of peaks in the X-ray diffractograms of exudate samples reflects their amorphous nature. SEM micrographs revealed a lot of variability in shape and size of the exudate particles.

  4. Physiological and physical characteristics of elite dragon boat paddlers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sarah R; Smith, Richard M; Chapman, Philip G; Sinclair, Peter J; Funato, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to profile the physiological and physical characteristics of elite dragon boat paddlers, to identify characteristics that predict race performance and to quantify the metabolic energy contributions to simulated 200-m and 500-m dragon boat racing. Eleven, national level, male, Japanese dragon boat paddlers completed a battery of tests on a paddling ergometer including an incremental maximal aerobic capacity test, a 2-minute maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) test, and simulated 200-m and 500-m races. A physiological and physical profile of subjects was compiled. Results showed that 200-m race performance correlated with flexed arm girth and excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) measured in the 30 minutes after the MAOD test, whereas 500-m race performance correlated with body fat percentage, relaxed and flexed arm girth, MAOD, EPOC, and peak power during the MAOD test. Stepwise multiple regression revealed that flexed arm girth was the most powerful predictor of 200-m and 500-m race performance, followed by EPOC with the combination of these 2 factors able to explain 74% and 68% of the variance in 200-m and 500-m race performance, respectively. Aerobic energy contributions for 200-m (50 seconds) and 500-m (1 minute 50 seconds) races were (mean (95% confidence intervals)) 52.1% (range, 47.4-56.8%) and 67.5% (range, 60.1-77.8%), respectively. In conclusion, coaches should develop training programs targeted at developing upper-body musculature and increasing anaerobic capacity because these factors are the strongest predictors of 200-m and 500-m race performance. Given the substantial aerobic energy contributions even for a 200-m race event, coaches should aim to increase the maximal aerobic capacity of the paddler in preparation for both 200-m and 500-m events.

  5. Single mothers in Ontario: sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, E L; Offord, D R; Boyle, M H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics of single mothers in Ontario. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Ontario residents aged 15 years or older who participated in the Ontario Health Supplement survey conducted between December 1990 and April 1991; of 9953 eligible participants, 1540 were mothers with at least 1 dependent child (less than 16 years of age). OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence rates of sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics. RESULTS: Single mothers were significantly more likely than the mothers in 2-parent families to be poor, to be 25 years of age or less, to have mental health problems (dissatisfaction with multiple aspects of life, affective disorder ever and 1 or more psychiatric disorders in the past year or ever) and to use mental health services. When compared by income level, poor single mothers had a higher prevalence of all mental health outcomes measured; the difference was significant for anxiety disorder in the past year or ever and for 1 or more psychiatric disorders in the past year or ever. In a logistic regression analysis, single-mother status was found to have the strongest independent effect on predicting mental health morbidity and utilization of mental health services; the next strongest was low income. CONCLUSIONS: Single mothers are more likely to be poor, to have an affective disorder and to use mental health services than mothers in 2-parent families. The risk of mental health problems is especially pronounced among poor single mothers. Further studies are needed to determine which aspects of single motherhood, apart from economic status, affect mental health outcomes. PMID:9068569

  6. Demographic characteristics and physical activity behaviors in sixteen Michigan parks.

    PubMed

    Reed, Julian A; Price, Anna E; Grost, Lisa; Mantinan, Karah

    2012-04-01

    The Building Healthy Communities (BHC) initiative addresses inadequate physical activity in Michigan using a population-based approach to prevent chronic disease. Eighteen local health departments through 2010 received $1,505,179 to plan and implement community-based interventions to increase physical activity among low-income and minority populations. This paper examines park user demographics, compares park user demographics to the demographic characteristics and examines physical activity behaviors of park users in these parks. BHC Park usage was examined from 2008 to 2010 using the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC). One sample binomial tests were used to examine if the proportion of male and female park users was different than the proportion of males and females in Michigan and to examine if the proportion of white and other park users was different than the proportion of whites and others in Michigan. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test was used to examine whether the observed proportions for age groups observed using the park differed from the actual proportions for age groups in Michigan. The majority of BHC park users were white. More children were observed than other age groups. Park users were most often observed engaging in walking or vigorous activity rather than sedentary activities. When comparing the proportion of whites (54.7%) and others (42.8%) observed using the parks to the proportion of whites (79%) and others (21%) residing in Michigan, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) with a greater proportion of whites and smaller proportion of persons of other ethnicities expected to be observed using the parks. This chi square goodness of fit test showed a significant difference in the observed and expected number of persons observed using the trail in each age group (χ(2) = 4,897.707, df = 3, P < 0.001) with a greater number of children (n = 1,939) and teens (n = 1,116) observed than the number of

  7. Characteristics and source of black carbon aerosols at Akedala station, Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqin; He, Qing; Liu, Tao; Chen, Feng; Liu, Xinchun; Zhong, Yuting; Yang, Sen

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon concentration and weather data were online monitored continuously from March 2008 to February 2009 at the Akedala regional atmosphere station in the arid region of Central Asia. We present the daily, monthly and seasonal variations of BC concentration in the atmosphere and discuss the possible emission sources. Black carbon concentration in this region varies in the range of 43.7-1,559.2 ng/m3. A remarkable seasonal variation of BC in the aerosol was observed in the order of winter > spring > autumn > summer. The peak value of BC appeared at 10:00-13:00 while the lowest one at 7:00-9:00 each day. Air masses backward trajectories show the potential emission sources in the northwest from spring to autumn. Through back trajectory also revealed that BC in winter might be attributed to the emission from the anthropogenic activities, including domestic heating, cooking, combustion of oil and natural gas, and the medium-range transport from those cities in northern slope of Tianshan Mountains and Siberia. Some BC aerosols from the arid region of Central Asia were transported to the Pacific Ocean by the Westerlies.

  8. Characteristics of Black Carbon Aerosol from a Surface Oil Burn During the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) x106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section is determined at 405 and 532 nm.

  9. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol from a surface oil burn during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) × 106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air and previously sampled from a variety of sources. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section was 10.2 ± 4.1 and 7.1 ± 2.8 m2/g at 405 and 532 nm respectively. These results help constrain the properties of BC emissions associated with DWH and other large spills.

  10. Sheep milk: physical-chemical characteristics and microbiological quality.

    PubMed

    Merlin Junior, Ivandré Antonio; Santos, Joice Sifuentes dos; Costa, Ligia Grecco; Costa, Renan Grecco; Ludovico, Agostinho; Rego, Fabiola Cristine de Almeida; Santana, Elsa Helena Walter de

    2015-09-01

    Sheep milk is the third most consumed milk in Brazil. It is much appreciated for its nutritional status and is important for children that have problems with cow milk. Little information is known about the chemical, physical and microbiological composition of sheep milk from South Brazil. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe chemical and microbiological characteristics of sheep milk produced on two rural properties located in southern Brazil (ParanA and Rio Grande do Sul). The chemical composition of sheep milk was 17.32 g/100 g total solids, 5.86 g/100 g total protein, 4.46 g/100 g casein, 1.08 g/100 g whey protein, 7.28 g/100 g fat, 0.93 g/100 g ash, and 3.41 g/100 g lactose. High somatic cell count (1.7x106 cells/mL), total mesophilic bacterias (16.0 x 106 CFU/mL) and psychrotrophics (5.8 x 106 CFU/mL) were observed. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, enterobacteria and coliforms occurred in 100% of the samples, and 45% of the samples showed growth of Escherichia coli. The sheep milk physical-chemical and microbiology parameters are similar to those presented in the literature for other countries but somatic cell count presented high levels.

  11. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. III. Presence of aerosols in the middle stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Berthet, Gwenaël; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Brogniez, Colette; Hadamcik, Edith; Chartier, Michel; Ovarlez, Henri

    2005-07-01

    The aerosol extinction measurements in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths by the balloonborne spectrometer Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON) show that aerosols are present in the middle stratosphere, above 25-km altitude. These observations are confirmed by the extinction measurements performed by a solar occultation radiometer. The balloonborne Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) counter instrument also confirms the presence of aerosol around 30-km altitude, with an unrealistic excess of micronic particles assuming that only liquid sulfate aerosols are present. An unexpected spectral structure around 640-nm observed by SALOMON is also detectable in extinction measurements by the satellite instrument Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment III. This set of measurements could indicate that solid aerosols were detected at these altitude ranges. The amount of soot detected up to now in the lower stratosphere is too low to explain these measurements. Thus, the presence of interplanetary dust grains and micrometeorites may need to be invoked. Moreover, it seems that these grains fill the stratosphere in stratified layers.

  12. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. III. Presence of aerosols in the middle stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Berthet, Gwenaël; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Brogniez, Colette; Hadamcik, Edith; Chartier, Michel; Ovarlez, Henri

    2005-07-01

    The aerosol extinction measurements in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths by the balloonborne spectrometer Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NO_x (SALOMON) show that aerosols are present in the middle stratosphere, above 25-km altitude. These observations are confirmed by the extinction measurements performed by a solar occultation radiometer. The balloonborne Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) counter instrument also confirms the presence of aerosol around 30-km altitude, with an unrealistic excess of micronic particles assuming that only liquid sulfate aerosols are present. An unexpected spectral structure around 640-nm observed by SALOMON is also detectable in extinction measurements by the satellite instrument Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment III. This set of measurements could indicate that solid aerosols were detected at these altitude ranges. The amount of soot detected up to now in the lower stratosphere is too low to explain these measurements. Thus, the presence of interplanetary dust grains and micrometeorites may need to be invoked. Moreover, it seems that these grains fill the stratosphere in stratified layers.

  13. The Relationship between Physical Therapist Assistant Faculty Characteristics and Program Outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Malorie Kosht

    2009-01-01

    Background. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty characteristics and outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA). Purpose. To determine if there was a relationship between faculty characteristics in PTA educational programs and program outcomes…

  14. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II water vapor observations - Method, validation, and data characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Oltmans, S.; Lerner, J.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of water vapor observations in the troposphere and stratosphere performed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II solar occultation instrument, and the analysis procedure, the instrument errors, and data characteristics are discussed. The results are compared with correlative in situ measurements and other satellite data. The features of the data set collected between 1985 and 1989 include an increase in middle- and upper-tropospheric water vapor during northern hemisphere summer and autumn; minimum water vapor values of 2.5-3 ppmv in the tropical lower stratosphere; slowly increasing water vapor values with altitude in the stratosphere, reaching 5-6 ppmv or greater near the stratopause; extratropical values with minimum profile amounts occurring above the conventionally defined tropopause; and higher extratropical than tropical water vapor values throughout the stratosphere except in locations of possible polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  16. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles in the Caribbean: Influence of African Dust and Soufriere Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Birriel, C. M.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Sheridan, P.; Ogren, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric particles such as dust and volcanic ash have the potential of influencing the earth's radiative budget directly by scattering or absorbing solar radiation in the atmosphere and indirectly by affecting cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and, therefore, cloud albedo. The radiatively-important properties of atmospheric particles are determined at the most fundamental level by their chemical composition and size distributions; therefore, the importance of studying the chemical, physical, and optical aerosol properties. Over the summer months, the island of Puerto Rico receives African dust incursions that reduce visibility and have an impact on public health, ecosystem, and climate. Visibility is also negatively affected when the island receives south-east winds and the Soufriere volcano (Montserrat Island) has been active. Here we present preliminary results of measurements performed during 2006 and 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The cases investigated showed three possible types of air masses: clean (C), with African Dust (AD), and with volcanic ash (VA) from the Soufriere. We used a condensation particle counter to determine the particle number concentration, a sunphotometer (part of the AERONET) to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficients, and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for the absorption coefficients. The particle number concentrations were higher for AD and VA periods (up to about 700 cm-3 on average for both cases) in contrast to ~400 cm-3 for the C period. Volume size distributions showed bimodal distributions for the three cases with a greater influence of the coarse fraction for the C and VA periods and an increase in the fine particles for the AD period. The total scattering coefficient showed higher values for the AD (30 Mm-1) and the VA (26

  17. Correlation between satellite-derived aerosol characteristics and oceanic dimethylsulfide (DMS). Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shema, R.A.

    1988-12-01

    Since the turn of the century, the earth's climate has fluctuated between warming and cooling cycles. A warming cycle has been observed in the early 1900's. The rising global temperature has been attributed to CO/sub 2/ release from the burning of fossil fuels. The absorption of IR energy emitted from the earth, or greenhouse effect , brought concern that continued warming would melt polar ice caps and permanently change global climate. However, beginning in the mid-1940's, atmospheric cooling was observed. A possible contribution to the cooling trend is an increase in the numbers of relatively small aerosol particles. These particles are efficient scatters of solar radiation. An increase in the number of scattering events causes a higher albedo, thereby creating a cooler planet. McCormick and Ludwig (1967) have presented arguments to show this relationship. Approximately forty years later, in the early 1980's, warming of the earth's climate again has been observed.

  18. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Mi; Wang, Huanbo; Chen, Yang; Yang, Fumo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zou, Qiang; Zhang, Renquan; Ma, Yongliang; He, Kebin

    2016-06-01

    Extremely severe haze weather events occurred in many cities in China, especially in the east part of the country, in January 2013. Comprehensive measurements including hourly concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical components (water-soluble inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC)) and related gas-phase precursors were conducted via an online monitoring system in Suzhou, a medium-sized city in Jiangsu province, just east of Shanghai. PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 µm or less) frequently exceeded 150 µg m-3 on hazy days, with the maximum reaching 324 µg m-3 on 14 January 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions (high relative humidity (RH), and low rainfall, wind speed, and atmospheric pressure) were conducive to haze formation. High concentrations of secondary aerosol species (including SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and SOC) and gaseous precursors were observed during the first two haze events, while elevated primary carbonaceous species emissions were found during the third haze period, pointing to different haze formation mechanisms. Organic matter (OM), (NH4)2SO4, and NH4NO3 were found to be the major contributors to visibility impairment. High concentrations of sulfate and nitrate might be explained by homogeneous gas-phase reactions under low RH conditions and by heterogeneous processes under relatively high RH conditions. Analysis of air mass trajectory clustering and potential source contribution function showed that aerosol pollution in the studied areas was mainly caused by local activities and surrounding sources transported from nearby cities.

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Physical Characteristics and Natural Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, P.D.; Hughes, J.F.

    2006-09-19

    The topography, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions (Fig. 1). The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR. The ORR, encompassing 33,114 acres (13,401 ha) of federally owned land and three Department of Energy (DOE) installations, is located in Roane and Anderson Counties in east Tennessee, mostly within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge and southwest of the population center of Oak Ridge. The ORR is bordered on the north and east by the population center of the city of Oak Ridge and on the south and west by the Clinch River/Melton Hill Lake impoundment. All areas of the ORR are relatively pristine when compared with the surrounding region, especially in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province (Fig. 2). From the air, the ORR is clearly a large and nearly continuous island of forest within a landscape that is fragmented by urban development and agriculture. Satellite imagery from 2006 was used to develop a land-use/land-cover cover map of the ORR and surrounding lands (Fig. 3). Following the acquisition of the land comprising the ORR in the early 1940s, much of the Reservation served as a buffer for the three primary facilities: the X-10 nuclear research facility (now known as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL]), the first uranium enrichment facility or Y-12 (now known as the Y-12 National Security Complex [Y-12 Complex]), and a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility (now known as the East Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP]). Over the past 60 years, this relatively undisturbed area has evolved into a rich and diverse eastern deciduous forest ecosystem of streams and reservoirs, hardwood forests, and extensive upland mixed forests. The combination of a large land area with complex physical characteristics

  20. Child Care Center Characteristics Associated With Preschoolers’ Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Khoury, Jane C.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite children spending long hours in child care centers, it is unknown what center characteristics are associated with children’s moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at the center and over the 24-hour day. Methods Mixed model ANOVA evaluated associations between 23 center characteristics (e.g., policies, facilities, practices, and staff training) and time in MVPA, measured with accelerometers, at the child care center and over the 24-hour day among 388 preschoolers from 30 randomly selected child care centers in Cincinnati, Ohio. Data collection occurred from November 2009 through January 2011; data analyses occurred in 2012–2014. Results Ninety percent of centers reported scheduling two or more outdoor sessions daily, yet only 40% of children had two or more outdoor sessions; 32% had no time outdoors. Eighty-three percent of centers reported scheduling ≥60 minutes outdoors; 28% of children experienced this during observation. Children spent a mean (SE) of 2.0 (0.06) minutes/hour in MVPA. Children with ≥60 minutes outdoor time had 0.6 minutes/hour more MVPA in child care (p=0.001), and 0.5 minutes/hour over the 24-hour day (p=0.001) than those who did not. Presence of an indoor play space, large outdoor playground, portable or fixed play equipment, staff PA training, weather and clothing policies, and TV/computer use were not related to children’s MVPA. Conclusions Outdoor time occurred less frequently than scheduled. Children with ≥60 minutes of outdoor time at the center were more active than children without. Centers may increase preschoolers’ PA by adhering to the scheduled ≥60 minutes of outdoor time daily. PMID:26585052

  1. Physical characteristics of starch granules and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gallant, D J; Bouchet, B; Buléon, A; Pérez, S

    1992-10-01

    Starch, the most abundant component of the diet, is characterized by its variety as well as the versatility of its derivatives in foods. This paper is an overview of the main physical characteristics of the native starch granule. Three different levels of organization are presented: macromolecular structure, crystalline organization and ultrastructure. Starch consists of amylose and amylopectin. Amylose is an essentially linear polymer composed of alpha-1,4-linked D-anhydroglucose units (AGU); amylopectin is a branched polymer clustering a large amount of short linear chains by the linkage of alpha-1,6-bonds, constituting about 5% of the total glycosidic bonds. In the native starch granules, a large number of the macromolecular chains are organized in crystalline structures. Three forms have been found, the A, B and C patterns. So far only A and B starch crystals have been modelled. There is a variation in the susceptibility of the starch granules to enzymatic digestion. This is explained by variation in the morphology of the granules and their crystalline organization.

  2. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Kengyelics, S M

    2007-12-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors.

  3. Analysis of the sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir satellite observations to the chemical and micro-physical properties of upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Sèze, Geneviève; Legras, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Secondary sulphate aerosols are the predominant typology of aerosols in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), and can have an important impact on radiative transfer and climate, cirrus formation and chemistry in the UTLS. Despite their importance, the satellite observation at the regional scale of sulphate aerosols in the UTLS is limited. In this work, we address the sensitivity of the thermal infrared satellite observations to secondary sulphate aerosols in the UTLS. The absorption properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The absorption coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques : Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the absorption of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the radiance spectra observed by these simulated satellite instruments. We found a marked spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. Micro-windows with a sensitivity to chemical and micro-physical properties of the sulphate aerosol layer are identified, and the role of interfering species, and temperature and water vapour profile is discussed.

  4. Insights into characteristics, sources, and evolution of submicron aerosols during harvest seasons in the Yangtze River delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Tang, L. L.; Wang, Z.; Yu, H. X.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, D.; Qin, W.; Canonaco, F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Zhang, H. L.; Zhou, H. C.

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric submicron particulate matter (PM1) is one of the most significant pollution components in China. Despite its current popularity in the studies of aerosol chemistry, the characteristics, sources and evolution of atmospheric PM1 species are still poorly understood in China, particularly for the two harvest seasons, namely, the summer wheat harvest and autumn rice harvest. An Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was deployed for online monitoring of PM1 components during summer and autumn harvest seasons in urban Nanjing, in the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China. PM1 components were shown to be dominated by organic aerosol (OA, 39 and 41%) and nitrate (23 and 20%) during the harvest seasons (the summer and autumn harvest). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the ACSM OA mass spectra resolved four OA factors: hydrocarbon-like mixed with cooking-related OA (HOA + COA), fresh biomass-burning OA (BBOA), oxidized biomass-burning-influenced OA (OOA-BB), and highly oxidized OA (OOA); in particular the oxidized BBOA contributes ~80% of the total BBOA loadings. Both fresh and oxidized BBOA exhibited apparent diurnal cycles with peak concentration at night, when the high ambient relative humidity and low temperature facilitated the partitioning of semi-volatile organic species into the particle phase. The fresh BBOA concentrations for the harvests are estimated as BBOA = 15.1 × (m/z 60-0.26% × OA), where m/z (mass-to-charge ratio) 60 is a marker for levoglucosan-like species. The (BBOA + OOA-BB)/ΔCO, (ΔCO is the CO minus background CO), decreases as a function of f44 (fraction of m/z 44 in OA signal), which might indicate that BBOA was oxidized to less volatile OOA, e.g., more aged and low volatility OOA (LV-OOA) during the aging process. Analysis of air mass back trajectories indicates that the high BB pollutant concentrations are linked to the air masses from the western (summer harvest) and southern (autumn harvest) areas.

  5. Seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical properties at the SKYNET Hefei site (31.90°N, 117.17°E) from 2007 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Wang, Yingjian; Khatri, Pradeep; Zhou, Jun; Takamura, Tamio; Shi, Guangyu

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical properties in Sky Radiometer Network (SKYNET) Hefei site are studied using a sky radiometer from March 2007 to May 2013. The aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (AE), volume size distributions, single-scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index, and asymmetry factor (ASY) of aerosols are simultaneously retrieved using the SKYRAD.pack version 4.2 software. During the study period, the AOD varied seasonally, with the maximum value of 1.02 ± 0.42 at 500 nm occurring in the summer, and the highest AOD (1.13 ± 0.42) occurred in June due to stagnant climate conditions and accumulation of polluted aerosols before the East Asian summer monsoon. The variation in AE showed a different pattern, with the minimum (0.97 ± 0.28) and maximum values (1.30 ± 0.22) occurring during the spring and fall seasons, respectively. The relatively low value of AE in spring is related to the emission of Asian dust events. The aerosol volume size distributions can be expressed by the trimodal patterns for each season, consisting of a fine mode with R < 0.6 µm, a coarse mode with R > 2.5 µm, and a middle mode located between them. The real part of the refractive index increased with wavelength (380-870 nm) while the imaginary part of the refractive index decreased for all seasons except for the summer. The seasonal mean values of SSA were 0.97 ± 0.02 (summer), 0.95 ± 0.03 (spring), 0.93 ± 0.04 (autumn), and 0.91 ± 0.04 (winter) at 380 nm indicating more absorbing aerosol in the autumn and winter months. Furthermore, aerosol properties were greatly modified by condensation growth as evidenced by the positive dependencies of AOD, SSA, and ASY on relative humidity.

  6. Aerosol arriving on the Caribbean island of Barbados: physical properties and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Dieckmann, Katrin; Roberts, Greg C.; Conrath, Thomas; Izaguirre, Miguel A.; Hartmann, Susan; Herenz, Paul; Schäfer, Michael; Ditas, Florian; Schmeissner, Tina; Henning, Silvia; Wehner, Birgit; Siebert, Holger; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The marine aerosol arriving at Barbados (Ragged Point) was characterized during two 3-week long measurement periods in November 2010 and April 2011, in the context of the measurement campaign CARRIBA (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiation and tuRbulence in the trade wInd regime over BArbados). Through a comparison between ground-based and airborne measurements it was shown that the former are representative of the marine boundary layer at least up to cloud base. In general, total particle number concentrations (Ntotal) ranged from as low as 100 up to 800 cm-3, while number concentrations for cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) at a supersaturation of 0.26 % ranged from some 10 to 600 cm-3. Ntotal and NCCN depended on the air mass origin. Three distinct types of air masses were found. One type showed elevated values for both Ntotal and NCCN and could be attributed to long-range transport from Africa, by which biomass burning particles from the Sahel region and/or mineral dust particles from the Sahara were advected. The second and third type both had values for NCCN below 200 cm-3 and a clear minimum in the particle number size distribution (NSD) around 70 to 80 nm (Hoppel minimum). While for one of these two types the accumulation mode was dominating (albeit less so than for air masses advected from Africa), the Aitken mode dominated the other and contributed more than 50 % of all particles. These Aitken mode particles likely were formed by new particle formation no more than 3 days prior to the measurements. Hygroscopicity of particles in the CCN size range was determined from CCN measurements to be κ = 0.66 on average, which suggests that these particles contain mainly sulfate and do not show a strong influence from organic material, which might generally be the case for the months during which measurements were made. The average κ could be used to derive NCCN from measured number size distributions, showing that this is a valid approach to obtain NCCN. Although the total

  7. Mixing and water-soluble characteristics of particulate organic compounds in individual urban aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic compounds (POCs) in the atmosphere can alter the morphology and hygroscopicity of inorganic particles by coagulation and mixing. Direct observations can illustrate the mixing of organic and inorganic particles. Compositions, mixing states, and morphologies of 360 aerosol particles from urban Beijing collected on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with Si-O substrate were obtained using TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X ray spectrometry (TEM/EDX). The Si-O substrate used in this study allows TEM/EDX to detect carbonaceous particles internally mixed with inorganic particles. POCs were present in approximately 90% of the nitrate-coated mineral particles on both hazy and clear days. Approximately 73% of K- and S-rich particles contained organic coatings and organic inclusions/aggregations on hazy days, while 53% of S-rich particles on clear days during the Beijing Olympics contained only organic coatings. Water dialysis of individual particles indicated that the organic inclusions/aggregations in the K- and S-rich particles were insoluble in water but that POCs from the coatings of individual particles were soluble. The organic coatings on individual inorganic particles may influence their surface hygroscopicity and optical properties.

  8. The characteristics of Beijing aerosol during two distinct episodes: impacts of biomass burning and fireworks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Engling, Guenter; He, Ke-bin; Duan, Feng-kui; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Liang, Lin-lin; Lu, Zi-feng; Liu, Jiu-meng; Zheng, Mei; Weber, Rodney J

    2014-02-01

    The chemical composition of Beijing aerosol was measured during summer and winter. Two distinct episodes were identified. Water-soluble potassium (K(+)) increased significantly during the firework episode in winter with an episode to non-episode ratio of 4.97, whereas the biomass burning (BB) episode in summer was characterized by high episode to non-episode ratios of levoglucosan (6.38) and K(+) (6.90). The BB and firework episodes had only a minor influence on the water-soluble OC (organic carbon) to OC ratio. Based on separate investigations of episode and non-episode periods, it was found that: (i) sulfate correlated strongly with both relative humidity and nitrate during the typical winter period presumably indicating the importance of the aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by nitrogen dioxide, (ii) oxalate and WSOC during both winter and summer in Beijing were mainly due to secondary formation, and (iii) high humidity can significantly enhance the formation potential of WSOC in winter.

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of black carbon aerosol and its radiative impact in a polluted urban area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhao, Zhuzi; Cao, Junji; Ni, Haiyan; Tie, Xuexi; Zhao, Shuyu; Su, Xiaoli; Han, Yongming; Shen, Zhenxing; Wang, Yichen; Zhang, Ningning; Zhou, Yaqing; Corbin, Joel C.

    2016-10-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol plays an important role in the Earth's radiative balance. An intensive measurement campaign was conducted at Xi'an, China, from December 2012 to January 2013 to investigate the sources and physicochemical characteristics of refractory BC (rBC) and its direct radiative forcing at the surface. The overall average rBC concentration for the campaign was 8.0 ± 7.1 µg m-3. Source apportionment based on positive matrix factorization showed that traffic was the dominant rBC source (46.0%), followed by coal burning (33.9%) and biomass burning (20.1%). The rBC mass size distributions were monomodal and lognormal with larger mass median diameters for coal burning source (215 nm) compared with the traffic source (189 nm). Coal burning rBC was more strongly associated with sulfate than traffic rBC, suggesting a higher cloud condensation nuclei activity. The slope of a robust linear regression between rBC and carbon monoxide (CO) for all samples was 5.9 µg m-3 ppm-1, and the slope for the coal burning source (4.5 µg m-3 ppm-1) was larger than that for the traffic source (2.7 µg m-3 ppm-1). The net rBC emission during winter of 2009 was estimated to be 4.5 Gg based on the relationship between rBC and CO. A Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible radiation model showed that the average daytime value for the clear-sky direct radiative forcing due to rBC from 23 December 2012 to 31 January 2013 was -47.7 ± 28.9 W m-2, which amounted to an average of 45.7% of the total surface atmospheric aerosol forcing.

  10. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. II. Comparison of extinction, reflectance, polarization, and counting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel; Brogniez, Colette; Herman, Maurice; Verwaerde, Christian; Balois, Jean-Yves; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Ovarlez, Henri; Crespin, Jacques; Deshler, Terry

    2002-12-01

    The physical properties of stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from optical measurements involving extinction, radiance, polarization, and counting. We present here the results of measurements from the balloonborne instruments AMON, SALOMON, and RADIBAL, and from the French Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique and the University of Wyoming balloonborne particle counters. A cross comparison of the measurements was made for observations of background aerosols conducted during the polar winters of February 1997 and January-February 2000 for various altitudes from 13 to 19 km. On the one hand, the effective radius and the total amount of background aerosols derived from the various sets of data are similar and are in agreement with pre-Pinatubo values. On the other hand, strong discrepancies occur in the shapes of the bimodal size distributions obtained from analysis of the raw measurements of the various instruments. It seems then that the log-normal assumption cannot fully reproduce the size distribution of background aerosols. The effect of the presence of particular aerosols on the measurements is discussed, and a new strategy for observations is proposed.

  11. The dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component AM3 of the GFDL global coupled model CM3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donner, L.J.; Wyman, B.L.; Hemler, R.S.; Horowitz, L.W.; Ming, Y.; Zhao, M.; Golaz, J.-C.; Ginoux, P.; Lin, S.-J.; Schwarzkopf, M.D.; Austin, J.; Alaka, G.; Cooke, W.F.; Delworth, T.L.; Freidenreich, S.M.; Gordon, C.T.; Griffies, S.M.; Held, I.M.; Hurlin, W.J.; Klein, S.A.; Knutson, T.R.; Langenhorst, A.R.; Lee, H.-C.; Lin, Y.; Magi, B.I.; Malyshev, S.L.; Milly, P.C.D.; Naik, V.; Nath, M.J.; Pincus, R.; Ploshay, J.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Seman, C.J.; Shevliakova, E.; Sirutis, J.J.; Stern, W.F.; Stouffer, R.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Winton, M.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Zeng, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) has developed a coupled general circulation model (CM3) for the atmosphere, oceans, land, and sea ice. The goal of CM3 is to address emerging issues in climate change, including aerosol-cloud interactions, chemistry-climate interactions, and coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere. The model is also designed to serve as the physical system component of earth system models and models for decadal prediction in the near-term future-for example, through improved simulations in tropical land precipitation relative to earlier-generation GFDL models. This paper describes the dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component (AM3) of this model. Relative to GFDL AM2, AM3 includes new treatments of deep and shallow cumulus convection, cloud droplet activation by aerosols, subgrid variability of stratiform vertical velocities for droplet activation, and atmospheric chemistry driven by emissions with advective, convective, and turbulent transport. AM3 employs a cubed-sphere implementation of a finite-volume dynamical core and is coupled to LM3, a new land model with ecosystem dynamics and hydrology. Its horizontal resolution is approximately 200 km, and its vertical resolution ranges approximately from 70 m near the earth's surface to 1 to 1.5 km near the tropopause and 3 to 4 km in much of the stratosphere. Most basic circulation features in AM3 are simulated as realistically, or more so, as in AM2. In particular, dry biases have been reduced over South America. In coupled mode, the simulation of Arctic sea ice concentration has improved. AM3 aerosol optical depths, scattering properties, and surface clear-sky downward shortwave radiation are more realistic than in AM2. The simulation of marine stratocumulus decks remains problematic, as in AM2. The most intense 0.2% of precipitation rates occur less frequently in AM3 than observed. The last two decades of

  12. Influence of surface characteristics of modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization performance.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface characteristics (surface roughness and specific surface area) of surface-modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization, and thus, the in vitro respirable fraction often referred to as fine particle fraction (FPF). By processing glass beads in a ball mill with different grinding materials (quartz and tungsten carbide) and varying grinding time (4 h and 8 h), and by plasma etching for 1 min, glass beads with different shades of surface roughness and increased surface area were prepared. Compared with untreated glass beads, the surface-modified rough glass beads show increased FPFs. The drug detachment from the modified glass beads is also more reproducible than from untreated glass beads indicated by lower standard deviations for the FPFs of the modified glass beads. Moreover, the FPF of the modified glass beads correlates with their surface characteristics. The higher the surface roughness and the higher the specific surface area of the glass beads the higher is the FPF. Thus, surface-modified glass beads make an ideal carrier for tailoring the performance of DPIs in the therapy of asthma and chronically obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  13. A Laboratory Investigation of Aerosol and Extinction Characteristics for SALTY DOG, NWC 29 and NWC 78 Pyrotechnics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Dispersion Extinction Pyrotechnics Salty Dog Smokes Deliquescent Growth i *0. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aide Iti nee.,ary and idently by block... deliquescent aerosol. Results from the laboratory investigation of individual particle growth indicate that the aerosol generated by NVC 78 has the...due to liquid water (i.e., the deliquesced aerosol) absorption at those IR wavelengths. To compare the extinction effectiveness of Salty Dog to that of

  14. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over Central India: Temporal variation and its dependence on mixed layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Manoj, M. R.; Kumar, N. V. P. Kiran; Shaeb, K. Hareef Baba; Joshi, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In a first of its kind study over the Indian region, concurrent and extensive measurements of black carbon (BC) concentration and atmospheric boundary layer parameters are used to quantify the role of atmospheric boundary layer in producing temporal changes in BC. During this study, 18 months (2011-12) data of continuous measurements of BC aerosols, made over a semi-urban location, Nagpur, in Central India are used along with concurrent measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric thermodynamics, made using weekly ascents of GPS aided Radiosonde for a period of 1 year. From the balloon data, mixed layer heights and ventilation coefficients are estimated, and the monthly and seasonal changes in BC mass concentration are examined in the light of the boundary layer changes. Seasonally, the BC mass concentration was highest (~ 4573 ± 1293 ng m- 3) in winter (December-February), and lowest (~ 1588 ± 897 ng m- 3) in monsoon (June-September), while remained moderate (~ 3137 ± 1446 ng m- 3) in pre-monsoon (March-May), and post-monsoon (~ 3634 ± 813 ng m- 3) (October-November) seasons. During the dry seasons, when the rainfall is scanty or insignificantly small, the seasonal variations in BC concentrations have a strong inverse relationship with mixed layer height and ventilation coefficient. However, the lowest BC concentrations do not occur during the season when the mixed layer height (MLH) is highest or the ventilation coefficient is the highest; rather it occurs when the rainfall is strong (during summer monsoon season) and airmass changes to primarily of marine origin.

  15. Chemical characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols during dust storms over Xi'an in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuxiang; Cao, Junji; Chow, Judith; Han, Yongming; Lee, Shuncheng; Watson, John

    2008-09-01

    Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols including CC (carbonate carbon), OC (organic carbon), and EC (elemental carbon) were investigated at Xi’an, China, near Asian dust source regions in spring 2002. OC varied between 8.2 and 63.7 µg m-3, while EC ranged between 2.4 and 17.2 µ m-3 during the observation period. OC variations followed a similar pattern to EC and the correlation coefficient between OC and EC is 0.89 ( n=31). The average percentage of total carbon (TC, sum of CC, OC, and EC) in PM2.5 during dust storm (DS) events was 13.6%, which is lower than that during non-dust storm (NDS) periods (22.7%). CC, OC, and EC accounted for 12.9%, 70.7%, and 16.4% of TC during DS events, respectively. The average ratio of OC/EC was 5.0 in DS events and 3.3 in NDS periods. The OC-EC correlation ( R 2=0.76, n=6) was good in DS events, while it was stronger ( R 2=0.90, n=25) in NDS periods. The percentage of water-soluble OC (WSOC) in TC accounted for 15.7%, and varied between 13.3% and 22.3% during DS events. The distribution of eight carbon fractions indicated that local emissions such as motor vehicle exhaust were the dominant contributors to carbonaceous particles. During DS events, soil dust dominated the chemical composition, contributing 69% to the PM2.5 mass, followed by organic matter (12.8%), sulfate (4%), EC (2.2%), and chloride (1.6%). Consequently, CC was mainly entrained by Asian dust. However, even in the atmosphere near Asian dust source regions, OC and EC in atmospheric dust were controlled by local emission rather than the transport of Asian dust.

  16. Characteristics of indoor aerosols in residential homes in urban locations: a case study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Lee, Sheng Sheng

    2007-08-01

    As part of a major study to investigate the indoor air quality in residential houses in Singapore, intensive aerosol measurements were made in an apartment in a multistory building for several consecutive days in 2004. The purpose of this work was to identify the major indoor sources of fine airborne particles and to assess their impact on indoor air quality for a typical residential home in an urban area in a densely populated country. Particle number and mass concentrations were measured in three rooms of the home using a real-time particle counter and a low-volume particulate sampler, respectively. Particle number concentrations were found to be elevated on several occasions during the measurements. All of the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities based on house occupant log entries. This enabled identification of the indoor sources that contributed to indoor particle concentrations. Activities such as cooking elevated particle number concentrations < or =2.05 x 10(5) particles/cm3. The fine particles collected on Teflon filter substrates were analyzed for selected ions, trace elements, and metals, as well as elemental and organic carbon (OC) contents. To compare the quality of air between the indoors of the home and the outdoors, measurements were also made outside the home to obtain outdoor samples. The chemical composition of both outdoor and indoor particles was determined. Indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios suggest that certain chemical constituents of indoor particles, such as chloride, sodium, aluminum, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, titanium, vanadium, zinc, and elemental carbon, were derived through migration of outdoor particles (I/O <1 or - 1), whereas the levels of others, such as nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead, and OC, were largely influenced by the presence of indoor sources (I/O >1).

  17. Anthropometric Characteristics and Physical Performance of Colombian Elite Male Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Velez, Robinson; Argothyd, Rodrigo; Meneses-Echavez, Jose Francisco; Beatriz Sanchez-Puccini, Maria; Lopez-Alban, Carlos Alejandro; Cohen, Daniel Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wrestling was an important part of the ancient Olympic Games and is still one of the most popular events of the modern Olympic Games. Studies indicate that general physiologic profile of successful wrestlers is high anaerobic power and capacity, muscular strength, above average aerobic power, exceptional flexibility, fat free mass, and a mesomorphic somatotype. Objectives: The objective of the present study was to evaluate anthropometric characteristics and physical performance of elite male wrestlers. Patients and Methods: The Colombian Wrestling Team was evaluated while in preparation for the Olympic Games (n = 21; age, 27.9 ± 6.7 years). Athletes were tested on anthropometric and fitness parameters: body composition, somatotype distribution according to Heath-Carter, aerobic capacity, vertical jump, and anaerobic power. Results: The evaluations showed a mean body fat percentage of 13.6% ± 3.0% (95% CI, 12.2%-15%), muscle mass of 46.4% ± 2.2% (95% CI, 45.4%-47.4%), Ponderal index of 41.0 ± 1.8 (95% CI, 40.2-41.8), body adiposity index (BAI) 25.1 ± 3.6 (95% CI, 23.5-26.8), and somatotype distribution mesomorphic-ectomorph (5.3-1.6-3.8). Mean aerobic capacity was 45.9 ± 6.6 mL/kg/min (95% CI, 42.8-48.9), vertical jump was 36.4 ± 6.6 cm (95% CI, 11.8-16.6), and anaerobic power was 92.6 ± 19.5 kg/s (95% CI, 83.7-101.5). Conclusions: These results provided a profile of elite wrestlers that could be used as training targets for developing athletes. The results may also provide information for training and tactical planning. PMID:25741411

  18. Observations and Inferred Physical Characteristics of Compact Intracloud Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Eack, K.B.; Holden, D.N.; Massey, R.S.; Shao, X.; Smith, D.A.; Wiens, K.C.

    1999-02-01

    Compact intracloud discharges (CIDS) represent a distinct class of electrical discharges that occur within intense regions of thunderstorms. They are singular discharges that produce brief (typically 3 µs in duration) broadband RF emissions that are 20 to 30 dB more powerful than radiation from all other recorded lightning processes in the HF and VHF radio spectrum. Far field electric field change recordings of CIDS consist of a single, large-amplitude bipolar pulse that begins to rise during the RF-producing phase of the CID and typically lasts for 20 µs. During the summer of 1998 we operated a 4-station array of electric field change meters in New Mexico to support FORTE satellite observations of transient RF and optical sources and to learn more about the phenomenology and physical characteristics of CIDS. Over 800 CIDS were detected and located during the campaign. The events were identified on the basis of their unique field change waveforms. CID source heights determined using the relative delays of ionospherically reflected source emissions were typically between 4 and 11 km above ground level. Events of both positive and negative polarity were observed with events' of initially- negative polarity (indicative of discharges occurring between underlying positive and overlying negative charge) occurring at slightly higher altitudes. Within CID field change waveforms the CID pulse was often followed within a few ms by one or more smaller-amplitude pulses. We associate these subsequent pulses with the initial activity of a "normal" intracloud flash, the inference being that some fraction of the time, a CID initiates an intracloud lightning flash.

  19. Physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, B.; Belli, G.; Gori, C.; Rosselli Del Turco, M.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography (GE Senographe 2000D, Lorad Selenia M-IV, Fischer Senoscan, Agfa DM 1000, and IMS Giotto) currently in clinical use. The basic performances of the mammography systems tested were assessed on the basis of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in an experimental setting closely resembling the clinical one. As expected, all the full field digital mammography systems show a linear response curve over a dynamic range from 3.5 to 500 {mu}Gy (0.998

  20. Physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, B; Belli, G; Gori, C; Rosselli Del Turco, M

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography (GE Senographe 2000D, Lorad Selenia M-IV, Fischer Senoscan, Agfa DM 1000, and IMS Giotto) currently in clinical use. The basic performances of the mammography systems tested were assessed on the basis of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in an experimental setting closely resembling the clinical one. As expected, all the full field digital mammography systems show a linear response curve over a dynamic range from 3.5 to 500 microGy (0.998

  1. Highly time-resolved urban aerosol characteristics during springtime in Yangtze River Delta, China: insights from soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Yanfang; Shen, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Xu, Jianzhong; Ge, Shun; Yu, Huan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Aerodyne soot particle - aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed for the first time during the spring of 2015 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, for online characterization of the submicron aerosols (PM1). The SP-AMS enables real-time and fast quantification of refractory black carbon (rBC) simultaneously with other non-refractory species (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and organics). The average PM1 concentration was found to be 28.2 µg m-3, with organics (45 %) as the most abundant component, following by sulfate (19.3 %), nitrate (13.6 %), ammonium (11.1 %), rBC (9.7 %), and chloride (1.3 %). These PM1 species together can reconstruct ˜ 44 % of the light extinction during this campaign based on the IMPROVE method. Chemically resolved mass-based size distributions revealed that small particles especially ultrafine ones (< 100 nm vacuum aerodynamic diameter) were dominated by organics and rBC, while large particles had significant contributions from secondary inorganic species. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) yielded four OA subcomponents, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Overall, secondary organic aerosol (SOA, equal to the sum of SV-OOA and LV-OOA) dominated the total OA mass (55.5 %), but primary organic aerosol (POA, equal to the sum of HOA and COA) can outweigh SOA in the early morning and evening due to enhanced human activities. High OA concentrations were often associated with high mass fractions of POA and rBC, indicating the important role of anthropogenic emissions during heavy pollution events. The diurnal cycles of nitrate, chloride, and SV-OOA both showed good anti-correlations with air temperatures, suggesting their variations were likely driven by thermodynamic equilibria and gas-to-particle partitioning. On the other hand, in contrast to other species

  2. Size Distribution and Chemical Characteristic of Aerosols in Northwestern Black Sea Region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztürk, Fatma; Keles, Melek; Halif Ngagine, Soulemane

    2016-04-01

    Size segregated PM samples were collected at the city center of Bolu, which is northwestern part of the Black Sea region of Turkey between 2015 and 2016. A cascade impactor was used for the collection of weekly PM samples on pre-fired quartz filters in eight different size ranges (9.0-10.0 μm, 5.8-9.0 μm, 4.7-5.8 μm, 3.3-4.7 μm, 2.1-3.3 μm, 1.1-2.1 μm, 0.65-1.1 μm, 0.43-0.65 μm). The collected samples were divided in three parts and each part was analyzed with different analytical technique. The first part of the filter was analyzed in terms of major ions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+). A large suit of metals from Li to U were determined in the second fraction of the filter by means of ICPMS. Lastly, the third part of the filter was analyzed in terms of EC and OC. The preliminary results indicated that the PM mass depicted bimodal distribution and the average concentration of PM10 was about 100 μg/m3for a five week period. Both EC and OC showed bi-modal distribution while these two parameters were more enriched on smaller particles. The average concentrations of EC and OC in PM1 were determined as 4.1 and 40.6 μg/m3, respectively, indicating the secondary organic aerosol formation in Bolu ambient air. Among the major ions, SO42- and NH4+ depicted unimodal distribution having significantly higher concentrations in fine particles (< 1 μm) while the rest of the ions present bimodal distribution. Mass closure analysis will be applied to the generated data set and sources will be evaluated by applying PMF. This project was supported financially by Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council (TÜBİTAK) with a project number 114Y429.

  3. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols at a pair of suburban and downtown sites in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous species in PM2.5 were measured in three seasons (except winter) in downtown and around a year in suburban in Nanjing. In particular, the OC and EC concentrations were continuously measured with 1-h interval at both sites. The mean concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC were 85.9 μg/m3, 10.4 μg/m3, 4.2 μg/m3 and 63.4 μg/m3, 8.1 μg/m3, 5.3μg/m3 for downtown and suburban respectively. At the suburban site, compared to the lowest average concentration in spring, the relatively higher concentration of carbonaceous aerosol in summer was caused by biomass-burning activities. Significant increasing peaks of OC (up to 122.9 ug/m3) and EC (up to 35.8 ug/m3) in suburban were recorded in the June 10th night, and it is indicated using back trajectory that the air mass came through nearby agriculture areas. On the other hand, the OC and EC concentrations during the 2nd AYG (Asian Youth Games, Aug 16th - 24th in 2013) compared to that in rest days in August reduced by 21% and 10%, respectively, attributing to the effective control measures on reduction of industrial point sources, temporary control of motor vehicle and fugitive dusts. Rations of OC/EC in suburban were much lower than that in downtown. This might be due to the fact that the sampling point in suburban is quite close (in 400 meters) to a main highway. Both OC and EC concentrations in suburban were higher in nighttime than daytime, except OC in summer, indicating the existence of strong SOC and supported by high OC/EC and O3 at noon. The annual average SOC estimated by EC-tracer methods occupied 34.5% and 36.7% of the total OC for the downtown and suburban areas, respectively. OC/EC correlations in suburban were much weaker than those from downtown areas, which shows suburban areas is much more affected by long-range transport of pollution and/or complex sources including domestic coal combustion, biomass burning, industrial and transportation, especially in three other seasons except winter, which is

  4. Characteristics of mineral aerosol deposited on the glaciers of Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus, Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzov, Stanislav; Shahgedanova, Maria; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Ginot, Patrick; Lavrentiev, Ivan; Popov, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    Records of mineral aerosol (desert dust) stored in glaciers provide data on frequency and intensity of deposition events, source regions and atmospheric pathways of mineral dust. We present and discuss a chronology of dust deposition events recorded in the shallow firn and ice cores extracted on the Western Plateau, Mt. Elbrus (5150 m a.s.l.), Caucasus Mountains, Russia and covering the period of 2009-2013. Particle size distribution and chemical analysis (major ions, trace elements) were peformed using Coulter Counter Multisizer III, Abacus particle counter, IC and ICPMS analysis. Sampling was performed using continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. Annual average dust flux (264 μg/cm2 a-1) and average mass concentration (1.7 mg/kg) over the period 2007-2013 were calculated for the first time for this region. A combination of satellite imagery (MSG SEVIRI), trajectory models (FLEXTA, HYSPLIT) and meteorological data were used to accurately date each of the dust layers observed in shallow cores and investigate provenance of the dust and its pathways. Desert dust originating from the Middle East and Sahara was deposited on the Caucasus glaciers 3-6 times a year. Although less frequent, Saharan events are characterized by considerably higher dust loads than the more frequent Middle Eastern events. The mass median diameter of dust particles ranged between 2 and 9 μm. The deposition of dust resulted in elevated concentrations of most ions, especially Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and sulphates. Dust originated from or passing over the Middle East was characterised by the elevated concentrations of nitrates and ammonia. This may be related to dust emissions from agricultural fields which, if abandoned due to droughts, become important sources of dust. By contrast, samples of the Saharan dust originated from natural sources showed lower concentrations of ammonium. The mean values of crustal enrichment factors for the measured trace elements including metals were calculated. Overall

  5. Revised Land Use Characteristic Dataset for Asia and Southwest Asia for the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. L.; Richardson, K.; Westphal, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Presently, the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) uses the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use characteristic dataset to determine global dust emission areas. The USGS dataset was developed from Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer 1-km data from April 1992 to March 1993. In the past decade drastic changes in land and water use in Asia and Southwest Asia have quickly outdated this dataset. In China and Mongolia, age-old practices of farming and animal husbandry have been abandoned. Herders have too many animals in one location allowing the grassland to be eaten away and leaving vast areas of topsoil exposed and primed for removal by the wind. In the case of Southwest Asia, a four-year drought is in progress. Many of the wetlands and marshes in the river deltas are drying up from the lack of water runoff. To compound the problem several new dams were and are being built along the major watersheds. In particular, Iraq's dam building in the 1990's and politically driven draining of the Mesopotamian marshes between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers has lead to the near disappearance of this historical marshland. To incorporate these changes we are updating the USGS land use characteristic dataset using GIS-like software named ENVI (Environment for Visualizing Images), 1 km National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global topographical data, satellite imagery, and recently released governmental maps and reports. (For example, within the last two years the Chinese and Mongolian governments have released land degradation and desertification maps to satisfy the requirements set forth by United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification.) The steps taken to create the new land use characteristic database will be described in detail. Before (non-dust producing areas) and after (dust producing areas) examples will be shown.

  6. General Course and Specialist Physical Education Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, L. B.; Whiting, H. T.A.

    1972-01-01

    Physical Education students tended to be mesomorphic, stable extroverts, with driving, aggressive social responses and authoritarian attitudes as compared with general course college students. (Authors/MB)

  7. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  8. Evolution of In-Cylinder Diesel Engine Soot and Emission Characteristics Investigated with Online Aerosol Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, V B; Eriksson, A C; Shen, M; Nilsson, P; Gallo, Y; Waldheim, B; Martinsson, J; Andersson, Ö; Pagels, J

    2017-02-07

    To design diesel engines with low environmental impact, it is important to link health and climate-relevant soot (black carbon) emission characteristics to specific combustion conditions. The in-cylinder evolution of soot properties over the combustion cycle and as a function of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated in a modern heavy-duty diesel engine. A novel combination of a fast gas-sampling valve and a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) enabled online measurements of the in-cylinder soot chemistry. The results show that EGR reduced the soot formation rate. However, the late cycle soot oxidation rate (soot removal) was reduced even more, and the net effect was increased soot emissions. EGR resulted in an accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during combustion, and led to increased PAH emissions. We show that mass spectral and optical signatures of the in-cylinder soot and associated low volatility organics change dramatically from the soot formation dominated phase to the soot oxidation dominated phase. These signatures include a class of fullerene carbon clusters that we hypothesize represent less graphitized, C5-containing fullerenic (high tortuosity or curved) soot nanostructures arising from decreased combustion temperatures and increased premixing of air and fuel with EGR. Altered soot properties are of key importance when designing emission control strategies such as diesel particulate filters and when introducing novel biofuels.

  9. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  10. Global Aerosol Remote Sensing from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Levy, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Jose V.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, spatial distribution and dynamics of global aerosols are still very poorly known, and new data from satellite sensors have long been awaited to improve current understanding and to give a boost to the effort in future climate predictions. The derivation of aerosol parameters from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensors aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua polar-orbiting satellites ushers in a new era in aerosol remote sensing from space. Terra and Aqua were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002 respectively, with daytime equator crossing times of approximately 10:30 am and 1:30 pm respectively. Several aerosol parameters are retrieved at 10-km spatial resolution (level 2) from MODIS daytime data. The MODIS aerosol algorithm employs different approaches to retrieve parameters over land and ocean surfaces, because of the inherent differences in the solar spectral radiance interaction with these surfaces. The parameters retrieved include: aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.47, 0.55 and 0.66 micron wavelengths over land, and at 0.47, 0.55, 0.66, 0.87, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 micron over ocean; Angstrom exponent over land and ocean; and effective radii, and the proportion of AOT contributed by the small mode aerosols over ocean. To ensure the quality of these parameters, a substantial part of the Terra-MODIS aerosol products were validated globally and regionally, based on cross correlation with corresponding parameters derived from ground-based measurements from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun photometers. Similar validation efforts are planned for the Aqua-MODIS aerosol products. The MODIS level 2 aerosol products are operationally aggregated to generate global daily, eight-day (weekly), and monthly products at one-degree spatial resolution (level 3). MODIS aerosol data are used for the detailed study of local, regional, and global aerosol concentration

  11. Particulate matter (PM) episodes at a suburban site in Hong Kong: evolution of PM characteristics and role of photochemistry in secondary aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi Ming; Jie Li, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lee, Berto Paul Yok Long; Huang, Dan Dan; Keung Chan, Chak

    2016-11-01

    Episodes with high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) across the seasons were investigated during four 1-month campaigns at a suburban site in Hong Kong. High-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements revealed that both regional transport and secondary formation contributed to high PM levels during the episodes at this site. Based on distinct meteorological conditions, episodes were categorized into three types: liquid water content (LWC), solar irradiance (IR), and long-range transport (LRT). Despite the difference in meteorological conditions, all episodes were characterized by a high fraction of sulfate (45-56 %) and organics (23-34 %). However, aerosols in LWC episodes were less aged, consisting of the lowest fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the highest fraction of small particles. Large particles mixed internally while freshly formed small particles mixed externally in LWC episodes. Aerosols in LRT episodes, by contrast, were the most aged and consisted of the highest proportion of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA) and the lowest proportion of small particles. Both small and large particles mixed externally in LRT episodes. The highest proportion of semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and a medium proportion of small particles were observed in IR episodes. Both small and large particles were likely externally mixed during IR episodes. Furthermore, aerosols experienced the most dramatic size increase and diurnal variation, with a time lag between SVOOA and LVOOA and a gradual increase in carbon oxidation state (OSc ≈ 2 × O : C - H : C). Five out of 10 episodes were of the IR type, further reflecting the importance of this type of episode. The evolution of aerosol components in one particular episode of the IR type, which exhibited a clear land-sea breeze pattern, was examined in detail. Sulfate and SOA due to photochemical aging

  12. Family social characteristics related to physical growth of young children.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, N; Mora, J O; Herrera, M G

    1975-01-01

    Altogether 164 poor families who had children of normal and subnormal weight and height were studied in Bogota, Colombia. Physical growth was found to be positively associated with expenditure on food, sanitary conditions in the home, mother's age, birth interval between surviving children, level of parental newspaper reading, aspirations for children, and socioeconomic status. Physical growth was negatively associated with crowded living conditions and family size. Only mother's age, family size, spacing of births, and sanitary conditions were related to weight and height, independent of socioeconomic status. Food expenditure, crowding, parental newspaper reading, and aspirations for children all reflected the influence of socioeconomic status upon physical growth. The findings emphasized the importance of within-class social differences as they affect the physical growth of young children. PMID:1182354

  13. Microbial quality and physical-chemical characteristics of thermal springs.

    PubMed

    Fazlzadeh, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Hadi; Bagheri, Pari; Poureshg, Yusef; Rostami, Roohollah

    2016-04-01

    Microbial quality and physical-chemical properties of recreational spas were surveyed to investigate the health aspect of the spas' water. A total of 195 samples were collected from pools and springs of the spas in five sites from Ardebil Province of Iran. The effects of an independent factor defined as 'condition' and its component sub-factors (i.e., sampling point, location, and sampling date) on microbial quality and physical-chemical properties of the spas were studied by applying path analysis. The influence of physical-chemical properties on microbial quality was also considered. The percentage of samples exceeding the ISIRI (Swimming pool water microbiological specifications (vol 9412), Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran, Tehran, 2007) limits for Staphylococcus (spp.) was up to 55.8 in the springs and 87.8 in the pools, 58.1 and 99.2 for HPC, 90.7 and 97.8 for total coliform and fecal coliform, and 9.3 and 34.4 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. There were significant differences between the pools and springs for both physical-chemical properties and microbial quality. From the path analysis, sampling point was the most effective sub-factor of 'condition' on both the physical-chemical properties and microbial quality. Among the physical-chemical properties, water color had the most enhancing or additive influence on microbial pollution, while EC indicated a reducing or subtractive effect.

  14. The Characteristics of the Outdoor School Environment Associated with Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Ellen; Torsheim, Torbjorn; Sallis, James F.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2010-01-01

    The school is an important setting for physical activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between physical environmental characteristics and participation in daily physical activity during school breaks. Data from 130 schools and 16 471 students (Grades 4-10) in Norway were obtained in 2004 through self-administered…

  15. Atmospheric Aging and Its Impacts on Physical Properties of Soot Aerosols: Results from the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zheng, J.; Reed, C. C.; Collins, D. R.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the Earth energy balance directly by scattering solar radiation back to space and indirectly by changing the albedo, frequency, and lifetime of clouds. Carbon soot (or black carbon) produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning represents a major component of primary aerosols. Because of high absorption cross-sections over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. In areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many megacities, solar heating by soot-containing aerosols is roughly comparable to heating due to greenhouse gases. In addition, light absorbing soot aerosols may reduce photolysis rates at the surface level, producing a noticeable impact on photochemistry. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by soot can stabilize the atmosphere, retarding vertical transport and exacerbating accumulation of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) pollutants within the planetary boundary layer. Less surface heating and atmospheric stabilization may decrease formation of clouds, and warming in the atmosphere can evaporate existing cloud droplets by lowering relative humidity. Furthermore, soot-containing aerosols represent a major type of PM that has adverse effects on human health. When first emitted, soot particles are low-density aggregates of loosely connected primary spherules. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically hydrophobic, but may become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during atmospheric aging by acquiring hydrophilic coatings. Hygroscopic soot particles, being efficient CCN, can exert indirect forcing on climate. In this talk, results will be presented on measurements of soot properties during the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign. Ambient aerosols and fresh soot particles injected into a captured air chamber were monitored to

  16. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  17. Physical and chemical characteristics of Mt. St. Helens airborne debris

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, W.A.; Heiken, G.H.; Mroz, E.J.; Gladney, E.S.; Perrin, D.R.; Leifer, R.; Fisenne, I.; Hinchliffe, L.; Chuan, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Tephra and aerosols from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington were sampled in the lower stratosphere with a WB-57F aircraft. The main body of the plume was intercepted over western Kansas on May 20, 48 hours after the eruption, at an altitude of 15.2 km. Concentrations on filter samples were 26 ng of SO/sub 4//g of air and 579 ng of ash/g of air. Angular glass pyroclasts ranged in size from 0.5 to 10 ..mu..m, with a mean grain size of 2 ..mu..m. Samples collected at altitudes of 16.7 and 12.5 km had only traces of SO/sub 4/ and ash. A second flight was flown, 72 hours after the eruption, on May 21. From north Texas to central Wyoming, at an altitude of 15.2 km, < 0.5 to 38 ng of ash/g of air and 1.0 to 2.2 ng of SO/sub 4//g of air were sampled. At an altitude of 18.3 km, from central Wyoming to NW New Mexico, the plume density and character were variable. Glassy pyroclasts similar to those sampled on the first flight range in size from 0.5 to 4 ..mu..m dia. Trace element analysis revealed some volatile element enrichment, but far less than previously observed in the plume from St. Augustine Volcano, 1976. Values of /sup 210/Po//sup 210/Pb were 0.7 to 1.32 comparable to the secular equilibrium value of 1.0 and far less than ratios previously reported by Lambert.

  18. Leadership in Physical Therapy: Characteristics of Academics and Managers: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Zach; Brooks, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the characteristics of physical therapy leaders in academic and managerial roles. Methods: This quantitative, cross-sectional study used an online questionnaire administered via email to Canadian physical therapists recruited through the Canadian Physiotherapy Association and via additional emails targeted to academic and health care institutions. Individuals who met the inclusion criteria after completion of the questionnaire were asked to complete the Clifton StrengthsFinder, which was used to objectively assess the extent to which participants exhibited personality characteristics. We calculated frequencies for demographic characteristics and the 10 most prominent characteristics for participants in academic and managerial roles. Results: A total of 88 participants completed the questionnaire (52 managers, 36 academics). The most prevalent strengths among both academics and managers were the learner and achiever characteristics. Conclusions: Academics and managers in physical therapy share similar core characteristics, with slight variations in secondary characteristics. PMID:27504048

  19. Modeling of growth and evaporation effects on the extinction of 1.0-micron solar radiation traversing stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of growth and evaporation of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols on the extinction of solar radiation traversing such an aerosol medium are reported for the case of 1.0-micron solar radiation. Modeling results show that aerosol extinction is not very sensitive to the change of ambient water vapor concentration, but is sensitive to ambient temperature changes, especially at low ambient temperatures and high ambient water vapor concentration. A clarification is given of the effects of initial aerosol size distribution and composition on the change of aerosol extinction due to growth and evaporation processes. It is shown that experiments designed to observe solar radiation extinction of aerosols may also be applied to the determination of observed changes in aerosol optical properties, environmental parameters, or the physical and optical characteristics of sulfate aerosols.

  20. Characteristics and sources of submicron aerosols above the urban canopy (260 m) in Beijing, China, during the 2014 APEC summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, W. Q.; Du, W.; Zhou, L. B.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Gao, Z. Q.; Zhang, Q.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    The megacity of Beijing has experienced frequent severe fine particle pollution during the last decade. Although the sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles have been extensively investigated on the basis of ground measurements, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition and sources above the urban canopy in Beijing is rare. In this study, we conducted real-time measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) composition at 260 m at the Beijing 325 m meteorological tower (BMT) from 10 October to 12 November 2014, by using an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) along with synchronous measurements of size-resolved NR-PM1 composition near ground level using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The NR-PM1 composition above the urban canopy was dominated by organics (46 %), followed by nitrate (27 %) and sulfate (13 %). The high contribution of nitrate and high NO3- / SO42- mass ratios illustrates an important role of nitrate in particulate matter (PM) pollution during the study period. The organic aerosol (OA) was mainly composed of secondary OA (SOA), accounting for 61 % on an average. Different from that measured at the ground site, primary OA (POA) correlated moderately with SOA, likely suggesting a high contribution from regional transport above the urban canopy. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit with strict emission controls provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol chemistry. All aerosol species were shown to have significant decreases of 40-80 % during APEC from those measured before APEC, suggesting that emission controls over regional scales substantially reduced PM levels. However, the bulk aerosol composition was relatively similar before and during APEC as a result of synergetic controls of aerosol precursors. In addition to emission controls, the routine circulations of mountain-valley breezes were also found to play

  1. Characteristics and sources of submicron aerosols above the urban canopy (260 m) in Beijing, China during 2014 APEC summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, W. Q.; Du, W.; Zhou, L. B.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Gao, Z. Q.; Zhang, Q.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    The megacity of Beijing has experienced frequent severe fine particle pollution during the last decade. Although the sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles have been extensively investigated on the basis of ground measurements, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition and sources above the urban canopy in Beijing is rare. In this study, we conducted real-time measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) composition at 260 m at the 325 m Beijing Meteorological Tower (BMT) from 10 October to 12 November 2014, by using an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) along with synchronous measurements of size-resolved NR-PM1 composition at near ground level using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The NR-PM1 composition above the urban canopy was dominated by organics (46 %), followed by nitrate (27 %) and sulfate (13 %). The high contribution of nitrate and high NO3-/SO42- mass ratios illustrate an important role of nitrate in particulate matter (PM) pollution during the study period. The organic aerosol (OA) was mainly composed by secondary OA (SOA), accounting for 61 % on an average. Different from that measured at the ground site, primary OA (POA) correlated moderately with SOA, likely suggesting a high contribution from regional transport above the urban canopy. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit with strict emission controls provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol chemistry. All aerosol species were shown to have significant decreases of 40-80 % during APEC from those measured before APEC, suggesting that emission controls over regional scales substantially reduced PM levels. However, the bulk aerosol composition was relatively similar before and during APEC as a result of synergetic controls of aerosol precursors such as SO2, NOx, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In addition to emission controls, the routine

  2. Comprehensive mapping and characteristic regimes of aerosol effects on the formation and evolution of pyro-convective clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, D.; Cheng, Y.; Reutter, P.; ...

    2015-09-21

    Here, a recent parcel model study (Reutter et al., 2009) showed three deterministic regimes of initial cloud droplet formation, characterized by different ratios of aerosol concentrations (NCN) to updraft velocities. This analysis, however, did not reveal how these regimes evolve during the subsequent cloud development. To address this issue, we employed the Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM) with full microphysics and extended the model simulation from the cloud base to the entire column of a single pyro-convective mixed-phase cloud. A series of 2-D simulations (over 1000) were performed over a wide range of NCN and dynamic conditions. Themore » integrated concentration of hydrometeors over the full spatial and temporal scales was used to evaluate the aerosol and dynamic effects. The results show the following. (1) The three regimes for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation in the parcel model (namely aerosol-limited, updraft-limited, and transitional regimes) still exist within our simulations, but net production of raindrops and frozen particles occurs mostly within the updraft-limited regime. (2) Generally, elevated aerosols enhance the formation of cloud droplets and frozen particles. The response of raindrops and precipitation to aerosols is more complex and can be either positive or negative as a function of aerosol concentrations. The most negative effect was found for values of NCN of ~ 1000 to 3000 cm–3. (3) The nonlinear properties of aerosol–cloud interactions challenge the conclusions drawn from limited case studies in terms of their representativeness, and ensemble studies over a wide range of aerosol concentrations and other influencing factors are strongly recommended for a more robust assessment of the aerosol effects.« less

  3. Comprehensive mapping and characteristic regimes of aerosol effects on the formation and evolution of pyro-convective clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.; Cheng, Y.; Reutter, P.; Trentmann, J.; Burrows, S. M.; Spichtinger, P.; Nordmann, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Poschl, U.; Su, H.

    2015-09-21

    Here, a recent parcel model study (Reutter et al., 2009) showed three deterministic regimes of initial cloud droplet formation, characterized by different ratios of aerosol concentrations (NCN) to updraft velocities. This analysis, however, did not reveal how these regimes evolve during the subsequent cloud development. To address this issue, we employed the Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM) with full microphysics and extended the model simulation from the cloud base to the entire column of a single pyro-convective mixed-phase cloud. A series of 2-D simulations (over 1000) were performed over a wide range of NCN and dynamic conditions. The integrated concentration of hydrometeors over the full spatial and temporal scales was used to evaluate the aerosol and dynamic effects. The results show the following. (1) The three regimes for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation in the parcel model (namely aerosol-limited, updraft-limited, and transitional regimes) still exist within our simulations, but net production of raindrops and frozen particles occurs mostly within the updraft-limited regime. (2) Generally, elevated aerosols enhance the formation of cloud droplets and frozen particles. The response of raindrops and precipitation to aerosols is more complex and can be either positive or negative as a function of aerosol concentrations. The most negative effect was found for values of NCN of ~ 1000 to 3000 cm–3. (3) The nonlinear properties of aerosol–cloud interactions challenge the conclusions drawn from limited case studies in terms of their representativeness, and ensemble studies over a wide range of aerosol concentrations and other influencing factors are strongly recommended for a more robust assessment of the aerosol effects.

  4. Influence of the micro-physical properties of the aerosol on the atmospheric correction of OLI data acquired over desert area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of surface reflectance obtained by different atmospheric correction algorithms of the Landsat 8 OLI data considering or not the micro-physical properties of the aerosol when images are acquired in desert area located in South-West of Nile delta. The atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. In particular, the role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was investigated [Bassani et al., 2015; Tirelli et al., 2015]. In this work, the OLI surface reflectance was retrieved by the developed OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) physically-based atmospheric correction which considers the aerosol micro-physical properties available from the two AERONET stations [Holben et al., 1998] close to the study area (El_Farafra and Cairo_EMA_2). The OLI@CRI algorithm is based on 6SV radiative transfer model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997], specifically developed for Landsat 8 OLI data. The OLI reflectance obtained by the OLI@CRI was compared with reflectance obtained by other atmospheric correction algorithms which do not consider micro-physical properties of aerosol (DOS) or take on aerosol standard models (FLAASH, implemented in ENVI software). The accuracy of the surface reflectance retrieved by different algorithms were calculated by comparing the spatially resampled OLI images with the MODIS surface reflectance products. Finally, specific image processing was applied to the OLI reflectance images in order to compare remote sensing products obtained for same scene. The results highlight the influence of the physical characterization of aerosol on the OLI data improving the retrieved atmospherically corrected

  5. Sensitivity of clear-sky direct radiative effect of the aerosol to micro-physical properties by using 6SV radiative transfer model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Tirelli, Cecilia; Manzo, Ciro; Pietrodangelo, Adriana; Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The aerosol micro-physical properties are crucial to analyze their radiative impact on the Earth's radiation budget [IPCC, 2007]. The 6SV model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997] has been used to perform physically-based atmospheric correction of hyperspectral airborne and aircraft remote sensing data [Vermote et al., 2009; Bassani et al. 2010; Tirelli et al., 2014]. The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data has been shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. The role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data acquired over water and land targets is investigated within the framework of CLAM-PHYM (Coasts and Lake Assessment and Monitoring by PRISMA HYperspectral Mission) and PRIMES (Synergistic use of PRISMA products with high resolution meteo-chemical simulations and their validation on ground and from satellite) projects, both funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI). In this work, the results of the radiative field of the Earth/Atmosphere coupled system simulated by using 6SV during the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data are presented. The analysis of the clear-sky direct radiative effect is performed considering the aerosol micro-physical properties used to define the aerosol model during the atmospheric correction process. In particular, the AERONET [Holben et al., 1998] and FLEXAOD [Curci et al., 2014] micro-physical properties are used for each image to evaluate the contribution of the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance and on the direct radiative forcing. The results highlight the potential of the hyperspectral remote sensing data for atmospheric studies as well as for environmental studies. Currently, the future hyperspectral missions, such as the

  6. Income, Family Characteristics, and Physical Violence toward Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: This paper discusses the ways in which existing microeconomic theories of partner abuse, intra-family bargaining, and distribution of resources within families may contribute to our current understanding of physical child abuse. The empirical implications of this discussion are then tested on data from the 1985 National Family Violence…

  7. Physical stability and aerosol properties of liposomes delivered using an air-jet nebulizer and a novel micropump device with large mesh apertures.

    PubMed

    Elhissi, A M A; Faizi, M; Naji, W F; Gill, H S; Taylor, K M G

    2007-04-04

    The aerosol properties of liposomes and their physical stability to aerosolization were evaluated using an air-jet nebulizer (Pari LC Plus) and a customized large aperture vibrating-mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm). Soya phosphatidylcholine: cholesterol (1:1 mole ratio) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) entrapping salbutamol sulfate were nebulized directly, or after being reduced in size by extrusion through 1 or 0.4microm polycarbonate membrane filters. MLVs were very unstable to jet nebulization and stability was not markedly enhanced when vesicles were extruded before nebulization, such that drug losses from delivered liposomes using the Pari nebulizer were up to 88% (i.e. only 12% retained in liposomes). The Aeroneb Pro-8microm nebulizer was less disruptive to liposomes, completed nebulization in a much shorter time, and produced greater mass output rate than the Pari nebulizer. However, aerosol droplets were larger, total drug and mass outputs were lower and aerosolization performance was dependent on formulation. Vibrating-mesh nebulization was less disruptive to liposomes extruded through the 1microm membranes compared with the non-extruded MLVs, so that the retained entrapment of the drug in the nebulized vesicles was 56% and 37%, respectively. However, extrusion of liposomes to 0.4microm resulted in reduced stability of liposomes to vibrating-mesh nebulization (retained entrapment=41%) which was attributed to the reduced liposome lamellarity and subsequent reduced resistance to nebulization-induced shearing. This study has shown that vibrating-mesh nebulization using the customized large aperture mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Pro-8microm) had a less disruptive effect on liposomes and produced a higher output rate compared with the Pari LC Plus air-jet nebulizer. On the other hand, the air-jet nebulizer produced higher total mass and drug outputs and smaller aerosol droplets.

  8. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols: Impact of biomass burning and secondary formation in summertime in a rural area of the North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Xinfeng; Xue, Likun; Li, Weijun; Sui, Xiao; Wen, Liang; Chi, Jianwei; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Junmei; Xu, Caihong; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-07-01

    To determine the characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in rural areas of the North China Plain, field measurements were conducted at Yucheng (YC) in the summers of 2013 and 2014. The concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols at YC exhibited clear diurnal variation, with higher concentrations in the early morning and at night and lower concentrations during the afternoon hours. The mass-balance method designed for particulate matter smaller than 2.5μm (PM2.5) was used to calculate the organic matter (OM)/organic carbon (OC) ratio. The value obtained, 2.07±0.05, was suggested as a reference to estimate organics in PM2.5 in rural areas of the North China Plain. Biomass burning was identified to be a significant source of carbonaceous aerosols; approximately half of the samples obtained at YC were affected by biomass burning during summer 2013. Case studies revealed that biomass burning accounted for up to 52.6% of the OC and 51.1% of the elemental carbon in PM2.5 samples. The organic coatings observed on sulphur-rich and potassium-rich particles indicated the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from the oxidation of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the aging of smoke released from biomass burning. Based on the evolution of the VOCs, the contribution of VOCs oxidation to SOA concentration was 3.21 and 1.07μgm(-3)ppm(-1) CO under conditions of low nitrogen oxide (NOx) and high NOx, respectively. Aromatics (e.g. benzene, toluene, xylene and ethylbenzene) made the greatest contribution to SOA concentration (88.4% in low-NOx conditions and 80.6% in high-NOx conditions). The results of the study offer novel insights into the effects of biomass burning on the carbonaceous aerosols and SOA formation in polluted rural areas.

  9. Measurement of the physical properties of aerosols in a fullerene factory for inhalation exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Yuji; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki; Suemura, Kouji

    2008-06-01

    Assessment of human exposure is important for the elucidation of potential health risks. However, there is little information available on particle number concentrations and number size distributions, including those of nanoparticles, in the working environments of factories producing engineered nanomaterials. The authors used a scanning mobility particle sizer and an optical particle counter to measure the particle number size distributions of particles ranging in diameter (D(p)) from 10 nm to >5000 nm in a fullerene factory and used scanning electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the particles. Comparisons of particle size distributions and morphology during non-work periods, during work periods, during an agitation process, and in the nearby outdoor air were conducted to identify the sources of the particles and to determine their physical properties. A modal diameter of 25 nm was found in the working area during the non-work period; this result was probably influenced by ingress of outdoor air. During the removal of fullerenes from a storage tank for bagging and/or weighing, the particle number concentration at D(p)<50 nm was no greater than that in the non-work period, but the concentration at D(p)>1000 nm was greater during the non-work period. When a vacuum cleaner was in use, the particle number concentration at D(p)<50 nm was greater than that during the non-work period, but the concentration at D(p)>1000 nm was no greater. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the coarse particles emitted during bagging and/or weighing were aggregates/agglomerates of fullerenes; although origin of particles with D(p)<50 nm is unclear.

  10. Can basin land use effects on physical characteristics of streams be determined at broad geographic scales?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, R.M.; Carlisle, D.M.; Meador, M.R.; Short, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The environmental setting (e.g., climate, topography, geology) and land use affect stream physical characteristics singly and cumulatively. At broad geographic scales, we determined the importance of environmental setting and land use in explaining variation in stream physical characteristics. We hypothesized that as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, land use would explain more of the variation in stream physical characteristics because environmental settings become more homogeneous. At a national scale, stepwise linear regression indicated that environmental setting was more important in explaining variability in stream physical characteristics. Although statistically discernible, the amount of variation explained by land use was not remarkable due to low partial correlations. At level II ecoregion spatial scales (southeastern USA plains, central USA plains, and a combination of the western Cordillera and the western interior basins and ranges), environmental setting variables were again more important predictors of stream physical characteristics, however, as the spatial scale decreased from national to regional, the portion of variability in stream physical characteristics explained by basin land use increased. Development of stream habitat indicators of land use will depend upon an understanding of relations between stream physical characteristics and environmental factors at multiple spatial scales. Smaller spatial scales will be necessary to reduce the confounding effects of variable environmental settings before the effects of land use can be reliably assessed. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  11. Application of laser light scattering for determination of the border aerosol-air in a specialized physical laboratory setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damov, K. S.; Iliev, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    The current article examines the application of laser light scattering in a specialized laboratory setup. It is used for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume (High Concentration Aerosols) by the method of free flow out. The measurement chamber is first filled with the investigated aerosol. After a predetermined delay time the aerosol is allowed to flow out through a calibrated pipe with fixed size located few centimetres above the chamber's bottom. The lowering of the upper border aerosol-air is continuously scanned using a laser beam directed along the axis of the cylindrical chamber. The kinematic viscosity and mass density of the investigated aerosol phase are calculated by formulas obtained by the authors. The suggested application of laser light scattering led to higher accuracy of the determination the position of aerosol-air border, thence the certainty of this method. This improvement allowed the use of computer controlled optoelectronic setting. The use of laser light scattering significantly improves the method for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume.

  12. Characteristics of aerosol and cloud particle size distributions in the tropical tropopause layer measured with optical particle counter and lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Maruyama, K.; Hayashi, M.; Ogino, S.-Y.; Ishimoto, H.; Tachibana, Y.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.; Yamashita, K.; Saga, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Kamiakito, Y.; Chabangborn, A.; Thana, B.; Hashizume, M.; Koike, T.; Oki, T.

    2007-07-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) is used in conjunction with lidar measurements to examine the characteristics of the particle size distribution in cirrus cloud in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) over Thailand where the TTL is defined as the height at which temperature is lower than -75°C in this paper. Of 11 OPC launches, cirrus cloud was detected at 10-15 km high on 7 occasions, cirrus was detected in the TTL in 6 cases, and simultaneous OPC and lidar measurements were made on two occasions. Comparison of lidar and OPC measurements reveal that the cloud heights of cirrus in the TTL varies by several hundred meters over distances of tens kilometers; hence the height is not always horizontally uniform. The mode radii of particles constituting the clouds are estimated by lidar and OPC measurements to be less than approximately 10 μm. The regression lines of the particle size distribution with and without cirrus cloud exhibit similar features at equivalent radii of <0.8 μm. Enhancement in the integrated number concentration at radii greater than 0.8 μm indicates that liquid particles tend to be frozen at a radius of 0.8 μm, with cirrus clouds above 10 km exhibiting similar features. On the other hand, enhancement in the particle size distribution at radii greater than 0.9 μm and a peak at around 0.8 μm in the ratio of the standard deviation of count values to that of the Poisson distribution of the averaged count values are common features of cirrus clouds in the TTL, where the ratio shows the vertical homogeneity of the particle number. These typical features suggest that the transition from liquid, sulfuric acid aerosol, to ice is more observable in the TTL and the timing of freezing may vary with height in the TTL.

  13. The Tagish Lake meteorite fall: interpretation of fireball physical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Revelle, D. O.; Hildebrand, A. R.

    2001-11-01

    We have analyzed available instrumental and eyewitness records associated with the fireball leading to the fall of the Tagish Lake meteorite. Initial chemical and physical studies of this carbonaceous chondrite have shown it to be unique. It is one of the most primitive meteorites yet recovered and is physically weak. By determining the meteoroid trajectory, velocity, and physical breakup in the atmosphere, we can characterise the fireball as intermediate between Type II and Type IIIa, following the classification of Ceplecha et al. (1998). Modelling suggests an initial porosity for the pre-atmospheric meteoroid in the range 40-60%. The initial fragmentation occurred under less than 0.3 MPa dynamic pressure. Determination of Tagish Lake's orbit suggests a linkage to parent bodies in the main asteroid belt, though association with Encke-type comets cannot be strictly excluded. Tagish Lake may represent an intermediate object between chondritic asteroids and cometary bodies consistent with a linkage to D-class asteroids based on results from reflectance-spectra work.

  14. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  15. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    aerosol (core)-shell (BC) when compared to their external mixture, while the SSA for maritime aerosols does not vary significantly for different mixing scenarios because of the dominance of sea salt aerosols. Thus, these results confirm that aerosol mixing can modify the physical and optical characteristics of aerosols, which vary as a function of relative humidity. These calculations will be useful in parameterising the effect of core-shell vs. external mixing of aerosols in global climate models, and in the evaluation of aerosol radiative effects.

  16. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus have a powerful effect on cloud properties. Increased aerosol concentrations resulting from pollution lead to higher cloud droplet concentrations, but smaller droplet sizes. This in turn affects the physical processes inside clouds that lead to the initiation of precipitation. Depending on a number of factors, including aerosol composition, atmospheric stability, and cloud water content, increasing CCN concentrations may either decrease or increase rainfall. In convective clouds, early rain formation is suppressed, which makes more water and energy available to rise higher in the atmosphere and form ice particles. This may invigorate the dynamics of convection, encourage the formation of hail and lightning, and enhance the transport of materials to the upper troposphere. In turn, cloud processing also affects the concentrations, composition, and distribution of atmospheric aerosols. In order to understand and quantify the effects of air pollution on climate, and precipitation in particular, knowledge of natural abundance and characteristics of aerosols is as essential as the observation of perturbed conditions. I will present recent advances in the conceptual understanding of aerosol-precipitation interactions, as well as results of measurements on aerosol and cloud characteristics in pristine and polluted conditions.

  17. Characteristics, sources and evolution of fine aerosol (PM1) at urban, coastal and forest background sites in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, A.; Holzinger, R.; Remeikis, V.; Röckmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of organic aerosol (OA) samples collected on PM1 filters was determined as a function of desorption temperature to investigate the main sources of organic carbon and the effects of photochemical processing on atmospheric aerosol. The filter samples were collected at an urban (54°38‧ N, 25°18‧ E), coastal (55°55‧ N, 21°00‧ E) and forest (55°27‧ N, 26°00' E) site in Lithuania in March 2013. They can be interpreted as winter-time samples because the monthly averaged temperature was -4 °C. The detailed chemical composition of organic compounds was analysed with a thermal desorption PTR-MS. The mass concentration of organic aerosol at the forest site was roughly by a factor of 30 lower than at the urban and coastal site. This fact could be an indication that in this cold month the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was very low. Moreover, the organic aerosol collected at the forest site was more refractory and contained a larger fraction of heavy molecules with m/z > 200. The isotopic composition of the aerosol was used to differentiate the two main sources of organic aerosol in winter, i.e. biomass burning (BB) and fossil fuel (FF) combustion. Organic aerosol from biomass burning is enriched in 13C compared to OA from fossil fuel emissions. δ13COC values of the OA samples showed a positive correlation with the mass fraction of several individual organic compounds. Most of these organic compounds contained nitrogen indicating that organic nitrogen compounds formed during the combustion of biomass may be indicative of BB. Other compounds that showed negative correlations with δ13COC were possibly indicative of FF. These compounds included heavy hydrocarbons and were on the average less oxidized than the bulk organic carbon. The correlation of δ13COC and the O/C ratio was positive at low but negative at high desorption temperatures at the forest site. We propose that this might be due to

  18. Understanding the influence of powder flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration characteristics on the aerosolization of pharmaceutical model powders.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Armstrong, Brian; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2010-08-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the intrinsic inter-particulate cohesion of model pharmaceutical powders on their aerosolization from a dry powder inhaler. Two cohesive poly-disperse lactose powders with median particle sizes of around 4 and 20 microm were examined. The results showed that after dry coating with magnesium stearate, their flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration behaviours could be substantially improved, as indicated by powder rheometry, shear testing and laser diffraction aerosol testing. This was achieved by reducing their cohesiveness via surface modification. In contrast to some previous reports, this study demonstrated how powder aerosolization may be improved more significantly and consistently (for widely varying air flow rates) by substantially reducing their inter-particulate cohesive forces. This study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between intrinsic cohesive nature and bulk properties such as flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration and its impact on their aerosolization, which is fundamental and critical in the optimal design of dry powder inhaler formulations. The intensive mechanical dry coating technique also demonstrated a promising potential to improve aerosolization efficiency of fine cohesive model powders.

  19. Liberation characteristic and physical separation of printed circuit board (PCB).

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Wang, Hui; Liang, Wei; Fu, Jiangang; Yi, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of printed circuit board (PCB) is an important subject and to which increasing attention is paid, both in treatment of waste as well as recovery of valuable material terms. Precede physical and mechanical method, a good liberation is the premise to further separation. In this study, two-step crushing process is employed, and standard sieve is applied to screen crushed material to different size fractions, moreover, the liberation situation and particles shape in different size are observed. Then metal of the PCB is separated by physical methods, including pneumatic separation, electrostatic separation and magnetic separation, and major metal contents are characterized by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Results show that the metal and nonmetal particles of PCB are dissociated completely under the crush size 0.6mm; metal is mainly enriched in the four size fractions between 0.15 and 1.25 mm; relatively, pneumatic separation is suitable for 0.6-0.9 mm size fraction, while the electrostatic separation is suitable for three size fractions that are 0.15-0.3mm, 0.3-0.6mm and 0.9-1.25 mm. The whole process that involves crushing, electrostatic and magnetic separation has formed a closed cycle that can return material and provide salable product.

  20. Physical characteristics of GE (General Electric) BWR (boiling-water reactor) fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S.; Notz, K.J.

    1989-06-01

    The physical characteristics of fuel assemblies manufactured by the General Electric Company for boiling-water reactors are classified and described. The classification into assembly types is based on the GE reactor product line, the Characteristics Data Base (CDB) assembly class, and the GE fuel design. Thirty production assembly types are identified. Detailed physical data are presented for each assembly type in an appendix. Descriptions of special (nonstandard) fuels are also reported. 52 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  1. Correlation between crustal physical properties and aftershock sequences characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, O.; Hainzl, S.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of well constrained seismic and GPS data allows to analyze different data sets together. In our work we focus on the complex analyses of the seismic catalogs and a GSP inversions, which will help to connect the aftershock activities to the crustal physical properties. In particular, we are searching for the dependencies between aftershock parameters and seismic coupling, coseismic and postseismic slip on a regional scale. We use the ETAS model for the description of primary and secondary aftershocks. Our analysis is based on the data related to the Chilean Maule (Mw=8.8) and Californian Parkfield (Mw=6.0) aftershock sequences. We have found correlation between the first order of aftershocks and seismic coupling, slip and b-value. Our results give an opportunity for better understanding of the aftershocks appearance.

  2. An overview of regional and local characteristics of aerosols in South Africa using satellite, ground, and modeling data

    PubMed Central

    Hersey, S. P.; Garland, R. M.; Crosbie, E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Piketh, S.; Burger, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of particulate air quality across the five major metropolitan areas of South Africa (Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Tshwane (Gauteng Province), the Industrial Highveld Air Quality Priority Area (HVAPA), and Durban), based on a decadal (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009) aerosol climatology from multiple satellite platforms and detailed analysis of ground-based data from 19 sites throughout Gauteng Province. Satellite analysis was based on aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Aqua and Terra (550 nm) and MISR (555 nm) platforms, Ångström Exponent (α) from MODIS Aqua (550/865 nm) and Terra (470/660 nm), ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) from TOMS, and results from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. At continentally influenced sites, AOD, α, and UVAI reach maxima (0.12–0.20, 1.0–1.8, and 1.0–1.2, respectively) during austral spring (September–October), coinciding with a period of enhanced dust generation and the maximum integrated intensity of close-proximity and subtropical fires identified by MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS). Minima in AOD, α, and UVAI occur during winter. Results from ground monitoring indicate that low-income township sites experience by far the worst particulate air quality in South Africa, with seasonally averaged PM10 concentrations as much as 136 % higher in townships that in industrial areas. We report poor agreement between satellite and ground aerosol measurements, with maximum surface aerosol concentrations coinciding with minima in AOD, α, and UVAI. This result suggests that remotely sensed data are not an appropriate surrogate for ground air quality in metropolitan South Africa. PMID:26312061

  3. An overview of regional and local characteristics of aerosols in South Africa using satellite, ground, and modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Garland, R. M.; Crosbie, E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Piketh, S.; Burger, R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of particulate air quality across the five major metropolitan areas of South Africa (Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Tshwane (Gauteng Province), the Industrial Highveld Air Quality Priority Area (HVAPA), and Durban), based on a decadal (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009) aerosol climatology from multiple satellite platforms and detailed analysis of ground-based data from 19 sites throughout Gauteng Province. Satellite analysis was based on aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Aqua and Terra (550 nm) and MISR (555 nm) platforms, Ångström Exponent (α) from MODIS Aqua (550/865 nm) and Terra (470/660 nm), ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) from TOMS, and results from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. At continentally influenced sites, AOD, α, and UVAI reach maxima (0.12-0.20, 1.0-1.8, and 1.0-1.2, respectively) during austral spring (September-October), coinciding with a period of enhanced dust generation and the maximum integrated intensity of close-proximity and subtropical fires identified by MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS). Minima in AOD, α, and UVAI occur during winter. Results from ground monitoring indicate that low-income township sites experience by far the worst particulate air quality in South Africa, with seasonally averaged PM10 concentrations as much as 136% higher in townships that in industrial areas. We report poor agreement between satellite and ground aerosol measurements, with maximum surface aerosol concentrations coinciding with minima in AOD, α, and UVAI. This result suggests that remotely sensed data are not an appropriate surrogate for ground air quality in metropolitan South Africa.

  4. An overview of regional and local characteristics of aerosols in South Africa using satellite, ground, and modeling data.

    PubMed

    Hersey, S P; Garland, R M; Crosbie, E; Shingler, T; Sorooshian, A; Piketh, S; Burger, R

    We present a comprehensive overview of particulate air quality across the five major metropolitan areas of South Africa (Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Tshwane (Gauteng Province), the Industrial Highveld Air Quality Priority Area (HVAPA), and Durban), based on a decadal (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009) aerosol climatology from multiple satellite platforms and detailed analysis of ground-based data from 19 sites throughout Gauteng Province. Satellite analysis was based on aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Aqua and Terra (550 nm) and MISR (555 nm) platforms, Ångström Exponent (α) from MODIS Aqua (550/865 nm) and Terra (470/660 nm), ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) from TOMS, and results from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. At continentally influenced sites, AOD, α, and UVAI reach maxima (0.12-0.20, 1.0-1.8, and 1.0-1.2, respectively) during austral spring (September-October), coinciding with a period of enhanced dust generation and the maximum integrated intensity of close-proximity and subtropical fires identified by MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS). Minima in AOD, α, and UVAI occur during winter. Results from ground monitoring indicate that low-income township sites experience by far the worst particulate air quality in South Africa, with seasonally averaged PM10 concentrations as much as 136 % higher in townships that in industrial areas. We report poor agreement between satellite and ground aerosol measurements, with maximum surface aerosol concentrations coinciding with minima in AOD, α, and UVAI. This result suggests that remotely sensed data are not an appropriate surrogate for ground air quality in metropolitan South Africa.

  5. Physical and optical properties of aged biomass burning aerosol from wildfires in Siberia and the Western USA at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, James R.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Hee, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    The summer of 2015 was an extreme forest fire year in the Pacific Northwest. Our sample site at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO, 2.7 km a.s.l.) in central Oregon observed biomass burning (BB) events more than 50 % of the time during August. In this paper we characterize the aerosol physical and optical properties of 19 aged BB events during August 2015. Six of the 19 events were influenced by Siberian fires originating near Lake Baikal that were transported to MBO over 4-10 days. The remainder of the events resulted from wildfires in Northern California and Southwestern Oregon with transport times to MBO ranging from 3 to 35 h. Fine particulate matter (PM1), carbon monoxide (CO), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat), aerosol light absorption coefficients (σabs), and aerosol number size distributions were measured throughout the campaign. We found that the Siberian events had a significantly higher Δσabs/ΔCO enhancement ratio, higher mass absorption efficiency (MAE; Δσabs/ΔPM1), lower single scattering albedo (ω), and lower absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) when compared with the regional events. We suggest that the observed Siberian events represent that portion of the plume that has hotter flaming fire conditions and thus enabled strong pyroconvective lofting and long-range transport to MBO. The Siberian events observed at MBO therefore represent a selected portion of the original plume that would then have preferentially higher black carbon emissions and thus an enhancement in absorption. The lower AAE values in the Siberian events compared to regional events indicate a lack of brown carbon (BrC) production by the Siberian fires or a loss of BrC during transport. We found that mass scattering efficiencies (MSE) for the BB events ranged from 2.50 to 4.76 m2 g-1. We measured aerosol size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Number size distributions ranged from unimodal to bimodal and had geometric mean diameters (Dpm

  6. Southeast Asian Summer Burning: A Micro Pulse Lidar Network Study of Aerosol Particle Physical Properties near Fires in Borneo and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    In August and September 2012, as part of the continuing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) project, three autonomous elastic-scattering 355 nm lidars were deployed by the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) to Sumatra and Borneo, measuring the vertical profile of aerosol particle scattering during peak burning season. In coordination with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a regional characterization of aerosol particle physical properties and distribution was performed. In addition to a permanent regional network site at Singapore, the three temporary sites established for this research include Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia), Kuching (northwest Borneo, Malaysia) and Palangkaraya (south-central Borneo, Indonesia). In this paper, we discuss the mission and instruments, and introduce data products available to the community through the MPLNET online website. We further describe initial results of the study, including a contrast of mean vertical scattering profiles versus those observed near active fire sources at Jambi and Palangkaraya, and resolve longer-range particle evolution at receptor sites, like Kuching, that are most commonly 1-2 days downwind of larger fire complexes.

  7. Aerosol physicochemical properties in relation to meteorology: Case studies in urban, marine, and arid settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna

    Atmospheric aerosols are a highly relevant component of the climate system affecting atmospheric radiative transfer and the hydrological cycle. As opposed to other key atmospheric constituents with climatic relevance, atmospheric aerosol particles are highly heterogeneous in time and space with respect to their size, concentration, chemical composition and physical properties. Many aspects of their life cycle are not understood, making them difficult to represent in climate models and hard to control as a pollutant. Aerosol-cloud interactions in particular are infamous as a major source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Field measurements are an important source of information for the modeling community and can lead to a better understanding of chemical and microphysical processes. In this study, field data from urban, marine, and arid settings are analyzed and the impact of meteorological conditions on the evolution of aerosol particles while in the atmosphere is investigated. Particular attention is given to organic aerosols, which are a poorly understood component of atmospheric aerosols. Local wind characteristics, solar radiation, relative humidity and the presence or absence of clouds and fog are found to be crucial factors in the transport and chemical evolution of aerosol particles. Organic aerosols in particular are found to be heavily impacted by processes in the liquid phase (cloud droplets and aerosol water). The reported measurements serve to improve the process-level understanding of aerosol evolution in different environments and to inform the modeling community by providing realistic values for input parameters and validation of model calculations.

  8. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  9. The Distinguishing Characteristics of High Schools with High and Low Enrollments in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Koevering, Thomas E.

    This paper presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine if high schools with either high or low enrollments in physics exhibit any distinguishing characteristics that are measurable. The study involved 48 schools, 51 physics teachers, and 3767 students in the State of Michigan. Questionnaires were administered…

  10. Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Combining GPS and Accelerometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kann, Dave H. H.; de Vries, Sanne I.; Schipperijn, Jasper; de Vries, Nanne K.; Jansen, Maria W. J.; Kremers, Stef P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) is decreasing among children, while sedentary behavior (SB) is increasing. Schoolyards seem suitable settings to influence children's PA behavior. This study investigated the associations between schoolyard characteristics and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and SB of children aged 8-11 years at…

  11. [Characteristics and sources of soluble ions in aerosols from Glacier No. 1 at the headwater of Urumqi River, Tianshan Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao-Ying; Li, Zhong-Qin; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Zhou, Ping; Fan, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Major soluble ions were measured in 26 aerosol samples collected at Glacier NO. 1 at the headwater of Urumqi River in Tianshan Mountains in April, August and October 2007. The concentration, seasonal change and source of aerosol were analyzed. The results showed that the mean concentration of total soluble major ions of aerosol was 2.76 microg.m-3, Ca2+, NO-(3) and SO2-(4) were the major soluble inorganic ion components. In spring, summer and autumn, the seasonal change of the mean concentration of total soluble inorganic ions was consistent with Ca2+ , SO2-(4) , NH+(4), Na+ , Mg2+ and Cl- , the highest concentration was in summer, followed by autumn and spring. While the maximum concentration of K and NO-(3) was observed in autumn, the minimum was in spring. Soluble inorganic ion source characteristics were that: Ca2+ , Na+, Mg2+ , K+ and Cl- were mostly the land source; NO-(3) and NH: were mainly from the anthropogenic source. SO2-(4) was mainly originated from both crustal surface and anthropogenic sources.

  12. Physical Characteristics and Geobiology of 'Rotten' Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantz, C. M.; Light, B.; Orellana, M. V.; Carpenter, S.; Junge, K.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic sea ice in its final stage of demise, "rotten ice", is characterized by seriously compromised structural integrity, making it difficult to collect and study. Consequently, little is known about the physical, chemical and biological properties of this ice type. Yet, as the Arctic melt season lengthens, this ice type will likely appear sooner and become more prevalent in the Arctic Ocean and its occurrence may be more common than satellite mapping and ice charts suggest (e.g., Barber et al., 2009). Here we present physical, chemical, biological, and optical measurements of first-year ice near Barrow, Alaska during the spring and summer of 2015. Samples represent a progression from solid, "springtime" shorefast ice (May); through melting, heavily melt-ponded, "summertime" shorefast ice (June); to the final stage of barely-intact, "rotten" ice collected from small floes Beaufort Sea (July). Results indicate that rotten ice exhibits low salinity, is well drained and has a lower density than its springtime counterpart. X-ray tomography of dimethyl phthalate-casted sea ice samples indicates differences in porosity and relative permeability in rotten ice vs. spring- and summertime ice. We also present a preliminary characterization of rotten sea ice as a microbial habitat using preliminary results of chemical measurements (nutrients, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon), and microbiological characterizations (concentrations and16S/18S rDNA-based identifications) from seawater vs. sea ice vs. sea ice brines. Optical measurements show that while decreased ice thickness and increased melt pond coverage cause an overall increase in solar radiation to the ocean as sea ice warms, rotten ice is actually less transparent to solar radiation than its spring- and summertime counterparts. These factors determine solar heating in the ocean and, ultimately, the potential for accelerated ice melting (e.g., Light et al., 2008). This work provides a foundation for understanding

  13. Air Force Physical Fitness: An Assessment of Characteristics and Programs which Affect Individual Physical Fitness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    taining physical fitness. Get rid of the greasy, starchy junk foods served in alert dining halls. (679) Why don’ t you award points towards promotion...fitness tests given to 4000 children in the United States and to 3000 children in Europe showed that American youth lagged far behind European youth in...attention and lack of physical fitness are well recognized. Kraus and Raub (27:10-12) list tension, obesity , musculoskeletal dys- function, and

  14. Levels and Characteristics of Physical Activity among a College Student Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kim; Staten, Ruth R.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Noland, Melody

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physical activity levels and the relationships between activity and personal characteristics among a cohort of college students and to determine personal characteristics that predict activity. A sample of 1,700 undergraduates was mailed a survey that requested demographic information and assessed health…

  15. Handwriting Characteristics among Secondary Students with and without Physical Disabilities: A Study with a Computerized Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W. P.; Au, Ricky K. C.; Chan, Michelle H. Y.; Chan, Lily W. L.; Lau, Gloria M. T.; Lo, T. K.; Leung, Howard W. H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the handwriting characteristics of secondary school students with and without physical disabilities (PD). With the use of a computerized Chinese Handwriting Assessment Tool (CHAT), it was made possible to objectively assess and analyze in detail the handwriting characteristics of individual…

  16. Generation and physical characteristics of the LANDSAT-1, -2 and -3 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1977-01-01

    The generation and format of the LANDSAT 1, 2, and 3 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes are discussed. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes. Also included in the discussion are geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape.

  17. Physical and decay characteristics of commercial LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.; Claiborne, H.C.; Ashline, R.C.; Johnson, P.J.; Rhyne, B.T.

    1986-01-01

    Information was collected from the literature and from major manufacturers that will be useful in the design and construction of a mined geologic repository for the disposal of light-water-reactor spent fuel. Pertinent data are included on mechanical design characteristics and materials of construction for fuel assemblies and fuel rods and computed values for heat generation rates, radioactivity, and photon and neutron emission rates as a function of time for four reference cases. Calculations were made with the ORIGEN2 computer code for burnups of 27,500 and 40,000 MWd for a typical boiling-water reactor and 33,000 and 60,000 MWd for a typical pressurized-water reactor. The results are presented in figures depicting the individual contributions per metric ton of initial heavy metal for the activation products, fission products, and actinides and their daughters to the radioactivity and thermal power as a function of time. Tables are also presented that list the contribution of each major nuclide to the radioactivity, thermal power, and photons and neutrons emitted for disposal emitted for disposal periods from 1 to 100,000 years.

  18. Anthropometric and physical characteristics of motor disabilited paralympic rowers.

    PubMed

    Porto, Yuri Caldas; Almeida, Marcilene; de Sá, Cloud Kennedy C; Schwingel, Paulo Adriano; Zoppi, Cláudio Cesar

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize aerobic, anaerobic, handgrip strength, and body fat content (BF) characteristics in paralympic rowers (ROW) in order to determine motor disabled rowers' fitness level and if specific motor disabilities could impair performance in this specific population. Upper body anaerobic threshold (LacT), peak (PK-AnP), mean (M-AnP), and lower (L-AnP) anaerobic power, peak anaerobic power to weight ratio (RelPk-AnP) and fatigue index (FI) were measured by the Wingate test (WinT). Handgrip strength was also measured and skinfold sum was used to estimate BF and were compared with a reference group of recreational disabled athletes (CON). LacT was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in ROW compared with CON. RelPk-AnP and BF were significantly different (p < 0.05) in ROW compared with CON as well. All other measured parameters did not significantly differ between ROW and CON. In most of cases, rowers have shown a relative low performance level, induced probably by specific disabilities.

  19. Physical characteristics of summer sea ice across the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, W. B.; Gow, A.J.; Meese, D.A.; Bosworth, H.W.; Reimnitz, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sea ice characteristics were investigated during July and August on the 1994 transect across the Arctic Ocean. Properties examined from ice cores included salinity, temperature, and ice structure. Salinities measured near zero at the surface, increasing to 3-4??? at the ice-water interface. Ice crystal texture was dominated by columnar ice, comprising 90% of the ice sampled. Surface albedos of various ice types, measured with radiometers, showed integrated shortwave albedos of 0.1 to 0.3 for melt ponds, 0.5 for bare, discolored ice, and 0.6 to 0.8 for a deteriorated surface or snow-covered ice. Aerial photography was utilized to document the distribution of open melt ponds, which decreased from 12% coverage of the ice surface in late July at 76??N to almost none in mid-August at 88??N. Most melt ponds were shallow, and depth bore no relationship to size. Sediment was pervasive from the southern Chukchi Sea to the north pole, occurring in bands or patches. It was absent in the Eurasian Arctic, where it had been observed on earlier expeditions. Calculations of reverse trajectories of the sediment-bearing floes suggest that the southernmost sediment was entrained during ice formation in the Beaufort Sea while more northerly samples probably originated in the East Siberian Sea, some as far west as the New Siberian Islands.

  20. Physical and performance characteristics of successful high school football players.

    PubMed

    Williford, H N; Kirkpatrick, J; Scharff-Olson, M; Blessing, D L; Wang, N Z

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the performance and physiologic characteristics of a "successful" American high school football team, and to compare the present values with values reported for other groups of high school, college, and professional players. For descriptive purposes, players were divided into two groups: backs (N = 8) and linemen (N = 10). Maximal aerobic power (VO2max) was determined from a maximal treadmill test, and body composition was evaluated by hydrostatic weighing. Maximal strength values were evaluated by one-repetition maximum bench press and squat test; the sit-and-reach test was used to measure flexibility. Speed and power were evaluated by a vertical jump and a 36.6-meter sprint. Results indicate that compared with other groups of college and professional players, as the level of competition increases so do height, weight, and fat-free weight of the players. Similar maximum oxygen consumption values were found for the present group when compared with other groups of these players. From the strength and power standpoint, football players at all levels are becoming stronger. Incorporation of strength training programs has greatly improved strength and performance profiles of football players at all levels of competition.

  1. Physical and decay characteristics of commercial LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.; Claiborne, H.C.; Ashline, R.C.; Johnson, P.J.; Rhyne, B.T.

    1985-10-01

    Information was collected from the literature and from major manufacturers that will be useful in the design and construction of a mined geologic repository for the disposal of light-water-reactor spent fuel. Pertinent data are included on mechanical design characteristics and materials of construction for fuel assemblies and fuel rods and computed values for heat generation rates, radioactivity, and photon and neutron emission rates as a function of time for four reference cases. Calculations were made with the ORIGEN2 computer code for burnups of 27,500 and 40,000 MWd for a typical boiling-water reactor and 33,000 and 60,000 MWd for a typical pressurized-water reactor. The results are presented in figures depicting the individual contributions per metric ton of initial heavy metal for the activation products, fission products, and actinides and their daughters to the radioactivity and thermal power as a function of time. Tables are also presented that list the contribution of each major nuclide to the radioactivity, thermal power, and photons and neutrons emitted for disposal periods from 1 to 100,000 years.

  2. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shen

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  3. Influence of Morphological Characteristics on Physical and Physiological Performances of Tunisian Elite Male Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Moncef, Cherif; Said, Mohamed; Olfa, Najlaoui; Dagbaji, Gomri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the body structure and morphological characteristics of Tunisian elite handball players, and to determine the effect of these variables on functional and physical performance levels. Methods A sample of 42 male handball players (mean age 21.98±3.24 years; training duration 12 years) at international level was submitted to a test battery comprising morphological, physical and physiological assessments. Tests were yo-yo intermittent recovery test, squat jump test, countermovement jump test, vertical-jump test, and Repeated sprint Ability. Measures for assessment of anthropometric characteristics were age, size, weight, body mass index, body fat, fat mass and thin mass. Results Weight was negatively correlated to the squat jump and the countermovement jump performance. Age, weight, and body composition measures (fat and thin body mass) were additionally negatively related to the maximal oxygen uptake, and to the maximal velocity obtained in the Yo-Yo recovery test. No relationship was found between size, body mass index, body fat and the physical abilities considered. Concerning the effects of physical characteristics on the functional performances, we can note a positive relationship between squat jump, countermovement jump, and the yo-yo recovery test performance. No relationship was found between vertical jump, repeated sprint ability, and the physiological performances. Conclusions Study results point to the existence of strong correlation between morphological and physical characteristics with functional characteristics. In handball, it is possible to have a reliable estimate of anthropometric measurements, physical and physiological performances. PMID:22942992

  4. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  5. Chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosols and their CCN activity: A case study in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijun; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yu; Shang, Dongjie; Du, Zhoufei; Zhang, Yuanhang; Hu, Min

    2017-02-01

    Biomass burning emits large amounts of both trace gases and particles into the atmosphere. It plays a profound role in regional air quality and climate change. In the present study, an intensive campaign was carried out at an urban site in Beijing, China, in June 2014, which covered the winter wheat harvest season over the North China Plain (NCP). Meanwhile, two evident biomass-burning events were observed. A clear burst in ultrafine particles (below 100nm in diameter, PM1) and subsequent particle growth took place during the events. With the growth of the ultrafine particles, the organic fraction of PM1 increased significantly. The ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C), which had an average value of 0.23±0.04, did not show an obvious enhancement, indicating that a significant chemical aging process of the biomass-burning aerosols was not observed during the course of events. This finding might have been due to the fact that the biomass-burning events occurred in the late afternoon and grew during the nighttime, which is associated with a low atmospheric oxidation capacity. On average, organics and black carbon (BC) were dominant in the biomass-burning aerosols, accounting for 60±10% and 18±3% of PM1. The high organic and BC fractions led to a significant suppression of particle hygroscopicity. Comparisons among hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA)-derived, cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc)-derived, and aerosol mass spectrometer-based hygroscopicity parameter (κ) values were consistent. The mean κ values of biomass-burning aerosols derived from both HTDMA and CCNc measurements were approximately 0.1, regardless of the particle size, indicating that the biomass-burning aerosols were less active. The burst in particle count during the biomass-burning events resulted in an increased number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation (SS)=0.2-0.8%.

  6. Ship diesel emission aerosols: A comprehensive study on the chemical composition, the physical properties and the molecular biological and toxicological effects on human lung cells of aerosols from a ship diesel engine operated with heavy or light diesel fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Dietmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Paur, H.; Dilger, M.; Mülhopt, S.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Hirvonen, M.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Berube, K.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Arteaga Salas, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Reda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Gröger, T.; Weiss, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties, transformation processes and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. This is performed by thorough comprehensive chemical and physical characterization of combustion aerosols (including application of advantageous on-line methods) and studying of biological effects on human lung cell-cultures. A new ALI air-liquid-interface (ALI) exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for the HICE-measurements. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized (e.g. proteomics). By using stable isotope labeling technologies (13C-Glucose/metabolomics; 2H-Lysine/SILAC-proteomics), high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of molecular-biological effects is achievable even at sub-toxic effect dose levels. Aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine (heavy/light fuel oil) have been investigated. The effect of wood combustion and ship diesel PM e.g. on the protein expression of ALI-exposed A549 cells was compared. Filtered aerosol is used as gas-reference for the isotope labeling based method (SILAC). Therefore the effects of wood combustion- and shipping diesel-PM can be directly compared. Ship diesel aerosol causes a broader distribution in the observed fold changes (log2), i.e. more proteins are significantly up-/down-regulated in case of shipping diesel PM-exposure. This corresponds to a stronger biological reaction if compared to wood combustion-PM exposure. The chemical analysis results on wood combustion- and ship diesel-PM depict more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)/oxidized-PAH but less of some transition metals (V, Fe) in the wood combustion case. Interestingly, alkylated PAH are considerably more abundant in shipping PM, suggesting that PAH/Oxy-PAH may be less relevant for

  7. The evaluation of a shuttle borne lidar experiment to measure the global distribution of aerosols and their effect on the atmospheric heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Joseph, J. H.; Trauger, J. T.; Guetter, P. J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Lawler, J. E.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Odell, A. P.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A shuttle-borne lidar system is described, which will provide basic data about aerosol distributions for developing climatological models. Topics discussed include: (1) present knowledge of the physical characteristics of desert aerosols and the absorption characteristics of atmospheric gas, (2) radiative heating computations, and (3) general circulation models. The characteristics of a shuttle-borne radar are presented along with some laboratory studies which identify schemes that permit the implementation of a high spectral resolution lidar system.

  8. Wintertime characteristics of aerosols at middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: Impacts of regional meteorology and long range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Tiwari, S.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Banerjee, T.

    2015-03-01

    To develop a coherent picture of possible origin of Asian aerosol, transport and meteorological interaction; wintertime aerosol (January, 1 to March, 31, 2014 (n = 90)) were measured in middle IGP in terms of aerosol mass loading, optical properties, altitudinal distributions and both high and low altitude transportation. Both space-borne passive (Aqua and Terra MODIS) and active sensor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) based measurements were concurrently used over the selected transect (25°10‧-25°19‧N and 82°54‧-83°4‧E). Exceptionally high aerosol mass loading was recorded for PM10 (233 ± 58.37 μg m-3) and PM2.5 (138 ± 47.12 μg m-3). Daily variations of PM2.5/PM10 persist in a range of 0.25-0.97 (mean = 0.60 ± 0.14; n = 90) and were in accordance to computed Angstrom exponent (0.078-1.407; mean: 1.002 ± 0.254) explaining concurrent contribution of both PM2.5 and PM10 for the region. Space borne (Aqua MODIS-AOD: 0.259-2.194) and ground based (MTP-AOD: 0.066-1.239) AODs revealed significant temporal variability and moderate association in terms of PM10 (MODIS-AOD: 0.46; MTP-AOD: 0.56) and PM2.5 (MODIS-AOD: 0.54; MTP-AOD: 0.39). Varying association of AOD and aerosol mass loading was also explained in terms of meteorological variables. CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles revealed presence of non-spherical coarse particulates (altitude: 1.2-5.4 km) and dominance of spherical fine particulates (altitude: 0.1-4.2 km). Contribution of trans-boundary aerosols transportation to mass loadings at middle IGP were recognized through lagrangian particle dispersion model, synoptic vector wind profiles at different geopotential heights and satellite images.

  9. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  10. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and III Aerosol Extinction Measurements in the Arctic Middle and Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treffeisen, R. E.; Thomason, L. W.; Strom, J.; Herber, A. B.; Burton, S. P.; Yamanouchi, T.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been expended toward understanding the impact of tropospheric aerosols on Arctic climate and chemistry. A significant part of this effort has been the collection and documentation of extensive aerosol physical and optical property data sets. However, the data sets present significant interpretive challenges because of the diverse nature of these measurements. Among the longest continuous records is that by the spaceborne Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II. Although SAGE tropospheric measurements are restricted to the middle and upper troposphere, they may be able to provide significant insight into the nature and variability of tropospheric aerosol, particularly when combined with ground and airborne observations. This paper demonstrates the capacity of aerosol products from SAGE II and its follow-on experiment SAGE III to describe the temporal and vertical variations of Arctic aerosol characteristics. We find that the measurements from both instruments are consistent enough to be combined. Using this combined data set, we detect a clear annual cycle in the aerosol extinction for the middle and upper Arctic troposphere.

  11. Characteristics of urban sidewalks/streets and objectively measured physical activity.

    PubMed

    Suminski, Richard R; Heinrich, Katie M; Poston, Walker S C; Hyder, Melissa; Pyle, Sara

    2008-03-01

    Several studies have found significant relationships between environmental characteristics (e.g., number of destinations, aesthetics) and physical activity. While a few of these studies verified that the physical activities assessed were performed in the environments examined, none have done this in an urban, neighborhood setting. This information will help efforts to inform policy decisions regarding the design of more "physically active" communities. Fourteen environmental characteristics of 60, 305-m-long segments, located in an urban, residential setting, were directly measured using standardized procedures. The number of individuals walking, jogging, and biking in the segments was assessed using an observation technique. The segments were heterogeneous with regards to several of the environmental characteristics. A total of 473 individuals were seen walking, bicycling, or jogging in the segments during 3,600 min of observation (60 min/segment). Of the 473 seen, 315 were walking, 116 bicycling, and 42 jogging. A greater number of individuals were seen walking in segments with more traffic, sidewalk defects, graffiti, and litter and less desirable property aesthetics. Only one environmental characteristic was associated with bicycling and none were significantly related with jogging. This study provides further evidence that environmental characteristics and walking are related. It also adds new information regarding the importance of scale (e.g., micro, macro) and how some environmental characteristics of urban, residential sidewalks and streets relate to physical activity.

  12. Chemical characteristics of aerosol particles (PM2.5) at a site of Horqin Sand-land in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhen-xing; Cao, Jun-ji; Li, Xu-xiang; Wang, Ya-qiang; Jie, Dong-mei; Zhang, Xiao-ye

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the mass concentration and chemical composition of aerosol particles (PM2.5) collected at Tongliao (Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China), a site in Horqin Sand-land in northeast China. During spring 2005, the mass concentration for PM2.5 was (126 +/- 71)microg/m3 in average. Five dust storm events were monitored with higher concentration of (255 +/- 77)microg/m3 in average than the non dusty days of (106 +/- 44)microg/m3. Concentrations for 20 elements were obtained by the PIXE method. Mass concentrations of Al, Mg, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and V, which increased with the PM2.5 concentration, were higher than the pollution elements (S, Cl, Zn, Ar, Se, Br, and Pb). Enrichment factor relative to crust material was also calculated, which showed dust trace elements were mainly from earth upper crust and pollution elements were dominated the anthropogenic aerosols. The Si/Al, Ca/Al, and Fe/Al ratios in PM2.5 samples at Tongliao were 4.07, 0.94, and 0.82, respectively, which were remarkably different with those on other source regions, such as "Western desert source region", "North desert source region" and central Asia source. Air mass back-trajectory analysis identified three kinds of general pathways were associated with the aerosol particle transport to Tongliao, but have the similar elemental ratios, implying that elemental signatures for dust aerosol from Horqin Sand-land were different with other regions.

  13. MODIS derived fire characteristics and aerosol optical depth variations during the agricultural residue burning season, north India.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad; Ellicott, Evan; Badarinath, K V S; Vermote, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Agricultural residue burning is one of the major causes of greenhouse gas emissions and aerosols in the Indo-Ganges region. In this study, we characterize the fire intensity, seasonality, variability, fire radiative energy (FRE) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) variations during the agricultural residue burning season using MODIS data. Fire counts exhibited significant bi-modal activity, with peak occurrences during April-May and October-November corresponding to wheat and rice residue burning episodes. The FRE variations coincided with the amount of residues burnt. The mean AOD (2003-2008) was 0.60 with 0.87 (+1σ) and 0.32 (-1σ). The increased AOD during the winter coincided well with the fire counts during rice residue burning season. In contrast, the AOD-fire signal was weak during the summer wheat residue burning and attributed to dust and fossil fuel combustion. Our results highlight the need for 'full accounting of GHG's and aerosols', for addressing the air quality in the study area.

  14. Remote Marine Aerosol: A Characterization of Physical, Chemical and Optical Properties and their Relation to Radiative Transfer in the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    Our research effort is focused on improving our understanding of aerosol properties needed for optical models for remote marine regions. This includes in-situ and vertical column optical closure and involves a redundancy of approaches to measure and model optical properties that must be self consistent. The model is based upon measured in-situ aerosol properties and will be tested and constrained by the vertically measured spectral differential optical depth of the marine boundary layer, MBL. Both measured and modeled column optical properties for the boundary layer, when added to the free-troposphere and stratospheric optical depth, will be used to establish spectral optical depth over the entire atmospheric column for comparison to and validation of satellite derived radiances (AVHRR).

  15. Quantitative physical and handling characteristics of novel antibacterial braided silk suture materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Hou, Dandan; Tang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Surgical braided silk sutures have been widely used because these materials exhibit good handling characteristics, ease of use, and ideal knot security. However, surgical silk sutures likely cause surgical site infections because these sutures are composed of natural protein materials with a braided structure. As such, antibacterial silk sutures for clinical wound closure should be developed. Braided silk suture could be treated and modified with antibacterial agent, provided that excellent physical and handling characteristics of this material should maximize maintained. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the effect of antibacterial treatment with different parameters on physical and handling characteristics of novel antibacterial braided silk sutures. Physical and handling characteristics, including appearance, knot-pull tensile strength, pullout friction resistance, tissue drag friction resistance, and bending stiffness, were evaluated. After physical and handling tests were conducted, images showed morphological characteristics were obtained and evaluated to investigate the relationship between antibacterial treatment and physical and handling properties. Results showed that suture diameter increased and reached the nearest thick size specification; knot-pull tensile strength decreased but remained higher than the standard value by at least 40.73%. Fracture asynchronism during knot-pull tensile strength test suggested that the fineness ratio of shell and core strands may enhance knot-pull tensile strength. Static and dynamic frictions of suture-to-suture friction behavior were slightly affected by antibacterial treatment, and changed to less than 16.07% and 32.77%, respectively. Suture-to-tissue friction and bending stiffness increased by approximately 50%; the bending stiffness of the proposed suture remained efficient compared with that of synthetic sutures. Therefore, good physical and handling characteristics can be maintained by selecting

  16. Physical properties, chemical composition, sources, spatial distribution and sinks of indoor aerosol particles in a university lecture hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, I.; Dosztály, K.; Borsós, T.; Söveges, B.; Weidinger, T.; Kristóf, G.; Péter, N.; Kertész, Zs.

    2013-01-01

    PM10 mass, particle number (N) and CO2 concentrations, particle number size distributions and meteorological parameters were determined with high time resolution, and daily aerosol samples were collected in the PM10-2.0 and PM2.0 size fractions for chemical analysis in the middle of a university lecture hall for one week. Median concentrations for the PM10 mass and N of 15.3 μg m-3 and 3.7 × 103 cm-3, respectively were derived. The data are substantially smaller than the related outdoor levels or typical values for residences. There were considerable concentration differences for workdays, weekends and various lectures. Main sources of PM10 mass include the usage of chalk sticks for writing, wiping the blackboard, ordinary movements and actions of students and cleaning. High PM10 mass concentration levels up to 100 μg m-3 were realised for short time intervals after wiping the blackboard. The mass concentrations decreased rapidly after the emission source ceased to be active. Two classes of coarse particles were identified. General indoor dust particles exhibited a residence time of approximately 35 min, while the residence time for the chalk dust particles was approximately 20 min as lower estimates. Emission source rate for wiping the blackboard was estimated to be between 8 and 14 mg min-1. This represents a substantial emission rate but the source is active only up to 1 min. Suspension of the chalk (made mainly of gypsum) dust particles was confirmed by enrichment of Ca and S in the hall with respect to ambient urban aerosol. Contribution of ambient aerosol via the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) facility was considerable for time intervals when the indoor sources of PM10 mass were not intensive. The HVAC facility introduces, however, the major amount of aerosol particles from the outdoors as far as their number concentration is regarded. Mean contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number was (69 ± 7)%, which is smaller

  17. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  18. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the Cottonwood River basin, southwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected points on streams in the Cottonwood River Basin, located in southwestern Minnesota, are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slop?. The points on the stream include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outlets of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  19. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the lower Minnesota River basin, south-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected sites on streams in the Lower Minnesota River Basin, located in south-central Minnesota are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. Stream sites include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outfalls of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  20. Generation and physical characteristics of the Landsat 1 and 2 MSS computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    The generation and format is discussed of the Landsat 1 and 2 system corrected multispectral scanner computer compatible tapes. Included in the discussion are the spacecraft sensors, scene characteristics, the transmission of data, and the conversion of the data to computer compatible tapes at the NASA Data Processing Facility. Geometric and radiometric corrections, tape formats, and the physical characteristics of the tape are also described.

  1. Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds and their secondary organic aerosol formation potentials from a petroleum refinery in Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijuan; Wang, Hao; Chen, Dan; Li, Qinqin; Thai, Phong; Gong, Daocheng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Chunlin; Gu, Yinggang; Zhou, Lei; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Boguang

    2017-04-15

    A campaign was carried out to measure the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different areas of a petroleum refinery in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in China. In the refining area, 2-methylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, methylcyclopentane, 3-methylhexane, and butane accounted for >50% of the total VOCs; in the chemical industry area, 2-methylpentane, p-diethylbenzene, 2,3-dimethylbutane, m-diethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were the top five VOCs detected; and in the wastewater treatment area, the five most abundant species were 2-methylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, methylcyclopentane, 3-methylpentane and p-diethylbenzene. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was estimated using the fractional aerosol coefficients (FAC), secondary organic aerosol potential (SOAP), and SOA yield methods. The FAC method suggests that toluene, p-diethylbenzene, and p-diethylbenzene are the largest contributors to the SOA formation in the refining, chemical industry, and wastewater treatment areas, respectively. With the SOAP method, it is estimated that toluene is the largest contributor to the SOA formation in the refining area, but o-ethyltoluene contributes the most both in the chemical industry and wastewater treatment areas. For the SOA yield method, aromatics dominate the yields and account for nearly 100% of the total in the three areas. The SOA concentrations estimated of the refining, chemical industry and wastewater treatment areas are 30, 3835 and 137μgm(-3), respectively. Despite the uncertainties and limitations associated with the three methods, the SOA yield method is suggested to be used for the estimation of SOA formation from the petroleum refinery. The results of this study have demonstrated that the control of VOCs, especially aromatics such as toluene, ethyltoluene, benzene and diethylbenzene, should be a focus of future regulatory measures in order to reduce PM pollution in the PRD region.

  2. Chemical and optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation China 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Han; Qiu, Xionghui; Zhang, Zhisheng; Wu, Yunfei; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Shulan

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of regional pollution control measures for improving visibility imposed during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) period, day- and nighttime PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected at an urban site in Beijing from October to November, 2014. PM2.5 and PM10 samples were subject to chemical analysis for major water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and biomass burning tracers - anhydrosugar levoglucosan (LG). In addition, aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) and aerosol absorption coefficient (bap) at dry condition were measured. PM2.5 mass concentration was 190 ± 125, 88 ± 60, 199 ± 142 μg m-3 during the pre-, during- and post-APEC period, respectively, while the concentration of the sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 was 75 ± 69, 19 ± 22 and 40 ± 46 μg m-3, respectively. The sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 accounted for 49 ± 24%, 19 ± 12% and 24 ± 12% of bext (the sum of bsp and bap) at ambient condition during the pre-, during- and post-APEC period, respectively, and the corresponding numbers are 39 ± 18%, 62 ± 8% and 61 ± 10% for the sum of OM and EC. Reduction of secondary inorganic aerosols played a key role in the "APEC blue", especially under moisture conditions due to their hygroscopic properties. As a result, visibility was improved significantly during the APEC period with five out of the 12 days having a visibility higher than 20 km. Control of biomass burning, especially during the nighttime, was not performed well during the APEC period, which should be paid more attention in making future emission control measures.

  3. Temporal and spectral characteristics of aerosol optical depths in a semi-arid region of southern India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Raghavendra; Narasimhulu, K; Reddy, R R; Gopal, K Rama; Reddy, L Siva Sankara; Balakrishnaiah, G; Moorthy, K Krishna; Babu, S Suresh

    2009-04-01

    The spectral and temporal variations of aerosol optical depths (AOD) observed over Anantapur (a semi-arid region) located in the Southern part of India are investigated by analyzing the data obtained from a Multiwavelength Solar Radiometer (MWR) during January 2005-December 2006 (a total of 404 clear-sky observations) using the Langley technique. In this paper, we highlighted the studies on monthly, seasonal and spectral variations of aerosol optical depth and their implications. The results showed seasonal variation with higher values during pre-monsoon (March-May) and lower in the monsoon (June-November) season at all wavelengths. The pre-monsoon increase is found to be due to the high wind speed producing larger amounts of wind-driven dust particles. The post-monsoon (December-February) AOD values decrease more at higher wavelengths, indicating a general reduction in the number of bigger particles. Also during the post-monsoon, direction of winds in association with high or low pressure weather systems and the air brings more aerosol content to the region which is surrounded by a number of cement plants, lime kilns, slab polishing and brick making units. The quantity of AOD values in pre-monsoon is higher (low during post-monsoon) for wavelength, such as shortwave infrared (SWIR) or near infrared (NIR), which shows that coarse particles contribute more compare with the sub-micron particles. The composite aerosols near the surface follow suit with the share of the accumulation mode to the total mass concentration decreasing from approximately 70% to 30% from post-monsoon to pre-monsoon. Coarse mode particle loading observed to be high during pre-monsoon and accumulation mode particles observed to be high during post-monsoon. The backward trajectories at three representative altitudes with source point at the observing site indicate a possible transport from the outflow regions into Bay of Bengal, southern peninsular India and Arabian Sea. The temporal variations

  4. Aerosol behavior in a steam-air environment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Petrykowski, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during accident sequences and released into containment is being studied in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP). Observation on the behavior of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ aerosol, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol, concrete aerosol, and various mixtures of these aerosols in a dry air environment and in a steam-air environment within the NSPP vessel are reported. Under dry conditions, the aerosols are agglomerated in the form of branched chains; the aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) of the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols ranged between 1.5 and 3..mu..m while that of the concrete aerosol was about 1 ..mu..m. A steam-air environment, which would be present in LWR containment during and following an accident, causes the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols to behave differently from that in a dry atmosphere; the primary effect is an enhanced rate of removal of the aerosol from the vessel atmosphere. Steam does not have a significant effect on the removal rate of a concrete aerosol. Electron microscopy showed the agglomerated U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols to be in the form of spherical clumps of particles differing from the intermingled branched chains observed in the dry air tests; the AMMD was in the range of 1 to 2 ..mu..m. Steam had a lesser influence on the physical shape of the concrete aerosol with the shape being intermediate between branched chain and spherical clumps. 9 figures.

  5. The Physical and Technical Characteristics of English Language Teaching Courseware in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Sayadian, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The present paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the physical and technical characteristics of the English language teaching courseware in Malaysia. A randomly selected group of English language teachers in Malaysia (n = 200) were surveyed to evaluate the courseware. SPSS (18.0) was applied to analyze the data. The results…

  6. Impact of Policy Environment Characteristics on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors of Children Attending Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Huberty, Jennifer; Beighle, Aaron; Moore, Justin B.; Webster, Collin; Ajja, Rahma; Weaver, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    State and national organizations recently developed policies focused on increasing physical activity (PA) in afterschool programs (ASPs). These policies emphasize "activity friendly" environment characteristics that, when present, should lead to higher levels of PA and reduce the amount of time children spend sedentary during an ASP.…

  7. Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

  8. National Board Certified Physical Educators: Background Characteristics, Subjective Warrants, and Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Amelia Mays; Rhoades, Jesse Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study examined National Board Certified Physical Education Teacher's (NBCPETs) demographic characteristics, recalled subjective warrants for entrance into the profession, and reasons for seeking this advanced certification. An extensive search for approximately 1,200 NBCPETs resulted in contact information for 819 NBCPETs. All were sent a…

  9. Frequency of Use and Characteristics of People with Intellectual Disabilities Subject to Physical Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Peter; Murphy, Glynis; Kelly-Pike, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of physical intervention (PI) with people with intellectual disabilities continues to cause concern. This study sought to clarify the frequency and circumstances of PI use and gather data on the characteristics of individuals subject to PI. Method: Data on individuals subject to PI were gathered by postal questionnaire…

  10. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  11. Physical characteristics of alkaline stabilized sewage sludge (N-viro soil) and their effects on soil physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.J.; Harrison, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The N-Viro process for alkaline stabilization of municipal sewage sludge combines dewatered sludge with one or more alkaline industrial byproducts and destroys pathogens by a combination of high pH, heat, and drying. The final product, N-Viro Soil, is a soil-like material that is being used as an agricultural lime substitute, soil amendment, and soil substitute. Physical characteristics of 28 N-Viro Soils were determined and compared to those of mineral soils. Results are described. 24 refs., 10 tabs.

  12. Satellite Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imaging of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David; Macenka, Steven; Scherr, Lawrence; Seshadri, Suresh; Chipman, Russell; Keller, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A proposed remote-sensing instrument, to be carried aboard a spacecraft in orbit around the Earth, would gather data on the spatial distribution and radiative characteristics of tropospheric aerosols. These data are needed for better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic origins of aerosols, and of the effects of aerosols on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

  13. The Influence of Fog and Airmass History on Aerosol Optical, Physical and Chemical Properties at Pt. Reyes National Seashore

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Berg, Larry K.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Jobson, Bertram Thomas; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.

    2011-04-05

    This paper presents an analysis of the aerosol chemical composition, optical properties and size distributions for a range of conditions encountered during a field measurement campaign conducted between July 7-29, 2005 at Point Reyes National Seashore, north of San Francisco, CA. Observations are partitioned into one-hour periods when conditions were ‘clear’ or ‘foggy’ to identify evidence of cloud processing of aerosols. During the first half of the campaign (July 7-18), conditions at the site were largely maritime. However flow during the second half of the campaigns (July 18-29) was influenced by a thermal trough that added a cyclonic twist to the incoming marine air, bringing it from the south with a more extensive over-land trajectory. Neither flow regime was associated with air coming from the San Francisco Bay area to the south. Measurements by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) of the equivalent molar ratio of ammonium to the sum of sulfate, nitrate and chloride made before the onset of the thermal trough on July 18th were associated with acidic or near-neutral particles. Measurements made after July 18th appear to have excess ammonium. The AMS measurements of mass loading were an order of magnitude less than those reported by a nearby IMPROVE station. However, the AMS measures only non-refractory particles between 0.1 µm and 1 µm, which would not include sea salt. In contrast, the IMPROVE station employs filter-based techniques to measure mass for all particles < 2.5 µm. Assuming chlorine is associated with large sea salt particles at Pt. Reyes and removing this value from the IMPROVE data resulted in good agreement in the total mass fraction between these two techniques,, indicating the importance of sea salt mass in particles greater than 1 µm. Model calculations of the equilibrium gas-phase mixing ratio of NH3 suggest very high values which we attribute to agricultural practices within the park. Reported as an incidental finding is

  14. Dicarboxylic acids and water-soluble organic carbon in aerosols in New Delhi, India, in winter: Characteristics and formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2009-10-01

    Day- and nighttime aerosol samples were collected at an urban site in New Delhi, India, in winter 2006-2007. They were studied for low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and related compounds, as well as total water-soluble organic carbon (TWSOC). High concentrations of diacids (up to 6.03 μg m-3), TWSOC, and OC were obtained, which are substantially higher than those previously observed at other urban sites in Asia. Daytime TWSOC/OC ratio (37%) was on average higher than that in nighttime (25%). In particular, more water-soluble OC (M-WSOC) to TWSOC ratio in daytime (50%) was twice higher than in nighttime (27%), suggesting that aerosols in New Delhi are photochemically more processed in daytime to result in more water-soluble organic compounds. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid, followed by succinic (C4) and malonic (C3) acids. Contributions of C2 to M-WSOC were greater (av. 8%) in nighttime than daytime (av. 3%). Positive correlations of C2 with malic acid (hC4), glyoxylic acid (ωC2), and relative humidity suggest that secondary production of C2 probably in aqueous phase is important in nighttime via the oxidation of both longer-chain diacids and ωC2. C2 also showed a positive correlation with potassium (K+) in nighttime, suggesting that the enhanced C2 concentrations are associated with biomass/biofuel burning. More tight, positive correlation between less water-soluble OC (L-WSOC) and K+ was found in both day- and nighttime, suggesting that L-WSOC, characterized by longer chain and/or higher molecular weight compounds, is significantly influenced by primary emissions from biomass/biofuel burning.

  15. Fine carbonaceous aerosol characteristics at a megacity during the Chinese Spring Festival as given by OC/EC online measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoshuang; Bi, Xiaohui; Feng, Yinchang; Dai, Qili; Xiao, Zhimei; Li, Liwei; Wu, Jianhui; Yuan, Jie; Zhang, YuFen

    2016-11-01

    The OC/EC online monitoring campaign was carried out in Tianjin of China from 8th February to 15th March 2015 during the Chinese Spring Festival period (CSFP). The concentrations of OC, EC, BC and other ambient pollutants (e.g. SO2, NO2 and PM2.5, etc.) in high time resolution were measured with related online-monitoring instruments. During the CSFP, according to the peaks of PM2.5 concentrations and number concentrations (NC) of aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between 0.3 and 2.5 μm, five pollution-events were generally identified and displayed. These pollution-events were closely associated with large-scale fireworks displaying, combustion activities such as heating for winter, and the stable meteorological conditions, etc. During the CSFP, EC and OC concentrations showed variations up to one order of magnitude. The uncertainty of instrument itself and the difference for measured methods, further caused the differences between thermal OC (measured OC by thermal method) and optical OC (measured OC by optical method) concentrations, as well as between thermal EC (measured EC by thermal method) and optical EC (measured EC by optical method) concentrations. The high-concentration carbonaceous aerosols could enlarge the uncertainty of measuring instrument, reducing the correlations between OC and EC, and enhance the differences among thermal EC, optical BC and optical EC. The OC/EC ratios and the percentages of SOC/OC would be declined, when the pollution-events formed during the CSFP. Due to the different sources for thermal POC and thermal SOC, the correlation of the two was relatively lower (R2 = 0.39). Thermal POC dominated over thermal OC during the CSFP.

  16. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm.

  17. An overview of regional and local characteristics of aerosols in South Africa using satellite, ground, and modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Garland, R. M.; Crosbie, E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Piketh, S.; Burger, R.

    2014-09-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of particulate air quality across the five major metropolitan areas of South Africa (Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Tshwane (Gauteng Province), the Industrial Highveld Air Quality Priority Area (HVAPA), and Durban), based on a decadal (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009) aerosol climatology from multiple satellite platforms and a detailed analysis of ground-based data from 19 sites throughout Gauteng. Data include Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD550, 555) from Aqua (550 nm), Terra (550 nm), and MISR (555 nm) platforms, Ängström Exponent (α550/865, 470/660) from Aqua (550/865 nm) and Terra (470/660 nm), Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI) from TOMS, and model results from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. Results in Cape Town are distinct, owing to a typically clean, marine airmass origin and infrequent continental influence. At continentally-influenced sites, AOD550, AOD555, α550/865, α470/660 and UVAI reach maxima (0.12-0.20, 1.0-1.8, and 1.0-1.2, respectively) during late winter and early spring (August-October), coinciding with a period of enhanced dust generation and the maximum frequency of close-proximity and subtropical fires identified by MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS). The adjacent metropolitan and industrial Gauteng and HVAPA areas have been identified as a megacity based on NO2 concentrations, but AOD is a factor of 3-6 lower than other megacities worldwide. GOCART results suggest that the contributions of organics and black carbon to AOD are significantly enhanced during biomass burning season (ASO), but that sulfate is the most significant contributor to AOD (~70-80%) through the rest of the year. Dust appears to be underestimated by GOCART emissions inventories at continentally-influenced metropolitan areas of South Africa. Ground monitoring sites were classified according to site type: (1) township and informal settlement sites with

  18. Fish assemblage relationships with physical characteristics and presence of dams in three eastern Iowa rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Clay; Nicholas L. Ahrens,; Anna K. Loan-Wilsey,; Gregory A. Simmons,; Gregory T. Gelwicks,

    2013-01-01

    Fish assemblages in rivers of the Midwestern United States are an important component of the region's natural resources and biodiversity. We characterized the physical environment and presence of dams in a series of reaches in three eastern Iowa rivers tributary to the Mississippi River and related these characteristics to the fish assemblages present. Some physical characteristics were similar among the 12 study reaches, whereas others differed substantially. We found a total of 68 species across the 12 study reaches; 56 in the Turkey River, 51 in the Maquoketa River and 50 in the Wapsipinicon River. Seventeen species could be described as ‘downstream-distributed’; 15 being found only in the lowest reach of one or more rivers and the other two being found only in the lowest reaches or two or more contiguous reaches including the lowest reach. Two species could be described as ‘upstream-distributed’, being found only in an uppermost reach. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination illustrated similarities among reaches, and five physical variables were significantly correlated with assemblage similarities. Catchment area and number of dams between reaches and the Mississippi River were strongly correlated with assemblage similarities, but the directions of their effects were opposite. Catchment area and number of dams were confounded. The collective evidence to date suggests that the pervasiveness of dams on rivers significantly alters fish assemblages, making underlying patterns of species change and relationships with naturally varying and human-influenced physical characteristics along a river's course difficult to discern.

  19. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  20. Seasonal changes in anthropometric and physical characteristics within English academy rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben; Emmonds, Stacey; Tester, Emma; Fahey, Jack; Cooke, Carlton

    2014-09-01

    Professional rugby league clubs implement training programmes for the development of anthropometric and physical characteristics within an academy programme. However, research that examines seasonal changes in these characteristics is limited. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the seasonal changes in anthropometric and physical characteristics of academy rugby league players by age category (i.e., under 14, 16, 18, 20). Data were collected on 75 players pre- and postseason over a 6-year period (resulting in a total of 195 assessments). Anthropometric (body mass, sum of 4 skinfolds) and physical (10- and 20-m sprint, vertical jump, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test and 1 repetition maximum squat, bench press, and prone row) measures were collected. The under 14s and 16s showed greater seasonal improvements in body mass (e.g., under 14s = 7.4 ± 4.3% vs. under 20s = 1.2 ± 3.3%) and vertical jump performance than under 18s and under 20s. In contrast, under 18s and under 20s players showed greater seasonal improvements in Yo-Yo performance and 10-m sprint (e.g., under 14s = 1.3 ± 3.9% vs. under 20s = -1.9 ± 1.2%) in comparison to under 14s and under 16s. Seasonal strength improvements were greater for the under 18s compared with under 20s. This study provides comparative data for seasonal changes in anthropometric and physical characteristics within rugby league players aged 13-20 years. Coaches should be aware that seasonal improvements in speed may not exist within younger age categories, until changes in body mass stabilize and consider monitoring changes in other characteristics (e.g., momentum). Large interplayer variability suggests that player development should be considered on an individual and longitudinal basis.

  1. Neighborhood Characteristics: Influences on Pain and Physical Function in Youth at Risk for Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Cathleen; Reed, Emily A.; Hingston, Tessa; Dennis, Catlin H.; Wilson, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood features such as community socioeconomic status, recreational facilities, and parks have been correlated to the health outcomes of the residents living within those neighborhoods, especially with regard to health-related quality of life, body mass index, and physical activity. The interplay between one’s built environment and one’s perceptions may affect physical health, well-being, and pain experiences. In the current study, neighborhood characteristics and attitudes about physical activity were examined in a high-risk (youths with a parent with chronic pain) and low-risk (youths without a parent with chronic pain) adolescent sample. There were significant differences in neighborhood characteristics between the high-risk (n = 62) and low-risk (n = 77) samples (ages 11–15), with low-risk participants living in residences with more walkability, closer proximity to parks, and higher proportion of neighborhood residents having college degrees. Results indicate that neighborhood features (e.g., walkability and proximity to parks), as well as positive attitudes about physical activity were correlated with lower levels of pain and pain-related disability, and higher performance in physical functioning tests. These findings suggest that the built environment may contribute to pain outcomes in youth, above and beyond the influence of family history of pain. PMID:27869773

  2. Robinow syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, and Pfeiffer syndrome: an overview of physical, neurological, and oral characteristics.

    PubMed

    Horbelt, Carlton V

    2010-01-01

    The general population expects dentists to be well-versed in the typical and atypical orofacial characteristics of all potential patients. As a result, dentists must possess a reasonable amount of knowledge concerning the physical and intraoral traits associated with developmental disorders such as those associated with Robinow syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, and Pfeiffer syndrome. None of the physical, neurological, or oral anomalies discussed in this column present insurmountable barriers to providing dental care. Dental techniques and procedures performed on patients with any of these syndromes will be identical or very similar to those done on any other patient.

  3. Observations of Aerosol Conditions Associated with Precipitation Events in the Remote Sierra Nevada Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Kingsmill, D.; Roberts, G. C.; Noblitt, S.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent investigations of atmospheric aerosols have suggested their importance in affecting clouds and precipitation patterns, especially in regions where anthropogenic contributions to aerosol loadings are large. Aerosols entrained into precipitating clouds have been shown to either enhance or suppress precipitation based on the characteristics of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) introduced. Due to the inherent chemical dependence of CCN activity, the chemical composition of aerosols introduced into precipitating clouds will determine their effect on precipitation. This presentation will utilize ground-based chemical and physical measurements of aerosols and precipitation from multiple winter seasons gathered at Sugar Pine Dam (Foresthill, CA) as part of the CalWater experiment. The coupled behavior of landfalling frontal systems, regional terrain-parallel flow along the windward slopes of the Sierra Nevada (i.e., the Sierra Barrier Jet), and observed aerosol conditions in the Sierra Nevada foothills will be demonstrated and related issues explored. Temporally correlated changes in aerosol chemical composition with approaching winter storms may provide key insights into the evolution of the Sierra Barrier Jet, a dynamic feature that can have a major influence on orographically-forced precipitation in this region, and could provide clues to the coupling of Central Valley pollution with winter-time orographic precipitation episodes (or lack thereof). Gaining an overall understanding of the frequency and magnitude of the entrainment of Central Valley pollutants on winter storm systems will ultimately provide an estimate of how much aerosols affect precipitation in California.

  4. Charicteristics of Aerosol indices distribution followed by Aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, S.; Song, C.

    2010-12-01

    Transboundary transport of aerosol has been a hot issue in East Asia and with various aerosol types from different source region. To detect signals from aerosols, OMI provides aerosol indices. Aerosol Indices (AI) represent the change of spectral contrast between two wavelengths and these indices are derived in UV and Visible regions. These indices also can get not only in ocean but also in land region so that AI is good to observe the source region and transport of aerosols. In UV region, AI (UV-AI) can classify the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998) so that this value is frequently used for dust detection. Additionally, visible AI (VIS-AI) uses to differentiate the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types. If we combine two types of indices at the coordinate system of two types of AI, distribution of indices contains different signals if aerosol types change theoretically. In this study, we want to find out classification results based by the observation data to see the theoretical distribution in two AI values. For the observation data, aerosol types are obtained from the results of MODIS-OMI algorithm and 4-channel algorithm classify four types of aerosols, i.e. dust, carbonaceous, sea-salt and Non-Absorbing (NA). These algorithms classify aerosol by using the characteristics of aerosol optical properties in visible and near IR regions. MODIS-OMI algorithm uses the MODIS AOD and UV-AI in OMI values. For UV-AI case, dust and carbonaceous types have larger UV-AI values than non-absorbing aerosols because of absorbing characteristics. However, dust and carbonaceous types cannot classify if UV-AI values use only. For VIS-AI case, dust has larger proportion, but carbonaceous aerosol has smaller proportion in high AI value. However, VIS-AI cannot clearly classify between dust and carbonaceous types except for the case of extremely high AI cases. In NA type, VIS-AI has almost positive values, but the distribution has smaller than the absorbing

  5. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the Chippewa River basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.; Krumrie, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected points on streams in the Chippewa River Basin, located in west-central Minnesota, are presented in this report The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. The points on the stream include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outlets of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  6. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the Pomme de Terre River Basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, D.L.; Payne, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Data describing the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected points on streams in the Pomme de Terre River Basin, located in west-central Minnesota, are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. The points on the stream include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outfalls of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  7. Characteristics and sources of PM2.5-bound carbonaceous aerosols in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youwei; Hong, Zhenyu; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    An investigation of atmospheric fine particle (PM2.5) from Shanghai, Nanjing and Ningbo in the Yangtze River Delta was conducted during Nov 2014 and Aug 2015. Organic species, including 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 10 nitro-PAHs and C8 to C40 n-alkanes, and stable carbon isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate carbonaceous aerosols' spatiotemporal variations and identify their potential sources. The averaged concentrations of total PAHs and n-alkanes in Shanghai, Nanjing and Ningbo were 16.5 and 101.1 ng m-3, 21.1 and 128.2 ng m-3, 33.0 and 241.1 ng m-3, respectively, while the mean concentrations of 10 nitro-PAHs was 2.02, 2.37 and 2.70 ng m-3. Seasonal variations of organic compounds were listed in the following order: winter > autumn > spring > summer. N-alkanes detected in PM2.5 were characterized by odd carbon number preference, with a unimodal peak shape. The maximum carbon number (Cmax) was C29, followed by C27 and C31. According to diagnostic ratios and principle components analysis (PCA) methods, vehicle emissions and coal burning were the dominant sources of PAHs. The ratios of 2-nitrofluoranthene to 1-nitropyrene were larger than 5, indicating that atmospheric transformation from PAHs was a major source of nitro-PAHs. Meanwhile, primary emissions tracers i.e., 1-nitropyrene (the mean concentration of 0.024 ng m-3 in all cities) was observed, suggesting primary contribution of motor vehicle exhaust to the fine particulate organic aerosols. In addition, isotope abundances (δ13COC=-24.6±0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -23.9±1.4‰) and EC/TC ratio (0.2 < EC/TC < 0.5) in Shanghai demonstrated that fossil fuels (e.g. motor vehicles) were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5. We further focus on radiocarbon (14C) analysis and gas/particle partitioning of organic tracers on different size particles. Keywords: organic tracers; stable carbon isotopes; spatiotemporal variations; sources apportionment; Yangtze River Delta

  8. Characteristics of trace gases and aerosols at top of urban canopy layer in Nanjing of China from one year observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tijian

    2013-04-01

    To understand the physical and chemical processes of air pollution formation in urban and their linkage with climate change in Yangtze River Delta(YRD), the fast developing area in China, a monitoring site was built on the top of a high building in the center of Nanjing. The site was set up to investigate the long term variations of trace gases and aerosols, which may play important roles in air pollution and climate change in regional scale. From one year measurement records, the annual average concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, total reactive nitrogen, water vapor are reported as 161.9±19.4 ppb, 93.8±8.9 ppb, 3856.7±412.1 ppb, 565.1±20.0 ppm, 173.6±15.6 ppb, 230.8±24.9 ppb, 34.76±7.2x10-3, respectively. PM10, PM2.5, visibility, black carbon, back scattering of particles(BSP), single scattering albedo(SSA), aerosol optical depth(AOD) and Angstrom wavelength exponent (AWE) are 115±113.1 μg/m3, 54±46.1 μg/m3, 9780±5594 m, 3055.9±2102.3 ng/m3, 66.3±97.5 Mm-1, 0.5±2.4, 0.7±0.38 and 1.22±0.28, respectively. Measurement show that the levels of air pollutants in YRD in East China are high compared to Pearl River Delta(PRD) in South China and Jing-Jin-Ji (JJJ) in North China, suggesting a possible stronger effect on atmospheric environment, climate change and human health in this region, which should be further addressed in the future study.

  9. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, K. .; Holben, B. N.; Hsu, N. C.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    About 60% of world population reside in Asia, in term of which sheer population density presents a major environmental stress. Economic expansion in this region is, in fact, accompanied by increases in bio-fuel burning, industrial pollution, and land cover and land use changes. With a growth rate of approx. 8%/yr for Indian economy, more than 600 million people from Lahore, Pakistan to Calcutta, India over the Indo-Gangetic Basin have particularly witnessed increased frequencies of floods and droughts as well as a dramatic increase in atmospheric loading of aerosols (i.e., anthropogenic and natural aerosol) in recent decades. This regional change (e.g., aerosol, cloud, precipitation, etc.) will constitute a vital part of the global change in the 21st century. Better understanding of the impacts of aerosols in affecting monsoon climate and water cycles is crucial in providing the physical basis to improve monsoon climate prediction and for disaster mitigation. Based on climate model simulations, absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) play a critical role in affecting interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Indian monsoon. An initiative on the integrated (aerosols, clouds, and precipitation) measurements approach over the Indo-Gangetic Basin will be discussed. An array of ground-based (e.g., AERONET, MPLNET, SMART-COMMIT, etc.) and satellite (e.g., Terra, A-Train, etc.) sensors will be utilized to acquire aerosol characteristics, sources/sinks, and transport processes during the pre-monsoon (April-May, aerosol forcing) season, and to obtain cloud and precipitation properties during the monsoon (May-June, water cycle response) season. Close collaboration with other international programs, such as ABC, CLIVAR, GEWEX, and CEOP in the region is anticipated.

  10. Simulation of South Asian aerosols for regional climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Solmon, Fabien; Giorgi, Filippo; Mariotti, Laura; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-02-01

    Extensive intercomparison of columnar and near-surface aerosols, simulated over the South Asian domain using the aerosol module included in the regional climate model (RegCM4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) have been carried out using ground-based network of Sun/sky Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) radiometers, satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and ground-based black carbon (BC) measurements made at Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India (ARFI) network stations. In general, RegCM4 simulations reproduced the spatial and seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical depth over South Asia reasonably well, particularly over west Asia, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading. In contrast, RegCM4 simulations drastically underestimated the BC mass concentrations over most of the stations, by a factor of 2 to 5, with a large spatial variability. Seasonally, the discrepancy between the measured and simulated BC tended to be higher during winter and periods when the atmospheric boundary layer is convectively stable (such as nighttime and early mornings), while during summer season and during periods when the boundary layer is convectively unstable (daytime) the discrepancies were much lower, with the noontime values agreeing very closely with the observations. A detailed analysis revealed that the model does not reproduce the nocturnal high in BC, observed at most of the Indian sites especially during winter, because of the excessive vertical transport of aerosols under stable boundary layer conditions. As far as the vertical distribution was concerned, the simulated vertical profiles of BC agreed well with airborne measurements during daytime. This comprehensive validation exercise reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the model in simulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of the aerosol fields over

  11. Triangulation method for determining capillary blood flow and physical characteristics of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gorti, S; Tone, H; Imokawa, G

    1999-08-01

    A method capable of measuring blood flow at precise depths within the skin is described. The method determines the static and the dynamic properties of light that is backscattered to small areas on the surface of the skin at several contiguous locations along the expected trajectory of laser-light propagation. From observations the method has been shown to be capable of determining physical characteristics that are unique to the different layers of the skin.

  12. Comparison of Upper Extremity Physical Characteristics Between Adolescent Competitive Swimmers and Nonoverhead Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E.; Laudner, Kevin; Berkoff, David J.; Kucera, Kristen L.; Yu, Bing; Myers, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Context Alterations to upper extremity physical characteristics of competitive swimmers (posture, range of motion [ROM], and subacromial-space distance) are commonly attributed to cumulative training load during a swimmer's competitive career. However, this accepted clinical belief has not been established in the literature. It is important to understand whether alterations in posture and associated physical characteristics occur as a result of sport training or factors other than swimming participation to better understand injury risk and possible interventions. Objective To compare posture, subacromial-space distance, and glenohumeral external-rotation, internal-rotation, and horizontal-adduction ROM between adolescent competitive swimmers and nonoverhead athletes. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Local swimming pools and high school athletic training rooms. Patients or Other Participants Forty-four competitive adolescent swimmers and 31 nonoverhead athletes who were not currently experiencing any elbow, shoulder, neck, or back pain that limited their sport activity. Intervention(s) Posture, subacromial-space distance, and glenohumeral ROM were measured using photography, diagnostic ultrasound, and a digital inclinometer, respectively. Main Outcome Measure(s) Forward shoulder posture, forward head posture, normalized subacromial-space distance, internal-rotation ROM, and external-rotation ROM. Results No clinically significant differences existed between swimmers and nonoverhead athletes for posture, normalized subacromial-space distance, or external- or internal-rotation ROM. Swimmers presented with less horizontal-adduction ROM than nonoverhead athletes. Conclusions Factors other than swimming participation, such as school and technology use, play important roles in the adaptation of physical characteristics in adolescents. Adolescents, regardless of swimming participation, presented with postural deviations. It is important to consider factors other than

  13. Production of Inhalable Submicrometer Aerosols from Conventional Mesh Nebulizers for Improved Respiratory Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Longest, P Worth; Spence, Benjamin M; Holbrook, Landon T; Mossi, Karla M; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Submicrometer and nanoparticle aerosols may significantly improve the delivery efficiency, dissolution characteristics, and bioavailability of inhaled pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to explore the formation of submicrometer and nanometer aerosols from mesh nebulizers suitable for respiratory drug delivery using experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Mesh nebulizers were coupled with add-on devices to promote aerosol drying and the formation of submicrometer particles, as well as to control the inhaled aerosol temperature and relative humidity. Cascade impaction experiments were used to determine the initial mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.1% albuterol aerosols produced by the AeroNeb commercial (4.69 μm) and lab (3.90 μm) nebulizers and to validate the CFD model in terms of droplet evaporation. Through an appropriate selection of flow rates, nebulizers, and model drug concentrations, submicrometer and nanometer aerosols could be formed with the three devices considered. Based on CFD simulations, a wire heated design was shown to overheat the airstream producing unsafe conditions for inhalation if the aerosol was not uniformly distributed in the tube cross-section or if the nebulizer stopped producing droplets. In comparison, a counter-flow heated design provided sufficient thermal energy to produce submicrometer particles, but also automatically limited the maximum aerosol outlet temperature based on the physics of heat transfer. With the counter-flow design, submicrometer aerosols were produced at flow rates of 5, 15, and 30 LPM, which may be suitable for various forms of oral and nasal aerosol delivery. Thermodynamic conditions of the aerosol stream exiting the counter-flow design were found be in a range of 21-45 °C with relative humidity greater than 40% in some cases, which was considered safe for direct inhalation and advantageous for condensational growth delivery.

  14. Production of Inhalable Submicrometer Aerosols from Conventional Mesh Nebulizers for Improved Respiratory Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Spence, Benjamin M.; Holbrook, Landon T.; Mossi, Karla M.; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Submicrometer and nanoparticle aerosols may significantly improve the delivery efficiency, dissolution characteristics, and bioavailability of inhaled pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to explore the formation of submicrometer and nanometer aerosols from mesh nebulizers suitable for respiratory drug delivery using experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Mesh nebulizers were coupled with add-on devices to promote aerosol drying and the formation of submicrometer particles, as well as to control the inhaled aerosol temperature and relative humidity. Cascade impaction experiments were used to determine the initial mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.1% albuterol aerosols produced by the AeroNeb commercial (4.69 μm) and lab (3.90 μm) nebulizers and to validate the CFD model in terms of droplet evaporation. Through an appropriate selection of flow rates, nebulizers, and model drug concentrations, submicrometer and nanometer aerosols could be formed with the three devices considered. Based on CFD simulations, a wire heated design was shown to overheat the airstream producing unsafe conditions for inhalation if the aerosol was not uniformly distributed in the tube cross-section or if the nebulizer stopped producing droplets. In comparison, a counter-flow heated design provided sufficient thermal energy to produce submicrometer particles, but also automatically limited the maximum aerosol outlet temperature based on the physics of heat transfer. With the counter-flow design, submicrometer aerosols were produced at flow rates of 5, 15, and 30 LPM, which may be suitable for various forms of oral and nasal aerosol delivery. Thermodynamic conditions of the aerosol stream exiting the counter-flow design were found be in a range of 21-45 °C with relative humidity greater than 40% in some cases, which was considered safe for direct inhalation and advantageous for condensational growth delivery. PMID:22707794

  15. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  16. Mercury biomagnification through food webs is affected by physical and chemical characteristics of lakes.

    PubMed

    Clayden, Meredith G; Kidd, Karen A; Wyn, Brianna; Kirk, Jane L; Muir, Derek C G; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in aquatic systems remains a global concern because the organic form, methyl Hg (MeHg), can biomagnify to harmful concentrations in fish, fish-eating wildlife, and humans. Food web transfer of MeHg has been explored using models of log MeHg versus relative trophic position (nitrogen isotopes, δ(15)N), but regression slopes vary across systems for unknown reasons. In this study, MeHg biomagnification was determined for 11 lake food webs in Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia, Canada, and compared to physical and chemical lake characteristics using principal component and multiple regression analyses. MeHg biomagnification (regression slopes of log MeHg versus baseline-adjusted δ(15)N for fishes and invertebrates) varied significantly across lakes and was higher in systems with lower aqueous nutrient/MeHg/chloride scores. This is one of the largest, consistent data sets available on MeHg biomagnification through temperate lake food webs and the first study to use a principal component and multiple regression approach to understand how lake chemical and physical characteristics interact to affect biomagnification among systems. Overall, our results show that the magnitude of MeHg biomagnification through lake food webs is related to the chemical and physical characteristics of the systems, but the underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation.

  17. Impacts of firecracker burning on aerosol chemical characteristics and human health risk levels during the Chinese New Year Celebration in Jinan, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingxiao; Gao, Xiaomei; Wang, Xinfeng; Nie, Wei; Wang, Jing; Gao, Rui; Xu, Pengju; Shou, Youping; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-04-01

    Measurements for size distribution and chemical components (including water-soluble ions, OC/EC and trace elements) of particles were taken in Jinan, China, during the 2008 Chinese New Year (CNY) to assess the impacts of firecracker burning on aerosol chemical characteristics and human health risk levels. On the eve of the CNY, the widespread burning of firecrackers had a clear contribution to the number concentration of small accumulation mode particles (100-500 nm) and PM2.5 mass concentration, with a maximum PM2.5 concentration of 464.02 μg/m(3). The firecracker activities altered the number size distribution of particles, but had no influence on the mass size distribution of major water-soluble ions. The concentrations of aerosol and most ions peaked in the rush hour of firecracker burning, whereas the peaks of NO3(-) and NH4(+) presented on the day following the burning of firecrackers. K(+), SO4(2-) and Cl(-) composed approximately 62% of the PM2.5 mass, and they existed as KCl and K2SO4 during the firecracker period. However, during the non-firecracker period, organic matter (OM), SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) were the major chemical components of the PM2.5, and major ions were primarily observed as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3. Estimates of non-carcinogenic risk levels to human health showed that the elemental risk levels during the firecracker period were substantially higher than those observed during the non-firecracker period. The total elemental risk levels in Jinan for the three groups (aged 2-6 years, 6-12 years and ≥70 years) were higher than 2 during the firecracker period, indicating that increased pollutant levels emitted from the burning of firecrackers over short periods of time may cause non-carcinogenic human health risks.

  18. Physical characteristics of residential psychiatric and substance abuse programs: organizational determinants and patients outcomes.

    PubMed

    Timko, C

    1996-02-01

    Described the Physical and Architectural Characteristics Inventory (PACI), which assesses the physical characteristics of hospital- and community-based psychiatric and substance abuse residential treatment programs for adults. Developed using data from 94 representative programs, the PACI has 7 dimensions that assess community accessibility, physical features that add convenience, aid recreation, and provide support for patients, and space for patient and staff functions. In comparison to community-based programs (n = 63), hospital programs (n = 31) had more social-recreational and prosthetic aids, safety features, staff facilities, and space. The PACI dimensions were also related to other organizational features, such as facility ownership and program size and staffing level. Programs with more physical amenities had patients who were more involved in self-initiated and community activities and were more likely to successfully complete the program and be discharged to independent living situations and paid jobs. Programs with more social-recreational and prosthetic aids, space, and access to community resources also had better patient outcomes. In addition, PACI dimensions were related to observers' ratings of facility attractiveness. Potential applications of the PACI and the full inventory of which it is a part are discussed.

  19. Physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpaste and evaluation of its effects on enamel roughness.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, Sérgio Paulo; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Santos, Fábio André; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpastes and their effect on bovine enamel after application of a bleaching agent (16% carbamide peroxide). Physical-chemical analysis was made considering mass loss by desiccation, ash content and pH of the toothpastes. Thirty bovine dental enamel fragments were prepared for roughness measurements. The samples were subjected to bleaching treatments and simulated brushing: G1. Sorriso Dentes Brancos (Conventional toothpaste), G2. Close-UP Whitening (Whitening toothpaste), and G3. Sensodyne Branqueador (Whitening toothpaste). The average roughness (Ra) was evaluated prior to the bleaching treatment and after brushing. The results revealed differences in the physical-chemical characteristics of the toothpastes (p < 0.0001). The final Ra had higher values (p < 0.05) following the procedures. The mean of the Ra did not show significant differences, considering toothpaste groups and bleaching treatment. Interaction (toothpaste and bleaching treatment) showed significant difference (p < 0.0001). The whitening toothpastes showed differences in their physical-chemical properties. All toothpastes promoted changes to the enamel surface, probably by the use of a bleaching agent.

  20. The characteristics of the outdoor school environment associated with physical activity.

    PubMed

    Haug, Ellen; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Sallis, James F; Samdal, Oddrun

    2010-04-01

    The school is an important setting for physical activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between physical environmental characteristics and participation in daily physical activity during school breaks. Data from 130 schools and 16 471 students (Grades 4-10) in Norway were obtained in 2004 through self-administered questionnaires to principals and students. Multilevel logistic regression models revealed that boys at secondary level with a larger number of outdoor facilities at school had 2.69 times [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.21-5.98] and girls 2.90 times (95% CI = 1.32-6.37) higher odds of being physically active compared with students in schools with fewer facilities. Boys at secondary level with areas for hopscotch/skipping rope had 2.53 times (95% CI = 1.55-4.13), with a soccer field 1.68 times (95% CI = 1.15-2.45), with playground equipment 1.66 times (95% CI = 1.16-2.37) and with a sledding hill 1.70 times (95% CI = 1.23-2.35) higher odds to be physically active compared with students in schools without these facilities. A sledding hill was also associated with girls' physical activity participation in secondary school (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.11-2.24). Outdoor facilities in secondary schools are associated with students' daily physical activity participation during school breaks. Therefore, improving the outdoor environment should be considered in physical activity promotion school programs in secondary schools.

  1. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  2. Sodium Nitrate Particles: Physical and Chemical Properties During Hydration and Dehydration, and Implications for Aged Sea Salt Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Rachel C.; Laskin, Alexander; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments probing the phase and behavior of NaNO3 particles at different relative humidities, important for elucidating the role these play in the chemistry and radiative properties of marine regions, are presented. Changes in NaNO3 particles during hydration were studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and conventional SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). Mixtures of NaNO3 and NaCl, which are typical of partially processed sea salt particles, were also studied. Complementary studies using long path FTIR were carried out to determine the extent of water association with NaNO3 aerosols, and for comparison, NaCl, MgCl2, and NH4NO3, as a function of relative humidity. The combination of these techniques shows that NaNO3 particles exist as unusual metastable, amorphous solids at low relative humidity that undergo continuous hygroscopic growth with increasing relative humidity. While other evidence for this phenomenon has been reported, this is the first direct observation using ESEM.

  3. Physical and Optical Characteristics of the October 2010 Haze Event Over Singapore: A Photometric and Lidar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Chew, Boon Ning; Miettinen, Jukka; Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Yu, Liya E.; Liew, Soo Chin

    2013-01-01

    Trans-boundary biomass burning smoke episodes have increased dramatically during the past 20-30 years and have become an annual phenomenon in the South-East-Asia region. On 15th October 2010, elevated levels of fire activity were detected by remote sensing satellites (e.g. MODIS). On the same date, measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at Singapore and Malaysia found high levels of fine mode particles in the local environment. All these observations were indicative of the initial onset of a smoke episode that lasted for several days. In this work, we investigate the temporal evolution of this smoke episode by analyzing the physical and optical properties of smoke particles with the aid of an AERONET Sun photometer, an MPLNet micropulse lidar, and surface PM2.5 measurements. Elevated levels of fire activity coupled with high aerosol optical depth and PM2.5 were observed over a period of nine days. Increased variability of parameters such as aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent number and its fine mode equivalents all indicated high levels of fine particulate presence in the atmosphere. Smoke particle growth due to aging, coagulation and condensation mechanisms was detected during the afternoons and over several days. Retrieved lidar ratios were compatible with the presence of fine particulate within the boundary/aerosol layer. Moreover, retrieved particle size distribution as well as single scattering albedo indicated the prevalence of the fine mode particulate regime as well as particles showing enhanced levels of absorption respectively.

  4. A study of automotive workers anthropometric physical characteristics from Mexico Northwest.

    PubMed

    Lucero-Duarte, Karla; de la Vega-Bustillos, Enrique; López-Millán, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of anthropometric information in northwest Mexico, we did an anthropometric study that represents the population physical characteristics and that is reliable for the design or redesign of workstations. The study was divided in two phases. The first one was the anthropometric study of 2900 automotive industry workers in northwest of Mexico. The study includes 40 body dimensions of 2345 males and 555 females personalized to be used in future researches. Second phase includes compared anthropometric characteristics of population reported in four Mexican studies and a Colombian study against the current study. Benefits of this project are: a reliable database of anthropometric characteristic of automotive industry population for workstations design or redesign that match with the users, increase product quality and reduce economic, medical and union complains.

  5. Aerosol size distribution and aerosol water content measurements during Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.; Wellman, D.; Pszenny, A.

    1995-11-01

    Aerosol size distribution data measured during the June 1992 Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of fine marine aerosol particles measured over the North Atlantic near the Azores Islands. Measured aerosol size distribution data were corrected using the corrected size calibration data based on the optical properties of particles being measured. The corrected size distribution data were then approximated with either one or two lognormal size distributions, depending on air mass conditions. Under clean air mass conditions <3 μm diameter aerosol size distributions typically exhibited two modes, consisting of an accumulation mode and the small end of the sea-salt particle mode. However, under the influence of continental polluted air masses, the aerosol size distribution was dominated by <1 μm diameter particles in a single mode with an increased aerosol concentration. Aerosol water content of accumulation mode marine aerosols was estimated from differences between several series of ambient and dried aerosol size distributions. The average aerosol water fraction was 0.31, which is in good agreement with an empirical aerosol growth model estimate. The average rate of SO4= production in the accumulation mode aerosol water by H2O2 oxidation was estimated to be <7×10-10 mol L-1 s-1, which is an insignificant contributor to the observed non-sea-salt SO4= in the accumulation mode.

  6. Chemical Characteristics of Particulate Matter from Vehicle emission using High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, T.; Lee, T.; Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Son, J.; Yoo, H. M.; Kim, K.; Park, G.

    2015-12-01

    Car emissions are major contributors of particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and effects of air pollution, climate change, and human activities. By increasing of interest in research of car emission for assessment of the PM control, it became require to understand the chemical composition and characteristics of the car exhaust gases and particulate matter. To understand car emission characteristics of PM, we will study PM of car emissions for five driving modes (National Institute Environmental Research (NIER)-5, NIER-9, NIER-12, NIER-14) and three fixed speed driving modes (30km/h, 70km/h, 110km/h) using different fuel types (gasoline, diesel, and LPG) at Transportation Pollution Research Center (TPRC) of NIER in Incheon, South Korea. PM chemical composition of car emission was measured for concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, PAHs, oxidation states and size distribution using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) on real-time. In the study, organics concentration was dominated for all cases of driving modes and the concentration of organics was increased in 110km/h fixed speed mode for gasoline and diesel. The presentation will provide an overview of the chemical composition of PM in the car emissions.

  7. Physical and Temporal Characteristics of Under 19, Under 21 and Senior Male Beach Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Alexandre; Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of age groups and players’ role (blocker vs. defender specialist) in beach volleyball in relation to physical and temporal variables, considering quality of opposition. 1101 rallies from Under 19 (U19), 933 rallies from Under 21 (U21), and 1480 rallies from senior (senior) (Men’s Swatch World Championships, 2010-2011) were observed using video match analysis. Cluster analysis was used to set teams’ competitive levels and establish quality of opposition as “balanced”, “moderate balanced” and “unbalanced” games. The analyzed variables were: temporal (duration of set, total rest time, total work time, duration of rallies, rest time between rallies) and physical (number of jumps and number of hits done by defenders and blockers) characteristics. A one-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and multinomial logistic regression were performed to analyze the variables studied. The analysis of temporal and physical characteristics showed differences considering age group, player’s role and quality of opposition. The duration of set, total rest time, and number of jumps done by defenders significantly increased from the U19 to senior category. Multinomial logistic regression showed that in: a) balanced games, rest time between rallies was higher in seniors than in U19 or U21; number of jumps done by defenders was higher in seniors than in U19) and U21; b) moderate balanced games, number of jumps done by defenders was higher in seniors than in U21 and number of jumps done by blockers was smaller in U19 than U21 or seniors; c) unbalanced games, no significant findings were shown. This study suggests differences in players’ performances according to age group and players’ role in different qualities of opposition. The article provides reference values that can be useful to guide training and create scenarios that resemble a competition, taking into account physical and temporal characteristics. Key Points Player

  8. Physical and temporal characteristics of under 19, under 21 and senior male beach volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Alexandre; Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao, José Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of age groups and players' role (blocker vs. defender specialist) in beach volleyball in relation to physical and temporal variables, considering quality of opposition. 1101 rallies from Under 19 (U19), 933 rallies from Under 21 (U21), and 1480 rallies from senior (senior) (Men's Swatch World Championships, 2010-2011) were observed using video match analysis. Cluster analysis was used to set teams' competitive levels and establish quality of opposition as "balanced", "moderate balanced" and "unbalanced" games. The analyzed variables were: temporal (duration of set, total rest time, total work time, duration of rallies, rest time between rallies) and physical (number of jumps and number of hits done by defenders and blockers) characteristics. A one-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and multinomial logistic regression were performed to analyze the variables studied. The analysis of temporal and physical characteristics showed differences considering age group, player's role and quality of opposition. The duration of set, total rest time, and number of jumps done by defenders significantly increased from the U19 to senior category. Multinomial logistic regression showed that in: a) balanced games, rest time between rallies was higher in seniors than in U19 or U21; number of jumps done by defenders was higher in seniors than in U19) and U21; b) moderate balanced games, number of jumps done by defenders was higher in seniors than in U21 and number of jumps done by blockers was smaller in U19 than U21 or seniors; c) unbalanced games, no significant findings were shown. This study suggests differences in players' performances according to age group and players' role in different qualities of opposition. The article provides reference values that can be useful to guide training and create scenarios that resemble a competition, taking into account physical and temporal characteristics. Key PointsPlayer roles, quality of opposition

  9. The Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from the Isoprene + OH Reaction in the Absence of NOx

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of isoprene (C5H8) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the absence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to determine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Experiments were conducted using a smog ch...

  10. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.

    2015-08-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind lid