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Sample records for aerosol products sampling

  1. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  2. The Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) for Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrieval Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Among the known atmospheric constituents, aerosols represent the greatest uncertainty in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood ', there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource,., an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  3. Aerosol sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  4. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M. Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO2 were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 × 106 cm−3, were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m−3, were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control recommendations

  5. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  6. AEROSOL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS, PHOENIX, ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An atmospheric sampling program was carried out in the greater Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area in November, 1975. Objectives of the study were to measure aerosol mass flux through Phoenix and to characterize the aerosol according to particle type and size. The ultimate goal of...

  7. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

    1984-04-11

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

  8. Volcanic Aerosol Evolution: Model vs. In Situ Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M. A.; Rietmeijer, F. J.; Brearley, A. J.; Fischer, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanoes are the most significant non-anthropogenic source of tropospheric aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at different distances from 92°C fumarolic source at Poás Volcano. Aerosols were captured on TEM grids coated by a thin C-film using a specially designed collector. In the sampling, grids were exposed to the plume for 30-second intervals then sealed and frozen to prevent reaction before ATEM analysis to determine aerosol size and chemistry. Gas composition was established using gas chromatography, wet chemistry techniques, AAS and Ion Chromatography on samples collected directly from a fumarolic vent. SO2 flux was measured remotely by COSPEC. A Gaussian plume dispersion model was used to model concentrations of the gases at different distances down-wind. Calculated mixing ratios of air and the initial gas species were used as input to the thermo-chemical model GASWORKS (Symonds and Reed, Am. Jour. Sci., 1993). Modeled products were compared with measured aerosol compositions. Aerosols predicted to precipitate out of the plume one meter above the fumarole are [CaSO4, Fe2.3SO4, H2SO4, MgF2. Na2SO4, silica, water]. Where the plume leaves the confines of the crater, 380 meters distant, the predicted aerosols are the same, excepting FeF3 replacing Fe2.3SO4. Collected aerosols show considerable compositional differences between the sampling locations and are more complex than those predicted. Aerosols from the fumarole consist of [Fe +/- Si,S,Cl], [S +/- O] and [Si +/- O]. Aerosols collected on the crater rim consist of the same plus [O,Na,Mg,Ca], [O,Si,Cl +/- Fe], [Fe,O,F] and [S,O +/- Mg,Ca]. The comparison between results obtained by the equilibrium gas model and the actual aerosol compositions shows that an assumption of chemical and thermal equilibrium evolution is invalid. The complex aerosols collected contrast the simple formulae predicted. These findings show that complex, non-equilibrium chemical reactions take place immediately upon volcanic

  9. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Herceg, Joseph E.; Klocksieben, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

  10. Sampling submicron T1 bacteriophage aerosols.

    PubMed

    Harstad, J B

    1965-11-01

    Liquid impingers, filter papers, and fritted bubblers were partial viable collectors of radioactive submicron T1 bacteriophage aerosols at 30, 55, and 85% relative humidity. Sampler differences for viable collection were due to incomplete physical collection (slippage) and killing of phage by the samplers. Dynamic aerosols of a mass median diameter of 0.2 mu were produced with a Dautrebande generator from concentrated aqueous purified phage suspensions containing extracellular soluble radioactive phosphate as a physical tracer. There was considerable destruction of phage by the Dautrebande generator; phage titers of the Dautrebande suspension decreased exponentially, but there was a progressive (linear) increase in tracer titers. Liquid impingers recovered the most viable phage but allowed considerable (30 to 48%) slippage, which varies inversely with the aerosol relative humidity. Filter papers were virtually complete physical collectors of submicron particles but were the most destructive. Fritted bubbler slippage was more than 80%. With all samplers, phage kill was highest at 85% relative humidity and lowest at 55% relative humidity. An electrostatic precipitator was used to collect aerosol samples for particle sizing with an electron microscope. The particle size was slightly larger at 85% relative humidity than at 30 or 55% relative humidity. PMID:5866038

  11. Metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Després, Viviane R; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Metaproteomic analysis of air particulate matter provides information about the abundance and properties of bioaerosols in the atmosphere and their influence on climate and public health. We developed and applied efficient methods for the extraction and analysis of proteins from glass fiber filter samples of total, coarse, and fine particulate matter. Size exclusion chromatography was applied to remove matrix components, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied for protein fractionation according to molecular size, followed by in-gel digestion and LC-MS/MS analysis of peptides using a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap MS. Maxquant software and the Swiss-Prot database were used for protein identification. In samples collected at a suburban location in central Europe, we found proteins that originated mainly from plants, fungi, and bacteria, which constitute a major fraction of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) in the atmosphere. Allergenic proteins were found in coarse and fine particle samples, and indications for atmospheric degradation of proteins were observed. Graphical abstract Workflow for the metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples. PMID:27411545

  12. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Mattoo, S.; Chu, D. A.; Martins, J. V.; Li, R.-R.; Ichoku, C.; Levy, R. C.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites is making near global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range. These measurements are used to derive spectral aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size parameters over both land and ocean. The aerosol products available over land include aerosol optical thickness at three visible wavelengths, a measure of the fraction of aerosol optical thickness attributed to the fine mode and several derived parameters including reflected spectral solar flux at top of atmosphere. Over ocean, the aerosol optical thickness is provided in seven wavelengths from 0.47 microns to 2.13 microns. In addition, quantitative aerosol size information includes effective radius of the aerosol and quantitative fraction of optical thickness attributed to the fine mode. Spectral aerosol flux, mass concentration and number of cloud condensation nuclei round out the list of available aerosol products over the ocean. The spectral optical thickness and effective radius of the aerosol over the ocean are validated by comparison with two years of AERONET data gleaned from 133 AERONET stations. 8000 MODIS aerosol retrievals colocated with AERONET measurements confirm that one-standard deviation of MODIS optical thickness retrievals fall within the predicted uncertainty of delta tauapproximately equal to plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau over ocean and delta tay equal to plus or minus 0.05 plus or minus 0.15 tau over land. 271 MODIS aerosol retrievals co-located with AERONET inversions at island and coastal sites suggest that one-standard deviation of MODIS effective radius retrievals falls within delta r_eff approximately equal to 0.11 microns. The accuracy of the MODIS retrievals suggests that the product can be used to help narrow the uncertainties associated with aerosol radiative forcing of global climate.

  13. MODIS 3km Aerosol Product: Algorithm and Global Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Munchak, L.

    2013-01-01

    After more than a decade of producing a nominal 10 km aerosol product based on the dark target method, the MODIS aerosol team will be releasing a nominal 3 km product as part of their Collection 6 release. The new product differs from the original 10 km product only in the manner in which reflectance pixels are ingested, organized and selected by the aerosol algorithm. Overall, the 3 km product closely mirrors the 10 km product. However, the finer resolution product is able to retrieve over ocean closer to islands and coastlines, and is better able to resolve fine aerosol features such as smoke plumes over both ocean and land. In some situations, it provides retrievals over entire regions that the 10 km product barely samples. In situations traditionally difficult for the dark target algorithm, such as over bright or urban surfaces the 3 km product introduces isolated spikes of artificially high aerosol optical depth (AOD) that the 10 km algorithm avoids. Over land, globally, the 3 km product appears to be 0.01 to 0.02 higher than the 10 km product, while over ocean, the 3 km algorithm is retrieving a proportionally greater number of very low aerosol loading situations. Based on collocations with ground-based observations for only six months, expected errors associated with the 3 km land product are determined to be greater than for the 10 km product: 0.05 0.25 AOD. Over ocean, the suggestion is for expected errors to be the same as the 10 km product: 0.03 0.05 AOD. The advantage of the product is on the local scale, which will require continued evaluation not addressed here. Nevertheless, the new 3 km product is expected to provide important information complementary to existing satellite-derived products and become an important tool for the aerosol community.

  14. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  15. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  16. Critical evaluation of cloud contamination in MISR aerosol product using collocated MODIS aerosol and cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Liu, B.; Deshmukh, R.

    2012-12-01

    Unique in its ability of observing the atmospheric state in nine angles nearly simultaneously, the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument has been successfully used for various applications including remote sensing of aerosol properties. However, MISR has limited spectral channels compared with other multi-spectral sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which poses a challenge to cloud screening for applications using MISR. This is particularly important for aerosol property retrievals as cloud contamination and cloud artifacts are one of the larger error sources in satellite aerosol products. Using collocated MODIS and MISR data sets, the potential effects of cloud contamination on the MISR aerosol product are studied. Over global oceans, for non-glint regions, the cloud mask from the level 2 MODIS aerosol products (MOD04) is used. Over ocean glint regions as well as land, the level 2 MODIS cloud mask products (MOD35) are used. The relations between cloud coverage and the bias of MISR AOD are examined using collocated the MODIS cloud information and MISR AOD data. In particular, the suspicious high AOD loading band reported by the MISR aerosol product over high latitude southern oceans is investigated. Finally, a level 3 MISR aerosol product with a new cloud screening method is developed and the potential usage of such a product in satellite aerosol data assimilation is explored.

  17. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  18. MISR Aerosol Product Attributes and Statistical Comparisons with MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David L.; Garay, Michael J.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Paradise, Susan R.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol product attributes are described, including geometry and algorithm performance flags. Actual retrieval coverage is mapped and explained in detail using representative global monthly data. Statistical comparisons are made with coincident aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (ANG) retrieval results from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. The relationship between these results and the ones previously obtained for MISR and MODIS individually, based on comparisons with coincident ground-truth observations, is established. For the data examined, MISR and MODIS each obtain successful aerosol retrievals about 15% of the time, and coincident MISR-MODIS aerosol retrievals are obtained for about 6%-7% of the total overlap region. Cloud avoidance, glint and oblique-Sun exclusions, and other algorithm physical limitations account for these results. For both MISR and MODIS, successful retrievals are obtained for over 75% of locations where attempts are made. Where coincident AOD retrievals are obtained over ocean, the MISR-MODIS correlation coefficient is about 0.9; over land, the correlation coefficient is about 0.7. Differences are traced to specific known algorithm issues or conditions. Over-ocean ANG comparisons yield a correlation of 0.67, showing consistency in distinguishing aerosol air masses dominated by coarse-mode versus fine-mode particles. Sampling considerations imply that care must be taken when assessing monthly global aerosol direct radiative forcing and AOD trends with these products, but they can be used directly for many other applications, such as regional AOD gradient and aerosol air mass type mapping and aerosol transport model validation. Users are urged to take seriously the published product data-quality statements.

  19. Introducing... The MODIS Collection 6 Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    As evidenced by more than 1000 publications to date, the MODIS aerosol products are indispensable to research as well as operational applications. The products are used independently, but also in conjunction with other remote sensing instruments and serve as the basis for intercomparisons with models of all scales. In collaboration with our data users, we have made a number of changes to the algorithm and product list, and expect to begin processing “Collection 6” (C006) beginning in early 2011. In addition to more robust means of dealing with degraded or missing reflectance observations, and new protocol for Quality Assurance (QA) characterization and reporting structure, C006 offers new scientific products. C006 will explicitly identify clouds within the aerosol scene, determine distance to nearest cloud for each non-cloudy pixel and provide statistics to help quantify cloud/aerosol interactions. In addition to the traditional retrieval at 10 km resolution focused on climate applications, C006 will provide a 3 km product aimed at characterizing regional and local air quality. The range of valid solar zenith is increased from 72° to 84°, thus increasing retrieval coverage in mid and high latitudes over both land and ocean. Over land, C006 will provide a merged “Dark-target” and “Deep-blue” aerosol product. As for the retrieval over traditional dark targets (land and ocean), the C006 product will benefit from better physical constraints. The lookup tables (central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depth) are more consistent in C006, and the over-ocean retrieval now includes dependence on wind speed. The dark-land retrieval is improved with adjusted aerosol map boundaries. Finally, the entire C006 archive will be produced utilizing collective knowledge of the MODIS instrument behavior over time. Impacts from calibration drifts and instrument response will be minimized such that C006 will be ever closer to characterizing a global aerosol climate data record.

  20. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs. PMID:27200479

  1. Non-destructive infrared spectroscopic analysis of IMPROVE aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthenburg, T. C.; Dillner, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is of increasing interest for determining organic functional group composition of aerosols. The organic fraction of aerosols is thought to affect visibility, climate and toxicity. Organic functional group composition can provide insights into aerosol sources and aging. The Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program, established in 1985, operates a long term particulate matter monitoring network primarily in National Parks and Wilderness Areas. IMRPROVE samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters are analyzed via IR spectroscopy to determine organic functional group composition. Organic carbon (OC) mass determined by MIR spectroscopy is compared to OC derived from a thermal-optical method.

  2. Aircraft studies of size-dependent aerosol sampling through inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. N.; Clarke, A. D.; Ferry, G.; Pueschel, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Representative measurement of aerosol from aircraft-aspirated systems requires special efforts in order to maintain near isokinetic sampling conditions, estimate aerosol losses in the sample system, and obtain a measurement of sufficient duration to be statistically significant for all sizes of interest. This last point is especially critical for aircraft measurements which typically require fast response times while sampling in clean remote regions. This paper presents size-resolved tests, intercomparisons, and analysis of aerosol inlet performance as determined by a custom laser optical particle counter. Measurements discussed here took place during the Global Backscatter Experiment (1988-1989) and the Central Pacific Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (1988). System configurations are discussed including (1) nozzle design and performance, (2) system transmission efficiency, (3) nonadiabatic effects in the sample line and its effect on the sample-line relative humidity, and (4) the use and calibration of a virtual impactor.

  3. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Subramanian, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging. PMID:26233420

  4. Hand calculations for transport of radioactive aerosols through sampling systems.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Mark; Thompson, Martha; Farfan, Eduardo; Hadlock, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    Workplace air monitoring programs for sampling radioactive aerosols in nuclear facilities sometimes must rely on sampling systems to move the air to a sample filter in a safe and convenient location. These systems may consist of probes, straight tubing, bends, contractions and other components. Evaluation of these systems for potential loss of radioactive aerosols is important because significant losses can occur. However, it can be very difficult to find fully described equations to model a system manually for a single particle size and even more difficult to evaluate total system efficiency for a polydispersed particle distribution. Some software methods are available, but they may not be directly applicable to the components being evaluated and they may not be completely documented or validated per current software quality assurance requirements. This paper offers a method to model radioactive aerosol transport in sampling systems that is transparent and easily updated with the most applicable models. Calculations are shown with the R Programming Language, but the method is adaptable to other scripting languages. The method has the advantage of transparency and easy verifiability. This paper shows how a set of equations from published aerosol science models may be applied to aspiration and transport efficiency of aerosols in common air sampling system components. An example application using R calculation scripts is demonstrated. The R scripts are provided as electronic attachments. PMID:24667389

  5. Two MODIS Aerosol Products Over Ocean on the Terra and Aqua CERES SSF Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatov, Alexander; Minnis, Patrick; Loeb, Norman; Wielicki, Bruce; Miller, Walter; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Tanre, Didier; Remer, Lorraine; Laszlo, Istvan; Geier, Erika

    2004-01-01

    Over ocean, two aerosol products are reported on the Terra and Aqua CERES SSFs. Both are derived from MODIS, but using different sampling and aerosol algorithms. This study briefly summarizes these products, and compares using 2 weeks of global Terra data from 15-21 December 2000, and 1-7 June 2001.

  6. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling and analysis requirements for the characterization of ambient particles are reviewed. The choice of sampling equipment and characterization procedures for ambient particles are often dictated by the objectives of the experiment. The paper describes the procedures and the...

  7. Toward a Coherent Detailed Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols represent one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource, an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, TerraMISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MASS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  8. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  9. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  10. Silicon production in an aerosol reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.; Flagan, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    An aerosol reactor system was developed in which large particles of silicon can be grown by silane pyrolysis. To grow particles to sizes larger than one micron, vapor deposition must be used to grow a relatively small number of seed particles. Suppression of nucleation is achieved by limiting the rate of gas phase chemical reactions such that the condensible products of the gas phase chemical reactions diffuse to the surface of the seed particles as rapidly as they are produced. This prevents high degrees of supersaturation and runaway nucleation during the growth process. Particles on the order of 10 microns were grown repeatedly with the present aersol reactor. The nucleation controlled aerosol reactor is, therefore, a suitable system for the production of powders that can readily be separated from the gas by aerodynamic means.

  11. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF SEMIVOLATILE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denuder based samplers can effectively separate semivolatile gases from particles and 'freeze' the partitioning in time. Conversely, samples collected on filters partition mass according to the conditions of the influent airstream, which may change over time. As a result thes...

  12. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  13. Artifact free denuder method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, P.; Vecera, Z.; Broškovicová, A.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past decade, a growing attention has been focused on the carbonaceous aerosols. Although they may account for 30--60% of the total fine aerosol mass, their concentration and formation mechanisms are not well understood, particularly in comparison with major fine particle inorganic species. The deficiency in knowledge of carbonaceous aerosols results from their complexity and because of problems associated with their collection. Conventional sampling techniques of the carbonaceous aerosols, which utilize filters/backup adsorbents suffer from sampling artefacts. Positive artifacts are mainly due to adsorption of gas-phase organic compounds by the filter material or by the already collected particles, whereas negative artifacts arise from the volatilisation of already collected organic compounds from the filter. Furthermore, in the course of the sampling, the composition of the collected organic compounds may be modified by oxidants (O_3, NO_2, PAN, peroxides) that are present in the air passing through the sampler. It is clear that new, artifact free, method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols is needed. A combination of a diffusion denuder and a filter in series is very promising in this respect. The denuder is expected to collect gaseous oxidants and gas-phase organic compounds from sample air stream prior to collection of aerosol particles on filters, and eliminate thus both positive and negative sampling artifacts for carbonaceous aerosols. This combination is subject of the presentation. Several designs of diffusion denuders (cylindrical, annular, parallel plate, multi-channel) in combination with various types of wall coatings (dry, liquid) were examined. Special attention was given to preservation of the long-term collection efficiency. Different adsorbents (activated charcoal, molecular sieve, porous polymers) and sorbents coated with various chemical reagents (KI, Na_2SO_3, MnO_2, ascorbic acid) or chromatographic stationary phases (silicon oils

  14. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  15. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: sampling criteria and aerosol characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Jared L.; Friend, Sherri; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to develop protocols for sampling and characterizing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerosols in workplaces or during inhalation studies. Manufactured dry powder containing MWCNT’s, combined with soot and metal catalysts, form complex morphologies and diverse shapes. The aerosols, examined in this study, were produced using an acoustical generator. Representative samples were collected from an exposure chamber using filters and a cascade impactor for microscopic and gravimetric analyses. Results from filters showed that a density of 0.008–0.10 particles per µm2 filter surface provided adequate samples for particle counting and sizing. Microscopic counting indicated that MWCNT’s, resuspended at a concentration of 10 mg/m3, contained 2.7 × 104 particles/cm3. Each particle structure contained an average of 18 nanotubes, resulting in a total of 4.9 × 105 nanotubes/cm3. In addition, fibrous particles within the aerosol had a count median length of 3.04 µm and a width of 100.3 nm, while the isometric particles had a count median diameter of 0.90 µm. A combination of impactor and microscopic measurements established that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the mixture was 1.5 µm. It was also determined that the mean effective density of well-defined isometric particles was between 0.71 and 0.88 g/cm3, and the mean shape factor of individual nanotubes was between 1.94 and 2.71. The information obtained from this study can be used for designing animal inhalation exposure studies and adopted as guidance for sampling and characterizing MWCNT aerosols in workplaces. The measurement scheme should be relevant for any carbon nanotube aerosol. PMID:23033994

  16. A method for sampling microbial aerosols using high altitude balloons.

    PubMed

    Bryan, N C; Stewart, M; Granger, D; Guzik, T G; Christner, B C

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the challenges posed to microbial aerosol sampling at high altitudes, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and extent of microbial taxa in the Earth-atmosphere system. To directly address this knowledge gap, we designed, constructed, and tested a system that passively samples aerosols during ascent through the atmosphere while tethered to a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. The sampling payload is ~ 2.7 kg and comprised of an electronics box and three sampling chambers (one serving as a procedural control). Each chamber is sealed with retractable doors that can be commanded to open and close at designated altitudes. The payload is deployed together with radio beacons that transmit GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude and altitude) in real time for tracking and recovery. A cut mechanism separates the payload string from the balloon at any desired altitude, returning all equipment safely to the ground on a parachute. When the chambers are opened, aerosol sampling is performed using the Rotorod® collection method (40 rods per chamber), with each rod passing through 0.035 m3 per km of altitude sampled. Based on quality control measurements, the collection of ~ 100 cells rod(-1) provided a 3-sigma confidence level of detection. The payload system described can be mated with any type of balloon platform and provides a tool for characterizing the vertical distribution of microorganisms in the troposphere and stratosphere. PMID:25455021

  17. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  18. The Remote Sensing of Mineral Aerosols and their Impact on Phytoplankton Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tindale, Neil W.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this experiment was to test the iron hypothesis does the addition of iron to nutrient rich surface waters enhance productivity? Our specific objectives in this experiment included sampling and studying the marine aerosol size and type (which are related to chemical reactivity) during the PlumEx cruise to determine the importance of local (Galapagos Islands) versus long-range sources of atmospheric material. Detailed results of single particle analysis of our samples are being prepared for publication in two papers. We collect aerosol samples and they have been analyzed for trace metals and other elements. We are mapped aerosol distribution and the desert source areas around the Arabian Sea region. We did record a clear relationship between the aerosol radiance and synoptic weather patterns with distinct signals over the ocean northwest and southwest of Australia. While the interpretation was limited an aerosol climatology pattern was presented.

  19. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, complementing field and modeling efforts to produce a comprehensive picture of aerosol characteristics. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations. MODIS-derived size parameters are also compared with AERONET retrievals and found to agree well for fine-mode dominated aerosol regimes. Aerosol regimes dominated by dust aerosol are less accurate, attributed to what is thought to be nonsphericity. Errors due to nonsphericity will be reduced by introducing a new set of empirical phase functions, derived without any assumptions of particle shape. The major innovation that MODIS bring to the field of remote sensing of aerosol is the measure of particle size and the separation of finemode and coarsemode dominated aerosol regimes. Particle size can separate finemode man-made aerosols created during combustion, from larger natural aerosols originating from salt spray or wind erosion. This separation allows for the calculation of aerosol radiative effect and the estimation of the man-made aerosol radiative forcing. MODIS can also be used in regional studies of aerosol-cloud interaction that affect the global radiative and hydrological cycles.

  20. Semicontinuous automated measurement of organic carbon in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Rashinkar, Shilpa M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-02-15

    A fully automated measurement system for ambient aerosol organic carbon, capable of unattended operation over extended periods, is described. Particles are collected in a cyclone with water as the collection medium. The collected sample is periodically aspirated by a syringe pump into a holding loop and then delivered to a wet oxidation reactor (WOR). Acid is added, and the WOR is purged to measure dissolved CO(2) or inorganic carbonates (IC) as evolved CO(2). The IC background can often be small and sufficiently constant to be corrected for, without separate measurement, by a blank subtraction. The organic material is now oxidized stepwise or in one step to CO(2). The one-step oxidation involves UV-persulfate treatment in the presence of ozone. This treatment converts organic carbon (OC) to CO(2), but elemental carbon is not oxidized. The CO(2) is continuously purged from solution and collected by two sequential miniature diffusion scrubbers (DSs), a short DS preceding a longer one. Each DS consists of a LiOH-filled porous hydrophobic membrane tube with terminal stainless steel tubes that function as conductance-sensing electrodes. As CO(2) is collected by the LiOH-filled DSs, hydroxide is converted into carbonate and the resulting decrease in conductivity is monitored. The simultaneous use of the dual short and long DS units bearing different concentrations of LiOH permits both good sensitivity and a large dynamic range. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is approximately 140 ng of C. With a typical sampling period of 30 min at a sampling rate of 30 L/min, this corresponds to an LOD of 160 ng/m(3). The approach also provides information on the ease of oxidation of the carbonaceous aerosol and hence the nature of the carbon contained therein. Ambient aerosol organic carbon data are presented. PMID:20092351

  1. Occupational exposure to inhalable and total aerosol in the primary nickel production industry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H; Wahl, G; Maldonado, G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--This paper describes a study that was carried out in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the levels of personal exposure to aerosols containing nickel and the impact on exposure assessment of introducing new personal sampling techniques with performance consistent with the latest particle size-selective criteria. METHODS--Experiments were carried out at workplaces in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works to investigate the effect of changing from the current method of total aerosol (with the widely used 37 mm filter holder) to the new method of measuring inhalable aerosol (with the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler). RESULTS--The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure concentrations--for both overall aerosol and for total nickel--were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol concentrations. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded IOM/37 mm factors ranging from about 1.2 to 4.0. The exposure data for each company process were found to be log-normally distributed. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest the possibility of generating a single pragmatic factor for each company process for converting current total aerosol exposures to new exposures based on the inhalability concept contained in the latest particle size-selective criteria for aerosol exposure assessment. Such data may be important in determining new occupational exposure limits for nickel. PMID:8563841

  2. Detection of Paracoccidioides spp. in environmental aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Thales Domingos; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Da Graça Macoris, Severino Assis; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account that paracoccidioidomycosis infection occurs by inhalation of the asexual conidia produced by Paracoccidioides spp. in its saprobic phase, this work presents the collection of aerosol samples as an option for environmental detection of this pathogen, by positioning a cyclonic air sampler at the entrance of armadillo burrows. Methods included direct culture, extinction technique culture and Nested PCR of the rRNA coding sequence, comprising the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region. In addition, we evaluated one armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) as a positive control for the studied area. Although the pathogen could not be isolated by the culturing strategies, the aerosol sampling associated with molecular detection through Nested PCR proved the best method for discovering Paracoccidioides spp. in the environment. Most of the ITS sequences obtained in this investigation proved to be highly similar with the homologous sequences of Paracoccidioides lutzii from the GenBank database, suggesting that this Paracoccidioides species may not be exclusive to mid-western Brazil as proposed so far. PMID:22762209

  3. A merged aerosol dataset based on MODIS and MISR Aerosol Optical Depth products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manoj K.; Gautam, Ritesh; Venkatachalam, Parvatham

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products available from MODIS and MISR observations are widely used for aerosol characterization, and global/environmental change studies. These products are based on different retrieval-algorithms, resolutions, sampling, and cloud-screening schemes, which have led to global/regional biases. Thus a merged product is desirable which bridges this gap by utilizing strengths from each of the sensors. In view of this, we have developed a "merged" AOD product based on MODIS and MISR AOD datasets, using Bayesian principles which takes error distributions from ground-based AOD measurements (from AERONET). Our methodology and resulting dataset are especially relevant in the scenario of combining multi-sensor retrievals for satellite-based climate data records; particularly for long-term studies involving AOD. Specifically for MISR AOD product, we also developed a methodology to produce a gap-filled dataset, using geostatistical methods (e.g. Kriging), taking advantage of available MODIS data. Merged and spatially-complete AOD datasets are inter-compared with other satellite products and with AERONET data at three stations- Kanpur, Jaipur and Gandhi College, in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. The RMSE of merged AOD (0.08-0.09) is lower than MISR (0.11-0.20) and MODIS (0.15-0.27). It is found that merged AOD has higher correlation with AERONET data (r within 0.92-0.95), compared to MISR (0.74-0.86) and MODIS (0.69-0.84) data. In terms of Expected Error, the accuracy of valid merged AOD is found to be superior as percent of merged AOD within error envelope are larger (71-92%), compared to MISR (43-61%) and MODIS (50-70%).

  4. Susceptibility of stored-product psocids to aerosol insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacies of commercial methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of stored-product psocid pests were evaluated in simulated field studies. The efficacies of methoprene, esfenvalerate EC, the carrier Isopar-M™, and a combination of methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of Li...

  5. NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF INERTIAL ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased sampling of airborne particulate from a flowing stream requires that the size distribution and concentration of aerosol collected be identical to that of the aerosol in the free stream. ampling errors occur during aspiration of the aerosol from the free stream to he face...

  6. Alternatives for Laboratory Measurement of Aerosol Samples from the International Monitoring System of the CTBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, H.; Forrester, J. B.; Greenwood, L. R.; Keillor, M. E.; Eslinger, P. W.; Regmi, R.; Biegalski, S.; Erikson, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol samples taken from the CTBT International Monitoring Systems stations are measured in the field with a minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of ~30 microBq/m3 of Ba-140. This is sufficient to detect far less than 1 kt of aerosol fission products in the atmosphere when the station is in the plume from such an event. Recent thinking about minimizing the potential source region (PSR) from a detection has led to a desire for a multi-station or multi-time period detection. These would be connected through the concept of ';event formation', analogous to event formation in seismic event study. However, to form such events, samples from the nearest neighbors of the detection would require re-analysis with a more sensitive laboratory to gain a substantially lower MDC, and potentially find radionuclide concentrations undetected by the station. The authors will present recent laboratory work with air filters showing various cost effective means for enhancing laboratory sensitivity.

  7. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  8. Development of synthetic GOES-R ABI aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, H.; Huff, A.

    2014-09-01

    An Observing Systems Simulation Experiment (OSSE) for GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) aerosol products has been carried out. The generation of simulated data involves prediction of aerosol chemical composition fields at one-hour resolution and 12 km × 12 km spacing. These data are then fed to a radiative transfer model to simulate the on-orbit radiances that the GOES-R ABI will see in six channels. This allows the ABI aerosol algorithm to be tested to produce products that will be available after launch. In cooperation with a user group of 40+ state and local air quality forecasters, the system has been tested in real-time experiments where the results mimic what the forecasters will see after 2016 when GOES-R launches. Feedback from this group has allowed refinement of the web display system for the ABI aerosol products and has creatively called for new products that were not envisaged by the satellite team.

  9. NASA GES DISC Level 2 Aerosol Analysis and Visualization Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer; Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Yang, Wenli; Johnson, James; Zhao, Peisheng; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Overview of NASA GES DISC Level 2 aerosol analysis and visualization services: DQViz (Data Quality Visualization)MAPSS (Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System), and MAPSS_Explorer (Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System Explorer).

  10. Aerosol Production in a Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, N.; Mielke, L.; Alaghmand, M.; Galloway, M.; Kammrath, A.; Keutsch, F.; Hansen, R.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P.; Carroll, M.; Bertman, S.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are of fundamental concern because of their impacts on air quality, human health and radiative forcing. Recent studies have focused on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production due to oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and more importantly biogenic-VOCs (BVOCs), in particular, isoprene. However, the SOA precursors are not well understood because the mechanisms have shown that isoprene oxidation can contribute to aerosol production through multiple generation oxidation products. For terpenes, it is more likely that primary or secondary oxidation products lead to particle formation. In the present study, we measured the aerosol size distribution, along with O3, HOx, NOx, NOy and BVOCs, in a mixed deciduous forest that is undergoing successional transition to a conifer-dominated species mix. This study was conducted in a rural forest environment in northern Michigan as a part of the summer 2008 PROPHET campaign at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). We examine here the potential BVOC contribution to aerosol formation. A TSI, inc. Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure aerosol number density in the size range, 15 nm < x < 711 nm and a Proton Transfer Reaction - Linear Ion Trap (PTR-LIT) mass spectrometer for quantifying isoprene and other BVOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and total monoterpenes. Preliminary results show periods of new particle production. Here we use a unique set of BVOC, HOx, NOx, NOy, O3 and meteorological data to examine conditions leading to new particle production.

  11. Oxygenated products of sesquiterpenes in secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijck, A.; Kampf, C.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    filter holder and the generated aerosol was collected for 20 hours. In case of β-caryophyllene five different acidic oxidation products were synthesized and these acids were used for quantification. Atmospheric air samples taken during the HUMPPA campaign summer 2010 in Finland were analyzed for sesquiterpene oxygenated products. The major sesquiterpene oxidation products in the ambient air samples were quantified and the correlation with temperature was analyzed. Duhl, T. R., Helmig, D. and Guenther, A. (2008) Biogeosciences 5, 761-777. Henze, D.K., Seinfeld, J.H., Ng, N.L., Kroll, J.H., Fu, T.M., Jacob, D.J. and Heald, C.L. (2008) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 8, 2405-2421. Lee, A., Goldstein, A.H., Kroll, J.H., Ng, N.L., Varutbangkul, V., Flagan, R.C. and Seinfeld, J.H. (2006) Journal of Geophysical Research 111, D17305.

  12. Real-Time Investigation of Tuberculosis Transmission: Developing the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Robin; Morrow, Carl; Barry, Clifton E.; Bryden, Wayne A.; Call, Charles J.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Rodes, Charles E.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Blackburn, Jonathan; Issarow, Chacha; Mulder, Nicola; Woodward, Jeremy; Moosa, Atica; Singh, Vinayak; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the airborne nature of respiratory disease transmission owes much to the pioneering experiments of Wells and Riley over half a century ago. However, the mechanical, physiological, and immunopathological processes which drive the production of infectious aerosols by a diseased host remain poorly understood. Similarly, very little is known about the specific physiological, metabolic and morphological adaptations which enable pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to exit the infected host, survive exposure to the external environment during airborne carriage, and adopt a form that is able to enter the respiratory tract of a new host, avoiding innate immune and physical defenses to establish a nascent infection. As a first step towards addressing these fundamental knowledge gaps which are central to any efforts to interrupt disease transmission, we developed and characterized a small personal clean room comprising an array of sampling devices which enable isolation and representative sampling of airborne particles and organic matter from tuberculosis (TB) patients. The complete unit, termed the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC), is instrumented to provide real-time information about the particulate output of a single patient, and to capture samples via a suite of particulate impingers, impactors and filters. Applying the RASC in a clinical setting, we demonstrate that a combination of molecular and microbiological assays, as well as imaging by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, can be applied to investigate the identity, viability, and morphology of isolated aerosolized particles. Importantly, from a preliminary panel of active TB patients, we observed the real-time production of large numbers of airborne particles including Mtb, as confirmed by microbiological culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping. Moreover, direct imaging of captured samples revealed the presence of multiple rod-like Mtb organisms whose

  13. Real-Time Investigation of Tuberculosis Transmission: Developing the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC).

    PubMed

    Wood, Robin; Morrow, Carl; Barry, Clifton E; Bryden, Wayne A; Call, Charles J; Hickey, Anthony J; Rodes, Charles E; Scriba, Thomas J; Blackburn, Jonathan; Issarow, Chacha; Mulder, Nicola; Woodward, Jeremy; Moosa, Atica; Singh, Vinayak; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the airborne nature of respiratory disease transmission owes much to the pioneering experiments of Wells and Riley over half a century ago. However, the mechanical, physiological, and immunopathological processes which drive the production of infectious aerosols by a diseased host remain poorly understood. Similarly, very little is known about the specific physiological, metabolic and morphological adaptations which enable pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to exit the infected host, survive exposure to the external environment during airborne carriage, and adopt a form that is able to enter the respiratory tract of a new host, avoiding innate immune and physical defenses to establish a nascent infection. As a first step towards addressing these fundamental knowledge gaps which are central to any efforts to interrupt disease transmission, we developed and characterized a small personal clean room comprising an array of sampling devices which enable isolation and representative sampling of airborne particles and organic matter from tuberculosis (TB) patients. The complete unit, termed the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC), is instrumented to provide real-time information about the particulate output of a single patient, and to capture samples via a suite of particulate impingers, impactors and filters. Applying the RASC in a clinical setting, we demonstrate that a combination of molecular and microbiological assays, as well as imaging by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, can be applied to investigate the identity, viability, and morphology of isolated aerosolized particles. Importantly, from a preliminary panel of active TB patients, we observed the real-time production of large numbers of airborne particles including Mtb, as confirmed by microbiological culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping. Moreover, direct imaging of captured samples revealed the presence of multiple rod-like Mtb organisms whose

  14. Silicon production in an aerosol reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.; Alam, M. K.; Johnson, B. E.; Flagan, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    An aerosol reactor for the growth of large silicon particles by silane pyrolysis was shown to demonstrate the following properties: (1) generate seed particles by pyrolysis of a small amount of silane; (2) mix seed aerosol with primary silane flow, limiting number concentration such that the amount of silane is sufficient to grow the desired size of particles from the seed; and (3) react the silane at a rate which is controlled such that the seed particles scavenge the condensible vapors rapidly enough to inhibit further nucleation.

  15. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreiss, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Alves, C.; Bossi, R.; Bjerke, A.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Gülcin, A.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-07-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wild fire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for biomass burning particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography (HPAEC), four used High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), and six resorted to Gas Chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 23%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e., for 33% of

  16. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the

  17. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

  18. Production of Highly Charged Pharmaceutical Aerosols Using a New Aerosol Induction Charger

    PubMed Central

    Golshahi, Laleh; Longest, P. Worth; Holbrook, Landon; Snead, Jessica; Hindle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Properly charged particles can be used for effective lung targeting of pharmaceutical aerosols. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of a new induction charger that operates with a mesh nebulizer for the production of highly charged submicrometer aerosols to bypass the mouth-throat and deliver clinically relevant doses of medications to the lungs. Methods Variables of interest included combinations of model drug (i.e. albuterol sulfate) and charging excipient (NaCl) as well as strength of the charging field (1–5 kV/cm). Aerosol charge and size were measured using a modified electrical low pressure impactor system combined with high performance liquid chromatography. Results At the approximate mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the aerosol (~ 0.4 μm), the induction charge on the particles was an order of magnitude above the field and diffusion charge limit. The nebulization rate was 439.3 ± 42.9 μl/min, which with a 0.1 % w/v solution delivered 419.5 ± 34.2 μg of medication per minute. A new correlation was developed to predict particle charge produced by the induction charger. Conclusions The combination of the aerosol induction charger and predictive correlations will allow for the practical generation and control of charged submicrometer aerosols for targeting deposition within the lungs. PMID:25823649

  19. Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2011-07-19

    The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with

  20. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Barbara J. Gaitley1, Ralph Kahn2, 1Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91109; 818-354-0552; 2NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; e-mail: barbara.gaitley@jpl.nasa.gov As a further step in validating the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol products, an extensive statistical comparison between MISR optical depth and Angstrom exponent and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals has been completed. Angstrom exponent was interpreted in terms of components and mixtures used by the retrieval algorithm. Specific examples illustrating the analysis approach will be shown. Eight years of data from 81 geographically diverse sites having good long-term measurement records were first stratified based on locations where six broad aerosol air mass type categories are likely to occur: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, urban pollution, continental and mixed dust+smoke aerosols. The number of actual coincident measurements was constrained by requiring that the AERONET direct sun aerosol optical depth (AOD) data was obtained within a two-hour window centered on the MISR overpass time. 5156 coincident observations are included in this AOD data set. AERONET direct sun data were averaged over the measurements obtained within this window, and were then interpolated to the MISR characteristic wavelengths to facilitate comparison. All AERONET measurements are Level 2.0, Version 2 data. A previous, systematic comparison of MISR and AERONET aerosol optical depth data [Kahn, Gaitley et al., JGR 110, 2005] identified specific, suggested improvements to the early post-launch MISR Standard Aerosol retrieval algorithms. Most of these suggestions were implemented in the uniformly reprocessed MISR Version 22 aerosol products used in the current study. We documented the performance of the current MISR products based on the comparison statistics. For example, agreement between AERONET and

  1. A New Stratospheric Aerosol Product from CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Vernier, J. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Young, S. A.; Liu, Z.; Lucker, P.; Tackett, J. L.; Omar, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are derived from precursor SO2 and OCS gases transported from the lower troposphere. Volcanic injections can also enhance aerosol loadings far above background levels. The latter can exert a significant influence on the Earth's radiation budget for major and even minor eruptions. Careful measurements are needed, therefore, to monitor the distribution and evolution of stratospheric aerosols for climate related studies. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission has been acquiring profile measurements of clouds and aerosols since 2006, leading to major advances in our understanding of tropospheric aerosol and cloud properties and the processes that control them. The CALIPSO products have also enabled new insights into polar stratospheric clouds and stratospheric aerosols. Vernier et al (2009,JGR,114,D00H10) reported on the construction of a modified CALIPSO lidar product that corrected minor artifacts with the original lidar calibration that affected stratospheric aerosol investigations. A significantly improved CALIPSO Lidar Version 4 Level 1 product has been recently released addressing these calibration issues and has resulted in enhanced signal levels and a highly stable record over the span of the mission. Based on this product, a new 3D gridded stratospheric CALIPSO data product is under development and being targeted for release in 2015. A key emphasis of this new product is to bridge the measurement gap between the SAGE II and SAGE III data record (1984-2005) and the start of measurements from the new SAGE III instrument to be deployed on the International Space Station in 2016. The primary parameters delivered in the CALIPSO stratospheric data products will be attenuated scattering ratio and aerosol extinction profiles, both averaged over one month intervals and binned into an equal angle grid of constant latitude and longitude with a vertical resolution of 900m. We will present the overall

  2. Aerosol Sample Inhomogeneity with Debris from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Reynaido; Biegalski, Steven R.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2014-09-01

    Radionuclide aerosol sampling is a vital component in the detection of nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and other radiation releases. This was proven by the detection and tracking of emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi incident across the globe by IMS stations. Two separate aerosol samplers were operated in Richland, WA following the event and debris from the accident were measured at levels well above detection limits. While the atmospheric activity concentration of radionuclides generally compared well between the two stations, they did not agree within uncertainties. This paper includes a detailed study of the aerosol sample homogeneity of 134Cs and 137Cs, then relates it to the overall uncertainty of the original measurement. Our results show that sample inhomogeneity adds an additional 5–10% uncertainty to each aerosol measurement and that this uncertainty is in the same range as the discrepancies between the two aerosol sample measurements from Richland, WA.

  3. Susceptibility of Stored-Product Psocids to Aerosol Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Opit, George P.; Arthur, Frank H.; Throne, James E.; Payton, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of commercial methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of stored-product psocid pests were evaluated in simulated field studies. The efficacies of methoprene, esfenvalerate EC, the carrier Isopar-M™, and a combination of methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of Liposcelis decolor (Pearman) (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) and Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) nymphs were assessed, and the effects of direct and indirect exposure of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel, L. decolor, and Liposcelis paeta Pearman adults to esfenvalerate EC aerosol were evaluated. The greatest nymphal mortality attained was 76%, indicating that the four aerosols tested were ineffective against L. decolor and L. entomophila nymphs. In the direct and indirect exposure studies, the greatest adult mortalities attained for the three psocid species were 62 and 32%, respectively. Based on these data, esfenvalerate aerosol is ineffective for control of L. bostrychophila, L. decolor, L. entomophila, and L. paeta psocid species. This study shows that methoprene, esfenvalerate EC, and a combination of methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols were ineffective against the four psocid species tested when applied at rates that are usually effective against other stored-product insect pests. PMID:23463916

  4. Susceptibility of stored-product psocids to aerosol insecticides.

    PubMed

    Opit, George P; Arthur, Frank H; Throne, James E; Payton, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of commercial methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of stored-product psocid pests were evaluated in simulated field studies. The efficacies of methoprene, esfenvalerate EC, the carrier Isopar-M™, and a combination of methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols for control of Liposcelis decolor (Pearman) (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) and Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) nymphs were assessed, and the effects of direct and indirect exposure of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel, L. decolor, and Liposcelis paeta Pearman adults to esfenvalerate EC aerosol were evaluated. The greatest nymphal mortality attained was 76%, indicating that the four aerosols tested were ineffective against L. decolor and L. entomophila nymphs. In the direct and indirect exposure studies, the greatest adult mortalities attained for the three psocid species were 62 and 32%, respectively. Based on these data, esfenvalerate aerosol is ineffective for control of L. bostrychophila, L. decolor, L. entomophila, and L. paeta psocid species. This study shows that methoprene, esfenvalerate EC, and a combination of methoprene and esfenvalerate aerosols were ineffective against the four psocid species tested when applied at rates that are usually effective against other stored-product insect pests. PMID:23463916

  5. Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties from the 1 Km Resolution MODIS Ocean Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study examines aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds by analyzing high-resolution atmospheric correction parameters provided in the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) ocean color product. The study analyzes data from a 2 week long period of September in 10 years, covering a large area in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that on the one hand, the Quality Assessment (QA) flags of the ocean color product successfully eliminate cloud-related uncertainties in ocean parameters such as chlorophyll content, but on the other hand, using the flags introduces a sampling bias in atmospheric products such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Angstrom exponent. Therefore, researchers need to select QA flags by balancing the risks of increased retrieval uncertainties and sampling biases. Using an optimal set of QA flags, the results reveal substantial increases in optical thickness near clouds-on average the increase is 50% for the roughly half of pixels within 5 km from clouds and is accompanied by a roughly matching increase in particle size. Theoretical simulations show that the 50% increase in 550nm AOT changes instantaneous direct aerosol radiative forcing by up to 8W/m2 and that the radiative impact is significantly larger if observed near-cloud changes are attributed to aerosol particles as opposed to undetected cloud particles. These results underline that accounting for near-cloud areas and understanding the causes of near-cloud particle changes are critical for accurate calculations of direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  6. Ion balances of size-resolved tropospheric aerosol samples: implications for the acidity and atmospheric processing of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Hillamo, Risto; Teinilä, Kimmo; Pakkanen, Tuomo; Allegrini, Ivo; Sparapani, Roberto

    A large set of size-resolved aerosol samples was inspected with regard to their ion balance to shed light on how the aerosol acidity changes with particle size in the lower troposphere and what implications this might have for the atmospheric processing of aerosols. Quite different behaviour between the remote and more polluted environments could be observed. At the remote sites, practically the whole accumulation mode had cation-to-anion ratios clearly below unity, indicating that these particles were quite acidic. The supermicron size range was considerably less acidic and may in some cases have been close to neutral or even alkaline. An interesting feature common to the remote sites was a clear jump in the cation-to-anion ratio when going from the accumulation to the Aitken mode. The most likely reason for this was cloud processing which, via in-cloud sulphate production, makes the smallest accumulation-mode particles more acidic than the non-activated Aitken-mode particles. A direct consequence of the less acidic nature of the Aitken mode is that it can take up semi-volatile, water-soluble gases much easier than the accumulation mode. This feature may have significant implications for atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei production in remote environments. In rural and urban locations, the cation-to-anion ratio was close to unity over most of the accumulation mode, but increased significantly when going to either larger or smaller particle sizes. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the supermicron size range were ascribed to carbonate associated with mineral dust. The ubiquitous presence of carbonate in these particles indicates that they were neutral or alkaline, making them good sites for heterogeneous reactions involving acidic trace gases. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the Aitken mode suggest that these particles contained some water-soluble anions not detected by our chemical analysis. This is worth keeping in mind when investigating the hygroscopic

  7. Aerosol Production from Charbroiled and Wet-Fried Meats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Blanc, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Previous work in our laboratory focused on the chemical and optical characterization of aerosols produced during the dry-frying of different meat samples. This method yielded a complex ensemble of particles composed of water and long-chain fatty acids with the latter dominated by oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids. The present study examines how wet-frying and charbroiling cooking methods affect the physical and chemical properties of their derived aerosols. Samples of ground beef, salmon, chicken, and pork were subject to both cooking methods in the laboratory, with their respective aerosols swept into a laminar flow cell where they were optically analyzed in the mid-infrared and collected through a gas chromatography probe for chemical characterization. This presentation will compare and contrast the nature of the aerosols generated in each cooking method, particularly those produced during charbroiling which exposes the samples, and their drippings, to significantly higher temperatures. Characterization of such cooking-related aerosols is important because of the potential impact of these particles on air quality, particularly in urban areas.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN RH -DENUDED MIE ACTIVE SAMPLING SYSTEM AND TARGETED AEROSOL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MIE pDR 1200 nephelometer provides time resolved aerosol concentrations during personal and fixed-site sampling. Active (pumped) operation allows defining an upper PM2.5 particle size, however, this dramatically increases the aerosol mass passing through the phot...

  9. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected aboard the FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ~ 150 km off the coast of California over a period of ~ 4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward-scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back-trajectory analysis of eastern North Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperature were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  10. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected on-board FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ∼150 km off the coast of California over a period of ∼4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back trajectory analysis of Northeast Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperatures were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  11. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10–90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties accurately. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in quantification of aerosol effects and prediction of future climate change. Evaluation and development of aerosol models require data products generated from field observations. Real-time, quantitative data acquired with aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) (Canagaratna et al. 2007) are critical to this need. The AMS determines size-resolved concentrations of non-refractory (NR) species in submicrometer particles (PM1) with fast time resolution suitable for both ground-based and aircraft deployments. The high-resolution AMS (HR-AMS), which is equipped with a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer, can be used to determine the elemental composition and oxidation degrees of OA (DeCarlo et al. 2006).

  12. Analysis of reversibility and reaction products of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W.; Surratt, J. D.; Kwan, A. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2009-04-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl, is an oxidation product of both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (Fu et al. JGR 113, D15303, 2008). Despite its low molecular weight, its role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has gained interest and a recent study suggested that it accounts for more than 15% of SOA in Mexico City (Volkamer et al. GRL 34, L19807, 2007). Despite numerous previous studies, questions remain regarding the processes controlling glyoxal uptake onto aerosol, including the role of acid catalysis, degree of reversibility, and identity of aerosol phase reaction products. We present results of chamber aerosol studies (Galloway et al. ACPD 8, 20799, 2008) and laboratory studies of bulk samples aimed at improving the understanding of these processes, in particular formation of oligomers and organosulfates of glyoxal, as well as the formation of imidazoles (carbon-nitrogen containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds) under dark and irradiated conditions. The relevance of these classes of reaction products extends beyond glyoxal, as evidence of oligomers and organosulfates other than those of glyoxal have been found in ambient aerosol (Surratt et al. JPCA 112, 8345, 2008; Denkenberger et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41, 5439, 2007). Experiments in which a chamber air mass was diluted after equilibration of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate seed aerosol (relative humidity 60% and glyoxal mixing ratios of 25-200 ppbv) shows that under these conditions uptake is reversible. The most important condensed phase products are hydrated oligomers of glyoxal, which are also formed reversibly under these conditions. Our studies show that organosulfates were not formed under dark conditions for neutral or acidified aerosol; similarly, Minerath et al. have recently shown that formation of a different class of organosulfates (alkyl sulfates) also proceeds very slowly even under acidic conditions (Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 4410, 2008). The

  13. Bioaerosol sampling for the detection of aerosolized influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Blachere, Francoise M.; Lindsley, William G.; Slaven, James E.; Green, Brett J.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Chen, Bean T.; Beezhold, Don H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Influenza virus was used to characterize the efficacy of a cyclone‐based, two‐stage personal bioaerosol sampler for the collection and size fractionation of aerosolized viral particles. Methods A Collison single‐jet nebulizer was used to aerosolize the attenuated FluMist® vaccine into a calm‐air settling chamber. Viral particles were captured with bioaerosol samplers that utilize 2 microcentrifuge tubes to collect airborne particulates. The first tube (T1) collects particles greater than 1.8 μm in diameter, while the second tube (T2) collects particles between 1.0 and 1.8 μm, and the back‐up filter (F) collects submicron particles. Following aerosolization, quantitative PCR was used to detect and quantify H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains. Results Based on qPCR results, we demonstrate that aerosolized viral particles were efficiently collected and separated according to aerodynamic size using the two‐stage bioaerosol sampler. Most viral particles were collected in T2 (1‐1.8 μm) and on the back‐up filter (< 1 μm) of the bioaerosol sampler. Furthermore, we found that the detection of viral particles with the two‐stage sampler was directly proportional to the collection time. Consequently, viral particle counts were significantly greater at 40 minutes in comparison to 5, 10 and 20 minute aerosol collection points. Conclusions Due to a lack of empirical data, aerosol transmission of influenza is often questioned. Using FluMist®, we demonstrated that a newly developed bioaerosol sampler is able to recover and size fractionate aerosolized viral particles. This sampler should be an important tool for studying viral transmission in clinical settings and may significantly contribute towards understanding the modes of influenza virus transmission. PMID:19453416

  14. Current Status of Suomi NPP VIIRS Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Liu, H.; Zhang, H.; Huang, J.; Remer, L. A.; Ciren, P.; Huang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched on October 28, 2011. It provides Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at two different spatial resolutions: a pixel level (~750 m at nadir) product called the Intermediate Product (IP) and an aggregated (~6 km at nadir) product called the Environmental Data Record (EDR). The VIIRS AOT is expected to provide continuity to the 10-km Aqua and Terra MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOT products that the air quality and public health community has been using. The VIIRS aerosol product suite also includes less mature products such as Suspended Matter (SM) and Aerosol Particle Size Parameter (APSP). An extensive validation of VIIRS best quality aerosol products with ground based L1.5 AERONET data shows that the AOT EDR product has an accuracy/precision of -0.01/0.11 and 0.01/0.08 over land and ocean respectively. Globally, VIIRS mean AOT EDR (0.20) is similar to Aqua MODIS (0.16) with some important regional and seasonal differences. Analysis of SM shows that the algorithm predominantly picks smoke both over land and ocean which is not in agreement with retrievals from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Space Observations (CALIPSO). Similarly, the Angstrom Exponent (AE) retrieval used as a proxy for particle size has no skill over land and only a marginal skill over ocean when compared to AERONET; although a bias of ~0.2 for over ocean retrievals meets specification (0.3), the correlation is low and the standard deviation is ~0.6 and does not meet specification (0.3). This evaluation places the VIIRS AOT product at the provisional maturity level (product is validated, may contain some errors, and ready for operational evaluation). However, several algorithm updates which include a better approach to retrieve surface reflectance are forthcoming. Current status of the aerosol

  15. PRODUCTION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FROM MULTIPHASE TERPENE PHOTOOXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involves a field and laboratory study of the production of aerosol from the atmospheric photooxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), specifically the terpenes α- and β-pinene, using a unique combination of approaches that rely on produ...

  16. Towards an improved aerosol product from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John; Hommel, Rene

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite from August 2002 to April 2012. A progress in the development of SCIAMACHY aerosol data product within the ROSA/ROMIC project including the improvements in the extinction coefficient data base and steps towards the retrieval of particle size distribution parameters is reported.

  17. Markers of heterogeneous reaction products in α-pinene ozone secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoschke, Nadine M.; Jang, Myoseon

    A gas chromatograph iontrap mass spectrometer (GC-ITMS) was used to analyze the gas-and particle-phase products of α-pinene ozone oxidation in the presence of three different inorganic seed aerosols: sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate only, and ammonium sulfate with sulfuric acid. Products of α-pinene ozone oxidation common to the literature showed little difference in gas or particle-phase concentrations between seed types within the precision of the measurements even though significantly different aerosol yields were found between seed types. Small amounts of ring-opening products of four-membered cyclic oxygenates and markers of aldol condensation products were tentatively identified in the particle-phase for all seed types. These tentatively identified products are thought to be the result of acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions in the particle-phase or during sampling processes or analysis. The mechanisms for their formation are also proposed in this study.

  18. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol. PMID:19204482

  19. Biochemical Controls on the Production and Composition of Primary Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Frossard, A. A.; Long, M. S.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Tyssebotn, I. M.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Nascent marine aerosols were produced by bursting bubbles from both flowing and fixed volumes of fresh surface seawater under controlled conditions in a high-capacity shipboard generator deployed in the eastern North Pacific Ocean during CalNex and in the western North Atlantic Ocean during the Western Atlantic Climate Study (WACS). Seawater conditions ranged from highly productive (chl a = 12 μg L-1) to oligotrophic (chl a = 0.03 μg L-1). Aerosols were also produced from fresh flowing seawater sampled at 2500 m depth (chl a = 0.00 μg L-1). Bubble sizes, bubble surface tension, and size-resolved aerosol chemical compositions and number production fluxes were quantified. Number fluxes were dominated by particles less than100-nm dry diameter that were composed primarily of organic matter (OM). Production fluxes of particulate OM corresponded to <0.01% of dissolved OM (DOC) in flowing seawater. Aerosol number fluxes from flowing productive waters were greater by factors of 2 to 3 compared to oligotrophic waters but corresponding organic enrichments (EFocs) relative to seawater were similar. Bubble scavenging from fixed-volume reservoirs of productive waters rapidly depleted dominant but small surfactants pools leading to lower bubble surface tensions and number production fluxes that converged to those for oligotrophic waters. Bubble scavenging from fixed-volume oligotrophic waters had no influence on aerosol fluxes suggesting the presence of a large background pool of surfactants. Number production fluxes and EFocs from flowing deep seawater were within the ranges of those from surface waters indicating that significant particulate OM is produced by bursting bubbles at the ocean surface in the absence of recent biological activity. Taken together, these results suggest that surfactant material associated with the large pool of recalcitrant DOC in surface seawater contributes to particulate OM in marine air.

  20. ESTIMATION OF DIFFUSION LOSSES WHEN SAMPLING DIESEL AEROSOL: A QUALITY ASSURANCE MEASURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fundamental component of the QA work for the assessment of instruments and sampling system performance was the investigation of particle losses in sampling lines. Along the aerosol sample pathway from its source to the collection media or measuring instrument, some nano-size p...

  1. Application of flow cytometry and cell sorting to the bacterial analysis of environmental aerosol samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow cytometry (FCM) combined with viability staining is a useful tool in discerning viable bacteria in environmental samples where traditional culture methods may fail. Contamination of aerosol samples with dust and other non-biological particles can interfere with accurate sample analysis and ther...

  2. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol... in cosmetics and/or cosmetics that are also drugs, as, for example, aerosol antiperspirants....

  3. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    The twin Moderate Imaging resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an incredible dataset of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there is significant impact on the products and their interpretation. The C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties (1) over ocean (dark in visible and near-IR wavelengths), (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible) and (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on the changes to both "dark target" algorithms (#1 and #2; DT-ocean and DT-land). Affecting both DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, and relaxed the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.01) over land, along with some changes in spatial coverage. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6 DT-products should compare at least as well as those from C5. However, at the same time as we

  4. The Collection 6 'dark-target' MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Patadia, Falguni; Gupta, Pawan; Remer, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms are applied to Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on both Terra and Aqua, creating two streams of decade-plus aerosol information. Products of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size are used for many applications, but the primary concern is that these global products are comprehensive and consistent enough for use in climate studies. One of our major customers is the international modeling comparison study known as AEROCOM, which relies on the MODIS data as a benchmark. In order to keep up with the needs of AEROCOM and other MODIS data users, while utilizing new science and tools, we have improved the algorithms and products. The code, and the associated products, will be known as Collection 6 (C6). While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. In its entirety, the C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties over different surfaces: These include the dark-target DT algorithms to retrieve over (1) ocean and (2) vegetated-dark-soiled land, plus the (3) Deep Blue (DB) algorithm, originally developed to retrieve over desert-arid land. Focusing on the two DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to 84) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such as topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and

  5. An investigation of a potential low bias in the MODIS aerosol products over Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, T. M.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Campbell, J. R.; Hsu, N. Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Heavy aerosol plumes can be misidentified as clouds in passive satellite-based aerosol retrievals due to their relatively high visible reflectivity. Thus, over regions such as China, where a higher frequency of heavy aerosol plumes is expected, regional aerosol optical depth analyses reported from passive satellite-based aerosol products may biased low. This fundamental error can be suppressed under certain conditions. In this study, with a synergistic use of satellite observations from MODIS, OMI and CALIOP, a low bias in the MODIS Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) aerosol products is studied over Asia for the influence of dense aerosol plume undersampling. A new scheme has been developed for detecting heavy aerosol plumes by coupling OMI aerosol index retrievals with available CALIOP level 1B and cloud and aerosol profile data. Collocated CALIOP, MODIS and OMI data are then used to further investigate the potential low bias in the MODIS DT and DB aerosol products, in an attempt to quantify the measure of undersampling in the regional DT and DB archive. Our preliminary results show that DT and DB aerosol algorithms detect about half heavy aerosol loading when CALIPSO and OMI AI believe there are heavy absorbing aerosols.

  6. Aqueous photooxidation of ambient Po Valley Italy air samples: Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Sullivan, A. P.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.; Collett, J. L.; Keutsch, F. N.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we conducted aqueous photooxidation experiments with ambient samples in order to develop insights concerning the formation of secondary organic aerosol through gas followed by aqueous chemistry (SOAaq). Water-soluble organics (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone) are formed through gas phase oxidation of alkene and aromatic emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. Their further oxidation in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols can form lower volatility products (e.g., oligomers, organic acids) that remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, thus producing SOA. The aqueous OH radical oxidation of several individual potentially important precursors has been studied in the laboratory. In this work, we used a mist-chamber apparatus to collect atmospheric mixtures of water-soluble gases from the ambient air at San Pietro Capofiume, Italy during the PEGASOS field campaign. We measured the concentration dynamics after addition of OH radicals, in order to develop new insights regarding formation of SOA through aqueous chemistry. Specifically, batch aqueous reactions were conducted with 33 ml mist-chamber samples (TOC ~ 50-100μM) and OH radicals (~10-12M) in a new low-volume aqueous reaction vessel. OH radicals were formed in-situ, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS +/-), and ESI-MS with IC pre-separation (IC/ESI-MS-). Reproducible formation of pyruvate and oxalate were observed both by IC and ESI-MS. These compounds are known to form from aldehyde oxidation in the aqueous phase. New insights regarding the aqueous chemistry of these "more atmospherically-realistic" experiments will be discussed.

  7. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Patadia, F.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-11-01

    The twin Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an extensive data set of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. The C6 aerosol data set will be created from three separate retrieval algorithms that operate over different surface types. These are the two "Dark Target" (DT) algorithms for retrieving (1) over ocean (dark in visible and longer wavelengths) and (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible), plus the "Deep Blue" (DB) algorithm developed originally for retrieving (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on DT-ocean and DT-land (#1 and #2). We have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase poleward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence on the surface reflectance, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time, we quantified how "upstream" changes to instrument calibration, land/sea masking and cloud masking will also impact the statistics of global AOD, and affect Terra and Aqua differently. For Aqua, all changes will result in reduced

  8. Comparison between CARIBIC Aerosol Samples Analysed by Accelerator-Based Methods and Optical Particle Counter Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-08-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on a Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with the following accelerator-based methods: particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during 1 year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  9. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-04-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  10. X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION SYSTEM FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF PARTICULATE AEROSOL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An x-ray powder diffraction system has been developed for the automated measurement and analysis of particulate aerosol samples. The system is optimized to process samples with particle loadings of about 100 micrograms/sq cm which are acquired with dichotomous air samplers. A pos...

  11. What is the "Clim-Likely" aerosol product?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    The "Clim-Likely" aerosol climatology data set was developed as an initial step in identifying a range of ... mixtures for the MISR Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm climatology, and as one standard against which to compare MISR aerosol air mass ...

  12. On the validity of the Poisson assumption in sampling nanometer-sized aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Damit, Brian E; Wu, Dr. Chang-Yu; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2014-01-01

    A Poisson process is traditionally believed to apply to the sampling of aerosols. For a constant aerosol concentration, it is assumed that a Poisson process describes the fluctuation in the measured concentration because aerosols are stochastically distributed in space. Recent studies, however, have shown that sampling of micrometer-sized aerosols has non-Poissonian behavior with positive correlations. The validity of the Poisson assumption for nanometer-sized aerosols has not been examined and thus was tested in this study. Its validity was tested for four particle sizes - 10 nm, 25 nm, 50 nm and 100 nm - by sampling from indoor air with a DMA- CPC setup to obtain a time series of particle counts. Five metrics were calculated from the data: pair-correlation function (PCF), time-averaged PCF, coefficient of variation, probability of measuring a concentration at least 25% greater than average, and posterior distributions from Bayesian inference. To identify departures from Poissonian behavior, these metrics were also calculated for 1,000 computer-generated Poisson time series with the same mean as the experimental data. For nearly all comparisons, the experimental data fell within the range of 80% of the Poisson-simulation values. Essentially, the metrics for the experimental data were indistinguishable from a simulated Poisson process. The greater influence of Brownian motion for nanometer-sized aerosols may explain the Poissonian behavior observed for smaller aerosols. Although the Poisson assumption was found to be valid in this study, it must be carefully applied as the results here do not definitively prove applicability in all sampling situations.

  13. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Garay, Michael J.; Diner, David J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical approach is used to assess the quality of the MISR Version 22 (V22) aerosol products. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval results are improved relative to the early post- launch values reported by Kahn et al. [2005a], varying with particle type category. Overall, about 70% to 75% of MISR AOD retrievals fall within 0.05 or 20% AOD of the paired validation data, and about 50% to 55% are within 0.03 or 10% AOD, except at sites where dust, or mixed dust and smoke, are commonly found. Retrieved particle microphysical properties amount to categorical values, such as three groupings in size: "small," "medium," and "large." For particle size, ground-based AERONET sun photometer Angstrom Exponents are used to assess statistically the corresponding MISR values, which are interpreted in terms of retrieved size categories. Coincident Single-Scattering Albedo (SSA) and fraction AOD spherical data are too limited for statistical validation. V22 distinguishes two or three size bins, depending on aerosol type, and about two bins in SSA (absorbing vs. non-absorbing), as well as spherical vs. non-spherical particles, under good retrieval conditions. Particle type sensitivity varies considerably with conditions, and is diminished for mid-visible AOD below about 0.15 or 0.2. Based on these results, specific algorithm upgrades are proposed, and are being investigated by the MISR team for possible implementation in future versions of the product.

  14. Monoterpene oxidation products and organosulfates in aerosols during BEARPEX 2007 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, Marianne; Kristensen, Kasper; Worton, David R.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2010-05-01

    Organosulfate esters of oxidation products of monoterpenes and isoprene have been identified in aerosols from both laboratory and field studies. While the exact route of formation of organosulfates is still ambiguous, these compounds pose an interesting coupling between anthropogenic emissions and biogenic oxidation products in secondary organic aerosols (SOA). We present measurements of monoterpene oxidation products, organosulfates and nitroxy organosulfates in aerosols collected during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in California during late summer 2007 and summer 2009. The study site was located in a Ponderosa pine plantation affected by regional transport of air pollutants. Particles (PM2.5) were collected as one night-time and two daytime samples per day using a high volume sampler. After extraction of filters, polar organic compounds were analysed by HPLC coupled through an electrospray inlet to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (qTOF-MS). Standards of adipic, cis-pinic and pinonic acids were used for quantification, while camphor sulphonic acid was used as a surrogate standard for organosulfate compounds. Organosulfate esters can be identified from their MS-fragments (HSO4- and SO3-) and the isotopic pattern of sulphur. Concentrations of adipic acid and the terpene oxidation products cis-pinic acid and pinonic acid (from α- and β-pinene) were quantified. The relative concentrations between samples of terpenylic acid, diterpenylic acid and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid were also investigated. Organosulfate esters and nitroxy organosulfate esters of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene and isoprene, as well as their oxidation products, were identified based on their molecular mass and fragmentation patterns. Concentrations of some nitroxy organosulfate esters generally increased during night compared to day-time. Their formation thus seems to be related to reactions involving nitrate radicals at night-time.

  15. Classification of Dust Days by Satellite Remotely Sensed Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorek-Hammer, M.; Cohen, A.; Levy, Robert C.; Ziv, B.; Broday, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress in satellite remote sensing (SRS) of dust particles has been seen in the last decade. From an environmental health perspective, such an event detection, after linking it to ground particulate matter (PM) concentrations, can proxy acute exposure to respirable particles of certain properties (i.e. size, composition, and toxicity). Being affected considerably by atmospheric dust, previous studies in the Eastern Mediterranean, and in Israel in particular, have focused on mechanistic and synoptic prediction, classification, and characterization of dust events. In particular, a scheme for identifying dust days (DD) in Israel based on ground PM10 (particulate matter of size smaller than 10 nm) measurements has been suggested, which has been validated by compositional analysis. This scheme requires information regarding ground PM10 levels, which is naturally limited in places with sparse ground-monitoring coverage. In such cases, SRS may be an efficient and cost-effective alternative to ground measurements. This work demonstrates a new model for identifying DD and non-DD (NDD) over Israel based on an integration of aerosol products from different satellite platforms (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Analysis of ground-monitoring data from 2007 to 2008 in southern Israel revealed 67 DD, with more than 88 percent occurring during winter and spring. A Classification and Regression Tree (CART) model that was applied to a database containing ground monitoring (the dependent variable) and SRS aerosol product (the independent variables) records revealed an optimal set of binary variables for the identification of DD. These variables are combinations of the following primary variables: the calendar month, ground-level relative humidity (RH), the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS, and the aerosol absorbing index (AAI) from OMI. A logistic regression that uses these variables, coded as binary

  16. Light-enhanced primary marine aerosol production from biologically productive seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in seawater controlling primary marine aerosol (PMA) production and composition are poorly understood and associated with large uncertainties in estimated fluxes into the atmosphere. PMA production was investigated in the biologically productive NE Pacific Ocean and in biologically productive and oligotrophic regions of the NW Atlantic Ocean. Physicochemical properties of model PMA, produced by aeration of fresh seawater under controlled conditions, were quantified. Diel variability in model PMA mass and number fluxes was observed in biologically productive waters, increasing following sunrise and decreasing to predawn levels overnight. Such variability was not seen in oligotrophic waters. During daytime, surfactant scavenging by aeration in the aerosol generator without replenishing the seawater in the reservoir reduced the model PMA production in productive waters to nighttime levels but had no influence on production from oligotrophic waters. Results suggest bubble plume interactions with sunlight-mediated biogenic surfactants in productive seawater significantly enhanced model PMA production.

  17. Aerosol sampling from stacks and ducts at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, A.R.; Anand, N.K.; Ortiz, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    While the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, CO is being decommissioned; there is air flow through the ventilation systems in the buildings. Although the air is HEPA filtered, under the requirements of both the U.S. EPA and the U.S. DOE, several of the stacks and ducts must be continuously monitored for radionuclide aerosol particles, where plutonium is the principal radionuclide of concern. The air sampling effort for compliance with EPA requirements is focussed on the acquisition of representative aerosol samples, which are collected on filters and subsequently analyzed in a laboratory. The goal of the DOE sampling is to acquire representative samples that can be analyzed with near-real-time monitors for alarming purposes, where the alarms are used to warn workers that may be affected by elevated concentrations of radionuclides. The air sampling at RFP is based on single point representative sampling with a shrouded probe. For stacks and ducts that are under the cognizance of EPA, the approach is embodied in a set of Alternate Reference Methodologies that EPA has approved for use at DOE facilities. Shrouded probes were designed based on numerical predictions of performance and the efficacy of the probes was verified by wind tunnel tests. Aerosol transport lines were designed using a code, DEPOSITION that provides optimization of aerosol penetration. Adequacy of a location for single point sampling was based on numerical criteria for mixing of both contaminant mass and fluid momentum as manifested by the uniformity of the velocity profile and the profiles of tracer gas and aerosol particles. Scale models were constructed of key ducts and these were tested in the laboratory to determine the proper locations. For ducts and stacks that fall under DOE, but not EPA requirements, similar methodology was used; however, the single point sampling location is based on alarming considerations.

  18. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for direct analysis of aerosol particle samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Benedetti, D; Borgese, L; Colombi, P; Stosnach, H; Finzi, G; Apostoli, P; Buttini, P; Depero, L E

    2010-04-14

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a great impact on the environment and on human health. Routine analysis of the particles usually involves only the mass determination. However, chemical composition and phases provide fundamental information about the particles' origins and can help to prevent health risks. For example, these particles may contain heavy metals such as Pb, Ni and Cd, which can adversely affect human health. In this work, filter samples were collected in Brescia, an industrial town located in Northern Italy. In order to identify the chemical composition and the phases of the atmospheric aerosols, the samples were analysed by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry with a laboratory instrument and X-ray microdiffraction at Synchrotron Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington (Cheshire, UK). The results are discussed and correlated to identify possible pollution sources. The novelty of this analytical approach is that filter samples for TXRF were analysed directly and did not require chemical pretreatment to leach elements from the aerosol particulates. The results of this study clearly show that TXRF is a powerful technique for the analysis of atmospheric aerosols on 'as-received' filters, thereby leaving samples intact and unaltered for possible subsequent analyses by other methods. In addition, the low detection limits for many elements (low ng/cm2) indicate that this method may hold promise in various application fields, such as nanotechnology. PMID:20480822

  19. Kinetics, products, and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources are oxidized by reactions with OH radicals, O(3), NO(3) radicals, or Cl atoms to form less volatile products that subsequently partition into aerosol particles. Once in particles, these organic compounds can undergo heterogenous/multiphase reactions to form more highly oxidized or oligomeric products. SOA comprises a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol mass and can have significant effects on atmospheric chemistry, visibility, human health, and climate. Previous articles have reviewed the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of atmospheric VOC reactions and the general chemistry and physics involved in SOA formation. In this article we present a detailed review of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase chemistry as they apply to SOA formation, with a focus on the effects of VOC molecular structure on the kinetics of initial reactions with the major atmospheric oxidants, the subsequent reactions of alkyl, alkyl peroxy, and alkoxy radical intermediates, and the composition of the resulting products. Structural features of reactants and products discussed include compound carbon number; linear, branched, and cyclic configurations; the presence of C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bonds and aromatic rings; and functional groups such as carbonyl, hydroxyl, ester, hydroxperoxy, carboxyl, peroxycarboxyl, nitrate, and peroxynitrate. The intention of this review is to provide atmospheric chemists with sufficient information to understand the dominant pathways by which the major classes of atmospheric VOCs react to form SOA products, and the further reactions of these products in particles. This will allow reasonable predictions to be made, based on molecular structure, about the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase reactions, including the effects of important variables such as VOC, oxidant, and NO

  20. Comparison of organic compositions in dust storm and normal aerosol samples collected at Gosan, Jeju Island, during spring 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Lee, Meehye

    To better understand the current physical and chemical properties of East Asian aerosols, an intensive observation of atmospheric particles was conducted at Gosan site, Jeju Island, South Korea during 2005 spring. Total suspended particle (TSP) samples were collected using pre-combusted quartz filters and a high-volume air sampler with the time intervals ranging from 3 h to 48 h. The kinds and amount of various organic compounds were measured in the samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the 99 target compounds detected, saccharides (average, 130 ± 14 ng m -3), fatty acids (73 ± 7 ng m -3), alcohols (41 ± 4 ng m -3), n-alkanes (32 ± 3 ng m -3), and phthalates (21 ± 2 ng m -3) were found to be major compound classes with polyols/polyacids, lignin and resin products, PAHs, sterols and aromatic acids being minor. Compared to the previous results reported for 2001 late spring samples, no significant changes were found in the levels of their concentrations and compositions for 4 years, although the economy in East Asia, especially in China, has sharply expanded from 2001 to 2005. During the campaign at Gosan site, we encountered two distinct dust storm episodes with high TSP concentrations. The first dust event occurred on March 28, which was characterized by a predominance of secondary organic aerosols. The second event that occurred on the next day (March 29) was found to be characterized by primary organic aerosols associated with forest fires in Siberia/northeastern China. A significant variation in the molecular compositions, which was found within a day, suggests that the compositions of East Asian aerosols are heterogeneous due to multi-contributions from different source regions together with different pathways of long-range atmospheric transport of particles.

  1. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an...

  2. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an...

  3. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an...

  4. Metagenomic Detection of Viruses in Aerosol Samples from Workers in Animal Slaughterhouses

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard J.; Leblanc-Maridor, Mily; Wang, Jing; Ren, Xiaoyun; Moore, Nicole E.; Brooks, Collin R.; Peacey, Matthew; Douwes, Jeroen; McLean, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Published studies have shown that workers in animal slaughterhouses are at a higher risk of lung cancers as compared to the general population. No specific causal agents have been identified, and exposures to several chemicals have been examined and found to be unrelated. Evidence suggests a biological aetiology as the risk is highest for workers who are exposed to live animals or to biological material containing animal faeces, urine or blood. To investigate possible biological exposures in animal slaughterhouses, we used a metagenomic approach to characterise the profile of organisms present within an aerosol sample. An assessment of aerosol exposures for individual workers was achieved by the collection of personal samples that represent the inhalable fraction of dust/bioaerosol in workplace air in both cattle and sheep slaughterhouses. Two sets of nine personal aerosol samples were pooled for the cattle processing and sheep processing areas respectively, with a total of 332,677,346 sequence reads and 250,144,492 sequence reads of 85 bp in length produced for each. Eukaryotic genome sequence was found in both sampling locations, and bovine, ovine and human sequences were common. Sequences from WU polyomavirus and human papillomavirus 120 were detected in the metagenomic dataset from the cattle processing area, and these sequences were confirmed as being present in the original personal aerosol samples. This study presents the first metagenomic description of personal aerosol exposure and this methodology could be applied to a variety of environments. Also, the detection of two candidate viruses warrants further investigation in the setting of occupational exposures in animal slaughterhouses. PMID:23967289

  5. Evaluating MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target Over Water Aerosol Products for Multi-sensor Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; McHardy, T. M.; Lee, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been widely used in aerosol related climate, visibility, and air quality studies for more than a decade. Recently, the MODIS collection 6 (c6) aerosol products from MODIS-Aqua have been released. The reported changes between Collection 5 and Collection 6 include updates in the retrieving algorithms and a new cloud filtering process for the over-ocean products. Thus it is necessary to fully evaluate the collection 6 products for applications that require high quality MODIS aerosol optical depth data, such as operational aerosol data assimilation. The uncertainties in the MODIS c6 DT over ocean products are studied through both inter-comparing with the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol products and by evaluation against ground truth. Special attention is given to the low bias in MODIS DT products due to the misclassifications of heavy aerosol plumes as clouds. Finally, a quality assured data assimilation grade aerosol optical product is constructed for aerosol data assimilation related applications.

  6. Sampling, characterization, and remote sensing of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Pickrell, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    When gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). As part of their Safety Analysis program, the authors have performed several experimental releases of UF/sub 6/ in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregate particle morphology and size appear to be dependent upon several conditions, including the relative humidity of the air into which it is released, and the elapsed time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using stationary samplers for the separate collection of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and HF, and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy).

  7. Improved stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles from SCIAMACHY: validation and sample results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Savigny, C.; Ernst, F.; Rozanov, A.; Hommel, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Rozanov, V.; Burrows, J. P.; Thomason, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles have been retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat measurements of limb-scattered solar radiation. The retrieval is an improved version of an algorithm presented earlier. The retrieved aerosol extinction profiles are compared to co-located aerosol profile measurements from the SAGE II solar occultation instrument at a wavelength of 525 nm. Comparisons were carried out with two versions of the SAGE II data set (version 6.2 and the new version 7.0). In a global average sense the SCIAMACHY and the SAGE II version 7.0 extinction profiles agree to within about 10 % for altitudes above 15 km. Larger relative differences (up to 40 %) are observed at specific latitudes and altitudes. We also find differences between the two SAGE II data versions of up to 40 % for specific latitudes and altitudes, consistent with earlier reports. Sample results on the latitudinal and temporal variability of stratospheric aerosol extinction and optical depth during the SCIAMACHY mission period are presented. The results confirm earlier reports that a series of volcanic eruptions is responsible for the increase in stratospheric aerosol optical depth from 2002 to 2012. Above about an altitude of 28 km, volcanic eruptions are found to have negligible impact in the period 2002-2012.

  8. Improved stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles from SCIAMACHY: validation and sample results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Savigny, C.; Ernst, F.; Rozanov, A.; Hommel, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Rozanov, V.; Burrows, J. P.; Thomason, L. W.

    2015-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles have been retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat measurements of limb-scattered solar radiation. The retrieval is an improved version of an algorithm presented earlier. The retrieved aerosol extinction profiles are compared to co-located aerosol profile measurements with the SAGE II solar occultation instrument at a wavelength of 525 nm. Comparisons were carried out with two versions of the SAGE II data set (version 6.2 and the new version 7.0). In a global average sense the SCIAMACHY and the SAGE II version 7.0 extinction profiles agree to within about 10 % for altitudes above 15 km. Larger relative differences (up to 40 %) are observed at specific latitudes and altitudes. We also find differences between the two SAGE II data versions of up to 40 % for specific latitudes and altitudes. Sample results on the latitudinal and temporal variability of stratospheric aerosol extinction and optical depth during the SCIAMACHY mission period are presented. The results indicate that a series of volcanic eruptions is responsible for the increase in stratospheric aerosol optical depth from 2002 to 2012. Above about 28 km altitude volcanic eruptions are found to have negligible impact in the period 2002 to 2012.

  9. Production of satellite-derived aerosol climate data records: current status of the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    and the Aerosol_cci team Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (Phase 1: 2010 -2014; Phase 2: 2014-2017) intensive work has been conducted to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors ATSR (3 algorithms), PARASOL, MERIS (3 algorithms), synergetic AATSR/SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOMOS. Whereas OMI and GOMOS were used to derive absorbing aerosol index and stratospheric extinction profiles, respectively, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Ångström coefficient were retrieved from the other sensors. The cooperation between the project partners, including both the retrieval teams and independent validation teams, has resulted in a strong improvement of most algorithms. In particular the AATSR retrieved AOD is qualitatively similar to that from MODIS, usually taken as the standard, MISR and SeaWiFS. This conclusion has been reached form several different ways of validation of the L2 and L3 products, using AERONET sun photometer data as the common ground-truth for the application of both 'traditional' statistical techniques and a 'scoring' technique using spatial and temporal correlations. Quantitatively, the limited AATSR swath width of 500km results in a smaller amount of data. Nevertheless, the assimilation of AATSR-retrieved AOD, together with MODIS data, contributes to improving the in the ECMWF climate model results. In addition to the multi-spectral AOD, and thus the Ångström Exponent, also a per-pixel uncertainty is provided and validated. By the end of Aerosol_cci Phase 1 the ATSR algorithms have been applied to both ATSR-2 and AATSR resulting in an AOD time series of 17 years. In phase 2 this work is continued with a focus on the further improvement of the ATSR algorithms as well as those for the other instruments and algorithms, mentioned above, which in phase 1 were considered less mature. The first efforts are on the further characterization of the uncertainties and on better understanding of the

  10. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 2: Product identification using Aerosol-CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Schwier, A. N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS) to characterize secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate in aqueous aerosol mimics. Bulk reaction mixtures were diluted and atomized to form submicron aerosol particles. Organics were detected using Aerosol-CIMS in positive and negative ion mode using I- and H3O+·(H2O)n as reagent ions. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These results support previous observations by us and others that ammonium sulfate plays a critical role in the SOA formation chemistry of dicarbonyl compounds.

  11. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.

    1995-02-01

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMs) have been developed for sampling of radionuclides from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the U.S. EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMs. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) anisokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  12. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.; Ortiz, C.A.; Muyshondt, A.; McFarland, A.R. |

    1994-12-31

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMS) have been developed for sampling of radionuclide; from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the US EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMS. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) an isokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  13. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 μm), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 μm) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  14. Resolution and Content Improvements to MISR Aerosol and Land Surface Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Bull, M. A.; Diner, D. J.; Hansen, E. G.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing operational Level 2 (swath-based) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution and atmospherically corrected land surface products at 1.1 km resolution. The performance of the aerosol product has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, model comparisons, and climatological assessments. This product has played a major role in studies of the impacts of aerosols on climate and air quality. The surface product has found a variety of uses, particularly at regional scales for assessing vegetation and land surface change. A major development effort has led to the release of an update to the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol and land surface retrieval products, which has been in production since December 2007. The new release is designated Version 23. The resolution of the aerosol product has been increased to 4.4 km, allowing more detailed characterization of aerosol spatial variability, especially near local sources and in urban areas. The product content has been simplified and updated to include more robust measures of retrieval uncertainty and other fields to benefit users. The land surface product has also been updated to incorporate the Version 23 aerosol product as input and to improve spatial coverage, particularly over mountainous terrain and snow/ice-covered surfaces. We will describe the major upgrades incorporated in Version 23 and present validation of the aerosol product against both the standard AERONET historical database, as well as high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON deployments. Comparisons will also be shown relative to the Version 22 aerosol and land surface products. Applications enabled by these product updates will be discussed.

  15. 13C measurements on organic aerosol - ambient samples versus source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Meusinger, Carl; Oyama, Beatriz; Ramon, Wichert; de Wilde, Peter A.; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The stable carbon isotopes 12C and 13C can be used to get information about sources and processing of organic aerosol (OA). We developed and tested a method to measure δ13C values of OA collected on filter samples in different volatility classes. These filter samples are introduced into an oven, where organic compounds are thermally desorbed in He at different temperatures. The compounds released at each temperature step are oxidized to CO2 using a platinum catalyst at 550 °C. The CO2 is then passed on to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to measure δ13C ratios. With a similar setup the chemical composition at each temperature step can be determined using a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). System evaluation with controlled test compounds showed that organic compounds usually start evaporating from the filter when their melting point is reached. Isotopic fractionation occurs only, if one temperature step is within a few degrees of the melting point of the substance, so that the substance only partially evaporates. However, this effect should be limited in an ambient sample containing thousands of individual chemical compounds. We analysed aerosol samples collected in a tunnel in Brazil (vehicular emissions), laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and ambient filter samples from a regional site in the Netherlands and an urban site in Belgium. First results indicate that SOA is more volatile than organic aerosol from ambient or tunnel filters. The δ13C ratios of SOA and vehicular emissions do not change strongly with oven temperature, i.e. the more refractory organic compounds have similar isotopic composition as the more volatile compounds. This is in contrast to ambient organic aerosol where the more volatile compounds evaporating below 200°C are depleted with respect to the refractory compounds. Possible reasons for this difference (mixture of sources vs the role of

  16. 13C measurements on organic aerosol - a comparison of sources with ambient samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Meusinger, Carl; Oyama, Beatriz; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon isotopes 12C and 13C can be used to get information about sources and processing of organic aerosol (OA). We developed and tested a method to measure δ13C values of OA collected on filter samples in different volatility classes. These filter samples are introduced into an oven, where organic compounds are thermally desorbed in He at different temperatures. The compounds released at each temperature step are oxidized to CO2 using a platinum catalyst at 550 °C. The CO2 is then passed on to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) to measure d13C ratios. With a similar setup the chemical composition at each temperature step can be determined using a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). System evaluation with controlled test compounds showed that organic compounds usually start evaporating from the filter when their melting point is reached. Isotopic fractionation occurs only if one temperature step is within a few degrees of the melting point of the substance, so that the substance only partially evaporates. However, this effect should be limited in an ambient sample containing thousands of individual chemical compounds. δ13C values of aerosol filter samples do not depend on the sample amount used, i.e. the system shows good linearity. The reproducibility depends somewhat on the sample amount and is usually < ± 0.3 ‰ for oven temperatures up to 200 °C and < ± 0.5 ‰ for oven temperatures greater than 200 °C. We analysed aerosol samples collected in a tunnel in Brazil (vehicular emissions), laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and ambient filter samples from a regional site in the Netherlands, an urban site in Belgium, and Sao Paulo Brazil. First results show that δ13C ratios of SOA and vehicular emissions do not change strongly with oven temperature, i.e. the more refractory organic compounds have similar isotopic composition as the more volatile compounds

  17. Sampling port for real time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Click, Eva M.; Lee, Sunhee; Hartings, Justin M.; Frothingham, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors influence the viability of aerosolized bacteria. The delivery of aerosols is affected by chamber conditions (humidity, temperature, and pressure) and bioaerosol characteristics (particle number, particle size distribution, and viable aerosol concentration). Measurement of viable aerosol concentration and particle size is essential to optimize viability and lung delivery. The Madison chamber is widely used to expose small animals to infectious aerosols. Methods A multiplex sampling port was added to the Madison chamber to measure the chamber conditions and bioaerosol characteristics. Aerosols of three pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) were generated under constant conditions and their bioaerosol characteristics were analyzed. Airborne microbes were captured using an impinger or BioSampler. The particle size distribution of airborne microbes was determined using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Viable aerosol concentration, spray factor (viable aerosol concentration/inoculum concentration), and dose presented to the mouse were calculated. Dose retention efficiency and viable aerosol retention rate were calculated from the sampler titers to determine the efficiency of microbe retention in lungs of mice. Results B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and M. tuberculosis aerosols were sampled through the port. The count mean aerodynamic sizes were 0.98, 0.77, and 0.78 μm with geometric standard deviations of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.37, and viable aerosol concentrations in the chamber were 211, 57, and 1 colony-forming unit (CFU)/mL, respectively. Based on the aerosol concentrations, the doses presented to mice for the three pathogens were 2.5e5, 2.2e4 and 464 CFU. Discussion Using the multiplex sampling port we determined whether the animals were challenged with an optimum bioaerosol based on dose presented and respirable particle size. PMID:20849964

  18. Assessment of 10-Year Global Record of Aerosol Products from the OMI Near-UV Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Global observations of aerosol properties from space are critical for understanding climate change and air quality applications. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption and dark surface albedo in the UV spectral region. These unique features enable us to retrieve both aerosol extinction optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) successfully from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nm by the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV). Recent improvements to algorithms in conjunction with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) carbon monoxide data also reduce uncertainties due to aerosol layer heights and types significantly in retrieved products. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. We also compare the OMI SSA against the inversion made by AERONET as well as an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability. The OMAERUV 10-year global aerosol record is publicly available at the NASA data service center web site (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/data-holdings/OMI/omaeruv_v003.shtml).

  19. VIIRS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) Products for Air Quality Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, A. K.; Zhang, H.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.

    2014-12-01

    The air quality community uses satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) for a variety of applications, including daily air quality forecasting, retrospective event analysis, and justification for Exceptional Events. AOD is suitable for ambient air quality applications because is related to particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5) concentrations in the atmosphere; higher values of AOD correspond to higher concentrations of particulate matter. AOD is useful for identifying and tracking areas of high PM2.5 concentrations that correspond to air quality events, such as wildfires, dust storms, or haze episodes. Currently, the air quality community utilizes AOD from the MODIS instrument on NASA's polar-orbiting Terra and Aqua satellites and from NOAA's GOES geostationary satellites (e.g, GASP). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi-NPP satellite is making AOD measurements that are similar to MODIS AOD, but with higher spatial resolution. Two AOD products are available from VIIRS: the 750 m nadir resolution Intermediate Product (IP) and the 6 km resolution Environmental Data Record (EDR) product, which is aggregated from IP measurements. These VIIRS AOD products offer a substantial increase in spatial resolution compared to the MODIS AOD 3 km and 10 km AOD products, respectively. True color (RGB) imagery is also available from VIIRS as a decision aid for air quality applications. It serves as a complement to AOD measurements by providing visible information about areas of smoke, haze, and blowing dust in the atmosphere. Case studies of VIIRS AOD and RGB data for recent air quality events will be presented, with a focus on wildfires, and the relative pros and cons of the VIIRS AOD IP and EDR for air quality applications will be discussed in comparison to MODIS AOD products. Improvements to VIIRS aerosol products based on user feedback as part of the NOAA Satellite Air Quality Proving Ground (AQPG) will be outlined, and an overview of future

  20. Total CMB analysis of streaker aerosol samples by PIXE, PIGE, beta- and optical-absorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annegarn, H. J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1993-04-01

    Multielemental analyses of aerosol samples are widely used in air pollution receptor modelling. Specifically, the chemical mass balance (CMB) model has become a powerful tool in urban air quality studies. Input data required for the CMB includes not only the traditional X-ray fluorescence (and hence PIXE) detected elements, but also total mass, organic and inorganic carbon, and other light elements including Mg, Na and F. The circular streaker sampler, in combination with PIXE analysis, has developed into a powerful tool for obtaining time-resolved, multielemental aerosol data. However, application in CMB modelling has been limited by the absence of total mass and complementary light element data. This study reports on progress in using techniques complementary to PIXE to obtain additional data from circular streaker samples, maintaining the nondestructive, instrumental approach inherent in PIXE: beta-gauging using a 147Pm source for total mass; optical absorption for inorganic carbon; and PIGE to measure the lighter elements.

  1. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  2. Size-separated sampling and analysis of isocyanates in workplace aerosols. Part I. Denuder--cascade impactor sampler.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Isocyanates in the workplace atmosphere are typically present both in gas and particle phase. The health effects of exposure to isocyanates in gas phase and different particle size fractions are likely to be different due to their ability to reach different parts in the respiratory system. To reveal more details regarding the exposure to isocyanate aerosols, a denuder-impactor (DI) sampler for airborne isocyanates was designed. The sampler consists of a channel-plate denuder for collection of gaseous isocyanates, in series with three-cascade impactor stages with cut-off diameters (d(50)) of 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mum. An end filter was connected in series after the impactor for collection of particles smaller than 0.5 mum. The denuder, impactor plates and the end filter were impregnated with a mixture of di-n-butylamine (DBA) and acetic acid for derivatization of the isocyanates. During sampling, the reagent on the impactor plates and the end filter is continuously refreshed, due to the DBA release from the impregnated denuder plates. This secures efficient derivatization of all isocyanate particles. The airflow through the sampler was 5 l min(-1). After sampling, the samples containing the different size fractions were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The DBA impregnation was stable in the sampler for at least 1 week. After sampling, the DBA derivatives were stable for at least 3 weeks. Air sampling was performed in a test chamber (300 l). Isocyanate aerosols studied were thermal degradation products of different polyurethane polymers, spraying of isocyanate coating compounds and pure gas-phase isocyanates. Sampling with impinger flasks, containing DBA in toluene, with a glass fiber filter in series was used as a reference method. The DI sampler showed good compliance with the reference method, regarding total air levels. For the different aerosols studied, vast differences were revealed in the distribution of isocyanate in gas and

  3. Continuous standalone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry highly charged cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm) with minimum losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was > 94% during these five months.

  4. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges). One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K) and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  5. Influence of anthropogenic aerosol deposition on the relationship between oceanic productivity and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Balkanski, Yves; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Boucher, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Gehlen, Marion; Peñuelas, Josep; Ethé, Christian; Hauglustaine, Didier; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Feng; Tao, Shu

    2015-12-01

    Satellite data and models suggest that oceanic productivity is reduced in response to less nutrient supply under warming. In contrast, anthropogenic aerosols provide nutrients and exert a fertilizing effect, but its contribution to evolution of oceanic productivity is unknown. We simulate the response of oceanic biogeochemistry to anthropogenic aerosols deposition under varying climate from 1850 to 2010. We find a positive response of observed chlorophyll to deposition of anthropogenic aerosols. Our results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols reduce the sensitivity of oceanic productivity to warming from -15.2 ± 1.8 to -13.3 ± 1.6 Pg C yr-1 °C-1 in global stratified oceans during 1948-2007. The reducing percentage over the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans reaches 40, 24, and 25%, respectively. We hypothesize that inevitable reduction of aerosol emissions in response to higher air quality standards in the future might accelerate the decline of oceanic productivity per unit warming.

  6. Global Long-Term SeaWiFS Deep Blue Aerosol Products available at NASA GES DISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Wei, J. C.; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Hsu, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term climate data records of aerosols are needed in order to study regional air quality and the uncertainty of aerosol radiative forcing with numerical models. Recently, global long-term (over 13 years from 1997 to 2010) SeaWiFS Deep Blue (SWDB) aerosol products have become available. The SWDB aerosol dataset has been produced by the "Consistent Long-Term Aerosol Data Records over Land and Ocean from SeaWIFS" project led by Dr. N. Christina Hsu as part of the Making Earth Science data records for Use in Research for Earth Science (MEaSUREs) program. The latest Deep Blue algorithm retrieves aerosol properties not only over bright desert surfaces, but also vegetated surfaces, oceans, and inland water bodies. Comparisons with AERONET observations have shown that the data are suitable for quantitative scientific use. The resolution of the Level 2 pixels is 13.5x13.5 km2 at the center of the swath. The Level 3 daily and monthly data are composed by using best quality level 2 pixels at resolution of both 0.5x0.5 and 1.0x1.0 degrees. This presentation, focusing over the south Asia region, will show sample higher resolution Level 2 images of dust events and the Level 3 monthly climatology at large scale. The data are compared with the widely-used MODIS (Deep Blue and Dark Target) aerosol dataset. The SWDB aerosol data are available from NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) through a number of data services, such as FTP; the data search system, Mirador; OPeNDAP; and online subsetting services. The global daily and monthly Level 3 products are also available in the innovative online visualization and analysis system, Giovanni. More information about SWBD aerosol products can be found from the project portal: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/dust. Seasonal climatology of SeaWiFS Deep Blue Aerosol Optical Depth at 550nm for the period from 1997.09 to 2010.12.

  7. The inertial and electrical effects on aerosol sampling, charging, and size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chuenchung.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of particle inertia on deposition behavior near the filter cassette sampler. Field sampling cassettes were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel for 0.2, 0.5 and 0.68 m/s wind speeds to simulate indoor air environment. Fluorescein aerosols of 2 and 5 {mu}m were generated from Berglund-Liu vibrating orifice generator as test material. Sampling tests were conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel with variables of particle size, wind speed, suction velocity and orientation of sampler examined to evaluate the combined effects. Sampling efficiencies were also examined. Electrostatic force is usually used as an effective method for removing, classifying and separating aerosols according to the electrical mobilities of the particulates. On the other hand, the aerosol charging theories possess differences in the ultrafine size range and need experimental verification. The present TSI's electrostatic aerosol analyzer has particle loss problem and cannot be used as a reliable tool in achieving efficient charging. A new unipolar charger with associated electronic circuits was designed, constructed and tested. The performance of the charger is tested in terms of particle loss, uncharged particles, and the collection efficiency of the precipitator. The results were compared with other investigator's data. The log-Beta distribution function is considered to be more versatile in representing size distribution. This study discussed the method in determining the size parameters under different conditions. Also the mutability of size distribution was evaluated when particles undergo coagulation or classification processes. Comparison of evolution between log-Beta and lognormal distributions were made.

  8. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  9. Solid versus Liquid Particle Sampling Efficiency of Three Personal Aerosol Samplers when Facing the Wind

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Anthony, T. Renee; Van Dyke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the facing-the-wind sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers as a function of particle phase (solid versus liquid). Samplers examined were the IOM, Button, and a prototype personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH). The prototype PHISH was designed to interface with the 37-mm closed-face cassette and provide an inhalable sample at 10 l min−1 of flow. Increased flow rate increases the amount of mass collected during a typical work shift and helps to ensure that limits of detection are met, particularly for well-controlled but highly toxic species. Two PHISH prototypes were tested: one with a screened inlet and one with a single-pore open-face inlet. Personal aerosol samplers were tested on a bluff-body disc that was rotated along the facing-the-wind axis to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. When compared to published data for facing-wind aspiration efficiency for a mouth-breathing mannequin, the IOM oversampled relative to mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency for all sizes and particle types (solid and liquid). The sampling efficiency of the Button sampler was closer to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency than the IOM for solid particles, but the screened inlet removed most liquid particles, resulting in a large underestimation compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. The open-face PHISH results showed overestimation for solid particles and underestimation for liquid particles when compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. Substantial (and statistically significant) differences in sampling efficiency were observed between liquid and solid particles, particularly for the Button and screened-PHISH, with a majority of aerosol mass depositing on the screened inlets of these samplers. Our results suggest that large droplets have low penetration efficiencies

  10. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  11. Technical note: An improved approach to determining background aerosol concentrations with PILS sampling on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Christine S.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Ryan Fulgham, S.; Murschell, Trey; Borch, Thomas; Smith, James N.; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-into-Liquid Samplers (PILS) have become a standard aerosol collection technique, and are widely used in both ground and aircraft measurements in conjunction with off-line ion chromatography (IC) measurements. Accurate and precise background samples are essential to account for gas-phase components not efficiently removed and any interference in the instrument lines, collection vials or off-line analysis procedures. For aircraft sampling with PILS, backgrounds are typically taken with in-line filters to remove particles prior to sample collection once or twice per flight with more numerous backgrounds taken on the ground. Here, we use data collected during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) to demonstrate that not only are multiple background filter samples are essential to attain a representative background, but that the chemical background signals do not follow the Gaussian statistics typically assumed. Instead, the background signals for all chemical components analyzed from 137 background samples (taken from ∼78 total sampling hours over 18 flights) follow a log-normal distribution, meaning that the typical approaches of averaging background samples and/or assuming a Gaussian distribution cause an over-estimation of background samples - and thus an underestimation of sample concentrations. Our approach of deriving backgrounds from the peak of the log-normal distribution results in detection limits of 0.25, 0.32, 3.9, 0.17, 0.75 and 0.57 μg m-3 for sub-micron aerosol nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonium (NH4+), sulfate (SO42-), potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+), respectively. The difference in backgrounds calculated from assuming a Gaussian distribution versus a log-normal distribution were most extreme for NH4+, resulting in a background that was 1.58× that determined from fitting a log-normal distribution.

  12. Characterization of an aerosol sample from the auxiliary building of the Three Mile Island reactor.

    PubMed

    Kanapilly, G M; Stanley, J A; Newton, G J; Wong, B A; DeNee, P B

    1983-11-01

    Analyses for radioisotopic composition and dissolution characteristics were performed on an aerosol filter sample collected for a week by an air sampler located in the auxiliary building of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor. The major radioisotopes found on the filter were 89Sr, 90Sr, 134Cs and 137Cs. Greater than 90% of both 89-90Sr and 134-137Cs dissolved within 48 hr in an in vitro test system. Scanning electron microscopic analyses showed the presence of respirable size particles as well as larger particles ranging up to 10 micron in diameter. The major matrix components were Fe, Ca, S, Mg, Al and Si. Although the radionuclides were present in a heterogeneous matrix, they were in a soluble form. This information enables a better evaluation of bioassay data and predictions of dose distribution resulting from an inhalation exposure to this aerosol. Further, the combination of techniques used in this study may be applicable to the characterization of other aerosols of unknown composition. PMID:6643066

  13. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning. PMID:26942452

  14. MODIS 3 Km Aerosol Product: Applications over Land in an Urban/suburban Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munchak, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites have provided a rich dataset of aerosol information at a 10 km spatial scale. Although originally intended for climate applications, the air quality community quickly became interested in using the MODIS aerosol data. However, 10 km resolution is not sufficient to resolve local scale aerosol features. With this in mind, MODIS Collection 6 is including a global aerosol product with a 3 km resolution. Here, we evaluate the 3 km product over the Baltimore/Washington D.C., USA, corridor during the summer of 2011, by comparing with spatially dense data collected as part of the DISCOVER-AQ campaign these data were measured by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and a network of 44 sun photometers (SP) spaced approximately 10 km apart. The HSRL instrument shows that AOD can vary by up to 0.2 within a single 10 km MODIS pixel, meaning that higher resolution satellite retrievals may help to characterize aerosol spatial distributions in this region. Different techniques for validating a high-resolution aerosol product against SP measurements are considered. Although the 10 km product is more statistically reliable than the 3 km product, the 3 km product still performs acceptably, with more than two-thirds of MODIS/SP collocations falling within the expected error envelope with high correlation (R > 0.90). The 3 km product can better resolve aerosol gradients and retrieve closer to clouds and shorelines than the 10 km product, but tends to show more significant noise especially in urban areas. This urban degradation is quantified using ancillary land cover data. Overall, we show that the MODIS 3 km product adds new information to the existing set of satellite derived aerosol products and validates well over the region, but due to noise and problems in urban areas, should be treated with some degree of caution.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of optical scattering and extinction on dispersed aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Dial, Kathy D; Hiemstra, Scott; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2010-10-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of light scattering and extinction by atmospheric particulate matter aid understanding of tropospheric photochemistry and are required for estimates of the direct climate effects of aerosols. In this work, we report on a second generation instrument to simultaneously measure light scattering (b(scat)) and extinction (b(ext)) coefficient by dispersed aerosols. The ratio of scattering to extinction is known as the single scatter albedo (SSA); thus, the instrument is referred to as the albedometer. Extinction is measured with the well-established cavity ring-down (CRD) technique, and the scattering coefficient is determined through collection of light scattered from the CRD beam. The improved instrument allows reduction in sample volume to <1% of the original design, and a reduction in response time by a factor of >30. Through using a commercially available condensation particle counter (CPC), we have measured scattering (σ(scat)) and extinction (σ(ext)) cross sections for size-selected ammonium sulfate and nigrosin aerosols. In most cases, the measured scattering and extinction cross section were within 1 standard deviation of the accepted values generated from Mie theory suggesting accurate measurements are made. While measurement standard deviations for b(ext) and b(scat) were generally <1 Mm(-1) when the measurement cell was sealed or purged with filtered air, relative standard deviations >0.1 for these variables were observed when the particle number density was low. It is inferred that statistical fluctuations of the absolute number of particles within the probe beam leads to this effect. However, measured relative precision in albedo is always superior to that which would be mathematically propagated assuming independent measurements of b(scat) and b(ext). Thus, this report characterizes the measurement precision achieved, evaluates the potential for systematic error to be introduced through light absorption by gases

  16. Dimers and organosulfates derived from biogenic oxidation products in aerosols during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in California 2007 and 2009 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Worton, D. R.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q.; Surratt, J.; Enggrob, K. L.; Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Farmer, D.; Docherty, K. S.; Platt, S.; Bilde, M.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Seinfeld, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Goldstein, A.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds, such as monoterpenes and isoprene, contribute to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). The organosulfate derivatives of these compounds are formed through heterogeneous reactions involving sulphur compounds, with a considerable contribution from anthropogenic sources. Organosulfate derivatives of biogenic oxidation products thus belong to a new group of anthropogenic enhanced biogenic SOA (ABSOA). The Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) during summers of 2007 and 2009 provided an excellent platform at Blodgett Forest, California (a ponderosa pine plantation) for studying ABSOA. Typically, polluted air masses were transported upslope from the California Central Valley during day, while night conditions were influenced by downslope transport of air masses, low local atmospheric mixing and formation of a shallow boundary layer. We collected particle samples (PM2.5) as one nighttime and two daytime samples per day. After extraction of filters in polar organic solvents (i.e. acetonitrile or methanol), organic aerosol constituents were analyzed by HPLC coupled through an electrospray inlet to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (qTOF-MS). Organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates derived from oxidation products of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene and isoprene were identified based on their molecular mass and MS fragmentation patterns. Measurements by High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS) show high mass loadings of nitrate in the night and morning samples with highest levels of the nitrooxy organosulfates with MW 295 and MW 297. This may indicate that elevated levels of nitrate and nitrooxy organosulfates are formed in the same polluted air mass, probably through nitrate radical reactions. Terpenylic acid, diterpenylic acid acetate, and methylbutane tricarboxylic acid were found at concentrations comparable to pinic acid. A dimer of

  17. Aerosols and their sources at Summit Greenland - First results of continuous size- and time-resolved sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanCuren, Richard A.; Cahill, Thomas; Burkhart, John; Barnes, David; Zhao, Yongjing; Perry, Kevin; Cliff, Steven; McConnell, Joe

    2012-06-01

    An ongoing program to continuously collect time- and size-resolved aerosol samples from ambient air at Summit Station, Greenland (72.6 N, 38.5 W) is building a long-term data base to both record individual transport events and provide long-term temporal context for past and future intensive studies at the site. As a "first look" at this data set, analysis of samples collected from summer 2005 to spring 2006 demonstrates the utility of continuous sampling to characterize air masses over the ice pack, document individual aerosol transport events, and develop a long-term record. Seven source-related aerosol types were identified in this analysis: Asian dust, Saharan dust, industrial combustion, marine with combustion tracers, fresh coarse volcanic tephra, and aged volcanic plume with fine tephra and sulfate, and the well-mixed background "Arctic haze". The Saharan dust is a new discovery; the other types are consistent with those reported from previous work using snow pits and intermittent ambient air sampling during intensive study campaigns. Continuous sampling complements the fundamental characterization of Greenland aerosols developed in intensive field programs by providing a year-round record of aerosol size and composition at all temporal scales relevant to ice core analysis, ranging from individual deposition events and seasonal cycles, to a record of inter-annual variability of aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources.

  18. Aerosols and their influence on radiation partitioning and savanna productivity in northern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Kanniah, K. D.; Beringer, J.; Tapper, N. J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effect of aerosols and clouds on the Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) of savannas in northern Australia using aerosol optical depth, clouds and radiation data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin and carbon flux data measured from eddy covariance techniques from a site at Howard Springs, 35km southeast of Darwin. Generally we found that the concentration of aerosols in this region was relatively low than observed at other sites, therefore the proportion of diffuse radiation reaching the earths surface was only ~ 30%. As a result, we observed only a modest change in carbon uptake under aerosol laden skies and there was no significant difference for dry season Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) between clear sky, aerosols or thin clouds. On the other hand thick clouds in the wet season produce much more diffuse radiation than aerosols or thin clouds and therefore the initial canopy quantum efficiency was seen to increase 45 and 2.5 times more than under thin clouds and aerosols respectively. The normalized carbon uptake under thick clouds is 57% and 50% higher than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively even though the total irradiance received under thick clouds was reduced 59% and 50% than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively. However, reduction in total irradiance decreases the mean absolute carbon uptake as much as 22% under heavy cloud cover compared to thin clouds or aerosols. Thus, any increase in aerosol concentration or cloud cover that can enhance the diffuse component may have large impacts on productivity in this region.

  19. Morphological characterization of carbonaceous aggregates in soot and free fall aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Kamna; Attri, Arun K.

    The morphological characteristics of BC aggregates present in the soot and carbonaceous aerosol (CA) samples were investigated. The process of soot formation under laboratory conditions took into account the commonly used practice of burning fuel in the households in India. The fractal morphology was determined by using box counting algorithm and maximum projected area of the aggregates by using their digital electron microscopic images. Former provided the estimates of perimeter fractal dimension (PD f) of each aggregate, and later estimated the average density fractal dimension (DD f) of aggregate groups. Numbers of particles constituting the aggregates, using projected area approach, were significantly higher than the estimates based on pixel counting. The measured average diameter of the primary particles in aggregates, ranged between 24 and 57 nm. The fractal dimensions, PD f, for the laboratory-generated soot aggregates varied from 1.36 to 1.88. The PD f for aggregates derived from diesel-vehicles and biomass burning showed significant variation: biomass, 1.27; diesel vehicle, 1.82 and 1.7. The size and the dimensions estimated for the free fall CA samples showed large deviation. The ratio L/ Rg (length/radius of gyration) for soot aggregates (gasoline, kerosene, diesel, mustard oil and hexane) ranged from 3.5 to 4.8. Surface morphology of these aggregates, using scanning electron microscope (SEM), showed the presence of spherical "charred cenosphere" like particles in gasoline and free fall aerosol aggregates. FTIR investigations revealed the presence of a large number of organic groups (OC) associated with carbonaceous aggregates present in soot and free fall aerosol samples.

  20. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  1. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  2. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  3. Controls on aerosol wet deposition from satellite-based (re-)analysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol wet deposition is the key aerosol loss mechanism globally, yet is not well-understood relative to aerosol sources and transformations. The difficulty in generating appropriate observational data sets is one important barrier to the study of aerosol wet removal. In this study, we combine two independent products based on satellite measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is obtained from the ECMWF Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) project, which is a re-analysis product that assimilates MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depth. Rainfall is obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis version 7 (TMPA-7). The latter product is available only from 50°N to 50°S, which sets our region of study. The data used is from 2011-12, is averaged to 6-hr intervals and has a horizontal resolution of 0.25°x0.25°. Our approach involves constructing a Lagrangian advection scheme that predicts aerosol AOD at the next time step (i.e. 6 hr in the future) based on current time step AOD and winds, and neglecting all aerosol sources and sinks. Predicted AOD is then compared with MACC reanalysis AOD conditioned on Lagrangian parcels that experienced rainfall during that interval, with AOD decreases attributed to wet deposition. Aerosol wet deposition is often parameterized in models as a function of rainfall rate using a power law. We evaluate the validity of such a power law relationship, and, when valid, compute the power law exponent globally, and by region (including continental and maritime locations) to reveal seasonal and geographic variability. Assuming precipitation is modulated by aerosol, at least in some regimes, then it follows that wet deposition also depends on AOD, and we quantify the strength of this coupling. This same approach could be used to study wet deposition of trace gases such as CO and ozone, as these are also available from the MACC re-analysis.

  4. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms. PMID:27593289

  5. Air Quality Monitoring and Forecasting Applications of Suomi NPP VIIRS Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, Shobha

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched on October 28, 2011. It provides Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at two different spatial resolutions: a pixel level (~750 m at nadir) product called the Intermediate Product (IP) and an aggregated (~6 km at nadir) product called the Environmental Data Record (EDR), and a Suspended Matter (SM) EDR that provides aerosol type (dust, smoke, sea salt, and volcanic ash) information. An extensive validation of VIIRS best quality aerosol products with ground based L1.5 Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) data shows that the AOT EDR product has an accuracy/precision of -0.01/0.11 and 0.01/0.08 over land and ocean respectively. Globally, VIIRS mean AOT EDR (0.20) is similar to Aqua MODIS (0.16) with some important regional and seasonal differences. The accuracy of the SM product, however, is found to be very low (20 percent) when compared to Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and AERONET. Several algorithm updates which include a better approach to retrieve surface reflectance have been developed for AOT retrieval. For dust aerosol type retrieval, a new approach that takes advantage of spectral dependence of Rayleigh scattering, surface reflectance, dust absorption in the deep blue (412 nm), blue (440 nm), and mid-IR (2.2 um) has been developed that detects dust with an accuracy of ~80 percent. For smoke plume identification, a source apportionment algorithm that combines fire hot spots with AOT imagery has been developed that provides smoke plume extent with an accuracy of ~70 percent. The VIIRS aerosol products will provide continuity to the current operational use of aerosol products from Aqua and Terra MODIS. These include aerosol data assimilation in Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) global aerosol model, verification of National Weather Service (NWS) dust and smoke forecasts, exceptional events monitoring by different states

  6. MODIS aerosol products in Collection 6:Moving towards multisensor fusion and interdisciplinary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    As the Terra satellite turns 10, so do the MODIS aerosol products. During the past ten years the MODIS products have evolved and expanded to include opportunities and capabilities nonexistent in the at-launch version. We are anticipating the next step, Collection 6, becoming available in late 2010. The new products in the Collection 6 MODIS aerosol suite of products will include: 1) Fine mode aerosol optical depth over land from the PARASOL POLDER data set, merged into the MODIS data product. This is a direct capture of the PARASOL product that will be placed in the MODIS data files. It is not a separate derivation using PARASOL radiances and polarization. The incorporation of the PARASOL product over land is collocated to the MODIS 10 km product pixel, and is provided as a convenience to MODIS users. 2) Aerosol optical depth over land at 3 km resolution for Air Quality monitoring. 3) Cloud mask and distance to the nearest cloud calculated and presented for every 500 m “cloud-free” pixel that allows better control of cloud contamination in the basic aerosol products. This information is also summarized statistically at the 10 km product resolution, and will be available for both land and ocean. 4) A Quality Assurance (QA) flag in simple plain integers that does not require a binary reader to decode.

  7. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  8. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lemma, F. G.; Colle, J. Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The results from the aerosol characterisation were compared with studies of the vaporization process by Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry and thermochemical equilibrium calculations. These studies permit an understanding of the aerosol gaseous precursors and the gaseous reactions taking place during the aerosol formation process.

  9. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Development and Applications of a New, High-Resolution, Operational MISR Aerosol Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Diner, D. J.; Kalashnikova, O.

    2014-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution. Capitalizing on the capabilities provided by multi-angle viewing, the operational MISR algorithm performs well, with about 75% of MISR AOD retrievals falling within 0.05 or 20% × AOD of the paired validation data from the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and is able to distinguish aerosol particles by size and sphericity, over both land and water. These attributes enable a variety of applications, including aerosol transport model validation and global air quality assessment. Motivated by the adverse impacts of aerosols on human health at the local level, and taking advantage of computational speed advances that have occurred since the launch of Terra, we have implemented an operational MISR aerosol product with 4.4 km spatial resolution that maintains, and sometimes improves upon, the quality of the 17.6 km resolution product. We will describe the performance of this product relative to the heritage 17.6 km product, the global AERONET validation network, and high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON sites. Other changes that simplify product content, and make working with the data much easier for users, will also be discussed. Examples of how the new product demonstrates finer spatial variability of aerosol fields than previously retrieved, and ways this new dataset can be used for studies of local aerosol effects, will be shown.

  11. Products of BVOC oxidation: ozone and organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, Jürgen; Andres, Stefanie; Carriero, Giulia; Ehn, Mikael; Fares, Silvano; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kleist, Einhard; Paoletti, Elena; Pullinen, Iida; Rohrer, Franz; Rudich, Yinon; Springer, Monika; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Wu, Cheng; Mentel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) are important precursors in photochemical O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments with OH-induced oxidation of monoterpenes to elucidate pathways and efficiencies of O3 and SOA formation. At high NOx conditions ([BVOC] / [NOx] < 7 ppbC / ppb) photochemical ozone formation was observed. For -pinene as individual BVOC as well as for the monoterpene mixes emitted from different plant species we observed increasing ozone formation with increasing [NOX]. Between 2 and 3 O3-molecules were formed from 1 monoterpene when ozone formation was BVOC limited. Under such high NOX conditions, new particle formation was suppressed. Increasing [BVOC] / [NOX] ratios caused increasing efficiency of new particle formation indicating that peroxy radicals are the key intermediates in both, photochemical ozone- and new particle formation. The classical chemistry of peroxy radicals is well established (e.g. Master Chemical Mechanism). Peroxy radicals are produced by addition of molecular oxygen to the alkyl radical formed after OH attack at the BVOC. They either react with NO which leads to ozone formation or they react with other peroxy radicals and form chemically stable products (hydroperoxides, alkoholes and ketones). Much less knowledge exists on such reactions for Highly Oxidized Peroxy Radicals, (HOPR). Such HOPR were observed during ozonolysis of several volatiles and, in case of monoterpenes as precursors, they can contain more than 12 Oxygen atoms (Mentel et al., 2015). Although the OH-initiated formation of HOPR is yet not fully understood, their basic gas phase reactions seem to follow classical photochemical rules. In reactions with NO they can act as precursor for O3 and in reactions with other HOPR or with classical less oxidized peroxy radicals they can form highly oxidized stable products and alkoxy radicals. In addition, HOPR-HOPR reactions lead to the formation of

  12. Fungal Spore Concentrations and Ergosterol Content in Aerosol Samples in the Caribbean During African Dust Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Figueroa, G.; Bolaños-Rosero, B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores are a major component of primary biogenic aerosol particles that are emitted to the atmosphere, are ubiquitous, and play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, climate, and public health. Every year, during summer months, African dust (AD) particles are transported to the Caribbean region causing an increase in the concentrations of particulate matter in the atmosphere. AD is one of the most important natural sources of mineral particulate matter at the global scale, and many investigations suggest that it has the ability to transport dust-associated biological particles through long distances. The relationship between AD incursions and the concentration of fungal spores in the Caribbean region is poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of AD incursions on fungal spore's emissions, fungal spore concentrations were monitored using a Burkard spore trap at the tropical montane cloud forest of Pico del Este at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. The presence of AD was supported with satellite images of aerosol optical thickness, and with the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Basidiospores and Ascospores comprised the major components of the total spore's concentrations, up to a maximum of 98%, during both AD incursions and background days. A considerably decrease in the concentration of fungal spores during AD events was observed. Ergosterol, biomarker for measuring fungal biomass, concentrations were determined in aerosols that were sampled at a marine site, Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve, in Fajardo Puerto Rico, and at an urban site, Facundo Bueso building at the University of Puerto Rico. Additional efforts to understand the relationship between the arrival of AD to the Caribbean and a decrease in spore's concentrations are needed in order to investigate changes in local spore's vs the contribution of long-range spores transported within the AD.

  13. SAMPLING DURATION DEPENDENCE OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS ORGANIC CARBON MEASUREMENTS ON STEADY STATE SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semi-continuous organic carbon concentrations were measured through several experiments of statically generated secondary organic aerosol formed by hydrocarbon + NOx irradiations. Repeated, randomized measurements of these steady state aerosols reveal decreases in the observed c...

  14. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  15. Validation of the NOAA/NESDIS satellite aerosol product over the North Atlantic in 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, Aleksandr M.; Stowe, Larry L.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Korotaev, Gennady K.

    1995-03-01

    A validation experiment and resulting potential improvements to the operational satellite optical thickness product at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NOAA/NESDIS) are presented. An earlier paper described a set of Sun photometer measurements collected from the Soviet R/V Akademik Vernadsky during its cruise in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea from September to December 1989. The accuracy of the Sun photometer aerosol optical thickness was proven acceptable of use as a ground truth standard for validation of the NOAA product. This paper describes the validation methodology and the results of its application to the NOAA 11 satellite product. A systematic underestimation in the operational values by about 35%, relative to the ship truth, is found. Causes for this discrepancy are examined, emphasizing the importance of careful satellite instrument calibration, and a revision of the oceanic reflectance model used in the retrieval algorithm. It is shown that the remaining systematic underestimate in satellite aerosol optical thickness can be attributed only to the aerosol model used in the retrieval. Additional checks of this conclusion using independent data sets are underway. If confirmed, a fundamental revision of the presently used aerosol model would be required. An example of a simple adjustment to the present aerosol model which successfully removes the bias is given, based on the assumption of an absorbing aerosol.

  16. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0

  17. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  18. Characterization of potential impurities and degradation products in electronic cigarette formulations and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Flora, Jason W; Meruva, Naren; Huang, Chorng B; Wilkinson, Celeste T; Ballentine, Regina; Smith, Donna C; Werley, Michael S; McKinney, Willie J

    2016-02-01

    E-cigarettes are gaining popularity in the U.S. as well as in other global markets. Currently, limited published analytical data characterizing e-cigarette formulations (e-liquids) and aerosols exist. While FDA has not published a harmful and potentially harmful constituent (HPHC) list for e-cigarettes, the HPHC list for currently regulated tobacco products may be useful to analytically characterize e-cigarette aerosols. For example, most e-cigarette formulations contain propylene glycol and glycerin, which may produce aldehydes when heated. In addition, nicotine-related chemicals have been previously reported as potential e-cigarette formulation impurities. This study determined e-liquid formulation impurities and potentially harmful chemicals in aerosols of select commercial MarkTen(®) e-cigarettes manufactured by NuMark LLC. The potential hazard of the identified formulation impurities and aerosol chemicals was also estimated. E-cigarettes were machine puffed (4-s duration, 55-mL volume, 30-s intervals) to battery exhaustion to maximize aerosol collection. Aerosols analyzed for carbonyls were collected in 20-puff increments to account for analyte instability. Tobacco specific nitrosamines were measured at levels observed in pharmaceutical grade nicotine. Nicotine-related impurities in the e-cigarette formulations were below the identification and qualification thresholds proposed in ICH Guideline Q3B(R2). Levels of potentially harmful chemicals detected in the aerosols were determined to be below published occupational exposure limits. PMID:26617410

  19. If the MODIS Aerosol Product is so Infested with Cloud Contamination, Why Does Everybody Use the Product?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remeer, Lorraine A.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS aerosol cloud mask is based on a spatial variability test, using the assumption that aerosols are more homogeneous than clouds. On top of this first line of defense are a series of additional tests based on threshold values and ratios of various MODIS channels. The goal is to eliminate clouds and keep the aerosol. How well have we succeeded? There have been several studies showing cloud contamination in the MODIS aerosol product and several alternative cloud masks proposed. There are even "competing" MODIS aerosol products that offer an alternative "cloud free" world. Are these alternative products an improvement to the old standard product? We find there is a trade-off between retrieval availability and cloud contamination, and for many applications it is better to have a little bit of cloud in the product than to not have enough product. I will review the decisions that led us to the present MODIS cloud mask, and show how it is simultaneously too liberal and too conservative, some ideas on how to make it better and why in the end it doesn't matter. I hope to inspire a spirited discussion and will be very willing to take your complaints and suggestions.

  20. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  1. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  2. Recovery Efficiency and Limit of Detection of Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from Environmental Surface Samples

    PubMed Central

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A.; Beard, Jeremy K.; Hein, Misty J.; Larsen, Lloyd D.; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Deye, Gregory J.; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm2). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm2) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm2) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm2) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  3. Sampling microbial aerosols. Summary report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Chatigny, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    Collecting microbial aerosols is not substantially different from collecting any other airborne particulates. After collection, however, the processing of the sample is all important. These particles have life and the capacity to grow, multiply, and as parasites - cause undesirable effects in the multiplicity of hosts. No chemical or physical measurement(s) available today can assess all these characteristics. Even detection of their presence often requires the bio-amplification provided by the growth characteristics. Both indoor and outdoor air are seas of microbial particles. Depending on local conditions, concentrations of viable particles will range from a few per ft. to many thousands or even millions. Particles are nearly indistinguishable so that detecting a specific viable and infective type is a little like selecting a specific raindrop in a rainstorm. Only by careful choice of growth and assay procedures, can the microbes of interest be selected out of the collectate.

  4. The uncertainty of MODIS C6 aerosol optical depth product over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has an important impact on climate change and air quality. A number of AOD satellite data products have been released, like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD product, which are further applied for monitoring PM2.5, for long-term aerosol trend analysis, and for estimating aerosol radiative forcing. However, the accuracy of MODIS AOD product with ±0.03 or 15-20% of global mean value over land is still low for extensive scientific research. To investigate the accuracy of the product, a synthetic experiment was designed where the errors introduced by both radiometry and algorithm, e.g. instrument calibration, gas correction and cloud mask, and some assumptions on aerosol properties can be removed. Through analysis of the mean value of retrieved AOD over 1520 observational configurations, the algorithm performs very well with small errors (up to 0.2%) for most cases, while for some extreme cases (eg., AOD=5.0), it performs less accurately (> 3%). The uncertainty also shows a trend related to the geometry of observations (e.g., scattering angle). The results suggest higher accuracy at large scattering angles, and lower accuracy at small scattering angles. The main reason for the uncertainty is an inappropriate assumption on surface reflectance, where surface reflectance is regarded as a function of aerosol loading and mixing ratio. Therefore, a more accurate representation of the surface reflectance will increase the accuracy of the MODIS AOD product.

  5. Artefacts in the sampling of nitrate studied in the "INTERCOMP" campaigns of EUROTRAC-AEROSOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M.; Spindler, G.; Schulz, M.; Acker, K.; Maenhaut, W.; Berner, A.; Wieprecht, W.; Streit, N.; Müller, K.; Brüggemann, E.; Chi, X.; Putaud, J.-P.; Hitzenberger, R.; Puxbaum, H.; Baltensperger, U.; ten Brink, H.

    Sampling of aerosol-nitrate can be problematic because of evaporative loss of the semi-volatile ammonium nitrate or adsorption of nitric acid gas. Such artefacts, which depend on filter type and ambient conditions, are not well documented for the filters in use in Europe and this was the reason to study these in a series of intercomparison trials. The trials were performed within the "INTERCOMP" programme of the AEROSOL subproject of EUROTRAC-2. The major effort was a 2-week field campaign at the rural site of Melpitz, a village near Leipzig in eastern Germany (INTERCOMP2000). Samplers were used containing the most common filter types in use in Europe, i.e. quartz, Teflon, (mixed) cellulose ester and cellulose. The concentration of nitrate in PM2.5, mainly present as ammonium nitrate, was on average 3.3 μg m -3. The variability in the concentrations stemming from the samplers appeared to be rather constant: ± 0.5 μg m -3 from the average of all samplers. The reason for the constant (but random) variability remains unexplained. Thus, the concentrations stemming from the samplers agreed very well at the average level with relative differences of 15% and less for higher concentrations. This is evidence that the influence of the mentioned artefacts was negligible. The absence is explained by extrapolation of results of tests on the artefacts in a laboratory setting (INTERCOMP99). It was found there that the loss of ammonium nitrate from Teflon and quartz filters is only substantial when temperatures are much higher than those during the field campaign. Cellulose and cellulose-acetate filters quantitatively collected both ammonium nitrate and nitric acid in the laboratory study, but in Melpitz measured nitric acid concentrations were too low to identify its adsorption. Possible artefacts due to adsorption of nitrous acid were negligible. We also used the laboratory information to evaluate the results of a further intercomparison (INTERCOMP98) in the Po

  6. Application of recent advances in aerosol sampling science towards the development of improved sampling devices: the way ahead.

    PubMed

    Vincent, J H; Ramachandran, G; Thomassen, Y; Keeler, G J

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the framework that underpins the development of a new generation of personal samplers capable of operating at much lower flowrates that those of the current generation and so capable of being used for exposure assessment not only for 'traditional' occupational populations (i.e., industrial workers) but also for people exposed to aerosols in the ambient atmosphere (including children). The opportunity for this new generation of samplers stems from the availability of very light and compact low-flowrate pumps. The development and deployment of such instruments presents: (a) physical challenges in terms of how to collect particle size fractions in a manner which is consistent with the new particle size-selective sampling criteria, and (b) analytical challenges in terms of how to quantitate the much smaller amounts of collected material that need to be analysed. The paper lays out the physical and analytical scenarios, and points the way forward to how such challenges can be overcome. Work is already in progress in several countries to develop prototype instruments for applications like those described. PMID:11529124

  7. ALTERNATIVE FORMULATIONS TO REDUCE CFC USE IN U.S. EXEMPTED AND EXCLUSED AEROSOL PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines products exempted and excluded from those affected by the 1978 ban on the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as aerosol propellants, the present consumption of CFCs still utilized for these products in the U.S., and alternative formulations which may be used to...

  8. ALTERNATIVE FORMULATIONS TO REDUCE CFC USE IN U.S. EXEMPTED AND EXCLUDED AEROSOL PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines products exempted and excluded from those affected by the 1978 ban on the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as aerosol propellants, the present consumption of CFCs still utilized for these products in the U.S., and alternative formulations which may be used to...

  9. Aerosol Products from The Future Space Lidar AEOLUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Pauline; Dabas, Alain; Lever, Vincent; Flamant, Pierre; Huber, Dorit

    2016-06-01

    Ready for launch by the end of 2016, the Doppler lidar mission AEOLUS from the European Space Agency (ESA) will be the first High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in space. Operating in the UV, it implements two detection channels for aerosol and molecular backscatter. The system is primarily designed for the measurement of winds, but the HSRL capability enables the measurement of the particulate backscatter and extinction coefficients without any a priori assumption on the aerosol type. The level-2A (L2A) processor has been developed for these measurements and tested with synthetic data. The results show good aerosol backscatter profiles can be retrieved. Extinction coefficients are reasonable but do not reach the quality of backscatter coefficients. A precise, full, radiometric calibration of the lidar is required. A major limitation of the system is a single polarization component of the light is detected leading to an underestimation of backscatter coefficients when the atmospheric particles are depolarizing. The vertical resolution goes from 250 meters in the lowest part of the atmosphere, to 2 km in the lower stratosphere. The maximum altitude can reach above 20km. The basic horizontal averaging is 90km. Averaging on shorter distances (down to a few km) are possible but require a sufficient signal to noise ratio.

  10. Evidence of Aerosols as a Media for Rapid Daytime HONO Production over China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Costabile, Francesa; Amoroso, Antonio; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-16

    Current knowledge of daytime HONO sources remains incomplete. A large missing daytime HONO source has been found in many places around the world, including polluted regions in China. Conventional understanding and recent studies attributed this missing source mainly to ground surface processes or gas-phase chemistry, while assuming aerosols to be an insignificant media for HONO production. We analyze in situ observations of HONO and its precursors at an urban site in Beijing, China, and report an apparent dependence of the missing HONO source strength on aerosol surface area and solar ultraviolet radiation. Based on extensive correlation analysis and process-modeling, we propose that the rapid daytime HONO production in Beijing can be explained by enhanced hydrolytic disproportionation of NO2 on aqueous aerosol surfaces due to catalysis by dicarboxylic acid anions. The combination of high abundance of NO2, aromatic hydrocarbons, and aerosols over broad regions in China likely leads to elevated HONO levels, rapid OH production, and enhanced oxidizing capacity on a regional basis. Our findings call for attention to aerosols as a media for daytime heterogeneous HONO production in polluted regions like Beijing. This study also highlights the complex and uncertain heterogeneous chemistry in China, which merits future efforts of reconciling regional modeling and laboratory experiments, in order to understand and mitigate the regional particulate and O3 pollutions over China.

  11. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low. PMID:15950041

  12. Bioequivalence for locally acting nasal spray and nasal aerosol products: standard development and generic approval.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing V; Jin, Feiyan; Lee, Sau L; Bai, Tao; Chowdhury, Badrul; Caramenico, Hoainhon T; Conner, Dale P

    2013-07-01

    Demonstrating bioequivalence (BE) for nasal spray/aerosol products for local action has been very challenging because the relationship between the drug in systemic circulation and the drug reaching the nasal site of action has not been well established. Thus, the current BE standard for these drug/device combination products is based on a weight-of-evidence approach, which contains three major elements: equivalent in vitro performance, equivalent systemic exposure, and equivalent local delivery. In addition, formulation sameness and device similarity are evidences to support BE. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the scientific rationale of the current BE standard and their development history for nasal spray/aerosol products, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's review and approval status of generic nasal sprays/aerosols with the application of these BE standard. PMID:23686396

  13. Forecasting Plant Productivity and Health Using Diffuse-to-Global Irradiance Ratios Extracted from the OMI Aerosol Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly; Andrews, Jane C.; Ryan, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are a major contributor to diffuse irradiance. This Candidate Solution suggests using the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) aerosol product as input into a radiative transfer model, which would calculate the ratio of diffuse to global irradiance at the Earth s surface. This ratio can significantly influence the rate of photosynthesis in plants; increasing the ratio of diffuse to global irradiance can accelerate photosynthesis, resulting in greater plant productivity. Accurate values of this ratio could be useful in predicting crop productivity, thereby improving forecasts of regional food resources. However, disagreements exist between diffuse-to-global irradiance values measured by different satellites and ground sensors. OMI, with its unique combination of spectral bands, high resolution, and daily global coverage, may be able to provide more accurate aerosol measurements than other comparable sensors.

  14. Contribution of airborne microbes to bacterial production and N2 fixation in seawater upon aerosol deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahav, Eyal; Ovadia, Galit; Paytan, Adina; Herut, Barak

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition may supply a high diversity of airborne microbes, which can affect surface microbial composition and biological production. This study reports a diverse microbial community associated with dust and other aerosol particles, which differed significantly according to their geographical air mass origin. Microcosm bioassay experiments, in which aerosols were added to sterile (0.2 µm filtered and autoclaved) SE Mediterranean Sea (SEMS) water, were performed to assess the potential impact of airborne bacteria on bacterial abundance, production, and N2 fixation. Significant increase was observed in all parameters within a few hours, and calculations suggest that airborne microbes can account for one third in bacterial abundance and 50-100% in bacterial production and N2-fixation rates following dust/aerosol amendments in the surface SEMS. We show that dust/aerosol deposition can be a potential source of a wide array of microorganisms, which may impact microbial composition and food web dynamics in oligotrophic marine systems such as the SEMS.

  15. Capabilities and Limitations of MISR Aerosol Products in Dust-Laden Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Garay, Michael J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Diner, David J.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Martonchcik, John V.; Lee, Jae N.; Torres, Omar; Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Kassabian, Sero; Chodas, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust particles have significant effects on climate and the environment, and despite notable advances in modeling and satellite and ground-based measurements, remain one of the major factors contributing to large uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing. We examine the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) 11+ year aerosol data record to demonstrate MISR's unique strengths and assess potential biases of MISR products for dust study applications. In particular, we examine MISR's unique capabilities to 1) distinguish dust aerosol from spherical aerosol types, 2) provide aerosol optical depths over bright desert source regions, and 3) provide high-resolution retrievals of dust plume heights and associated winds. We show examples of regional and global MISR data products in dusty regions together with quantitative evaluations of product accuracies through comparisons with independent data sources, and demonstrate applications of MISR data to dust regional and climatological studies, such as dust property evolution during transport, dust source climatology in relation to climatic factors, and dust source dynamics. The potential use of MISR radiance data to study dust properties is also discussed.

  16. Laser Remote Sensing from ISS: CATS Cloud and Aerosol Level 2 Data Products (Heritage Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, Sharon; Palm, Steve; Vaughan, Mark; Yorks, John; McGill, Matt; Jensen, Mike; Murray, Tim; Trepte, Chip

    2016-06-01

    With the recent launch of the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) we have the opportunity to acquire a continuous record of space based lidar measurements spanning from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) era to the start of the EarthCARE mission. Utilizing existing well-validated science algorithms from the CALIPSO mission, we will ingest the CATS data stream and deliver high-quality lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. In this paper we present an overview of procedures necessary to generate CALIPSO-like lidar level 2 data products from the CATS level 1 data products.

  17. Physical Properties and Chemical Composition of Aerosols sampled in T1 site during MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, T.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Saavedra, M. I.; Garcia, J.; Amador, O.; Carabali, G.; Salcido, A.; Herrera, E.; Baez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Results from pollutant measurements and meteorological variables corresponding to the month of March of 2006 during the MILAGRO campaign at site T1 are presented (Tecamac, State of Mexico). Three 8-stage cascade impactors (MOUDI) were employed to obtain aerosol samples of different sizes. For organic species analysis, samples were collected with a PM2.5 High Volume sampler. Mass and chemical composition (inorganic and organic species) were obtained with the use of analytical techniques. Particle morphology analysis was done with a TEM-EDAX System. Physical properties of aerosols were measured with a PSAP, a nephelometer and a CPC. According with area meteorology, days with Mexico City urban influence on T1 (March 9-12) and without influence (March 14 and 15) were analyzed. The particle average concentration during the whole campaign was 20,000 particles/cm3. For the days with and without urban influence the average concentrations were 17,500 and 8,000 particles/cm3 respectively. From the MOUDI data the highest particle concentration through the campaign was during the morning in the mode d50=0.32 μm. On the other hand, the cumulative highest concentration of all the stages was observed for March 19 followed by March 9. Scattering and absorption coefficients average obtained on T1 were 5.1x10-5 m-1 and 2.54x10-5 m-1 respectively and single scattering albedo was 0.676. These values show T1 as a polluted atmosphere, just as happens with megacities. Morphology of particles captured in a MOUDI impactor was studied. Particles between d50=0.18 μm and d50=1.8 μm sampled in T1 associated with urban influence (March 9) tended to show less irregular shapes through different periods of that day. These findings suggest the presence of large numbers of secondary aerosols and aged agglomerated particles. Particles ranging from d50=0.18 μm to d50=1.8 μm sampled in T1 and associated mainly with surrounding areas influence, e.g. Tizayuca Industrial Park (March 15) showed

  18. Aerosol composition at Chacaltaya, Bolivia, as determined by size-fractionated sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, F.; van Espen, P.; Maenhaut, W.

    Thirty-four cascade-impactor samples were collected between September 1977 and November 1978 at Chacaltaya, Bolivia. The concentrations of 25 elements were measured for the six impaction stages of each sample by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and proton-induced X-ray emission analysis. The results indicated that most elements are predominantly associated with a unimodal coarse-particle soil-dustdispersion component. Also chlorine and the alkali and alkaline earth elements belong to this group. The anomalously enriched elements (S, Br and the heavy metals Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Pb and Bi) showed a bimodal size distribution. Correlation coefficient calculations and principal component analysis indicated the presence in the submicrometer aerosol mode of an important component, containing S, K, Zn, As and Br, which may originate from biomass burning. For certain enriched elements (i.e. Zn and perhaps Cu) the coarse-particle enrichments observed may be the result of the true crust-air fractionation during soil-dust dispersion.

  19. PIXE identification of fine and coarse particles of aerosol samples and their distribution across Beirut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumié, M.; Saliba, N.; Nsouli, B.; Younes, M.; Noun, M.; Massoud, R.

    2011-12-01

    This study is the first national attempt to assess the levels of PMs in Beirut city and consequently understand air pollution distribution. Aerosol sampling was carried out using three PM 10 and three PM 2.5 samplers which were installed at three locations lying along the SE-NW direction over Beirut. The sampling of PM 10 and PM 2.5 was done during a period extending from May till December 2009. The random collection of the particles (1 in 6 days) was carried out on Teflon filters, for a period of 24-h. The elemental analysis of particulate matter was performed using proton induced X-ray emission technique PIXE at the Lebanese 1.7 MV Tandem-Pelletron accelerator of Beirut. Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Cl were quantified using 1 MeV proton beam, while K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were determined using 3 MeV-energy of proton beam.

  20. High Resolution Mass Spectrometry of Seasonal Aerosol Samples From an Urban Location in the Italian Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Brendan; Giorio, Chiara; Gallimore, Peter J.; Zielinski, Arthur T.; Tapparo, Andrea; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The Po Valley in Northern Italy represents one of the most polluted environments in Europe, with PM2.5 and ozone concentrations regularly exceeding 100μg/m3 and 50ppb respectively. Particularly during winter, prolonged inversion conditions together with biomass burning and anthropogenic emissions regularly lead to severe air pollution events. Over the course of several months in 2013-14, we carried out a sampling program at a city-centre site in Padova, Italy, collecting 24-hour high-volume aerosol filter samples, 18 in winter (mid December - mid March) and 20 in summer (late May - late July). Utilising high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques, we have characterised these sample sets to examine the long-term variation in aerosol composition over the sampling campaign and to determine the effect of anthropogenic gaseous pollutants such as NOx and SO2 on the composition of organic particle components. The results showed that between ca. 450-700 ions were measured in each sample in both the summer and winter sample sets, however the majority (90%) of ions in the winter samples were below 300m/z and below 380m/z in the summer samples. A much higher percentage of CHO-only ions were found in winter (ca. 27%) compared to the summer samples (ca. 6%), indicating a higher degree of photochemical reactions taking place involving pollutants such as NOx and SO2 in summer. Our results represent the first long term data set of high-resolution measurements of aerosol composition and demonstrate that this technique is an important tool in evaluating the composition of aerosol particles in complex polluted urban areas.

  1. Aerosol Precursor Emissions, Secondary Aerosol Production, and Climate-Forcing Gas Exchange in the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskey, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol precursors in the Midwest are generated from a myriad of sources including biogenic emissions of terpenes from the Ozarks region, anthropogenic emissions of volatile and semivolatile aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from the St. Louis airshed, and agricultural emissions of ammonia (NH3), amines, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from animal husbandry and cropping systems of the Midwest Corn Belt. The deciduous and coniferous forests of the Ozarks region are significant sources of isoprene, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes that are sensitive to rising CO2 levels and temperature and generate light-scattering, secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Application of nitrogen fertilizers stimulates emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O) from agricultural soils and crops. Nitric acid, generated through photooxidation of NO emissions from fossil fuel combustion in urban air and from soil emissions in agroecosystems, reacts rapidly with NH3 to generate light-scattering, secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA). The atmospheric lifetime of N2O is about 120 years, making the substance a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential of 290 for a time horizon of 20 years relative to CO2. Emissions of CO2, N2O, and SIA precursors from the Midwest Corn Belt and surrounding areas are likely to increase in the near future as pastureland and prairie is converted to grow corn and other biofuel crops to meet the demand for renewable fuels. Several large river systems transport nutrients from fertilized fields of the Midwest agroecosystem to the Gulf of Mexico where plankton growth is accelerated. Microbial decomposition of plankton detritus consumes oxygen and creates a hypoxic zone, which might be a significant source of N2O.The presentation will discuss gaps in our knowledge of the production of climate-forcing species in the Midwestern United States.

  2. Fingerprinting El Nino Southern Ocean events using oxygen triple isotopic composition of aerosol sulfate from the South Pole snow pit samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Shaheen, R.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th assessment report [IPCC 2007], aerosols are the largest source of uncertainty in modeling the earth's radiative budget. Sulfate aerosols contributes to global cooling that may mask warming effect by greenhouse gases, therefore, high resolution record of aerosol sulfate can help to understand the impact of anthropogenic activities and natural variations on climate change. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from the ice pit samples obtained from the South Pole (1979-2002) at a high resolution temporal record of the winter and summer seasons. To insure highest measurement ability of very small samples (few nano moles) a hydrogen peroxide cleaning method was developed to remove organic impurities from aerosols which otherwise significantly affect O-triple isotopic measurement of the sulfates. Preliminary data indicated non sea salt contributions of 70-95% with a range in δ18OVSMOW = -1.86 -12% and Δ17O = 0.8-3.7% for the years 1990-2001. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. All other sulfate sources (sea salt sulfates and primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion), including gas-phase oxidation by OH in the troposphere, metal catalyzed oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), are strictly mass dependent (Δ17O = 0%). The magnitude of the transfer of the Δ17O varies according to the relative contribution from H2O2 at pH < 6 (Δ17O = 1%) and O3 at pH > 6 (Δ17O = 8%). Seasonal variations of these oxidants and their contribution to S(IV) oxidation will be discussed. Since our samples include the time period 1977-2002, each year divided into two parts (winter and summer season's aerosols), in addition to seasonal variation in sulfate oxidation pathways, we may also be able to assess if the oxidation cycle of sulfate changes during El Niño years.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis And Synergy Of Aerosol Products From Multiple Satellite Sensors For Advanced Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air, and can be made up of wind-blown dust, smoke from fires, and particulate emissions from automobiles, industries, and other natural and man-made sources. Aerosols can have significant impacts on the air quality, and can interact with clouds and solar radiation in such a way as to affect the water cycle and climate. However, the extent and scale of these impacts are still poorly understood, and this represents one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research to date. To fill this gap in our knowledge, the global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols are being extensively observed and measured, especially during the last decade, using both satellite and ground-based instruments, including such spaceborne sensors as MODIS on the Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR on Terra, OMI on Aura, POLDER on PARASOL, CALIOP on CALIPSO, SeaWiFS on SeaStar, and the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sunphotometers. The aerosol measurements collected by these instruments over the last decade contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. Still, to be able to utilize these measurements synergistically, they have to be carefully and uniformly analyzed and inter-compared, in order to understand the uncertainties and limitations of the products - a process that is greatly complicated by the diversity of differences that exist among them. In this presentation, we will show results of a coherent comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from the above-named satellite sensors relative to AERONET. We use these results to demonstrate how these sensors perform in different parts of the world over different landcover types as well as their performance relative to one another, thereby facilitating product selection and integration for specific research and applications needs.

  4. Aerus-GEO: newly available satellite-derived aerosol optical depth product over Europe and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, D.; Roujean, J. L.; Ceamanos, X.; Six, B.; Suman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The major difficulty in detecting the aerosol signal from visible and near-infrared remote sensing observations is to reach the proper separation of the components related to the atmosphere and the surface. A method is proposed to circumvent this issue by exploiting the directional and temporal dimensions of the satellite signal through the use of a semi-empirical kernel-driven model for the surface/atmosphere coupled system. This algorithm was implemented by the ICARE Data Center (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr), which operationally disseminates a daily AOD product at 670 nm over the MSG disk since 2014. The proposed method referred to as AERUS-GEO (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method - application to GEO data) is applied to three spectral bands (0.6 mm, 0.8 mm, and 1.6 mm) of MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) observations, which scan Europe, Africa, and the Eastern part of South America every 15 minutes. The daily AOD estimates at 0.63μm has been extensively validated. In contrast, the Angstrom coefficient is still going through validation and we will show the differences between the MSG derived Angstrom exponent with that of CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) near-real time aerosol product. The impact of aerosol type on the aerosol radiative forcing will be presented as a part of future development plan.

  5. A Marine Aerosol Reference Tank system as a breaking wave analogue for the production of foam and sea-spray aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, M. D.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Ruppel, M. J.; Ryder, O. S.; Brady, J. M.; Zhao, D.

    2013-04-01

    In order to better understand the processes governing the production of marine aerosols a repeatable, controlled method for their generation is required. The Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART) has been designed to closely approximate oceanic conditions by producing an evolving bubble plume and surface foam patch. The tank utilizes an intermittently plunging sheet of water and large volume tank reservoir to simulate turbulence, plume and foam formation, and the water flow is monitored volumetrically and acoustically to ensure the repeatability of conditions.

  6. Thermodesorption of aerosol matter on multiple filters of different materials for a more detailed evaluation of sampling artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus; Keck, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    Multiple, essentially identical samples of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP aerosol matter were collected on filters of cellulose acetate-nitrate membrane (CA), quartz fiber (QF) and glass fiber (GF) material. The samples were analyzed in terms of the gravimetric mass and the mass of nine inorganic ions. These parameters were also measured after step-wise thermodesorption of aerosol matter by 1-h heating in ambient air up to 350 °C. The observed thermograms of the analyzed ions were compared with results obtained using pure and mixed salts on filter. In summer the apparent mass concentration of aerosol matter collected on CA was always larger than on QF and GF filter. The excess mass on CA was found to be highly volatile, i.e. completely removable at 120 °C, and composed of both ionic and non-ionic matter. The apparent nitrate concentration sampled on QF and GF was almost an order of magnitude lower than on CA. The very pronounced nitrate losses from the fiber filters are attributed to volatilization of ammonium nitrate. In contrast, nitrate losses from CA were small or even negligible for two reasons, pile-up of aerosol matter predominantly on (rather than in) the filter ("cake" formation) and, more importantly, re-adsorption of volatilized ammonia and nitric acid in the filter. Sampling on GF filters was found to suffer from severe problems due to chemical reactions between Na+ of the glass and SO42- of the aerosol matter. A novel type of artifact was observed in sampling campaigns during fall. Presumably as a results of a high water content, the collected aerosol matter became liquefied and a large fraction of the water soluble components was driven through the filter into the support pad underneath. The negative "wetting artifact" was much more pronounced for the thin CA than for the relatively thick QF filters. The total amount of aerosol matter in the CA/pad and QF/pad combinations was the same, indicating that this kind of artifact can be corrected for. Ammonium

  7. Face Mask Sampling for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Expelled Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Joanne; Patel, Hemu; Otu, Jacob; Mlaga, Kodjovi; Sutherland, Jayne S.; Antonio, Martin; Perera, Nelun; Woltmann, Gerrit; Haldar, Pranabashis; Garton, Natalie J.; Barer, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although tuberculosis is transmitted by the airborne route, direct information on the natural output of bacilli into air by source cases is very limited. We sought to address this through sampling of expelled aerosols in face masks that were subsequently analyzed for mycobacterial contamination. Methods In series 1, 17 smear microscopy positive patients wore standard surgical face masks once or twice for periods between 10 minutes and 5 hours; mycobacterial contamination was detected using a bacteriophage assay. In series 2, 19 patients with suspected tuberculosis were studied in Leicester UK and 10 patients with at least one positive smear were studied in The Gambia. These subjects wore one FFP30 mask modified to contain a gelatin filter for one hour; this was subsequently analyzed by the Xpert MTB/RIF system. Results In series 1, the bacteriophage assay detected live mycobacteria in 11/17 patients with wearing times between 10 and 120 minutes. Variation was seen in mask positivity and the level of contamination detected in multiple samples from the same patient. Two patients had non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. In series 2, 13/20 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis produced positive masks and 0/9 patients with extrapulmonary or non-tuberculous diagnoses were mask positive. Overall, 65% of patients with confirmed pulmonary mycobacterial infection gave positive masks and this included 3/6 patients who received diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavages. Conclusion Mask sampling provides a simple means of assessing mycobacterial output in non-sputum expectorant. The approach shows potential for application to the study of airborne transmission and to diagnosis. PMID:25122163

  8. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  9. Photochemical production of aerosols from real plant emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th. F.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Dal Maso, M.; Fisseha, R.; Hohaus, Th.; Spahn, H.; Uerlings, R.; Wegener, R.; Griffiths, P. T.; Dinar, E.; Rudich, Y.; Wahner, A.

    2009-07-01

    Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) which on oxidation form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can couple the vegetation with the atmosphere and climate. Particle formation from tree emissions was investigated in a new setup: a plant chamber coupled to a reaction chamber for oxidizing the plant emissions and for forming SOA. Emissions from the boreal tree species birch, pine, and spruce were studied. In addition, α-pinene was used as reference compound. Under the employed experimental conditions, OH radicals were essential for inducing new particle formation, although O3 (≤80 ppb) was always present and a fraction of the monoterpenes and the sesquiterpenes reacted with ozone before OH was generated. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were linearly related to the VOC carbon mixing ratios, as were the maximum observed volume and the condensational growth rates. For all trees, the threshold of new particle formation was lower than for α-pinene. It was lowest for birch which emitted the largest fraction of oxygenated VOC (OVOC), suggesting that OVOC may play a role in the nucleation process. Incremental mass yields were ≍5% for pine, spruce and α-pinene, and ≍10% for birch. α-Pinene was a good model compound to describe the yield and the growth of SOA particles from coniferous emissions. The mass fractional yields agreed well with observations for boreal forests. Despite the somewhat enhanced VOC and OH concentrations our results may be up-scaled to eco-system level. Using the mass fractional yields observed for the tree emissions and weighting them with the abundance of the respective trees in boreal forests SOA mass concentration calculations agree within 6% with field observations. For a future VOC increase of 50% we predict a particle mass increase due to SOA of 19% assuming today's mass contribution of pre-existing aerosol and oxidant levels.

  10. Photochemical production of aerosols from real plant emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th. F.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Dal Maso, M.; Fisseha, R.; Hohaus, Th.; Spahn, H.; Uerlings, R.; Wegener, R.; Griffiths, P. T.; Dinar, E.; Rudich, Y.; Wahner, A.

    2009-01-01

    By emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) which on oxidation form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) the vegetation is coupled to atmosphere and climate. New particle formation from tree emissions was investigated in a new setup: a plant chamber coupled to a reaction chamber for oxidizing the plant emissions and for forming SOA. The boreal tree species birch, pine, and spruce were studied and α-pinene was used as reference compound. Under the experimental conditions OH radicals were essential for inducing new particle formation, although O3 (≤80 ppb) was always present and a part of the monoterpenes and the sesquiterpenes reacted already with ozone before OH was generated. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were linearly related to the carbon mixing ratios of the VOC, as were the maximum observed volume and the condensational growth rates. The threshold of new particle formation was lower for the tree emissions than for α-pinene. It was lowest for birch with the largest fraction of oxygenated VOC (OVOC) suggesting that OVOC may play a pivotal role in new particle formation. Incremental mass yields were ≍5% for pine, spruce and α-pinene, and ≍10% for birch. α-Pinene was a good model compound to describe the yield and the growth of SOA particles from coniferous emissions. The mass fractional yields agreed well with observations for boreal forests. Despite our somewhat enhanced VOC and OH concentrations our results may thus be up-scaled to eco-system level. Using the mass fractional yields observed for the tree emissions and weighting them with the abundance of the respective trees in boreal forests we calculate SOA mass concentrations which agree within 6% with field observations. For a future VOC increase of 50% we predict a particle mass increase due to SOA of 19% assuming today's mass contribution of pre-existing aerosol.

  11. Sampling honeybee colonies for brood production: a double sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.E.; Gilbert, R.O.; Burgett, M.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure is described for estimating numbers of capped brood cells by double sampling combined with linear regression. A complete census of capped brood cells is better than an estimate, provided it is possible to count all brood cells directly or from photographs of brood frames. The double sampling technique, however, has the advantage of enabling data to be collected more quickly and at a lower cost than for a complete count. It also provides an estimate of the approximate variability associated with brood estimates and a mechanism for correcting biases associated with different investigators or with estimates by the same individual at different times or under different conditions. The technique is easy to apply in the field and involves minimal disturbance to the colony. A disadvantage is that the calculations associated with estimates of brood area are more arduous, estimates of variability are approximate, and brood estimates may be biased if the data are too few. All calculations can be easily adapted to a programmable calculator or small computer. Linear calibration, an alternative to the use of double sampling, is briefly discussed.

  12. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  13. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  14. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  15. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  16. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  17. Observation of aerosol parameters at Saga using GOSAT product validation lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takubo, Shoichiro; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Takeru; Abdullah, Indra Nugraha; Uchino, Osamu; Morino, Isamu; Yokota, Tatsuya; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Maki, Takashi; Arai, Kohei

    2012-11-01

    Greenhouse gases Observation SATellite (GOSAT) was launched to enable the precise monitoring of the density of carbon dioxide by combining global observation data sent from space with data obtained on land, and with simulation models. In addition, observation of methane, another greenhouse gas, has been considered. For validation of GOSAT data products, ground-base observation with Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), aerosol lidar and ozone-DIAL (DIfferencial Absorption Lidar) at Saga University, JAPAN has been continued since March, 2011. In this article, observation results obtained from aerosol lidar are reported.

  18. On the Physics of Fizziness: How liquid properties control bursting bubble aerosol production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Josserand, Christophe; Seon, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Either in a champagne glass or at the oceanic scales, the tiny capillary bubbles rising at the surface burst in ejecting myriads of droplets. Focusing on the ejected droplets produced by a single bubble, we investigate experimentally how liquid properties and bubble size affect their characteristics: number, ejection velocities, sizes and ejection heights. These results allow us to finely tune the bursting bubble aerosol production. In the context of champagne industry, aerosols play a major role by spreading wine aroma above the glass. We demonstrate that this champagne fizz can be enhanced by selecting the wine viscosity and the bubble size, thanks to specially designed glass.

  19. Organic Composition of Size-Segregated Aerosols Sampled During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using non-rotating Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, FL, USA. Daily samples were collected 12 m above ground at a flow rate of 30 lpm throughout the month of May 2002. Aluminum foil discs were used to sample aerosol size fractions with aerodynamic cut diameter of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.17 and 0.093 um. Samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Low detection limits were achieved using a HP Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) and large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolution was obtained using a 60 m long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. A quantification method was built for over 90 organic compounds chosen as source markers including straight/iso/anteiso alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed. Also, results will be compared with samples acquired in different environments including the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, GA, USA.

  20. A decadal regional and global trend analysis of the aerosol optical depth using a data-assimilation grade over-water MODIS and Level 2 MISR aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.

    2010-08-01

    Using the ten-year (2000-2009) DA quality Terra MODIS and MISR aerosol products, as well as 7 years of Aqua MODIS, we studied both regional and global aerosol trends over oceans. This included both natural and data assimilation grade versions of the products. Contrary to some of the previous studies that showed a decreasing trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over global oceans, after correcting for what appears to be aerosol signal drift from the radiometric calibration of both MODIS instruments, we found MODIS and MISR agreed on a statistically negligible global trend of 0.0003/per year. Our study also suggests that AODs over the Indian Bay of Bengal, east coast of Asia, and Arabian Sea show statistically significant increasing trends of 0.07, 0.06, and 0.06 per ten years for MODIS, respectively. Similar increasing trends were found from MISR, but with less relative magnitude. These trends reflect respective increases in the optical intensity of aerosol events in each region: anthropogenic aerosols over the east coast of China and Indian Bay of Bengal; and a stronger influence from dust events over the Arabian Sea. Negative AOD trends are found off Central America, the east coast of North America, and the west coast of Africa. However, confidence levels are low in these regions, which indicate that longer periods of observation are necessary to be conclusive.

  1. Model-Based Estimation of Sampling-Caused Uncertainty in Aerosol Remote Sensing for Climate Research Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, Twan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of sampling frequency on the global monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT), we use 6 years of geographical coordinates of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) L2 aerosol data, daily global aerosol fields generated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model and the chemical transport models Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport, Spectral Radiationtransport Model for Aerosol Species and Transport Model 5, at a spatial resolution between 1.125 deg × 1.125 deg and 2 deg × 3?: the analysis is restricted to 60 deg S-60 deg N geographical latitude. We found that, in general, the MODIS coverage causes an underestimate of the global mean AOT over the ocean. The long-term mean absolute monthly difference between all and dark target (DT) pixels was 0.01-0.02 over the ocean and 0.03-0.09 over the land, depending on the model dataset. Negative DT biases peak during boreal summers, reaching 0.07-0.12 (30-45% of the global long-term mean AOT). Addition of the Deep Blue pixels tempers the seasonal dependence of the DT biases and reduces the mean AOT difference over land by 0.01-0.02. These results provide a quantitative measure of the effect the pixel exclusion due to cloud contamination, ocean sun-glint and land type has on the MODIS estimates of the global monthly mean AOT. We also simulate global monthly mean AOT estimates from measurements provided by pixel-wide along-track instruments such as the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor and the Cloud-Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization. We estimate the probable range of the global AOT standard error for an along-track sensor to be 0.0005-0.0015 (ocean) and 0.0029-0.01 (land) or 0.5-1.2% and 1.1-4% of the corresponding global means. These estimates represent errors due to sampling only and do not include potential retrieval errors. They are smaller than or comparable to the published estimate of 0.01 as being a climatologically significant

  2. Observed aerosol-induced radiative effect on plant productivity in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    We apply satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in conjunction with flux tower-derived estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) to probe the relationship between atmospheric aerosol loading and carbon uptake rate at 10 select sites (4 deciduous broadleaf, 3 cropland, 1 evergreen needle leaf, 1 mixed forest and 1 grassland) on hourly time scales in the growing season in the eastern United States. For deciduous and mixed forests, the aerosol light scattering increases GPP with a maximum effect observed under polluted conditions (AOD >0.6), when diffuse radiation is 40-60%. During midday hours, high AOD conditions (>0.4) enhance plant productivity by ∼13% in deciduous forests. In contrast, we find that high diffuse light fraction does not increase the carbon uptake rate in croplands and grasslands; for these ecosystems, we estimate that high AOD conditions reduce GPP by ∼17% during midday hours. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that have attributed these contrasting response sensitivities to the complex and closed canopy architecture of forests versus crops and grasslands. C4 but not C3 crops may benefit from pollution-induced changes in diffuse and direct light. Further research is needed to investigate the role of local meteorology as a possible confounder in the connection between atmospheric aerosols and plant productivity.

  3. Hygroscopicity of dicarbonyl-amine secondary organic aerosol products investigated with HTDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; de Haan, D. O.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of amine-dicarbonyl chemistry as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathway, producing imines, imidazoles, and N-containing oligomers. Preliminary work in our group has suggested that some of these products may be surface active. Therefore, the presence of these products may result in important changes to submicron particle hygroscopicity that affect aerosol scattering and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, especially in regions with significant amine-containing particles. To investigate their hygroscopicity, we have designed a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system around a 300 L Teflon chamber that allows for longer humidification times needed for some organic aerosol components that are only slightly hygroscopic. This modification provides a range of residence times from 2.5 minutes up to 1 hour, unlike previously published systems that vary from 2-30 seconds. Using the modified hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), we have measured the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of SOA formed from reactions of glyoxal (and methylglyoxal) with methylamine, ammonium sulfate, and several amino acids. Changes to inorganic aerosol HGF in response to the presence of SOA products are also investigated.

  4. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  5. Diffusion battery sampling of sulfuric acid aerosols formed in oleum spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I N; Wong, W T; Munkelwitz, H R

    1980-01-01

    Fuming sulfuric acid (oleum) is one of several hazardous chemicals routinely transported in bulk quantities on US waterways. In the event of a marine accident, a large amount of the cargo acid could suddenly be released into water, resulting in the formation of a dense sulfuric acid cloud. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory to study the factors controlling the extent of acid aerosol formation under conditions likely to occur in maritime spill accidents. A Sinclair-type diffusion battery was used for aerosol sizing. In this presentation, a brief discussion of an improved nonlinear iterative inversion method for the analysis of diffusion battery data is given. Experimental results obtained with monodisperse test aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols formed during oleum spills are presented. It is shown that the diffusion battery, coupled with the inversion technique, is capable of sizing particles up to 0.8 ..mu..m in diameter.

  6. THE NIST-EPA INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT ON MEASUREMENTS AND STANDARDS IN AEROSOL CARBON: SAMPLING REGIONAL PM 2.5 FOR THE CHEMOMETRIC OPTIMIZATION OF THERMAL-OPTICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the NIST-EPA Interagency Agreement on Measurements and Standards in Aerosol Carbon: Sampling Regional PM2.5 for the Chemometric Optimization of Thermal-Optical Analysis Study will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annual Confer...

  7. Comparison of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) joint aerosol product with high-resolution model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O.; Lee, H.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Level 3 Joint Aerosol product (JOINT_AS) provides global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical thickness (AOT) for eight different types of aerosols at 5 x 5 degrees of horizontal resolution in each month between March 2000 and present. Using Version 22 JOINT_AS, this study analyzed characteristics of the observed AOT distributions and compared various statistical moments of aerosol optical thickness derived from JOINT_AS with the results from Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulation. Overall, marginal distributions of AOT show highly positive skewness at many grid points. Some of the large skewness values are related to the problems in MISR's retrieval algorithm. For example, the positive skewness in AOT for strongly absorbing aerosols at mid- and high latitudes in winter results from few outlier values is due to cloud contamination over a wide area. Combined AOT for multiple MISR aerosol types is comparable to the AOT for carbonaceous, sulfate aerosols and dust particles from the NICAM simulation implemented with aerosol transport processes. NICAM's carbonaceous aerosols in the Southwest Africa show good agreement with MISR's strongly absorbing aerosols. The AOT of dust particles in MISR and NICAM exhibit similar spatial patterns over the Sahara desert. The AOT of nonabsorbing aerosols in MISR well represents spatial distributions of the sulfate aerosols originating from industrial complex over the Shandong Peninsula in China. Our results indicate that MISR's AOT for each aerosol type may be useful for monitoring biomass burning, dust storms and air pollution and evaluating chemistry climate models.

  8. Efficacy of screens in removing long fibers from an aerosol stream – sample preparation technique for toxicology studies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Deye, Gregory J.; Turkevich, Leonid A.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber dimension (especially length) and biopersistence are thought to be important variables in determining the pathogenicity of asbestos and other elongate mineral particles. In order to prepare samples of fibers for toxicology studies, it is necessary to develop and evaluate methods for separating fibers by length in the micrometer size range. In this study, we have filtered an aerosol of fibers through nylon screens to investigate whether such screens can efficiently remove the long fibers (L >20 μm, a typical macrophage size) from the aerosol stream. Such a sample, deficient in long fibers, could then be used as the control in a toxicology study to investigate the role of length. A well-dispersed aerosol of glass fibers (a surrogate for asbestos) was generated by vortex shaking a Japan Fibrous Material Research Association (JFMRA) glass fiber powder. Fibers were collected on a mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter, imaged with phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and lengths were measured. Length distributions of the fibers that penetrated through various screens (10, 20 and 60 μm mesh sizes) were analyzed; additional study was made of fibers that penetrated through double screen and centrally blocked screen configurations. Single screens were not particularly efficient in removing the long fibers; however, the alternative configurations, especially the centrally blocked screen configuration, yielded samples substantially free of the long fibers. PMID:24417374

  9. Formation and evolution of molecular products in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; McVay, Renee C; Huang, Dan D; Dalleska, Nathan F; Aumont, Bernard; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-11-17

    Much of our understanding of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from volatile organic compounds derives from laboratory chamber measurements, including mass yield and elemental composition. These measurements alone are insufficient to identify the chemical mechanisms of SOA production. We present here a comprehensive dataset on the molecular identity, abundance, and kinetics of α-pinene SOA, a canonical system that has received much attention owing to its importance as an organic aerosol source in the pristine atmosphere. Identified organic species account for ∼58-72% of the α-pinene SOA mass, and are characterized as semivolatile/low-volatility monomers and extremely low volatility dimers, which exhibit comparable oxidation states yet different functionalities. Features of the α-pinene SOA formation process are revealed for the first time, to our knowledge, from the dynamics of individual particle-phase components. Although monomeric products dominate the overall aerosol mass, rapid production of dimers plays a key role in initiating particle growth. Continuous production of monomers is observed after the parent α-pinene is consumed, which cannot be explained solely by gas-phase photochemical production. Additionally, distinct responses of monomers and dimers to α-pinene oxidation by ozone vs. hydroxyl radicals, temperature, and relative humidity are observed. Gas-phase radical combination reactions together with condensed phase rearrangement of labile molecules potentially explain the newly characterized SOA features, thereby opening up further avenues for understanding formation and evolution mechanisms of α-pinene SOA. PMID:26578760

  10. A consistent aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset over mainland China by integration of several AOD products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Guang, J.; Xue, Y.; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Che, Y. H.; Guo, Jianping; He, X. W.; Wang, T. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provide validated aerosol optical depth (AOD) products over both land and ocean. However, the values of the AOD provided by each of these satellites may show spatial and temporal differences due to the instrument characteristics and aerosol retrieval algorithms used for each instrument. In this article we present a method to produce an AOD data set over Asia for the year 2007 based on fusion of the data provided by different instruments and/or algorithms. First, the bias of each satellite-derived AOD product was calculated by comparison with ground-based AOD data derived from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) for different values of the surface albedo and the AOD. Then, these multiple AOD products were combined using the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) method using weights derived from the root mean square error (RMSE) associated with the accuracies of the original AOD products. The original and merged AOD dataset has been validated by comparison with AOD data from the CARSNET. Results show that the mean bias error (MBE) and mean absolute error (MAE) of the merged AOD dataset are not larger than that of any of the original AOD products. In addition, for the merged AOD dataset the fraction of pixels with no data is significantly smaller than that of any of the original products, thus increasing the spatial coverage. The fraction of retrievable area is about 50% for the merged AOD dataset and between 5% and 20% for the MISR, SeaWiFS, MODIS-DT and MODIS-DB algorithms.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office

  12. Biology of the Coarse Aerosol Mode: Insights Into Urban Aerosol Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Montero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial aerosols have been understudied, despite implications for climate studies, public health, and biogeochemical cycling. Because viable bacterial aerosols are often associated with coarse aerosol particles, our limited understanding of the coarse aerosol mode further impedes our ability to develop models of viable bacterial aerosol production, transport, and fate in the outdoor environment, particularly in crowded urban centers. To address this knowledge gap, we studied aerosol particle biology and size distributions in a broad range of urban and rural settings. Our previously published findings suggest a link between microbial viability and local production of coarse aerosols from waterways, waste treatment facilities, and terrestrial systems in urban and rural environments. Both in coastal Maine and in New York Harbor, coarse aerosols and viable bacterial aerosols increased with increasing wind speeds above 4 m s-1, a dynamic that was observed over time scales ranging from minutes to hours. At a New York City superfund-designated waterway regularly contaminated with raw sewage, aeration remediation efforts resulted in significant increases of coarse aerosols and bacterial aerosols above that waterway. Our current research indicates that bacterial communities in aerosols at this superfund site have a greater similarity to bacterial communities in the contaminated waterway with wind speeds above 4 m s-1. Size-fractionated sampling of viable microbial aerosols along the urban waterfront has also revealed significant shifts in bacterial aerosols, and specifically bacteria associated with coarse aerosols, when wind direction changes from onshore to offshore. This research highlights the key connections between bacterial aerosol viability and the coarse aerosol fraction, which is important in assessments of production, transport, and fate of bacterial contamination in the urban environment.

  13. A decadal regional and global trend analysis of the aerosol optical depth using a data-assimilation grade over-water MODIS and Level 2 MISR aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    Using the ten-year (2000-2009) Data-Assimilation (DA) quality Terra MODIS and MISR aerosol products, as well as 7 years of Aqua MODIS, we studied both regional and global aerosol trends over oceans. This included both operational and data assimilation grade versions of the products. After correcting for what appears to be aerosol signal drift from the radiometric calibration of both MODIS instruments, we found MODIS and MISR agreed on a statistically negligible global trend of ±0.003/per decade. Our study also suggests that AODs over the Indian Bay of Bengal, east coast of Asia, and Arabian Sea show increasing trends of 0.07, 0.06, and 0.06 per decade for MODIS, respectively. These regional trends are considered as significant with a confidence level above 95%. Similar increasing trends were found from MISR, but with less relative magnitude. These trends reflect respective increases in the optical intensity of aerosol events in each region: anthropogenic aerosols over the east coast of China and Indian Bay of Bengal; and a stronger influence from dust events over the Arabian Sea. Negative AOD trends, low in confidence levels, are found off Central America, the east coast of North America, and the west coast of Africa, which indicate that longer periods of observation are necessary to be conclusive.

  14. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components. PMID:21626190

  15. Laser Remote Sensing from ISS: the CATS-CALIPSO Cloud and Aerosol Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, S. D.; Palm, S. P.; Jensen, M. H.; Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a dual-beam, multi-wavelength (1064, 532 and 355 nm), polarization sensitive (1064 and 532 nm) lidar developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for deployment to the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2014. CATS will be mounted on the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and will provide near-continuous, altitude-resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. The ISS orbit path provides a unique opportunity to capture the full diurnal cycle of cloud and aerosol development and transport, allowing for studies that are not possible with the lidar aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, which flies in the sun-synchronous A-Train orbit. One of the primary objectives of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO data record to provide continuity of aerosol and cloud lidar observations during the transition from CALIPSO to EarthCARE. To accomplish this, the CATS project at GSFC and the CALIPSO project at NASA's Langley Research Center are closely collaborating to develop and deliver a full suite of CALIPSO-like level 2 data products generated from the newly acquired CATS level 1B data. Now in its eighth year of on-orbit operations, the CALIPSO project has developed a robust set of mature and well-validated science algorithms to retrieve the spatial and optical properties of clouds and aerosols from multi-wavelength lidar backscatter signal. By leveraging both new and existing NASA technical resources, this joint effort by the CATS-CALIPSO team will enable rapid delivery of high-quality lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. In this work we outline the development of the CALIPSO- CATS level 2 software and data products and describe the modifications made to the input CATS data stream and the CALIPSO processing algorithms in order to successfully interface two disparate data processing

  16. United role of radon decay products and nano-aerosols in radon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerajec, M.; Vaupotič, J.

    2012-04-01

    The major part of human exposure to natural radiation originates from inhalation of radon (Rn) and radon short-lived decay products (RnDP: 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 214Po). RnDP are formed as a result of α-transformation of radon. In the beginning they are positive ions which neutralize and form clusters with air molecules, and later partly attach to background aerosol particles in indoor air. Eventually, they appear as radioactive nano-aerosols with a bimodal size distribution in ranges of 1-10 nm (unattached RnDP) and of 200-800 nm (attached RnDP). When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory tract. Deposition is more efficient for smaller particles. Therefore, the fraction (fun) of the unattached RnDP, which appears to be influenced by the number concentration and size distribution of general (background) aerosols in the ambient air, has a crucial role in radon dosimetry. Radon, radon decay products and general aerosols have been monitored simultaneously in the kitchen of a typical rural house under real living conditions, also comprising four human activities generating particular matter: cooking and baking, as two typical activities in kitchen, and cigarette smoking and candle burning. In periods without any human activity, the total number concentration of general aerosol ranged from 1000 to 3000 cm-3,with the geometric mean of particle diameter in the range of 60-68 nm and with 0.1-1 % of particles smaller than 10 nm. Preparation of coffee changed the concentration to 193,000 cm-3, the geometric mean of diameter to 20 nm and fraction of particles smaller than 10 nm to 11 %. The respective changes were for baking cake: 503,000 cm-3, 17 nm and 19 %, for smoking:423,000 cm-3, 83 nm and 0.4 %, and forcandle burning: 945,000 cm-3, 8 nm and 85 %. While, as expected, a reduction of fun was observed during cooking, baking and smoking, when larger particles were emitted, fun did not increase during candle burning with mostly particles smaller than 10 nm

  17. Chemical composition of individual aerosol particles in workplace air during production of manganese alloys.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S; Weinbruch, S; Wentzel, M; Ortner, H M; Skogstad, A; Hetland, S; Thomassen, Y

    2000-02-01

    Aerosol particle samples were collected at ELKEM ASA ferromanganese (FeMn) and silicomanganese (SiMn) smelters at Porsgrunn, Norway, during different production steps: raw material mixing, welding of protective steel casings, tapping of FeMn and slag, crane operation moving the ladles with molten metal, operation of the Metal Oxygen Refinement (MOR) reactor and casting of SiMn. Aerosol fractions were assessed for the analysis of the bulk elemental composition as well as for individual particle analysis. The bulk elemental composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. For individual particle analysis, an electron microprobe was used in combination with wavelength-dispersive techniques. Most particles show a complex composition and cannot be attributed to a single phase. Therefore, the particles were divided into six groups according to their chemical composition: Group I, particles containing mainly metallic Fe and/or Mn; Group II, slag particles containing mainly Fe and/or Mn oxides; Group III, slag particles consisting predominantly of oxidized flux components such as Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Na and K; Group IV, particles consisting mainly of carbon; Group V, mixtures of particles from Groups II, III and IV; Group VI, mixtures of particles from Groups II and III. In raw material mixing, particles originating from the Mn ores were mostly found. In the welding of steel casings, most particles were assigned to Group II, Mn and Fe oxides. During the tapping of slag and metal, mostly slag particles from Group III were found (oxides of the flux components). During movement of the ladles, most particles came from Group II. At the MOR reactor, most of the particles belonged to the slag phase consisting of the flux components (Group III). The particles collected during the casting of SiMn were mainly attributed to the slag phase (Groups III and V). Due to the compositional complexity of the particles, toxicological investigations on the

  18. Factors Regulating the Size-Resolved Production and Composition of Nascent Marine Aerosols (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, W. C.; Frossard, A.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Russell, L. M.; Kieber, D. J.; Kinsey, J.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2010-12-01

    Bursting bubbles generated by breaking wind waves at the ocean surface are a major but poorly constrained global source for aerosol mass, volume, and number and associated reactive constituents all of which significantly influence the multiphase physicochemical evolution of Earth’s troposphere and climate. During a spring 2010 cruise of the R/V Atlantis in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, marine aerosols were produced in a high-capacity glass and Teflon generator by artificially injecting zero air into fresh flowing seawater via coarse (A) and fine (D) frits at 1.2 m depth and seawater jets impinging upon the surface. Size-resolved number concentrations and organic and inorganic composition, organic functional groups, bubble-plume volumes, and near-surface bubble sizes were characterized over ranges of bubble and seawater flow rates and headspace RH. Seawater temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll a concentrations were measured in parallel. Relative to fine frits, bubble-plume volumes generated with coarse frits were three times smaller due to the higher initial rise velocity and shorting lifetimes of larger bubbles. However, bubbles produced by both coarse and fine frits evolved in response to surface tension to similar size (0.2- to 0.5-mm diameter) near the water-air interface. Consequently, the two frit sizes produced similar number fluxes of size-resolved aerosols per unit volume air flux. Production fluxes of supermicron- and submicron-diameter size fractions varied as linear functions of air detrainment. Ranges in centroids for number size distributions of aerosols produced with coarse (70- to 100-nm dry diameter) and fine frits (60- to 80-nm dry diameter) overlapped. Centroids for size distributions produced by a bubbler-type generator deployed in open seawater adjacent to the ship ranged from 55- 60-nm dry diameter. Number-size distributions produced by water jets were shifted towards larger particles with centroids of 100- to 150-nm dry diameter

  19. Aerosol sampling: Comparison of two rotating impactors for field droplet sizing and volumetric measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper compares the collection characteristics of a new rotating impactor for ultra fine aerosols (FLB) with the industry standard (Hock). The volume and droplet size distribution collected by the rotating impactors were measured via spectroscopy and microscopy. The rotary impactors were co-lo...

  20. DETERMINATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL PRODUCTS FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF TOLUENE AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN AMBIENT PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic aerosol products from photooxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. The laboratory experiments consisted of irradiating toluene/propylene/NOX/air mixtures in a smog chamber operated in the dynamic mode...

  1. 3. Guidelines for efficacy testing of household insecticide products - Mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document provides specific and standardized procedures and criteria for efficacy testing and evaluation of specific household insecticide products intended for indoor use against mosquitoes, namely, mosquito coils, vaporizer mats, liquid vaporizers, ambient emanators and aerosols....

  2. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water) and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution). Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  3. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9 % reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  4. A new operational EUMETSAT product for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land (PMAp v2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy; Lang, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task to provide data for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolution for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) has been delivered as an operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The product is now extended to pixels over land using a new release of the operational PMAp processor (PMAp v2). The pre-operational data dissemination of the new PMAp v2 data to our users is scheduled for March 2016. This presentation gives an overview on the new operational product PMAp v2 with a focus on the validation of the PMAp aerosol optical depth over land. The impact of different error sources on the results (e.g. surface contribution to the TOA reflectance) is discussed. We also show first results of upcoming extensions of our PMAp processor, in particular the improvement of the cloud/aerosol discrimination of thick aerosol events (e.g. volcanic ash plumes, desert dust outbreaks).

  5. The influence of marine microbial activities on aerosol production: A laboratory mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Bothe, Dylan W.; Radway, JoAnn C.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    The oceans cover most of the Earth's surface, contain nearly half the total global primary biomass productivity, and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. Here we experimentally investigate links between biological activity in seawater and sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, a relationship of potential significance for organic aerosol loading and cloud formation over the oceans and thus for climate globally. Bubbles were generated in laboratory mesocosm experiments either by recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Experiments were conducted with Atlantic Ocean seawater collected off the eastern end of Long Island, NY, and with artificial seawater containing cultures of bacteria and phytoplankton Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Changes in SSA size distributions occurred during all phases of bacterial and phytoplankton growth, as characterized by cell concentrations, dissolved organic carbon, total particulate carbon, and transparent exopolymer particles (gel-forming polysaccharides representing a major component of biogenic exudate material). Over a 2 week growth period, SSA particle concentrations increased by a factor of less than 2 when only bacteria were present and by a factor of about 3 when bacteria and phytoplankton were present. Production of jet-generated SSA particles of diameter less than 200 nm increased with time, while production of all particle diameters increased with time when frits were used. The implications of a marine biological activity dependent SSA flux are discussed.

  6. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Riziq, A. A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different relative humidity (RH) conditions, varying from dry conditions (~20 % RH) and up to 90 % RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90 %). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90 % to ~40 %. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50 %, 75 % and 90 % show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including imidazoles) increases with increasing RH value. A core/shell model used for the investigation of the optical properties of the reaction products of AS 300nm with gas phase glyoxal, shows that the refractive index (RI) of the reaction products are in the range between 1.57-1.71 for the real part and between 0-0.02 for the imaginary part of the RI at 355 nm. The observed increase in the

  7. Regional PIXE facility at Chandigarh (India) and Trace Element Analysis of Aerosol and Bio-medical Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, I. M.

    2009-03-10

    A regional Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) facility is newly developed using 3 Mev Proton beam from Variable Energy Cyclotron, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India). A new target chamber has been designed to cater for Proton Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) along with PIXE measurements. The HPGe x-ray detector, the Ge (Li) gamma-ray detector and a silicon surface barrier (SSB) detector can be mounted simultaneously in the chamber for this purpose. A remotely controlled stepper motor is provided to move the target wheel holding 12/24 samples at a time. This facility is now routinely used for the detection of trace elements in the aerosol, medical and forensic science samples. The paper presents the analysis of Aerosol samples collected from highly polluted steel city of Mandi Govindgarh in Punjab state and relatively clean city of Jammu in Jammu and Kashmir region. The results from the analysis of these samples show some basic differences in the trace element profile of the two cities. The paper also describes the trace element analysis of fly ash in the vicinity of Ropar Thermal Power plant in Punjab. The scope of this study was to determine the concentration and composition of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in the vicinity of coal-fired thermal power plants in India. The data taken for the Bio-medical samples are also discussed.

  8. Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-08-11

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

  9. CIP10 optimization for 4,4-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate aerosol sampling and field comparison with impinger method.

    PubMed

    Puscasu, Silvia; Aubin, Simon; Cloutier, Yves; Sarazin, Philippe; Tra, Huu V; Gagné, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    4,4-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) aerosol exposure evaluation in spray foam insulation application is known as being a challenge because the spray foam application actually involves a fast-curing process. Available techniques are either not user-friendly or are inaccurate or not validated for this application. To address these issues, a new approach using a CIP10M was developed to appropriately collect MDI aerosol in spray foam insulation while being suitable for personal sampling. The CIP10M is a commercially available personal aerosol sampler that has been validated for the collection of microbial spores into a liquid medium. Tributylphosphate with 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (MOPIP) was introduced into the CIP10M to collect and stabilize the MDI aerosols. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the method were 0.007 and 0.024 μg ml(-1), respectively. The dynamic range was from 0.024 to 0.787 μg ml(-1) (with R (2) ≥ 0.990), which corresponds to concentrations in the air from 0.04 to 1.3 µg m(-3), assuming 60 min of sampling at 10 l min(-1). The intraday and interday analytical precisions were <2% for all of the concentration levels tested, and the accuracy was within an appropriate range of 98 ± 1%. No matrix effect was observed, and a total recovery of 99% was obtained. Parallel sampling was performed in a real MDI foam spraying environment with a CIP10M and impingers containing toluene/MOPIP (reference method). The results obtained show that the CIP10M provides levels of MDI monomer in the same range as the impingers, and higher levels of MDI oligomers. The negative bias observed for MDI monomer was between 2 and 26%, whereas the positive bias observed for MDI oligomers was between 76 and 113%, with both biases calculated with a confidence level of 95%. The CIP10M seems to be a promising approach for MDI aerosol exposure evaluation in spray foam applications. PMID:25452291

  10. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  11. On the effect of water-soluble compounds removal on EC quantification by TOT analysis in aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzalunga, A.; Bernardoni, V.; Fermo, P.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, three different thermal protocols were tested on untreated and water-washed aerosol samples to study the influence of soluble organic and inorganic compounds on EC measurements. Moreover, analyses on the water soluble extracts were carried out. The aim was to find out the most suitable protocol to analyse samples collected in a heavily polluted area. Indeed, the tests were performed on real samples collected at an urban background station in the Po Valley, which is one of the main pollution hot-spots in Europe. The main differences among the tested protocols were the maximum temperature of the He step (i.e. 870 °C, 650 °C, and 580 °C) and the duration of the plateaus during the heating procedure. Our measurements evidenced the presence of a significant amount of weakly light-absorbing aerosol evolving during the highest temperature step in He (i.e. 870 °C), which makes lower temperature protocols not suitable for EC determination in samples collected in heavily polluted areas like Milan.

  12. ACE-Asia: Size Resolved Sampling of Aerosols on the Ronald H Brown and US Western Receptor Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Cruz, M. P.; Cliff, S. S.; Perry, K. D.; Cahill, T. A.; Bates, T. S.

    2001-12-01

    The ACE (Aerosol Characterization Experiment)-Asia project was pre-dominantly performed during the spring of 2001. In addition to the core Asian sampling sites, we sampled at 4 Western US receptor sites. The receptor sites include, Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, Crater Lake Oregon, Adak Island, Alaska and Rattlesnake Mountain, Washington. A small subset of sites (Rattlesnake Mtn., MLO, and Asian sites) continued during a 6-week intensive summer study. For the spring study, an 8-stage DRUM impactor also sampled aboard the NOAA ship RV Ronald H Brown, and mix of 8- and 3-DRUM impactors were used at the western US receptor sites. The impactors are capable of size-segregated, time-resolved aerosol collection. The size categories for the 8-DRUM are inlet-5.00, 5.00-2.50, 2.50-1.15, 1.15-0.75, 0.75-0.56, 0.56-0.34, 0.34-.026, 0.26-.09 microns and 3-DRUM: 2.50-1.10, 1.10-0.34, 0.34-0.12 microns. These samples were analyzed in 6 hour time bites using synchrotron-XRF for quantitative composition for elements sodium through uranium, when present. A major dust event occurring around April 13 was detected at all receptor sites. Comparisons of key elemental ratios and conservative tracers will be presented.

  13. RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System for detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from aerosol collection samples: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Ted; Ryan, Valorie; Spaulding, Usha K; Clemens, Kristine M; Ota, Irene M; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    The RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System was validated in a collaborative study for the detection of Bacillus anthracis in aerosol collection buffer. Phosphate-buffered saline was charged with 1 mg/mL standardized dust to simulate an authentic aerosol collection sample. The dust-charged buffer was spiked with either B. anthracis Ames at 2000 spores/mL or Bacillus cereus at 20 000 spores/mL. Twelve collaborators participated in the study, with four collaborators at each of three sites. Each collaborator tested 12 replicates of B. anthracis in dust-charged buffer and 12 replicates of B. cereus in dust-charged buffer. All samples sets were randomized and blind-coded. All collaborators produced valid data sets (no collaborators displayed systematic errors) and there was only one invalid data point. After unblinding, the analysis revealed a cross-collaborator probability of detection (CPOD) of 1.00 (144 positive results from 144 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.975-1.00) for the B. anthracis samples and a CPOD of 0.00 (0 positive results from 143 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.00-0.0262) for the B. cereus samples. These data meet the requirements of AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement 2010.003, developed by the Stakeholder Panel on Agent Detection Assays. PMID:23767365

  14. AMS Measurements in National Parks of Aerosol Mass, Size and Composition, Comparison with Filter Samples and Correlation with Particle Hygroscopicity and Optical Extinction Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M.; Taylor, N. F.; Collins, D. R.; Kumar, N.; Allen, J.; Newburn, M.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Zielinska, B.

    2011-12-01

    We report a comparison of results from aerosol studies at Great Smoky Mountain National Park (2006), Mt. Rainier National Park (2009) and Acadia National Park (2011), all class I visibility areas associated with IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) sites. This collaborative study was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and was done with the cooperation of the National Park Service and the EPA. The atmospheric aerosol composition in these sites is influenced by a number of anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources, providing a rich environment for fundamental aerosol studies. The primary purpose of these studies was to add state-of-the-art aerosol instrumentation to the standard light extinction and aerosol measurements at the site, used to determine parameters for the IMPROVE light extinction reconstruction equation, adopted by the EPA to estimate light extinction from atmospheric aerosol concentrations and Rayleigh scattering. The combination of these diverse measurements also provides significant insight into fundamental aerosol properties such as aging and radiative forcing. New instrumentation included a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne Q-AMS-Smoky Mountain Study), a high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS - Mt. Rainier and Acadia studies) for real time measurements that directly address the relationship between sulfate, nitrate, and OC size and concentration, which is related to cloud and dry gas-to-particle conversion as air masses age during transport, the relationship between WSOC hygroscopic growth and oxygenated organic (OOA) composition, the OCM/OC ratio, and the chemical composition that determines the ambient hygroscopic state. The OCM/OC ratio and organic water uptake was addressed with high-volume and medium volume PM2.5 aerosol samples. Aerosols were collected daily on Teflon coated glass fiber filters (TGFF) in four high-volume PM2.5 samplers

  15. Development, Application, and Transition of Aerosol and Trace Gas Products Derived from Next-Generation Satellite Observations to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Naeger, Aaron; Zavodsky, Bradley; McGrath, Kevin; LaFontaine, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a history of successfully transitioning unique observations and research capabilities to the operational weather community to improve short-term forecasts. SPoRTstrives to bridge the gap between research and operations by maintaining interactive partnerships with end users to develop products that match specific forecast challenges, provide training, and assess the products in the operational environment. This presentation focuses on recent product development, application, and transition of aerosol and trace gas products to operations for specific forecasting applications. Recent activities relating to the SPoRT ozone products, aerosol optical depth composite product, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol index products are discussed.

  16. Secondary organic aerosol formation from m-xylene photooxidation: The role of the phenolic product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Qi, L.; Clark, C.; Sato, K.; Tang, P.; Cocker, D.

    2009-12-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons comprise a significant fraction of volatile organic compounds in the urban atmosphere and their importance as precursors to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been widely recognized. However, SOA formation from aromatics is one of the least understood processes among all the classes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its complex multi-generation reactions. Phenolic compounds have been identified as one of the significant products from OH-initiated reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons and are suggested to have a very high potential of SOA formation (e.g., cresol isomers having SOA yield 9~42%, Henry et al., Atmos. Environ., 2008). We examined the effect of extent of oxidation of m-xylene on chemical composition and physical properties using m-xylene and xylenol as reactants in environmental chamber experiments. Chemical composition of SOA was investigated by Liquid Chromatography / Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (LC/ToF-MS), and Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Physical properties of SOA such as density, volatility, and hygroscopicity were investigated by Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS), Hygroscopicity/Volatility - Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H/V-TDMA), respectively. Also SOA yields were obtained to evaluate the importance of xylenol as an intermediate product.

  17. A relative humidity processing method for the sampling of aerosol particles with low growth-ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Bengt G.; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Asking, Lars; Cederfelt, Sven-Inge

    1992-11-01

    A method for the fractionation of aerosol particles with respect to size and ability to grow with an increased relative humidity has been developed. The system consists of cascade impactors, diffusion driers, a humidifier, and a temperature stabilizer. Diffusion driers were designed and the vapor penetration was modeled below 20 percent. A humidifier which can be operated with an output relative humidity above 95 percent was developed. Flow-rates up to 51/min can be used and the relative humidity can be controlled within approximately 1 percent. The ability of the system to fractionate aerosol particles with respect to growth with relative humidity was investigated. The equivalent aerodynamic diameter growth factor for sodium chloride was determined to 2 at a relative humidity of 98 percent, in good agreement with theory.

  18. Composition of microbial communities in aerosol, snow and ice samples from remote glaciated areas (Antarctica, Alps, Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, J.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Řeháková, K.

    2007-06-01

    Taxonomical and ecological analyses were performed on micro-autotrophs (cyanobacteria and algae together with remnants of diatom valves), micro-fungi (hyphae and spores), bacteria (rod, cocci and red clusters), yeast, and plant pollen extracted from various samples: Alps snow (Mt. Blank area), Andean snow (Illimani, Bolivia), Antarctic aerosol filters (Dumont d'Urville, Terre Adélie), and Antarctic inland ice (Terre Adélie). Three methods for ice and snow sample's pre-concentration were tested (filtration, centrifugation and lyophilisation). Afterwards, cultivation methods for terrestrial, freshwater and marine microorganisms (micro-autotrophs and micro-fungi) were used in combination with liquid and solid media. The main goal of the study was to find out if micro-autotrophs are commonly transported by air masses, and later stored in snow and icecaps around the world. The most striking result of this study was the absence of culturable micro-autotrophs in all studied samples. However, an unusual culturable pigmented prokaryote was found in both alpine snow and aerosol samples. Analyses of many samples and proper statistical analyses (PCA, RDA- Monte Carlo permutation tests) showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in both microbial community and biotic remnants composition F=9.33, p=0.001. In addition, GLM showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in numbers of categories of microorganisms and remnants of biological material F=11.45, p=0.00005. The Antarctic aerosol samples were characterised by having red clusters of bacteria, the unusual prokaryote and yeasts. The high mountain snow from the Alps and Andes contained much more culturable heterotrophs. The unusual prokaryote was very abundant, as were coccoid bacteria, red clusters of bacteria, as well as yeasts. The Antarctic ice samples were quite different. These samples had higher numbers of rod bacteria and fungal hyphae. The microbial communities and biological remnants of

  19. Culturability of Bacillus spores on aerosol collection filters exposed to airborne combustion products of Al, Mg, and B·Ti.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Atin; Yermakov, Michael; Indugula, Reshmi; Reponen, Tiina; Driks, Adam; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of bioweapon facilities due to explosion or fire could aerosolize highly pathogenic microorganisms. The post-event air quality assessment is conducted through air sampling. A bioaerosol sample (often collected on a filter for further culture-based analysis) also contains combustion products, which may influence the microbial culturability and, thus, impact the outcome. We have examined the interaction between spores deposited on collection filters using two simulants of Bacillus anthracis [B. thuringiensis (Bt) and B. atrophaeus (referred to as BG)] and incoming combustion products of Al as well as Mg and B·Ti (common ingredient of metalized explosives). Spores extracted from Teflon, polycarbonate, mixed cellulose ester (MCE), and gelatin filters (most common filter media for bioaerosol sampling), which were exposed to combustion products during a short-term sampling, were analyzed by cultivation. Surprisingly, we observed that aluminum combustion products enhanced the culturability of Bt (but not BG) spores on Teflon filters increasing the culturable count by more than an order of magnitude. Testing polycarbonate and MCE filter materials also revealed a moderate increase of culturability although gelatin did not. No effect was observed with either of the two species interacting on either filter media with products originated by combustion of Mg and B·Ti. Sample contamination, spore agglomeration, effect of a filter material on the spore survival, changes in the spore wall ultrastructure and germination, as well as other factors were explored to interpret the findings. The study raises a question about the reliability of certain filter materials for collecting airborne bio-threat agents in combustion environments. PMID:26914458

  20. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties as derived from collocated measurements using polarization lidar and direct sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tetsu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Mano, Yuzo; Zaizen, Yuji; Inomata, Yayoi

    2012-12-01

    Collocated and simultaneous measurements of aerosols near the ground were conducted using a lidar and aerosol sampler at Tsukuba, Japan, to clarify the relationship between lidar-derived optical properties and in-situ microphysical properties. The total linear particle depolarization ratio (δp) ranged from 14% to 18% when nonspherical mineral dust particles were predominant in the supermicrometer range on May 7-8, 2008, whereas it ranged from 6% to 7% when spherical sea-salt particles were predominant in that range on September 3-4, 2008. Sulfates and nitrates were predominant in the submicrometer range for these two periods. Water-dialysis analysis on May 6-7 indicated that 29% of the coarse particles were water insoluble, whereas 70% were water soluble or nearly soluble on September 3-4. The ratio of dry mass concentration to the backscattering coefficient (M/βp) was 34-39 g m-2 sr on May 7-8 and 6.2-6.3 g m-2 sr on September 3-4. Our results provide evidence that lidar-derived βp and δp capture the aerosol mass concentration and relative abundance of the spherical and nonspherical particles although the microphysical properties vary significantly for individual particles.

  1. Laser Remote Sensing From ISS: CATS Cloud and Aerosol Level 2 Data Products (Heritage Edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Palm, Steve; Jensen, Mike; Yorks, John; McGill, Matt; Trepte, Chip; Murray, Tim; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2015-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) instrument was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and deployed to the International Space Station (ISS) on 10 January 2015. CATS is mounted on the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility (JEM_EF) and will provide near-continuous, altitude-resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. The CATS ISS orbit path provides a unique opportunity to capture the full diurnal cycle of cloud and aerosol development and transport, allowing for studies that are not possible with the lidar aboard the CALIPSO platform, which flies in the sun-synchronous A-Train orbit." " One of the primary science objectives of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record to provide continuity of lidar climate observations during the transition from CALIPSO to EarthCARE. To accomplish this, the CATS project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the CALIPSO project at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) are closely collaborating to develop and deliver a full suite of CALIPSO-like level 2 data products that will be produced using the newly acquired CATS level 1B data whenever CATS is operating in science modes 1. The CALIPSO mission is now well into its ninth year of on-orbit operations, and has developed a robust set of mature and well-validated science algorithms to retrieve the spatial and optical properties of clouds and aerosols from multi-wavelength lidar backscatter signals. By leveraging both new and existing NASA technical resources, this joint effort by the CATS and CALIPSO teams will deliver validated lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. The science community will have access to two sets of CATS Level 2 data products. The "Operational" data products will be produced by the GSFC CATS team utilizing the new instrument capabilities (e.g., multiple FOVs and 1064 nm depolarization), while the "Heritage" data products created

  2. An Evaluation of Sharp Cut Cyclones for Sampling Diesel Particulate Matter Aerosol in the Presence of Respirable Dust

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Emanuele; Sheehan, Maura; Gussman, Robert; Kenny, Lee; Volkwein, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Two prototype cyclones were the subjects of a comparative research campaign with a diesel particulate matter sampler (DPMS) that consists of a respirable cyclone combined with a downstream impactor. The DPMS is currently used in mining environments to separate dust from the diesel particulate matter and to avoid interferences in the analysis of integrated samples and direct-reading monitoring in occupational environments. The sampling characteristics of all three devices were compared using ammonium fluorescein, diesel, and coal dust aerosols. With solid spherical test aerosols at low particle loadings, the aerodynamic size-selection characteristics of all three devices were found to be similar, with 50% penetration efficiencies (d50) close to the design value of 0.8 µm, as required by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration for monitoring occupational exposure to diesel particulate matter in US mining operations. The prototype cyclones were shown to have ‘sharp cut’ size-selection characteristics that equaled or exceeded the sharpness of the DPMS. The penetration of diesel aerosols was optimal for all three samplers, while the results of the tests with coal dust induced the exclusion of one of the prototypes from subsequent testing. The sampling characteristics of the remaining prototype sharp cut cyclone (SCC) and the DPMS were tested with different loading of coal dust. While the characteristics of the SCC remained constant, the deposited respirable coal dust particles altered the size-selection performance of the currently used sampler. This study demonstrates that the SCC performed better overall than the DPMS. PMID:25060240

  3. An evaluation of sharp cut cyclones for sampling diesel particulate matter aerosol in the presence of respirable dust.

    PubMed

    Cauda, Emanuele; Sheehan, Maura; Gussman, Robert; Kenny, Lee; Volkwein, Jon

    2014-10-01

    Two prototype cyclones were the subjects of a comparative research campaign with a diesel particulate matter sampler (DPMS) that consists of a respirable cyclone combined with a downstream impactor. The DPMS is currently used in mining environments to separate dust from the diesel particulate matter and to avoid interferences in the analysis of integrated samples and direct-reading monitoring in occupational environments. The sampling characteristics of all three devices were compared using ammonium fluorescein, diesel, and coal dust aerosols. With solid spherical test aerosols at low particle loadings, the aerodynamic size-selection characteristics of all three devices were found to be similar, with 50% penetration efficiencies (d 50) close to the design value of 0.8 μm, as required by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration for monitoring occupational exposure to diesel particulate matter in US mining operations. The prototype cyclones were shown to have 'sharp cut' size-selection characteristics that equaled or exceeded the sharpness of the DPMS. The penetration of diesel aerosols was optimal for all three samplers, while the results of the tests with coal dust induced the exclusion of one of the prototypes from subsequent testing. The sampling characteristics of the remaining prototype sharp cut cyclone (SCC) and the DPMS were tested with different loading of coal dust. While the characteristics of the SCC remained constant, the deposited respirable coal dust particles altered the size-selection performance of the currently used sampler. This study demonstrates that the SCC performed better overall than the DPMS. PMID:25060240

  4. A Novel Aerosol Method for the Production of Hydrogel Particles

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.

    2012-01-01

    A novel method of generating hydrogel particles for various applications including drug delivery purposes was developed. This method is based on the production of hydrogel particles from sprayed polymeric nano/microdroplets obtained by a nebulization process that is immediately followed by gelation in a crosslinking fluid. In this study, particle synthesis parameters such as type of nebulizer, type of crosslinker, air pressure, and polymer concentration were investigated for their impact on the mean particle size, swelling behavior, and morphology of the developed particles. Spherical alginate-based hydrogel particles with a mean particle size in the range from 842 to 886 nm were obtained. Using statistical analysis of the factorial design of experiment it was found that the main factors influencing the size and swelling values of the particles are the alginate concentration and the air pressure. Thus, it was demonstrated that the method described in the current study is promising for the generation of hydrogel particles and it constitutes a relatively simple and low-cost system. PMID:23687513

  5. Photooxidation Products of Isoprene Epoxydiols (IEPOX) and IEPOX-Derived Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, K. H.; Nguyen, T. B.; Coggon, M. M.; Lignell, H.; Stoltz, B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) has recently been identified as a key intermediate in the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions and in the formation of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). IEPOX is generally expected to react with OH in the gas phase, where it has been found to form predominantly C4O3H8 products, or undergo reactive uptake onto particles, where it is converted into 2-methyltetrols or organosulfates by acid- or ammonium-catalyzed mechanisms. The subsequent chemistry of these gas- and particle-phase products has not yet been explored. Using synthetic standards of IEPOX and its gas-phase products, we have performed environmental chamber and flow tube experiments to investigate the fate of IEPOX in both the gas and particle phases. To explore the gas-phase chemistry of IEPOX, three potential isomers of the C4O3H8 products were synthesized and photooxidized by exposure to OH. Detection with CF3O- chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) allowed for determination of their oxidation rates, fractional yields from IEPOX oxidation, and major products. To explore the photooxidation of IEPOX-derived SOA, synthetic IEPOX was reacted with various salts and atomized into a flow tube, where it was photooxidized by exposure to OH. We will present results showing changes in gas- and particle-phase chemical composition, monitored during oxidation by CIMS and aerosol mass spectrometry, including their dependence on both seed particle composition and OH concentration. Preliminary data show that the photochemical loss of IEPOX-derived SOA mass may be an important consideration for predicting aerosol loading and gas phase oxidative chemistry in isoprene-rich environments.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy Techniques for the Detection of Biological Samples in Suspensions and as Aerosol Particles: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix-Rivera, Hilsamar; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews current scientific literature focusing on Raman spectroscopy modalities that have been successfully applied to the detection of biological samples in aqueous suspensions and in aerosols. Normal Raman, surface enhanced Raman scattering, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, resonance Raman and UV-Raman spectropies, allow the detection of biological samples in situ in the near field and as well as in the far field at standoff distances. Applications span from fundamental studies to applied research in areas of defense and security and in monitoring of environmental pollution. A primary focus has been placed on biological samples including bacteria, pollen, virus, and biological contents in these specimens, in suspensions, and in aerosols. Several Raman spectroscopy studies have been reviewed to show how various modalities can achieve detection in these biosystems. Current data generated by our group is also included. Necessary parameters used to accomplish the detection and data analysis, which could also be used to interpret the results and to render the methodologies robust and reliable, are discussed.

  7. New Global Deep Blue Aerosol Product over Land and Ocean from VIIRS, and Its comparisons with MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N. Y. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Tsay, S. C.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of natural and anthropogenic sources of air pollution on climate and human health have continued to gain attention from the scientific community. In order to facilitate these effects, high quality consistent long-term global aerosol data records from satellites are essential. Several EOS-era instruments (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MISR) are able to provide such information with a high degree of fidelity. However, with the aging MODIS sensors and the launch of the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP in late 2011, the continuation of long-term aerosol data records suitable for climate studies from MODIS to VIIRS is needed urgently. VIIRS was designed to have similar capabilities to MODIS, with similar visible/infrared spectral channels, and spatial/ temporal resolution. However, small but significant differences in several key channels used in aerosol retrievals between MODIS and VIIRS mean that significant effort is required to revise aerosol models and surface reflectance determination modules previously developed using MODIS data. In this study, we will show the global (land and ocean) distribution of aerosols from Version 1 of the VIIRS Deep Blue data set. The preliminary validation results of these new VIIRS Deep Blue aerosol products using data from AERONET sunphotometers over land and ocean will be discussed. We will also compare the monthly averaged Deep Blue aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from VIIRS with the MODIS C6 products to investigate if any systematic biases may exist between MODIS C6 and VIIRS AOT.

  8. CTBTO Contractor Laboratory Test Sample Production Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Hague; Tracy Houghton; Nick Mann; Matt Watrous

    2013-08-01

    In October 2012 scientists from both Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria designed a system and capability test to determine if the INL could produce and deliver a short lived radio xenon standard in time for the standard to be measured at the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria. The test included sample standard transportation duration and potential country entrance delays at customs. On October 23, 2012 scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared and shipped a Seibersdorf contract laboratory supplied cylinder. The canister contained 1.0 scc of gas that consisted of 70% xenon and 30% nitrogen by volume. The t0 was October 24, 2012, 1200 ZULU. The xenon content was 0.70 +/ 0.01 scc at 0 degrees C. The 133mXe content was 4200 +/ 155 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty). The 133Xe content was 19000 +/ 800 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty).

  9. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1-2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4-15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.

  10. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2014-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for several days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (∼50%) and of shorter duration (1-2 days). The production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes. In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.

  11. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2014-07-03

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for several days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (∼50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products ofmore » both aromatics and alkanes. In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.« less

  12. Production, Organic Characterization, and Phase Transformations of Marine Particles Aerosolized from a Laboratory Mesocosm Phytoplankton Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particles emitted from bubble bursting and wave breaking of ocean waters with high biological activity can contain sea salts associated with organic material, with smaller particles containing a larger mass fraction of organics than larger particles. This likely indicates a link between phytoplankton productivity in oceans and particulate organic material in marine air. Once aerosolized, particles with significant amount of organic material can affect cloud activation and formation of ice crystals, among other atmospheric processes, thus influencing climate. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, in which concentrations of biological organisms can reach up to 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms. Here we present results of bubble bursting aerosol production from a seawater mesocosm containing artificial seawater, natural seawater and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species. These phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emilianaia huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus), possessed siliceous frustules, calcareous frustules and no frustules, respectively. Bubbles were generated employing recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions and bulk aerosol organic composition were measured as a function of phytoplankton growth, and chlorophyll composition and particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the water were determined. Finally, particles were collected on substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, their elemental compositions were determined using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEMEDAX), and their carbon speciation was determined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle size distributions exposed to dry and humidified air employing

  13. Production of sulfate aerosols in the plume of a coal-fired power plant under normal and reduced precipitator operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, J.F.; Bailey, E.M.; Stockburger, L. III

    1981-12-01

    A series of field experiments were conducted at TVA's Cumberland Steam Plant to examine the effect of primary aerosol on sulfate aerosol production. Plume measurements were made using an instrumented helicopter and flue gas analyses were performed on each of the two stacks. The plume particle loading was increased during four of the experiments through a reduction in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) capacity. The average rate of oxidation of SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in the plume was found to be 0.014 +- 0.015 h/sup -1/. The average rate measured for daytime and normal ESP operation was 0.019 +- 0.015 h/sup -1/. The average nighttime rate was also 0.019 +- 0.021 h/sup -1/. The average rate measured during periods of reduced ESP operation was 0.007 +- 0.01 h/sup -1/. The relatively high night-time rates were measured just after sunset and may result from delayed reactions of free radical precursors which were produced during the day-light hours. The difference between extrapolated intercepts from aircraft measurements and flue gas sampling indicates that a region of rapid SO/sub 2/ oxidation must exist for the first few minutes after the flue gas is emitted from the stacks.

  14. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient and volatility of important BVOC oxidation products using the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G.; Hohaus, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schmitt, S. H.; Yu, Z.; Schlag, P.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can alter the Earth's radiative budget and global climate but can also affect human health. A dominant contributor to the submicrometer particulate matter (PM) is organic aerosol (OA). OA can be either directly emitted through e.g. combustion processes (primary OA) or formed through the oxidation of organic gases (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). A detailed understanding of SOA formation is of importance as it constitutes a major contribution to the total OA. The partitioning between the gas and particle phase as well as the volatility of individual components of SOA is yet poorly understood adding uncertainties and thus complicating climate modelling. In this work, a new experimental methodology was used for compound-specific analysis of organic aerosol. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) is a newly developed instrument that deploys an aerodynamic lens to separate the gas and particle phase of an aerosol. The particle phase is directed to a cooled sampling surface. After collection particles are thermally desorbed and transferred to a detector for further analysis. In the present work, the ACM was coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to detect and quantify organic compounds partitioning between the gas and particle phase. This experimental approach was used in a set of experiments at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR to investigate SOA formation. Ozone oxidation with subsequent photochemical aging of β-pinene, limonene and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were studied. Simultaneous measurement of the gas and particle phase using the ACM-PTR-ToF-MS allows to report partitioning coefficients of important BVOC oxidation products. Additionally, volatility trends and changes of the SOA with photochemical aging are investigated and compared for all systems studied.

  15. Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the ozonolysis of ten different terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Anita; Goldstein, Allen H.; Keywood, Melita D.; Gao, Song; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Bahreini, Roya; Ng, Nga L.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-04-01

    The ozonolyses of six monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, 3-carene, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and myrcene), two sesquiterpenes (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene), and two oxygenated terpenes (methyl chavicol and linalool) were conducted individually in Teflon chambers to examine the gas-phase oxidation product and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from these reactions. Particle size distribution and number concentration were monitored and allowed for the calculation of the SOA yield from each experiment, which ranged from 1 to 54%. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used to monitor the evolution of gas-phase products, identified by their mass to charge ratio (m/z). Several gas-phase oxidation products, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, acetic acid, and nopinone, were identified and calibrated. Aerosol yields, and the yields of these identified and calibrated oxidation products, as well as many higher m/z oxidation products observed with the PTR-MS, varied significantly between the different parent terpene compounds. The sum of measured oxidation products in the gas and particle phase ranged from 33 to 77% of the carbon in the reacted terpenes, suggesting there are still unmeasured products from these reactions. The observations of the higher molecular weight oxidation product ions provide evidence of previously unreported compounds and their temporal evolution in the smog chamber from multistep oxidation processes. Many of the observed ions, including m/z 111 and 113, have also been observed in ambient air above a Ponderosa pine forest canopy, and our results confirm they are consistent with products from terpene + O3 reactions. Many of these products are stable on the timescale of our experiments and can therefore be monitored in field campaigns as evidence for ozone oxidative chemistry.

  16. Organosulfates and oxidation products from biogenic hydrocarbons in fine aerosols from a forest in North West Europe during spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne

    2011-09-01

    Organosulfates of monoterpenes and isoprene, as well as their oxidation products have been identified in biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) from both laboratory and field studies. Organosulfates provide an interesting coupling between air pollution and formation of low-volatility BSOA. HPLC quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to study polar acidic monoterpene and isoprene oxidation products including pinic acid, pinonic and terpenylic acid along with organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in aerosols from ambient air. The method was first validated by analysis of spiked quartz filters, which showed acceptable recoveries >74% for pinic acid, pinonic acid, camphor sulphonic acid and adipic acid. Acetonitrile was identified as a better solvent than methanol for extraction and analysis of pinonic acid and adipic acid, due to improved analytical sensitivity and prevention of methyl ester formation during sample extraction. PM 1 (i.e, aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter ≤1 μm) were collected during spring 2008 in a forest in Denmark with mixed deciduous and coniferous trees. Average concentrations of the most abundant compounds were: pinic acid: 1.5 ng m -3, pinonic acid: 3.0 ng m -3, terpenylic acid: 0.8 ng m -3 and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid: 3.0 ng m -3. Organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were identified in a majority of the daily samples and the highest levels were observed during a warm period in late spring. As a first approach, due to the lack of authentic standards, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were tentatively quantified based on the analytical response of camphor sulphonic acid. Generally the concentrations of organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were lower than first generation oxidation products. The maximum concentration of a total of 10 organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were found to be about three times lower than pinonic acid with a maximum concentration of 8 ng m -3. A

  17. N(2)O(5) reaction on submicron sea salt aerosol: kinetics, products, and the effect of surface active organics.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Joel A; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2005-11-10

    The reaction of N(2)O(5) on sea salt aerosol is a sink for atmospheric nitrogen oxides and a source of the Cl radical. We present room-temperature measurements of the N(2)O(5) loss rate on submicron artificial seawater (ASW) aerosol, performed with an entrained aerosol flow tube coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, as a function of aerosol phase (aqueous or partially crystalline), liquid water content, and size. We also present an analysis of the product growth kinetics showing that ClNO(2) is produced at a rate equal to N(2)O(5) loss, with an estimated lower limit yield of 50% at 50% relative humidity (RH). The reaction probability for N(2)O(5), gamma(N(2)(O)(5)), depends strongly on the particle phase, being 0.005 +/- 0.004 on partially crystalline ASW aerosol at 30% RH and 0.03 +/- 0.008 on aqueous ASW aerosol at 65% RH. At 50% RH, N(2)O(5) loss is relatively insensitive to particle size for radii greater than 100 nm, and gamma(N(2)(O)(5)) displays a statistically insignificant increase from 0.022 to approximately 0.03 for aqueous ASW aerosol over the RH range of 43-70%. We find that the presence of millimolar levels of hexanoic acid in the aerosol bulk decreases the gamma(N(2)(O)(5)) at 70% RH by a factor of 3-4 from approximately 0.025 to 0.008 +/- 0.004. This reduction is likely due to the partitioning of hexanoic acid to the gas-aerosol interface at a surface coverage that we estimate to be equivalent to a monolayer. This result is the first evidence that a monolayer coating of aqueous organic surfactant can slow the reactive uptake of atmospheric trace gases to aerosol. PMID:16838918

  18. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production from the Aqueous Reactions of Phenols and Triplet Aromatic Carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sun, Y.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Anastasio, C.

    2010-12-01

    The phenolic compounds guaiacol, syringol and phenol have recently been shown to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) at high yields in the aqueous phase upon exposure to simulated sunlight and hydroxyl radical. These phenols are significant products from wood combustion that can readily enter atmospheric waters, such as aqueous aerosol particles and cloud/fog droplets. Once in the aqueous phase, phenols can react with the triplet excited states of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls (NPCs), particle-bound organics that are also emitted from wood combustion. In this study, we examined the aqueous-phase production of SOA from the reaction of phenolic compounds with triplet excited state organics. These aqueous phase reactions were tested by illuminating solutions containing a phenolic compound and NPC under simulated sunlight at various concentrations and pH values. The phenolic compound is consumed during these reactions, following a first-order decay that varies with phenol concentration, phenol identity, and pH. The non-volatile product mass formed in our illuminated solutions was determined gravimetrically and by analysis with High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-AMS). The SOA mass yield was determined as the mass of non-volatile product formed per mass of phenolic consumed during illumination. We also used HR-AMS to analyze for elemental composition, carbon oxidation state, and oligomers in the SOA produced. Our results to date indicate that phenols can be rapidly oxidized by triplet excited states under environmentally relevant conditions and that the accompanying SOA mass yields are very high.

  19. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    Long before the industrial evolution and the era of fossil fuels, high concentrations of aerosol particles were alluded to in heavily populated areas, including ancient Rome and medieval London. Recent radiocarbon measurements (14C) conducted in modern megacities came as a surprise: carbonaceous aerosol (mainly organic aerosol, OA), a predominant fraction of particulate matter (PM), remains overwhelmingly non-fossil despite extensive fossil fuel combustion. Such particles are directly emitted (primary OA, POA) or formed in-situ in the atmosphere (secondary OA, SOA) via photochemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Urban levels of non-fossil OA greatly exceed the levels measured in pristine environments strongly impacted by biogenic emissions, suggesting a contribution from unidentified anthropogenic non-fossil sources to urban OA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) techniques applied to ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne) data identify primary cooking emissions (COA) as one of the main sources of primary non-fossil OA in major cities like London (Allan et al., 2010), New York (Sun et al., 2011) and Beijing (Huang et al., 2010). Cooking processes can also emit VOCs that can act as SOA precursors, potentially explaining in part the high levels of oxygenated OA (OOA) identified by the AMS in urban areas. However, at present, the chemical nature of these VOCs and their secondary aerosol production potential (SAPP) remain virtually unknown. The approach adopted here involves laboratory quantification of PM and VOC emission factors from the main primary COA emitting processes and their SAPP. Primary emissions from deep-fat frying, vegetable boiling, vegetable frying and meat cooking for different oils, meats and vegetables were analysed under controlled conditions after ~100 times dilution. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a high resolution proton transfer time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR

  20. Concentrations of iodine isotopes ((129)I and (127)I) and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Daraoui, A; Riebe, B; Walther, C; Wershofen, H; Schlosser, C; Vockenhuber, C; Synal, H-A

    2016-04-01

    New data about (129)I, (127)I concentrations and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from the trace survey station of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Northern Germany, are presented and discussed in this paper. The investigated samples were collected on a weekly basis during the years 2011 to 2013. Iodine was extracted from aerosol filters using a strong basic solution and was separated from the matrix elements with chloroform and was analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for (129)I and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for (127)I. The concentrations of (127)I and (129)I in aerosol filters ranged from 0.31 to 3.71 ng m(-3) and from 0.06 to 0.75 fg m(-3), respectively. The results of (129)I/(127)I isotopic ratios were in the order 10(-8) to 10(-7). The (129)I originated directly from gaseous emissions and indirectly from liquid emissions (via sea spray) from the reprocessing plants in Sellafield and La Hague. In comparison with the results of (131)I after the Fukushima accident, no contribution of (129)I from this accident was detectable in Central Europe due to the high background originating from the (129)I releases of the European reprocessing plants. (129)I atmospheric activity concentrations were compared with those of an anthropogenic radionuclide ((85)Kr). We did not find any correlation between (129)I and (85)Kr, both having nuclear reprocessing plant as the main source. PMID:26867099

  1. Gas-Phase Oxidation Kinetics and Organic Aerosol Products of Ethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borduas, N.; Abbatt, J.; Murphy, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ethanolamine is currently the solvent of choice in carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) which aims to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere in coal powered pilot plants. CCS technology represents an unprecedented large scale application of ethanolamine and little is known of its fate if it was unintentionally released into the atmosphere. Relative kinetic experiments were conducted in a 1m3 smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. The kinetics of oxidation with hydroxyl radicals from light and dark sources converge to a value of (7.6 ± 1.1) x 10-11 cm3 molec-1 s-1. The reaction of ethanolamine with ozone was determined to be (1.05 ± 0.08) x 10-18 cm3 molec-1 s-1. We find that ethanolamine has a short lifetime in the atmosphere and readily deposits onto wall and particle surfaces, as observed by considerable formation of organonitrogen aerosol products. An investigation into the oxidation product formation using a combination of reagent ions with online chemical ionization mass spectrometry approaches lead to the detection of higher order products. The formation of these high molecular weight products is simultaneous with the oxidation of ethanolamine and implies substantial organic aerosol chemistry.

  2. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2015-01-16

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction productsmore » of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4–15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. The results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.« less

  3. Quantifying VOC-Reaction Tracers, Ozone Production, and Continuing Aerosol Production Rates in Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert; Ren, X.; Brune, W.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have found a surprisingly informative decomposition of the complex question of smoggy ozone production (basically, [HO2] in a more locally determined field of [NO]) in the process of linked investigations of modestly smoggy Eastern North America (by NASA aircraft, July 2004) and rather polluted Flushing, NYC (Queens College, July, 2001). In both rural and very polluted situations, we find that a simple contour graph parameterization of the local principal ozone production rate can be estimated using only the variables [NO] and j(sub rads) [HCHO]: Po(O3) = c (j(sub rads) [HCHO])(sup a) [HCHO](sup b). Here j(sub rads) is the photolysis of HCHO to radicals, presumably capturing many harder-UV photolytic processes and the principle ozone production is that due to HO2; mechanisms suggest that ozone production due to RO2 is closely correlated, often suggesting a limited range of different proportionality factors. The method immediately suggests a local interpretation for concepts of VOC limitation and NOx limitation. We believe that the product j(sub rads) [HCHO] guages the oxidation rate of observed VOC mixtures in a way that also provides [HO2] useful for the principle ozone production rate k [HO2] [NO], and indeed, all ozone chemical production. The success of the method suggests that dominant urban primary-HCHO sources may transition to secondary plume-HCHO sources in a convenient way. Are there other, simple, near-terminal oxidized VOC's which help guage ozone production and aerosol particle formation? Regarding particles, we report on, to the extent NASA Research resources allow, on appealing relationships between far-downwind (Atlantic PBL) HCHO and very fine aerosol (including sulfate. Since j(sub rads) [HCHO] provides a time-scale, we may understand distant-plume particle production in a more quantitative manner. Additionally we report on a statistical search in the nearer field for relationships between glyoxals (important near-terminal aromatic and isoprene

  4. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  5. Laboratory studies of oxidation of primary emissions: Oxidation of organic molecular markers and secondary organic aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Emily A.

    vehicle markers. Aerosol composition is a key influence on reaction rate constants, perhaps more significant than external influences. Alkenoic acid concentrations in the meat grease particles appear to influence cholesterol oxidation rates. Also, the reaction rate constants for new motor oil were faster than those of the more viscous used motor oil. The measured reaction rate constants were used to oxidize source profiles that were subsequently run in the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model. Oxidizing the molecular markers in the meat-cooking profile led to unrealistically high meat-cooking aerosol contributions to the total organic carbon (OC), often more than 100%. This suggests that there is either unaccounted for sources of meat-cooking molecular markers in the ambient samples, or there is some property of atmospheric aerosols that significantly inhibits reaction that was not captured in this study. Oxidation of motor vehicle profiles led to both higher estimates of total vehicle OC and a quadrupling of gasoline OC, while the diesel contribution changed very little. The increase in gasoline OC changes gasoline vehicle emissions from a relatively minor source to a major one. Thus, oxidation of molecular markers can have a significant impact on receptor model predictions. The second objective was to investigate SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of whole diesel exhaust. Diluted exhaust from a diesel engine was photo-oxidized in a smog chamber to investigate SOA production. Photochemical oxidation rapidly produced significant SOA, almost doubling the organic aerosol contribution of primary emissions after several hours of processing. Less than 10% of the SOA mass could be explained using a SOA model and the measured oxidation of known precursors, such as light aromatics. However, the ultimate yield of SOA is uncertain because it is sensitive to treatment of particle and vapor losses to the chamber walls. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) mass spectra reveal that the

  6. 7 CFR 58.56 - Incubation of product samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incubation of product samples. 58.56 Section 58.56... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1...

  7. Spatiotemporal fusion of multiple-satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products using Bayesian maximum entropy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingxin; Bo, Yanchen; Zhu, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Merging multisensor aerosol optical depth (AOD) products is an effective way to produce more spatiotemporally complete and accurate AOD products. A spatiotemporal statistical data fusion framework based on a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method was developed for merging satellite AOD products in East Asia. The advantages of the presented merging framework are that it not only utilizes the spatiotemporal autocorrelations but also explicitly incorporates the uncertainties of the AOD products being merged. The satellite AOD products used for merging are the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Level-2 AOD products (MOD04_L2) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Deep Blue Level 2 AOD products (SWDB_L2). The results show that the average completeness of the merged AOD data is 95.2%,which is significantly superior to the completeness of MOD04_L2 (22.9%) and SWDB_L2 (20.2%). By comparing the merged AOD to the Aerosol Robotic Network AOD records, the results show that the correlation coefficient (0.75), root-mean-square error (0.29), and mean bias (0.068) of the merged AOD are close to those (the correlation coefficient (0.82), root-mean-square error (0.19), and mean bias (0.059)) of the MODIS AOD. In the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations, the accuracy of the merged AOD is higher than those of MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs. Even in regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs are missing, the accuracy of the merged AOD is also close to the accuracy of the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations.

  8. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chen, Ying; Lima, Ivan D.; Doney, Scott C.; Mahowald, Natalie; Labiosa, Rochelle; Post, Anton F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus. We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere–ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia. PMID:19273845

  9. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  10. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Mackey, Katherine R M; Chen, Ying; Lima, Ivan D; Doney, Scott C; Mahowald, Natalie; Labiosa, Rochelle; Post, Anton F

    2009-03-24

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus. We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia. PMID:19273845

  11. Determination of Trace Cadmium in Geological Samples by Aerosol Dilution ICP-MS with Inverse Aqua Regia Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Guo, W.; Jin, L.; Hu, S.; Chai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element that occurs at ppb level in most terrestrial materials. The determination of Cd in geological samples by ICP-MS is subject to Zr and/or Mo based oxide/hydroxide interference. This study developed a valid method for the determination of Cd by Ar aerosol dilution ICP-MS with inverse aqua regia extraction (in a water bath at 95℃ for 2h). An Agilent 7700x ICP-MS (Agilent Technologies, USA) with an aerosol dilution system was used. The extraction procedure separated most of the Zr matrix (>90%) from the analyte, and the residual Zr- hydroxides and Mo-oxides or hydroxides were successfully eliminated by adding an amount of Ar to the sample aerosol prior to the plasma. Compared to the conventional operation, the amounts of oxide and hydroxide ions formed in the plasma were reduced by up to 10 times. The relative yields of the interfering oxides and hydroxides were as low as 0.012% ((94Mo16OH++95Mo16O+)/(94Mo++95Mo+)) and 0.007% (94Zr16OH+/94Zr+). Under the optimized dilution gas flow rate (0.85 L min-1) and carrier gas flow rate (0.24 L min-1), the limit of detection (LOD, 3s) for 111Cd was 1.3 ng g-1. The accuracy of the method was assessed by using two USGS SRMs (andesite AGV-2 and basalt BCR-2). The Cd contents determined for AGV-2 and BCR-2 are 0.058±0.004μg g-1 and 0.148±0.007μg g-1 (N=10), which are in good agreement with the USGS reference values (0.061μg g-1 and 0.14μg g-1). The proposed method was also applied to determine Cd contents in 65 IGGE SRMs (28 soils, 28 sediments and 9 rocks). The measured Cd levels in these samples agree well with their certified values. The developed method shows great potential for the direct determination of trace levels of Cd in geological samples.

  12. Aqueous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from the oxidation of phenols by triplet excited state organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Yu, L.; Zhang, Q.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-12-01

    Recent literature has shown that atmospheric condensed-phase chemistry can play a significant role in the evolution of organic aerosols, including the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA formation from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the aqueous phase has largely focused on oxidations involving the hydroxyl radical and other oxidants, such as photochemically created triplet excited states, have not been fully investigated. Phenolic compounds are one of the primary carbon emission classes from biomass and wood combustion and have significant water solubility. Once in the aqueous phase, phenolic compounds can react with the triplet excited states of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls (NPCs), particle-bound organics that are also emitted in large quantities from wood combustion. The oxidation of phenolic species in the condensed phase by triplet excited states can result in the production of SOA. A main goal of this study was to investigate bulk solution reaction kinetics under atmospherically relevant conditions in order to ascertain how these reactions can impact aqueous-phase SOA production. In our experiments, we studied the reactions of five phenols (phenol, guaiacol, syringol, catechol, and resorcinol) with the triplet state of 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde (34-DMB) during simulated solar radiation. We have characterized the impacts of pH, ionic strength and reactant concentrations on the reaction behavior of this system. In addition, we analyzed the SOA formed using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to infer the reaction mechanisms. Our evidence suggests that under atmospherically relevant conditions, triplet excited states can be the dominant oxidant of phenolics and contribute significantly to the total SOA budget.

  13. ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF LOW VOLUME RESIDENTIAL SAMPLES FOR SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results for organic speciation analysis for Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on Se...

  14. Bacterial Communities in Aerosols and Manure Samples from Two Different Dairies in Central and Sonoma Valleys of California

    PubMed Central

    Ravva, Subbarao V.; Sarreal, Chester Z.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols have been suspected to transport food pathogens and contaminate fruits and vegetables grown in close proximity to concentrated animal feeding operations, but studies are lacking that substantiate such transport. To monitor the potential transport of bacteria originated from fresh or dry manure through aerosols on a dairy, we identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, bacteria in aerosols collected within 2 to 3 meters from dairy cows at two dairies. Gram-positive Firmicutes were predominant in aerosols from a dairy in Sonoma, California, and surrounded by vineyards, in contrast to sequences of Gram-negative Proteobacteria predominant in aerosols from a dairy in Modesto, California, also surrounded by other dairies. Although Firmicutes represented approximately 50% of the 10 most abundant sequences, aerosols from the Sonoma dairy also contained sequences of Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria, identified previously with animal feces. While none of the top 10 sequences from fresh or dry manure from Modesto dairy were detected in aerosols, two of the sequences from the phylum Bacteriodetes and one from class Clostridia from fresh manure were detected in aerosols from Sonoma. Interestingly, none of the sequences from dry manure were in the top 10 sequences in aerosols from both dairies. The 10 most abundant sequences in aerosols from the Modesto dairy were all from Proteobacteria and nearly half of them were from genus Massilia, which have been isolated previously from immune-compromised people and aerosols. We conclude that the predominant bacteria in aerosols are diverse among locations and that they do not reflect the predominant species of bacteria present in cow feces and/or in close proximity to cows. These results suggest that the aerosol sequences did not originate from manure. Large volumes of aerosols would be required to determine if bacterial sequences from aerosols could be used to track bacteria in manure to crops grown in proximity. PMID:21364996

  15. Sampling strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of organic aerosol measurements requiring long sample-collection times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, Rob L.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The composition and properties of atmospheric organic aerosols (OAs) change on timescales of minutes to hours. However, some important OA characterization techniques typically require greater than a few hours of sample-collection time (e.g., Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy). In this study we have performed numerical modeling to investigate and compare sample-collection strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of OA measurements requiring long sample-collection times. Specifically, we modeled the measurement of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) concentrations at a polluted urban site in Mexico City, and investigated how to construct hourly resolved time series from samples collected for 4, 6, and 8 h. We modeled two sampling strategies - sequential and staggered sampling - and a range of post-processing methods including interpolation and deconvolution. The results indicated that relative to the more sophisticated and costly staggered sampling methods, linear interpolation between sequential measurements is a surprisingly effective method for increasing time resolution. Additional error can be added to a time series constructed in this manner if a suboptimal sequential sampling schedule is chosen. Staggering measurements is one way to avoid this effect. There is little to be gained from deconvolving staggered measurements, except at very low values of random measurement error (< 5 %). Assuming 20 % random measurement error, one can expect average recovery errors of 1.33-2.81 µg m-3 when using 4-8 h-long sequential and staggered samples to measure time series of concentration values ranging from 0.13-29.16 µg m-3. For 4 h samples, 19-47 % of this total error can be attributed to the process of increasing time resolution alone, depending on the method used, meaning that measurement precision would only be improved by 0.30-0.75 µg m-3 if samples could be collected over 1 h instead of 4 h. Devising a

  16. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-09-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient relative humidity (RH). Our experiments imitate an atmospheric scenario of a dry particle hydration at ambient RH conditions in the presence of glyoxal gas followed by efflorescence due to decrease of the ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different RH conditions, starting from dry conditions (~20% RH) and up to 90% RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments, and followed by consequent drying of the reacted particles before their analysis by the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), cavity ring down (CRD) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) systems. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90%). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100 nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90% to ~40%. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50%, 75% and 90% show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including

  17. Beryllium aerosol characteristics in the magnesium and aluminum transformation industry in Quebec: a comparison of four different sampling methodologies.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, A; Dion, C; Viau, S; Cloutier, Y; Perrault, G

    2009-11-01

    To examine the influence of the sampling method on beryllium (Be) exposure assessment, a study was conducted in foundries and smelters to contrast the performance of five different dust sampling devices. Six sampling surveys were conducted in four different settings, and both personal and fixed station samples were collected using the following sampling heads: IOM samplers (inhalable dust), 35-mm plastic cassettes (total dust), aluminum SKC cyclones (respirable dust), 8-stage Sierra cascade impactors, and 12-stage MOUDI impactors. In total, beryllium concentrations were determined for 66/68 inhalable dust samples, 62/62 total dust samples, 56/57 respirable dust samples, 54/64 8-stage Sierra samples, and 19/25 12-stage MOUDI samples. In the magnesium foundry and aluminum smelters, the concentrations obtained during specific tasks could exceed the actual permissible exposure limit of the province of Quebec (0.15 microg/m(3)) or of the ACGIH threshold limit value (TLV) (0.05 microg/m(3)). The median of median dust concentration ratios computed from the sampling heads at the fixed station decreased as follows: IOM (1.00) > Sierra (0.76) > 37-mm cassette (0.61) > MOUDI (0.48) > respirable (0.12). The same trends were observed with the ratios of the median of median Be concentrations at the fixed station but with a larger scattering within sampling heads as follows: IOM (1.00) > Sierra (0.69) > 37-mm cassette (0.64) > MOUDI (0.54) > respirable (0.19). The median of median ratios of dust (IOM (1.00) > Sierra (0.56) > 37-mm cassette (0.35) > respirable (0.06)) and Be (IOM (1.00) > Sierra (0.66) > 37-mm cassette (0.48) > respirable (0.11)) in dust were lower, and there was less scattering for the 37-mm cassette and SKC cyclone used during breathing zone sampling than for the same sampling heads at the fixed station. Inhalable aerosol measurements should remain the tool for estimating the risk of exposure to beryllium in these settings until a clear dose response is

  18. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 2: grab samples and re-suspensions.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M Jay; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected during a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). To fully understand mineral dusts, their chemical and physical properties, as well as mineralogical inter-relationships, were accurately established. In addition to the ambient samples, bulk soil samples were collected at each of the 15 sites. In each case, approximately 1 kg of soil from the top 10 mm at a previously undisturbed area near the aerosol sampling site was collected. The samples were air-dried and sample splits taken for soil analysis. Further sample splits were sieved to separate the < 38 micro m particle fractions for mineralogical analysis. Examples of major-element and trace-element chemistry, mineralogy, and other physical properties of the 15 grab samples are presented. The purpose of the trace-element analysis was to measure levels of potentially harmful metals while the major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. X-ray diffractometry provided a measure of the mineral content of the dust. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze chemical composition of small individual particles. From similarities in the chemistry and mineralogy of re-suspended and ambient sample sets, it is evident that portions of the ambient dust are from local soils. PMID:19235611

  19. Aerosol-chamber study of the α-pinene/O 3 reaction: influence of particle acidity on aerosol yields and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    α-Pinene ozonolysis was carried out in the presence of ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid seed particles in a 9 m 3 Teflon chamber at the mixing ratios of 100 ppbv for α-pinene and about 70 ppbv for ozone. The evolution of size distribution was measured by means of a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS). The resulting secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was sampled by a denuder/quartz fiber filter combination for the determination of the total organic carbon concentration (TOC) in the particle phase, using a thermographic method and by a denuder/PTFE filter combination for the analysis of individual chemical species in the particle phase using capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS). cis-Pinic acid ( m/ z 185) and another species tentatively identified at m/ z 171 and 199 were the major particle phase species for both seed particles although the product yields were different, indicating the influence of seed particle acidity. A thermographic method for the determination of TOC showed an increase of particle phase organics by 40% for the experiments with higher acidity. CE-ESI-MS analysis showed a large increase in the concentration of compounds with Mw>300 from the experiments with sulfuric acid seed particles. These results suggest that the seed particle acidity enhances the yield of SOA and plays an important role in the formation of larger molecules in the particle phase. Our results from direct particle phase chemical analysis suggest for the first time that condensation of smaller organics takes place by polymerization or aldol condensation following the formation of aldehydes, such as pinonaldehyde from the terpene ozonolysis.

  20. A Comparison of Parameterizations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production: Global Budget and Spatiotemporal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Z.; Horowitz, L. W.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Fan, S.; Cheng, Y.; Ervens, B.; Fu, T. M.; He, C.; Tao, S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have a profound influence on air quality and climate, but large uncertainties exist in modeling SOA on the global scale. In this study, five SOA parameterization schemes, including a two-product model (TPM), volatility basis-set (VBS) and three cloud SOA schemes (Ervens et al. (2008, 2014), Fu et al. (2008) , and He et al. (2013)), are implemented into the global chemical transport model (MOZART-4). For each scheme, model simulations are conducted with identical boundary and initial conditions. The VBS scheme produces the highest global annual SOA production (close to 35 Tg·y-1), followed by three cloud schemes (26-30 Tg·y-1) and TPM (23 Tg·y-1). Though sharing a similar partitioning theory to the TPM scheme, the VBS approach simulates the chemical aging of multiple generations of VOCs oxidation products, resulting in a much larger SOA source, particularly from aromatic species, over Europe, the Middle East and Eastern America. The formation of SOA in VBS, which represents the net partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds from vapor to condensed phase, is highly sensitivity to the aging and wet removal processes of vapor-phase organic compounds. The production of SOA from cloud processes (SOAcld) is constrained by the coincidence of liquid cloud water and water-soluble organic compounds. Therefore, all cloud schemes resolve a fairly similar spatial pattern over the tropical and the mid-latitude continents. The spatiotemporal diversity among SOA parameterizations is largely driven by differences in precursor inputs. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the evolution, wet removal, and phase partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds, particularly above remote land and oceanic areas, is critical to better constrain the global-scale distribution and related climate forcing of secondary organic aerosols.

  1. Radial diffusion and penetration of gas molecules and aerosol particles through laminar flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes are essential tools for many applications in analytical and physical chemistry and engineering. We derive a new method for determining radial diffusion effects and the penetration or transmission of gas molecules and aerosol particles through cylindrical tubes under laminar flow conditions using explicit analytical equations. In contrast to the traditional Brown method [Brown, R. L. J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U. S.) 1978, 83, 1-8] and CKD method (Cooney, D. O.; Kim, S. S.; Davis, E. J. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1974, 29, 1731-1738), the new approximation developed in this study (known as the KPS method) does not require interpolation or numerical techniques. The KPS method agrees well with the CKD method under all experimental conditions and also with the Brown method at low Sherwood numbers. At high Sherwood numbers corresponding to high uptake on the wall, flow entry effects become relevant and are considered in the KPS and CKD methods but not in the Brown method. The practical applicability of the KPS method is demonstrated by analysis of measurement data from experimental studies of rapid OH, intermediate NO3, and slow O3 uptake on various organic substrates. The KPS method also allows determination of the penetration of aerosol particles through a tube, using a single equation to cover both the limiting cases of high and low deposition described by Gormley and Kennedy (Proc. R. Ir. Acad., Sect. A. 1949, 52A, 163-169). We demonstrate that the treatment of gas and particle diffusion converges in the KPS method, thus facilitating prediction of diffusional loss and penetration of gases and particles, analysis of chemical kinetics data, and design of fluid reactors, denuders, and sampling lines. PMID:25744622

  2. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Aerosols from Collection 6 Aqua and Terra MODIS e-Deep Blue Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettenhausen, C.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols continue to attract a significant amount of attention from researchers worldwide due to their extensive effects on Earth's climate, ecology, public health, and even energy production. In order to truly understand these effects, a long, stable, and well-calibrated data record is required. Since 2000 and 2002, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites together with the e-Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm have been providing such a data record. After a multi-year development effort, the production of both Aqua and Terra MODIS Collection 6 (C6) atmosphere products successfully completed earlier this year and the data was released to the public shortly thereafter. The C6 Deep Blue products (now enhanced Deep Blue or e-Deep Blue) have been significantly improved over the previous Collection 5.1 version. In this poster we provide an overview of the latest C6 e-Deep Blue products and the improvements implemented since the previous collection including coverage over dark surfaces and updates to the Terra calibration. Validation results utilizing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data are also summarized. We then use the C6 e-Deep Blue products from both Aqua and Terra to explore the spatial characteristics in addition to the seasonal and inter-annual variability of aerosols on both regional and global scales. We also use this as an opportunity to compare these results and investigate any differences found between the two instruments.

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--PERSONAL, INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR SAMPLING PROCEDURES FOR TOTAL INSPIRABLE AND PM10 AEROSOLS (RTI/ACS-AP-209-010)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol describes the procedures for field application of personal, indoor, and outdoor air sampling systems to collect integrated aerosol samples using a battery operated personal sampling system (pump, flow controller, Delta Pressure sensor, thermistor, interval timer, da...

  4. Improved measurement of carbonaceous aerosol in Beijing, China: intercomparison of sampling and thermal-optical analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K. B.; Duan, F. K.; Zheng, M.; Ma, Y. L.; Tan, J. H.; Du, Z. Y.

    2010-06-01

    The sampling artifacts (both positive and negative) and the influence of thermal-optical methods (both charring correction method and the peak inert mode temperature) on the split of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were evaluated in Beijing. The positive sampling artifact constituted 10% and 23% of OC concentration determined by the bare quartz filter during winter and summer, respectively. For summer samples, the adsorbed gaseous organics were found to continuously evolve off the filter during the whole inert mode when analyzed by the IMPROVE-A temperature protocol. This may be due to the oxidation of the adsorbed organics during sampling (reaction artifact) which would increase their thermal stability. The backup quartz approach was evaluated by a denuder-based method for assessing the positive artifact. The quartz-quartz (QBQ) in series method was demonstrated to be reliable, since all of the OC collected by QBQ was from originally gaseous organics. Negative artifact that could be adsorbed by quartz filter was negligible. When the activated carbon impregnated glass fiber (CIG) filter was used as the denuded backup filter, the denuder efficiency for removing gaseous organics that could be adsorbed by the CIG filter was only about 30%. EC values were found to differ by a factor of about two depending on the charring correction method. Influence of the peak inert mode temperature was evaluated based on the summer samples. The EC value was found to continuously decrease with the peak inert mode temperature. Premature evolution of light absorbing carbon began when the peak inert mode temperature was increased from 580 to 650 °C; when further increased to 800 °C, the OC and EC split frequently occurred in the He mode, and the last OC peak was characterized by the overlapping of two separate peaks. The discrepancy between EC values defined by different temperature protocols was larger for Beijing carbonaceous aerosol compared with North America and

  5. Solar Occultation Satellite Data and Derived Meteorological Products: Sampling Issues and Comparisons with Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria; Daffer, William H.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hoppel, Karl W.; Walker, Kaley A.; Knosp, Brian W.; Boone, Chris; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Santee, Michelle L.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Pawson, Steven; Jackson, David R.; Deaver, Lance; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Lambert, Alyn; Schwartz, Michael J.; Froidevaux, Lucien; McLeod, Sean; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max J.; Trepte, Charles R.; Livesey, Nathaniel; Harwood, Robert S.; Waters, Joe W.

    2007-01-01

    Derived Meteorological Products (DMPs, including potential temperature (theta), potential vorticity, equivalent latitude (EqL), horizontal winds and tropopause locations) have been produced for the locations and times of measurements by several solar occultation (SO) instruments and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). DMPs are calculated from several meteorological analyses for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and III, Halogen Occultation Experiment, and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II and III SO instruments and MLS. Time-series comparisons of MLS version 1.5 and SO data using DMPs show good qualitative agreement in time evolution of O3, N2O, H20, CO, HNO3, HCl and temperature; quantitative agreement is good in most cases. EqL-coordinate comparisons of MLS version 2.2 and SO data show good quantitative agreement throughout the stratosphere for most of these species, with significant biases for a few species in localized regions. Comparisons in EqL coordinates of MLS and SO data, and of SO data with geographically coincident MLS data provide insight into where and how sampling effects are important in interpretation of the sparse SO data, thus assisting in fully utilizing the SO data in scientific studies and comparisons with other sparse datasets. The DMPs are valuable for scientific studies and to facilitate validation of non-coincident measurements.

  6. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.; Turner, R.S.

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  7. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  8. Light-absorbing aldol condensation products in acidic aerosols: Spectra, kinetics, and contribution to the absorption index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Esteve, William

    The radiative properties of aerosols that are transparent to light in the near-UV and visible, such as sulfate aerosols, can be dramatically modified when mixed with absorbing material such as soot. In a previous work we had shown that the aldol condensation of carbonyl compounds produces light-absorbing compounds in sulfuric acid solutions. In this work we report the spectroscopic and kinetic parameters necessary to estimate the effects of these reactions on the absorption index of sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmosphere. The absorption spectra obtained from the reactions of six different carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal, 2-butanone, and trifluoroacetone) and their mixtures were compared over 190-1100 nm. The results indicated that most carbonyl compounds should be able to undergo aldol condensation. The products are oligomers absorbing light in the 300-500 nm region where few other compounds absorb, making them important for the radiative properties of aerosols. Kinetic experiments in 96-75 wt% H 2SO 4 solutions and between 273 and 314 K gave an activation energy for the rate constant of formation of the aldol products of acetaldehyde of -(70±15) kJ mol -1 in 96 wt% solution and showed that the effect of acid concentration was exponential. A complete expression for this rate constant is proposed where the absolute value in 96 wt% H 2SO 4 and at 298 K is scaled to the Henry's law coefficient for acetaldehyde and the absorption cross-section for the aldol products assumed in this work. The absorption index of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols after a 2-year residence time was estimated to 2×10 -4, optically equivalent to a content of 0.5% of soot and potentially significant for the radiative forcing of these aerosols and for satellite observations in channels where the aldol products absorb.

  9. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (±0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (±0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation. PMID:26299576

  10. An evaluation of the "GGP" personal samplers under semi-volatile aerosols: sampling losses and their implication on occupational risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Dragan, George C; Breuer, Dietmar; Blaskowitz, Morten; Karg, Erwin; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Nordsieck, Hermann; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Semi-volatile (SV) aerosols still represent an important challenge to occupational hygienists due to toxicological and sampling issues. Particularly problematic is the sampling of hazardous SV that are present in both particulate and vapour phases at a workplace. In this study we investigate the potential evaporation losses of SV aerosols when using off-line filter-adsorber personal samplers. Furthermore, we provide experimental data showing the extent of the evaporation loss that can bias the workplace risk assessment. An experimental apparatus consisting of an aerosol generator, a flow tube and an aerosol monitoring and sampling system was set up inside a temperature controlled chamber. Aerosols from three n-alkanes were generated, diluted with nitrogen and sampled using on-line and off-line filter-adsorber methods. Parallel measurements using the on-line and off-line methods were conducted to quantify the bias induced by filter sampling. Additionally, two mineral oils of different volatility were spiked on filters and monitored for evaporation depending on the samplers flow rate. No significant differences between the on-line and off-line methods were detected for the sum of particles and vapour. The filter-adsorber method however tended to underestimate up to 100% of the particle mass, especially for the more volatile compounds and lower concentrations. The off-line sampling method systematically returned lower particle and higher vapour values, an indication for particle evaporation losses. We conclude that using only filter sampling for the assessment of semi-volatiles may considerably underestimate the presence of the particulate phase due to evaporation. Thus, this underestimation can have a negative impact on the occupational risk assessment if the evaporated particle mass is no longer quantified. PMID:25345615

  11. Production of Samples of Individual Radioxenon Isotopes Through Neutron Irradiation of Stable Xenon Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Foltz Biegalski, Kendra M.

    2008-09-23

    The Spectral Deconvolution Analysis Tool (SDAT) software was developed to improve counting statistics and detection limits for nuclear explosion radionuclide measurements. SDAT utilizes spectral deconvolution spectroscopy techniques and can analyze both β-γ coincidence spectra for radioxenon isotopes and high-resolution HPGe spectra from aerosol monitors. The deconvolution algorithm of the SDAT requires a library of β-γ coincidence spectra of individual radioxenon isotopes to determine isotopic ratios in a sample. In order to get experimentally produced spectra of the individual isotopes we have irradiated enriched samples of 130Xe, 132Xe, and 134Xe gas with a neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor at The University of Texas. The samples produced were counted in an Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) style β-γ coincidence detector. The spectra produced show that this method of radioxenon production yields samples with very high purity of the individual isotopes for 131mXe and 135Xe and a sample with a substantial 133mXe to 133Xe ratio.

  12. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for the quantitative analysis of solid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, J.

    1999-02-12

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become the method of choice for elemental and isotopic analysis. Several factors contribute to its success. Modern instruments are capable of routine analysis at part per trillion levels with relative detection limits in part per quadrillion levels. Sensitivities in these instruments can be as high as 200 million counts per second per part per million with linear dynamic ranges up to eight orders of magnitude. With standards for only a few elements, rapid semiquantitative analysis of over 70 elements in an individual sample can be performed. Less than 20 years after its inception ICP-MS has shown to be applicable to several areas of science. These include geochemistry, the nuclear industry, environmental chemistry, clinical chemistry, the semiconductor industry, and forensic chemistry. In this introduction, the general attributes of ICP-MS will be discussed in terms of instrumentation and sample introduction. The advantages and disadvantages of current systems are presented. A detailed description of one method of sample introduction, laser ablation, is given. The paper also gives conclusions and suggestions for future work. Chapter 2, Quantitative analysis of solids by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for calibration, has been removed for separate processing.

  13. Daytime resolved analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban aerosol samples - impact of sources and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Sklorz, Martin; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Liu, Yongbo; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2007-03-01

    Urban aerosol was collected in a summer and a winter campaign for 7 and 3 days, respectively. Low volume samples were taken with a time resolution of 160 min using a filter/sorption cartridge system extended by an ozone scrubber. Concentrations of mainly particle associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and oxidised PAH (O-PAH) were determined by gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. The sampling site was located in the city centre of Augsburg, Germany, near major roads with high traffic volume. The daily concentrations and profiles were mainly governed by local emissions from traffic and domestic heating, as well as by the meteorological conditions. During the winter campaign, concentrations were more than 10 fold higher than during the summer campaign. Highest concentrations were found concurrent with low boundary layer heights and low wind speeds. Significant diurnal variation of the PAH profiles was observed. Enhanced influences of traffic related PAH on the PAH profiles were evident during daytime in summer, whereas emissions from hot water generation and domestic heating were obvious during the night time of both seasons. A general idea about the global meteorological situation was acquired using back trajectory calculations (NOAA ARL HYSPLIT4). Due to high local emissions in combination with low air exchange during the two sampling campaigns, effects of mesoscale transport were not clearly observable. PMID:17182082

  14. Modeling of Aerosols in Post-Combustor Flow Path and Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The development and application of a multi-dimensional capability for modeling and simulation of aviation-sourced particle emissions and their precursors are elucidated. Current focus is on the role of the flow and thermal environments. The cases investigated include a film cooled turbine blade, the first-stage of a high-pressure turbine, the sampling probes, the sampling lines, and a pressure reduction chamber.

  15. Relationships linking primary production, sea ice melting, and biogenic aerosol in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, S.; Lazzara, L.; Marchese, C.; Dayan, U.; Ascanius, S. E.; Cacciani, M.; Caiazzo, L.; Di Biagio, C.; Di Iorio, T.; di Sarra, A.; Eriksen, P.; Fani, F.; Giardi, F.; Meloni, D.; Muscari, G.; Pace, G.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the relationships linking methanesulfonic acid (MSA, arising from the atmospheric oxidation of the biogenic dimethylsulfide, DMS) in atmospheric aerosol, satellite-derived chlorophyll a (Chl-a), and oceanic primary production (PP), also as a function of sea ice melting (SIM) and extension of the ice free area in the marginal ice zone (IF-MIZ) in the Arctic. MSA was determined in PM10 samples collected over the period 2010-2012 at two Arctic sites, Ny Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E), Svalbard islands, and Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W), Greenland. PP is calculated by means of a bio-optical, physiologically based, semi-analytical model in the potential source areas located in the surrounding oceanic regions (Barents and Greenland Seas for Ny Ålesund, and Baffin Bay for Thule). Chl-a peaks in May in the Barents sea and in the Baffin Bay, and has maxima in June in the Greenland sea; PP follows the same seasonal pattern of Chl-a, although the differences in absolute values of PP in the three seas during the blooms are less marked than for Chl-a. MSA shows a better correlation with PP than with Chl-a, besides, the source intensity (expressed by PP) is able to explain more than 30% of the MSA variability at the two sites; the other factors explaining the MSA variability are taxonomic differences in the phytoplanktonic assemblages, and transport processes from the DMS source areas to the sampling sites. The taxonomic differences are also evident from the slopes of the correlation plots between MSA and PP: similar slopes (in the range 34.2-36.2 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)) are found for the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in Barents Sea, and between MSA at Thule and PP in the Baffin Bay; conversely, the slope of the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in the Greenland Sea in summer is smaller (16.7 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)). This is due to the fact that DMS emission from the Barents Sea and Baffin Bay is mainly related to the MIZ

  16. Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to model the turbulence in the flow. Conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models were used for the LES simulations. Wall functions were used to resolve the near wall boundary layer. These simulations were run with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The velocity and tracer gas concentration Coefficient of Variations were compared with experimental results. The results from the LES simulations compared better with experimental results than the results from the RANS simulations. The level of mixing downstream of a S-shaped double elbow was higher than either the single elbow or the U-shaped double elbow due to the presence of counter rotating vortices. Penetration of neutralized and non-neutralized aerosol particles through three different types of tubing was studied. The tubing used included standard PVC pipes, aluminum conduit and flexible vacuum hose. Penetration through the aluminum conduit was unaffected by the presence or absence of charge neutralization, whereas particle penetrations through the PVC pipe and the flexible hosing were affected by the amount of particle charge. The electric field in a space enclosed by a solid conductor is zero. Therefore charged particles within the conducting aluminum conduit do not experience any force due to ambient electric fields, whereas the charged particles within the non-conducting PVC pipe and flexible hose experience forces due to the ambient electric fields. This increases the deposition of charged particles compared to neutralized particles within the 1.5" PVC tube and 1.5" flexible hose. Deposition 2001a (McFarland et al. 2001) software was used to predict the penetration through transport lines. The prediction from the software compared

  17. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  18. 76 FR 60530 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Plastic Aerosol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Plastic...''), Plastic Aerosol Research Group, L.L.C. (``PARG'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the... are: Aerofil Technology Inc, Sullivan, MO; Aptar Beauty & Home, Cary, IL; Berry Plastics...

  19. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  20. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  1. Factors to Consider in Designing Aerosol Inlet Systems for Engine Exhaust Plume Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    This document consists of viewgraphs of charts and diagrams of considerations to take when sampling the engine exhaust plume. It includes a chart that compares the emissions from various fuels, a diagram and charts of the various processes and conditions that influence the particulate size and concentration,

  2. NUMERICAL CALCULATION: ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspiration efficiency of particles from a flowing airstream into a thin-walled sampling inlet is accurately predicted using a numerical model. he model combines the Boundary Integral Equation Method for predicting the velocity field into the inlet with an analytical solution to t...

  3. Molecular-level Analysis of Size Resolved Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Samples from CALNEX Bakersfield Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. E.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Weber, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    This project focuses on analyzing the identities of molecules that comprise oligomers in size resolved aerosol fractions. Since oligomers are generally too large and polar to be measured by typical GC/MS analysis, soft ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry is used to extend the range of observable compounds. Samples collected with a microorifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) during CALNEX Bakersfield in June 2010 have been analyzed with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The nano-DESI is a soft ionization technique that allows molecular ions to be observed and the Orbitrap has sufficient resolution to determine the elemental composition of almost all species above the detection limit. A large fraction of SOA is made up of high molecular weight oligomers which are thought to form through acid catalyzed reactions of photo-chemically processed volatile organic compounds (VOC). The formation of oligomers must be influenced by the VOCs available, the amount of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate, and the magnitude of photo-chemical processing, among other potential influences. We present the elemental composition of chemical species in SOA in the 0.18 to 0.32 micron size range, providing the first multi-day data set for the study of these oligomers in atmospheric samples. Possible formation pathways and sources of observed compounds will be examined by comparison to other concurrent measurements at the site.

  4. In Situ Propellant Production for improved sample return mission performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, M. L.; Niehoff, J. C.; Wells, W. C.; Feingold, H.; Ash, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) on the surface of a target body is evaluated as a potential way to relax sample return mass constraints and to improve mission performance. Utilization of an oxygen/methane bipropellant combination for primary outbound and return propulsion has a significant favorable impact upon Earth escape requirements. A small sample can be returned from Mars using a single Shuttle/IUS(Twin) launch. Performance and design data are presented for the Mars mission. For sample returns from selected Galilean satellites, launch requirements are reduced by fifteen to forty percent. An assessment is made of overall utility of ISPP to planetary missions.

  5. Characterizing Uncertainty in Global Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, M.; Smirnov, A.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Complementary global aerosol products have been routinely available from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, SeaWiFS, and VIIRS. However, a variety of studies suggest that individual aerosol products have significant differences in the geographic distribution of their retrieval uncertainties. Nonetheless, it can be difficult or impractical to track down relevant product validation studies and invest time in mastering the proprietary file formats of these aerosol products. As a result, many studies are performed using data from one or two most familiar products that, oftentimes, may not be optimal for a given region of interest. In this presentation, we will use Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) data within the framework of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to catalog the accuracy of aerosol retrievals from the spaceborne sensors listed above. We will report our findings in analyzing the spatial and temporal distributions of the uncertainties in the global over-land and maritime retrievals of aerosols based on inter-comparing spaceborne data with coincident ground-based measurements from both AERONET and MAN. We will also explain our vision of how this analysis can be used as a base for a multi-sensor aerosol product package that would help end users to make a more informed choice when selecting data for their regions of interest.

  6. How We Can Constrain Aerosol Type Globally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In addition to aerosol number concentration, aerosol size and composition are essential attributes needed to adequately represent aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in models. As the nature of ACI varies enormously with environmental conditions, global-scale constraints on particle properties are indicated. And although advanced satellite remote-sensing instruments can provide categorical aerosol-type classification globally, detailed particle microphysical properties are unobtainable from space with currently available or planned technologies. For the foreseeable future, only in situ measurements can constrain particle properties at the level-of-detail required for ACI, as well as to reduce uncertainties in regional-to-global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). The limitation of in situ measurements for this application is sampling. However, there is a simplifying factor: for a given aerosol source, in a given season, particle microphysical properties tend to be repeatable, even if the amount varies from day-to-day and year-to-year, because the physical nature of the particles is determined primarily by the regional environment. So, if the PDFs of particle properties from major aerosol sources can be adequately characterized, they can be used to add the missing microphysical detail the better sampled satellite aerosol-type maps. This calls for Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses (SAM-CAAM). We are defining a relatively modest and readily deployable, operational aircraft payload capable of measuring key aerosol absorption, scattering, and chemical properties in situ, and a program for characterizing statistically these properties for the major aerosol air mass types, at a level-of-detail unobtainable from space. It is aimed at: (1) enhancing satellite aerosol-type retrieval products with better aerosol climatology assumptions, and (2) improving the translation between satellite-retrieved aerosol optical properties and

  7. Bacterial communities in aerosols and manure samples from two different dairies in central and Sonoma valleys of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosols have been suspected to transport food pathogens and contaminate fruits and vegetables grown in close proximity to animal raising operations, but studies are lacking that substantiates such transport. Thus, we determined by 16S rRNA sequencing if bacteria in aerosols collected with in 2 to 3...

  8. Global and regional validation of the Collection 6 MODIS dark target aerosol products, and comparison to Collection 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark targets aerosol algorithms include several updates, including multiple wind speed look up tables over ocean and improved sensor calibration. We analyze the entirety of the MODIS-Aqua aerosol record against AERONET to characterize uncertainty in the products, and relate the new collection to the well-characterized Collection 5 (C5) products to understand specific improvements. Over land, ~70% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds, which is comparable to C5; however, a slight overestimation of AOD at low optical depths and a slight underestimation at high optical depths that was observed in C5 has been eliminated in C6. The highest agreement with AERONET occurs in the Eastern U.S. and Europe. Regions with large surface reflectance, such as the Western U.S., or higher aerosol loading, including much of Africa and South America, remain a challenge. Over ocean, the inclusion of wind speed in the surface characterization has removed a wind speed dependant bias, and globally, ~63% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds. The dust outflow regions off the coast of Africa show the poorest agreement with AERONET. The aerosol products validate acceptably for science, though users should be aware of some regional biases we present in this work.

  9. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  10. Rethinking the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget: stronger production, faster removal, shorter lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Jo, Duseong S.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent laboratory studies suggest that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates are higher than assumed in current models. There is also evidence that SOA removal by dry and wet deposition occurs more efficiently than some current models suggest and that photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation may be important (but currently ignored) SOA sinks. Here, we have updated the global GEOS-Chem model to include this new information on formation (i.e., wall-corrected yields and emissions of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds) and on removal processes (photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation). We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these improved representations of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. The updated model presents a more dynamic picture of the life cycle of atmospheric SOA, with production rates 3.9 times higher and sinks a factor of 3.6 more efficient than in the base model. In particular, the updated model predicts larger SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, leading to better agreement with surface and aircraft measurements of organic aerosol compared to the base model. Our analysis thus suggests that the long-standing discrepancy in model predictions of the vertical SOA distribution can now be resolved, at least in part, by a stronger source and stronger sinks leading to a shorter lifetime. The predicted global SOA burden in the updated model is 0.88 Tg and the corresponding direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere is -0.33 W m-2, which is comparable to recent model estimates constrained by observations. The updated model predicts a population-weighed global mean surface SOA concentration that is a factor of 2 higher than in the base model, suggesting the need for a reanalysis of the contribution of

  11. Rethinking the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget: stronger production, faster removal, shorter lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Jo, D. S.; Cappa, C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Park, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Recent laboratory studies suggest that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates are higher than assumed in current models. There is also evidence that SOA removal by dry and wet deposition occurs more efficiently than some current models suggest, and that photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation may be important (but currently ignored) SOA sinks. Here, we have updated the global GEOS-Chem model to include this new information on formation (i.e. wall-corrected yields and emissions of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds) and on removal processes (photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation). We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these improved representations of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. The updated model presents a more dynamic picture of the lifecycle of atmospheric SOA, with production rates 4 times higher and sinks a factor of 3.7 more efficient than in the base model. In particular, the updated model predicts larger SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, leading to better agreement with surface and aircraft measurements of organic aerosol compared to the base model. Our analysis thus suggests that the long-standing discrepancy in model predictions of the vertical SOA distribution can now be resolved, at least in part, by a stronger source and stronger sinks leading to a shorter lifetime. The predicted global SOA burden in the updated model is 0.95 Tg and the corresponding direct radiative forcing at top of the atmosphere is -0.35 W m-2, which is comparable to recent model estimates constrained by observations. The updated model predicts a population-weighed global mean surface SOA concentration that is a factor of 2 higher than in the base model, suggesting the need for a reanalysis of the contribution of

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) for assessing aerosol deposition of orally inhaled drug products.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Myrna B; Bailey, Dale L

    2012-12-01

    The topical distribution of inhaled therapies in the lung can be viewed using radionuclides and imaging. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional functional imaging technique providing quantitatively accurate localization of the quantity and distribution of an inhaled or injected PET radiotracer in the lung. A series of transaxial slices through the lungs are obtained, comparable to an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. Subsequent reformatting allows coronal and sagittal images of the distribution of radioactivity to be viewed. This article describes procedures for administering [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose aerosol to human subjects for the purpose of determining dose and distribution following inhalation from an aerosol drug delivery device (ADDD). The advantages of using direct-labeled PET drugs in the ADDD are discussed with reference to the literature. The methods for designing the inhalation system, determining proper radiation shielding, calibration, and validation of administered radioactivity, scanner setup, and data handling procedures are described. Obtaining an X-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scan to provide accurate geometry of the lung and also correct for tissue attenuation of the PET radiotracer is discussed. Protocols for producing accurate images, including factors that need to be incorporated into the data calibration, are described, as well as a proposed standard method for partitioning the lung into regions of interest. Alternate methods are described for more detailed assessments. Radiation dosimetry/risk calculations for the procedures are appended, as well as a sample data collection form and spreadsheet for calculations. This article should provide guidance for those interested in using PET to determine quantity and distribution of inhaled therapeutics. PMID:23215847

  13. Asymptotics of Sample Entropy Production Rate for Stochastic Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Lihu

    2016-06-01

    Using the dimension-free Harnack inequality and the integration by parts formula for the associated diffusion semigroup, we prove the central limit theorem, the moderate deviation principle, and the logarithmic iteration law for the sample entropy production rate of a family of stochastic differential equations.

  14. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  15. Methods to assess carbonaceous aerosol sampling artifacts for IMPROVE and other long-term networks.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G; Chow, Judith C; Chen, L W Antony; Frank, Neil H

    2009-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) adsorb to quartz fiber filters during fine and coarse particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) sampling for thermal/optical carbon analysis that measures organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Particulate SVOCs can evaporate after collection, with a small portion adsorbed within the filter. Adsorbed organic gases are measured as particulate OC, so passive field blanks, backup filters, prefilter organic denuders, and regression methods have been applied to compensate for positive OC artifacts in several long-term chemical speciation networks. Average backup filter OC levels from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network were approximately 19% higher than field blank values. This difference is within the standard deviation of the average and likely results from low SVOC concentrations in the rural to remote environments of most IMPROVE sites. Backup filters from an urban (Fort Meade, MD) site showed twice the OC levels of field blanks. Sectioning backup filters from top to bottom showed nonuniform OC densities within the filter, contrary to the assumption that VOCs and SVOCs on a backup filter equal those on the front filter. This nonuniformity may be partially explained by evaporation and readsorption of vapors in different parts of the front and backup quartz fiber filter owing to temperature, relative humidity, and ambient concentration changes throughout a 24-hr sample duration. OC-PM2.5 regression analysis and organic denuder approaches demonstrate negative sampling artifact from both Teflon membrane and quartz fiber filters. PMID:19728484

  16. Science verification of operational aerosol and cloud products for TROPOMI on Sentinel-5 precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Luca; Gimeno-Garcia, Sebastian; Sanders, Abram; Sneep, Maarten; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Kokhanvosky, Alexander A.; Loyola, Diego; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    With the approaching launch of the Sentinel-5 precursor (S-5P) satellite, scheduled by mid 2016, one preparatory task of the L2 working group (composed by the Institute of Environmental Physics IUP Bremen, the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI De Bilt, and the German Aerospace Center DLR Oberpfaffenhofen) has been the assessment of biases among aerosol and cloud products, that are going to be inferred by the respective algorithms from measurements of the platform's payload TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI). The instrument will measure terrestrial radiance with varying moderate spectral resolutions from the ultraviolet throughout the shortwave infrared. Specifically, all the operational and verification algorithms involved in this comparison exploit the sensitivity of molecular oxygen absorption (the A-band, 755-775 nm, with a resolution of 0.54 nm) to changes in optical and geometrical parameters of tropospheric scattering layers. Therefore, aerosol layer height (ALH) and thickness (AOT), cloud top height (CTH), thickness (COT) and albedo (CA) are the targeted properties. First, the verification of these properties has been accomplished upon synchronisation of the respective forward radiative transfer models for a variety of atmospheric scenarios. Then, biases against independent techniques have been evaluated with real measurements of selected GOME-2 orbits. Global seasonal bias assessment has been carried out for CTH, CA and COT, whereas the verification of ALH and AOT is based on the analysis of the ash plume emitted by the icelandic volcanic eruption Eyjafjallajökull in May 2010 and selected dust scenes off the Saharan west coast sensed by SCIAMACHY in year 2009.

  17. The use of MODIS data and aerosol products for air quality prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Keith D.; Smith, Solar; Faruqui, Shazia

    2004-09-01

    The Center for Space Research (CSR) is exploring new approaches to integrate data collected by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, flown on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites, into a real-time prediction methodology to support operational air quality forecasts issued by the Monitoring Operations Division (MOD) of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Air pollution is a widespread problem in the United States, with over 130 million individuals exposed to levels of air pollution that exceed one or more health-based standards. Texas air quality is under assault by a variety of anthropogenic sources associated with a rapidly growing population along with increases in emissions from the diesel engines that drive international trade between the US and Central America. The challenges of meeting air quality standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency are further impacted by the transport of pollution into Texas that originates from outside its borders and are cumulative with those generated by local sources. In an earlier study, CSR demonstrated the value of MODIS imagery and aerosol products for monitoring ozone-laden pollution that originated in the central US before migrating into Texas and causing TCEQ to issue a health alert for 150 counties. Now, data from this same event are re-analyzed in an attempt to predict air quality from MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations. The results demonstrate a method to forecast air quality from remotely sensed satellite observations when the transient pollution can be isolated from local sources. These pollution sources can be separated using TCEQ's network of ground-based Continuous Air quality Monitoring (CAM) stations.

  18. Particle size distribution of workplace aerosols in manganese alloy smelters applying a personal sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, B; Bugge, M D; Ulvestad, B; Kjuus, H; Kandler, K; Ellingsen, D G

    2015-12-01

    Air samples were collected by personal sampling with five stage Sioutas cascade impactors and respirable cyclones in parallel among tappers and crane operators in two manganese (Mn) alloy smelters in Norway to investigate PM fractions. The mass concentrations of PM collected by using the impactors and the respirable cyclones were critically evaluated by comparing the results of the parallel measurements. The geometric mean (GM) mass concentrations of the respirable fraction and the <10 μm PM fraction were 0.18 and 0.39 mg m(-3), respectively. Particle size distributions were determined using the impactor data in the range from 0 to 10 μm and by stationary measurements by using a scanning mobility particle sizer in the range from 10 to 487 nm. On average 50% of the particulate mass in the Mn alloy smelters was in the range from 2.5 to 10 μm, while the rest was distributed between the lower stages of the impactors. On average 15% of the particulate mass was found in the <0.25 μm PM fraction. The comparisons of the different PM fraction mass concentrations related to different work tasks or different workplaces, showed in many cases statistically significant differences, however, the particle size distribution of PM in the fraction <10 μm d(ae) was independent of the plant, furnace or work task. PMID:26498986

  19. Research on test of product based on spatial sampling criteria and variable step sampling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihong; Han, Yueping

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an effective approach for online testing the assembly structures inside products using multiple views technique and X-ray digital radiography system based on spatial sampling criteria and variable step sampling mechanism. Although there are some objects inside one product to be tested, there must be a maximal rotary step for an object within which the least structural size to be tested is predictable. In offline learning process, Rotating the object by the step and imaging it and so on until a complete cycle is completed, an image sequence is obtained that includes the full structural information for recognition. The maximal rotary step is restricted by the least structural size and the inherent resolution of the imaging system. During online inspection process, the program firstly finds the optimum solutions to all different target parts in the standard sequence, i.e., finds their exact angles in one cycle. Aiming at the issue of most sizes of other targets in product are larger than that of the least structure, the paper adopts variable step-size sampling mechanism to rotate the product specific angles with different steps according to different objects inside the product and match. Experimental results show that the variable step-size method can greatly save time compared with the traditional fixed-step inspection method while the recognition accuracy is guaranteed.

  20. Production of Inhalable Submicrometer Aerosols from Conventional Mesh Nebulizers for Improved Respiratory Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Spence, Benjamin M.; Holbrook, Landon T.; Mossi, Karla M.; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Submicrometer and nanoparticle aerosols may significantly improve the delivery efficiency, dissolution characteristics, and bioavailability of inhaled pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to explore the formation of submicrometer and nanometer aerosols from mesh nebulizers suitable for respiratory drug delivery using experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Mesh nebulizers were coupled with add-on devices to promote aerosol drying and the formation of submicrometer particles, as well as to control the inhaled aerosol temperature and relative humidity. Cascade impaction experiments were used to determine the initial mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.1% albuterol aerosols produced by the AeroNeb commercial (4.69 μm) and lab (3.90 μm) nebulizers and to validate the CFD model in terms of droplet evaporation. Through an appropriate selection of flow rates, nebulizers, and model drug concentrations, submicrometer and nanometer aerosols could be formed with the three devices considered. Based on CFD simulations, a wire heated design was shown to overheat the airstream producing unsafe conditions for inhalation if the aerosol was not uniformly distributed in the tube cross-section or if the nebulizer stopped producing droplets. In comparison, a counter-flow heated design provided sufficient thermal energy to produce submicrometer particles, but also automatically limited the maximum aerosol outlet temperature based on the physics of heat transfer. With the counter-flow design, submicrometer aerosols were produced at flow rates of 5, 15, and 30 LPM, which may be suitable for various forms of oral and nasal aerosol delivery. Thermodynamic conditions of the aerosol stream exiting the counter-flow design were found be in a range of 21-45 °C with relative humidity greater than 40% in some cases, which was considered safe for direct inhalation and advantageous for condensational growth delivery. PMID:22707794

  1. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Characterization of Aqueous Photochemistry Products of Common Types of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-03-19

    A significant fraction of atmospheric organic compounds is predominantly found in condensed phases, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Many of these compounds are photolabile and can degrade through direct photolysis or indirect photooxidation processes on time scales that are comparable to the typical lifetimes of aqueous droplets (hours) and particles (days). This paper presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d- limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features, and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx generated SOA had more unique visual appearance, and indicated a lower extent of products overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents

  2. Understanding the anthropogenic influence on formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols via analysis of organosulfates and related oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Christensen, M. K.; Cozzi, F.; Zare, A.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Tulinius, T. E.; Madsen, H. H.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Massling, A.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) may affect concentration levels and composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) through photochemical reactions with biogenic organic precursors to form organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates. We investigated this influence in a field study from 19 May-22 June 2011 at two sampling sites in Denmark. Within the study, we identified a substantial number of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in the ambient urban curbside and semi-rural background air. A high degree of correlation in concentrations was found among a group of specific organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates, which may originate from various precursors, suggesting a common mechanism or factor affecting their concentration levels at the sites. It was proposed that the formation of those species most likely occurred on a larger spatial scale with the compounds being long-range transported to the sites on the days with highest concentrations. The origin of the long-range transported aerosols was investigated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in addition to modeled emissions of related precursors including isoprene and monoterpenes using the global Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and SO2 emissions using the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) database. The local impacts were also studied by examining the correlation between selected species which showed significantly enhanced concentrations at the urban curbside site and the local concentrations of various gases including SO2, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), NOx, aerosol acidity and other meteorological conditions. This investigation showed that an inter-play of the local parameters such as the aerosol acidity, NOx, relative humidity (RH), temperature and global radiation seemed to influence the concentration level of those species, via

  3. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  4. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-07-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28–49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades.

  5. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China.

    PubMed

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28-49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades. PMID:27388031

  6. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28–49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades. PMID:27388031

  7. OH- Initiated Heterogeneous Oxidation of Saturated Organic Aerosols in the Presence of SO2: Uptake Kinetics and Product Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Ward, M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase oxidation mechanisms for organic gases are often used as a starting point to understand heterogeneous oxidation. The reaction of a simple alkane hydrocarbon by OH proceeds through hydrogen abstraction and under ambient conditions leads to peroxy radical (RO2) formation. RO2 can further react to form: (1) smaller molecular weight products (i.e. fragmentation) via alkoxy radical formation and dissociation and/or (2) higher molecular weight products with oxygenated functional groups (i.e. functionalization). The ability to perturb these two pathways (functionalization vs. fragmentation) is critical for understanding the detailed reaction mechanism that control atmospheric aging chemistry of particles. At high temperatures the presence of sulfur dioxide (SO2) during organic-OH gas-phase oxidation enhances the fragmentation pathway leading to increased alkoxy formation. It is unknown if a comparative affect occurs at room temperature during a heterogeneous reaction. We used the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles in the presence and absence of SO2 as a model system to explore changes in individual mechanistic pathways. Detailed kinetic measurements were made in a flow tube reactor using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and oxidation products are identified from samples collected on quartz filters using thermal desorption two-dimensional chromatographic separation and ionization by either VUV (10.5 eV) or electron impact (70 eV), with detection by high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS). In the presence of SO2 the yields of alcohols were enhanced compared to without SO2, suggesting that the alkoxy formation pathway was dominant. The results from this work will provide an experimentally-confirmed kinetic framework that could be used to model atmospheric aging mechanisms.

  8. APPLICATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS (PROJECT SUMMARY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    report gives results of research, undertaken to develop tools and meth-odologies to measure aerosol chemical and particle dispersion through space. Georgia Tech Research Institute re-searchers built an Aerosol Mass Spec-tral Interface (AMSI), which is interfaced with a mass spect...

  9. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 1: ambient sampling.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected over a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). Three collocated low-volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended particulate matter, < 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) particulate matter, and < 2.5 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) particulate matter, were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a '1 in 6' day sampling schedule. Trace-element analysis was performed to measure levels of potentially harmful metals, while major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of small individual particles. Secondary electron images provided information on particle size and shape. This study shows the three main air pollutant types to be geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and heavy metal condensates (possibly from metals smelting and battery manufacturing facilities). Non-dust storm events resulted in elevated trace metal concentrations in Baghdad, Balad, and Taji in Iraq. Scanning-electron-microscopy secondary electron images of individual particles revealed no evidence of freshly fractured quartz grains. In all instances, quartz grains had rounded edges and mineral grains were generally coated by clay minerals and iron oxides. PMID:19235610

  10. Atmospheric oxidation of 1,3-butadiene: characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implications for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Docherty, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Kleindienst, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas- and particle-phase products. The chemical composition of the gas phase and SOA was analyzed using derivative-based methods (BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, or DNPH) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the derivative compounds. The analysis showed the occurrence of more than 60 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phases, of which 31 organic monomers were tentatively identified. The major identified products include glyceric acid, d-threitol, erythritol, d-threonic acid, meso-threonic acid, erythrose, malic acid, tartaric acid, and carbonyls including glycolaldehyde, glyoxal, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, and peroxyacryloyl nitrate (APAN). Some of these were detected in ambient PM2.5 samples, and could potentially serve as organic markers of 13BD. Furthermore, a series of oligoesters were detected and found to be produced through chemical reactions occurring in the aerosol phase between compounds bearing alcoholic groups and compounds bearing acidic groups. SOA was analyzed for organic mass to organic carbon (OM /OC) ratio, effective enthalpy of vaporization (Δ Hvapeff), and aerosol yield. The average OM /OC ratio and SOA density were 2.7 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.05, respectively. The average Δ Hvapeff was -26.08 ± 1.46 kJ mol-1, a value lower than that of isoprene SOA. The average laboratory SOA yield measured in this study at aerosol mass concentrations between 22.5 and 140.2 μg m-3 was 0.025 ± 0.011, a value consistent with the literature (0.021-0.178). While the focus of this study has been examination of the particle-phase measurements, the gas-phase photooxidation products have also been

  11. Gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol formation from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of myrcene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böge, Olaf; Mutzel, Anke; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Kahnt, Ariane; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial vegetation releases a great variety of volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. Monoterpenes, like myrcene, contribute significantly to this global biogenic VOC emission. In the atmosphere, monoterpenes rapidly undergo oxidation reactions by OH radicals (mainly during the daytime), NO3 radicals (mainly during the nighttime) and O3 to form multifunctional oxidation products. The products of these reactions are likely to be of low volatility and hence might lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In the present study, we report results from a series of chamber experiments performed in the LEAK chamber at TROPOS in which the gas-phase products and SOA yields obtained from myrcene O3 reactions with and without an OH radical scavenger as well as from the myrcene OH radical reaction in the presence of NOx have been measured. During the experiments the consumption of myrcene as well as the formation of gas-phase products was monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Ozone concentration was measured by an O3 monitor and the mixing ratios of nitrogen oxides were measured by a NOx monitor. Particle size distributions between 3-900 nm were monitored every 11 min using a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system. In addition to the products observed by means of the PTR-MS by their m/z values, an identification of carbonylic compounds by their DNPH derivatives was performed. Beside low molecular mass products the formation of 4-vinyl-4-pentenal with a yield of 55 % in myrcene ozonolysis has been observed. The further oxidation of this major first generation product lead to the formation of two dicarbonylic products with m/z 113 and to SOA formation. The influence of the continuing oxidation of 4-vinyl-4-pentenal on SOA formation will be discussed in detail. The emergence of the gas-phase product hydroxyacetone as direct result of the myrcene ozone reaction will be mooted, because hydroxyacetone seems to

  12. Sample contamination with NMP-oxidation products and byproduct-free NMP removal from sample solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar Berrueco; Patricia Alvarez; Silvia Venditti; Trevor J. Morgan; Alan A. Herod; Marcos Millan; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2009-05-15

    1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) is widely used as a solvent for coal-derived products and as eluent in size exclusion chromatography. It was observed that sample contamination may take place, through reactions of NMP, during extraction under refluxing conditions and during the process of NMP evaporation to concentrate or isolate samples. In this work, product distributions from experiments carried out in contact with air and under a blanket of oxygen-free nitrogen have been compared. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) clearly shows that oxidation products form when NMP is heated in the presence of air. Upon further heating, these oxidation products appear to polymerize, forming material with large molecular masses. Potentially severe levels of interference have been encountered in the size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of actual samples. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and SEC agree in showing an upper mass limit of nearly 7000 u for a residue left after distilling 'pure' NMP in contact with air. Furthermore, experiments have shown that these effects could be completely avoided by a strict exclusion of air during the refluxing and evaporation of NMP to dryness. 45 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Study on particulate matter air pollution in Beijing with MODIS aerosol level 2 products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jietai; Li, Chengcai; Lau, Alexis K.

    2004-09-01

    In the run-up to the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Chinese government officials at both the central and municipal levels are keenly aware that they must transform Beijing into a world-class city. According to the Beijing Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau (BJEPB) to improve its air quality some actions are adopting, including taking steps to increase the forested area surrounding the city preventing dust storms, reducing the automotive vehicles, moving polluting factories now inside the fourth ring road ringing the inner city to locations outside of the fourth ring road, and switching the fuel of public buses and taxis from diesel to natural gas, etc. Will they eliminate most serious environmental problems in Beijing? MODIS aerosol products are helping us to answer this kind of questions. A long-term validation has been finished by sun-photometer observations, and the results proved the relative error of MODIS level 2 products was slightly larger than the estimation of Chu et al. (2002) from the results in most AERONET sites. However, the comparison between the products and moisture-corrected air pollution index (API) data, which were daily released to public by EPB, showed a high correlation coefficient. An air pollution episode in 2003 was investigated by the usage of satellite products. Our conclusion for the air pollution control strategy in Beijing is that only reducing the pollution sources from inner city can't fully solve the pollution problems in Beijing and the regional transports from the nearby southern provinces are contributing a lot to the pollution situation in Beijing.

  14. An improved whitecap timescale for sea spray aerosol production flux modeling using the discrete whitecap method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Adrian H.

    2013-09-01

    The discrete whitecap method (DWM) to model the sea spray aerosol (SSA) production flux explicitly requires a whitecap timescale, which up to now has only considered a whitecap decay timescale, τdecay. A reevaluation of the DWM suggests that the whitecap timescale should account for the total whitecap lifetime (τwcap), which consists of both the formation timescale (τform) and the decay timescale (timescale definitions are given in the text). Here values of τform for 552 oceanic whitecaps measured at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory on the east coast of the USA are presented, and added to the corresponding values of τdecay to form 552 whitecap timescales. For the majority of whitecaps, τform makes up about 20-25% of τwcap, but this can be as large as 70% depending on the value of τdecay. Furthermore, an area-weighted mean whitecap timescale for use in the DWM (τDWM) is defined that encompasses the variable nature of individual whitecap lifetimes within a given time period, and is calculated to be 5.3 s for this entire data set. This value is combined with previously published whitecap coverage parameterizations and estimates of SSA particle production per whitecap area to form a size-resolved SSA production flux parameterization (dF(r80)/dlog10r80). This parameterization yields integrated sea-salt mass fluxes that are largely within the range of uncertainty of recent measurements over the size range 0.029 µm < r80 < 0.580 µm. Physical factors controlling whitecap lifetime such as bubble plume lifetime and surfactant stabilization are discussed in the context of SSA production from whitecaps.

  15. Atmospheric Aerosol Sampling with Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in Alaska: Instrument Development, Payload Integration, and Measurement Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberie, S. R.; Saiet, E., II; Hatfield, M. C.; Cahill, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols remain one of biggest variables in understanding global climate. The number of feedback loops involved in aerosol processes lead to nonlinear behavior at the systems level, making confident modeling and prediction difficult. It is therefore important to ground-truth and supplement modeling efforts with rigorous empirical measurements. To this end, the Alaska Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration (ACUASI) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has developed a new cascade DRUM-style impactor to be mounted aboard a variety of unmanned aircraft and work in tandem with an optical particle counter for the routine collection of atmospheric aerosols. These UAS-based aerosol samplers will be employed for measurement campaigns in traditionally hazardous conditions such as volcanic plumes and over forest fires. Here we report on the development and laboratory calibration of the new instrument, the integration with UAS, and the vertical profiling campaigns being undertaken.

  16. Fast sampling algorithm for Lie-Trotter products.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian

    2005-04-01

    A fast algorithm for path sampling in path-integral Monte Carlo simulations is proposed. The algorithm utilizes the Lévy-Ciesielski implementation of Lie-Trotter products to achieve a mathematically proven computational cost of n log2(n) with the number of time slices n, despite the fact that each path variable is updated separately, for reasons of optimality. In this respect, we demonstrate that updating a group of random variables simultaneously results in loss of efficiency. PMID:15903719

  17. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  18. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Broekhuizen, K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2007-08-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4), confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  19. Comparison Between NPP-VIIRS Aerosol Data Products and the MODIS AQUA Deep Blue Collection 6 Dataset Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Kondragunta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are small particles suspended in the atmosphere and have a variety of natural and man-made sources. Knowledge of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a measure of the amount of aerosol in the atmosphere, and its change over time, is important for multiple reasons. These include climate change, air quality (pollution) monitoring, monitoring hazards such as dust storms and volcanic ash, monitoring smoke from biomass burning, determining potential energy yields from solar plants, determining visibility at sea, estimating fertilization of oceans and rainforests by transported mineral dust, understanding changes in weather brought upon by the interaction of aerosols and clouds, and more. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine AOD. This study compares the VIIRS dataset to ground-based measurements of AOD, along with a state-of-the-art satellite AOD dataset (the new version of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Deep Blue algorithm) to assess its reliability. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011, carrying several instruments designed to continue the biogeophysical data records of current and previous satellite sensors. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD), and related activities since launch have been focused towards validating and understanding this new dataset through comparisons with other satellite and ground-based products. The operational VIIRS AOD product is compared over land with AOD derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations using the Deep Blue (DB) algorithm from the forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS data

  20. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter < 2.5 μm) resolved aerosol samples analysed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie European Union framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the approach used is the simultaneous sampling at two monitoring sites in Barcelona (Spain) during September-October 2010: an urban background site (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non-exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (regional sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types of industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%, percentages presented are average source contributions to the total elemental mass measured). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by very good correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Some important conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both

  1. Satellite assessment of sea spray aerosol productivity: Southern Ocean case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witek, Marcin L.; Diner, David J.; Garay, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite many years of observations by multiple sensors, there is still substantial ambiguity regarding aerosol optical depths (AOD) over remote oceans, in particular, over the pristine Southern Ocean. Passive satellite retrievals (e.g., Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)) and global aerosol transport models show a distinct AOD maximum around the 60°S latitude band. Sun photometer measurements performed by the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN), on the other hand, indicate no increased AODs over the Southern Ocean. In this study elevated Southern Ocean AODs are examined from the modeling perspective. The primary aerosol component over the Southern Ocean is sea spray aerosol (SSA). Multiple simulations of SSA concentrations and optical depths are carried out using a single modeling framework, the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model. Several SSA emission functions are examined, including recently proposed formulations with sea surface temperature corrections. The differences between NAAPS simulations are primarily due to different SSA emission formulations. The results are compared against satellite-derived AODs from the MISR and MODIS instruments. MISR and MODIS AOD retrievals are further filtered to eliminate retrievals potentially affected by cloud contamination and cloud adjacency effects. The results indicate a very large impact of SSA emission parameterization on the simulated AODs. For some scenarios, the Southern Ocean AOD maximum almost completely disappears. Further MISR and MODIS AOD quality screening substantially improves model/satellite agreement. Based on these comparisons, an optimal SSA emission function for global aerosol transport models is recommended.

  2. A Spatio-Temporal Approach for Global Validation and Analysis of MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didier; Slutsker, Ilya; Holben, Brent N.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the launch of the MODIS sensor on the Terra spacecraft, new data sets of the global distribution and properties of aerosol are being retrieved, and need to be validated and analyzed. A system has been put in place to generate spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of the MODIS aerosol parameters over more than 100 validation sites spread around the globe. Corresponding statistics are also computed from temporal subsets of AERONET-derived aerosol data. The means and standard deviations of identical parameters from MOMS and AERONET are compared. Although, their means compare favorably, their standard deviations reveal some influence of surface effects on the MODIS aerosol retrievals over land, especially at low aerosol loading. The direction and rate of spatial variation from MODIS are used to study the spatial distribution of aerosols at various locations either individually or comparatively. This paper introduces the methodology for generating and analyzing the data sets used by the two MODIS aerosol validation papers in this issue.

  3. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates from South Asian Clay Brick Production Based on Direct Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Athalye, V.; Ragavan, S.; Rajarathnam, U.; Kr, B.; Lalchandani, D.; Maithel, S.; Malhotra, G.; Bhanware, P.; Thoa, V.; Phuong, N.; Baum, E.; Bond, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    About 150-200 billion clay bricks are produced in India every year. Most of these bricks are fired in small-scale traditional kilns that burn coal or biomass without pollution controls. Reddy and Venkataraman (2001) estimated that 8% of fossil fuel related PM2.5 emissions and 23% of black carbon emissions in India are released from brick production. Few direct emissions measurements have been done in this industry and black carbon emissions, in particular, have not been previously measured. In this study, 9 kilns representing five common brick kiln technologies were tested for aerosol properties and gaseous pollutant emissions, including optical scattering and absorption and thermal-optical OC/EC. Simple relationships are then used to estimate the radiative-forcing impact. Kiln design and fuel quality greatly affect the overall emission profiles and relative climate warming. Batch production kilns, such as the Downdraft kiln, produce the most PM2.5 (0.97 gPM2.5/fired brick) with an OC/EC fraction of 0.3. Vertical Shaft Brick kilns using internally mixed fuels produce the least PM (0.09 gPM2.5/kg fired brick) with the least EC (OC/EC = 16.5), but these kilns are expensive to implement and their use throughout Southern Asia is minimal. The most popular kiln in India, the Bull's Trench kiln, had fewer emissions per brick than the Downdraft kiln, but an even higher EC fraction (OC/EC = 0.05). The Zig-zag kiln is similar in structure to the Bull's Trench kiln, but the emission factors are significantly lower: 50% reduction for CO, 17% for PM2.5 and 60% for black carbon. This difference in emissions suggests that converting traditional Bull's Trench kilns into less polluting Zig-zag kilns would result in reduced atmospheric warming from brick production.

  4. The Remote Sensing of Mineral Aerosols and Their Impact on Phytoplankton Productivity using Sea WiFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegmann, Petra M.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal was to use SeaWiFs data to study the relationship between aerosols found in aeollan dust and photosynthesis of phytoplankton in open ocean surface waters. This project was a collaborative effort between myself and Dr. Neil Tindale at Texas A&M University and followed on our earlier funded proposal which had been designed as a proof-of-concept study to determine if ocean color sensors such as the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) could be used to detect and map large-scale mineral aerosol plumes. Despite the large spatial and temporal gaps inherent in the CZCS data coverage, our results from this initial study indicated that an ocean color sensor could indeed be used to detect aerosols. These encouraging results led us to propose in this proposal the use of SeaWiFS data to study mineral aerosol transport and its impact on phytoplankton production. This proposal orignally intended to make use of SeaWiFS images, but as the launch delay of SeaWiFS dragged on, we had to make do with other satellite data sets. Thus, the focus of this proposal became the CSCS image archive instead. I detail my results and accomplishments with this data set.

  5. Toward Understanding Amines and Their Degradation Products from Postcombustion CO2 Capture Processes with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC) is a promising technique for reducing CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning plants. A concern of the technique, however, is the emission of amines and their degradation byproducts. To assess the environmental risk of this technique, standardized stack sampling and analytical methods are needed. Here we report on the development of an integrated approach that centers on the application of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) for characterizing amines and PCCC-relevant species. Molecular characterization is achieved via ion chromatography (IC) and electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The method has been optimized, particularly, by decreasing the AMS vaporizer temperature, to gain quantitative information on the elemental composition and major nitrogen-containing species in laboratory-degraded amine solvents commonly tested for PCCC applications, including ethanolamine (MEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and piperazine (PIP). The AMS-derived nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) ratios for the degraded solvent and product mixtures agree well with the results from a total organic carbon and total nitrogen (TOC/TN) analyzer. In addition, marker ions identified in the AMS spectra are used to estimate the mass contributions of individual species. Overall, our results indicate that this new approach is suitable for characterizing PCCC-related mixtures as well as organic nitrogen species in other sample types. As an online instrument, AMS can be used for both real-time characterization of emissions from operating PCCC plants and ambient particles in the vicinity of the facilities. PMID:24617831

  6. Toward understanding amines and their degradation products from postcombustion CO2 capture processes with aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xinlei; Shaw, Stephanie L; Zhang, Qi

    2014-05-01

    Amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC) is a promising technique for reducing CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning plants. A concern of the technique, however, is the emission of amines and their degradation byproducts. To assess the environmental risk of this technique, standardized stack sampling and analytical methods are needed. Here we report on the development of an integrated approach that centers on the application of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) for characterizing amines and PCCC-relevant species. Molecular characterization is achieved via ion chromatography (IC) and electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The method has been optimized, particularly, by decreasing the AMS vaporizer temperature, to gain quantitative information on the elemental composition and major nitrogen-containing species in laboratory-degraded amine solvents commonly tested for PCCC applications, including ethanolamine (MEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and piperazine (PIP). The AMS-derived nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) ratios for the degraded solvent and product mixtures agree well with the results from a total organic carbon and total nitrogen (TOC/TN) analyzer. In addition, marker ions identified in the AMS spectra are used to estimate the mass contributions of individual species. Overall, our results indicate that this new approach is suitable for characterizing PCCC-related mixtures as well as organic nitrogen species in other sample types. As an online instrument, AMS can be used for both real-time characterization of emissions from operating PCCC plants and ambient particles in the vicinity of the facilities. PMID:24617831

  7. Preliminary results for salt aerosol production intended for marine cloud brightening, using effervescent spray atomization.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gary; Foster, Jack; Galbraith, Lee; Jain, Sudhanshu; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob

    2014-12-28

    The large-scale production of vast numbers of suitable salt nuclei and their upward launch is one of the main technological barriers to the experimental testing of marine cloud brightening (MCB). Very promising, though not definitive, results have been obtained using an adapted version of effervescent spray atomization. The process is simple, robust and inexpensive. This form of effervescent spraying uses only pressurized water and air sprayed from small nozzles to obtain very fine distributions. While it is far from optimized, and may not be the best method if full deployment is ever desired, we believe that even in its present form the process would lend itself well to preliminary field test investigations of MCB. Measurements obtained using standard aerosol instrumentation show approximately lognormal distributions of salt nuclei with median diameters of approximately 65 nm and geometric standard deviations slightly less than 2. However, these measurements are not in agreement with those based on scanning electron microscopy imaging of collected particles, an observation that has not yet been explained. Assuming the above distribution, 10(15) particles per second could be made with 21 kW of spray power, using approximately 200 nozzles. It is envisioned that existing snow making equipment can be adapted to launch the nuclei 60-100 m into the air, requiring approximately 20 kW of additional power. PMID:25404673

  8. Preliminary results for salt aerosol production intended for marine cloud brightening, using effervescent spray atomization

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Gary; Foster, Jack; Galbraith, Lee; Jain, Sudhanshu; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale production of vast numbers of suitable salt nuclei and their upward launch is one of the main technological barriers to the experimental testing of marine cloud brightening (MCB). Very promising, though not definitive, results have been obtained using an adapted version of effervescent spray atomization. The process is simple, robust and inexpensive. This form of effervescent spraying uses only pressurized water and air sprayed from small nozzles to obtain very fine distributions. While it is far from optimized, and may not be the best method if full deployment is ever desired, we believe that even in its present form the process would lend itself well to preliminary field test investigations of MCB. Measurements obtained using standard aerosol instrumentation show approximately lognormal distributions of salt nuclei with median diameters of approximately 65 nm and geometric standard deviations slightly less than 2. However, these measurements are not in agreement with those based on scanning electron microscopy imaging of collected particles, an observation that has not yet been explained. Assuming the above distribution, 1015 particles per second could be made with 21 kW of spray power, using approximately 200 nozzles. It is envisioned that existing snow making equipment can be adapted to launch the nuclei 60–100 m into the air, requiring approximately 20 kW of additional power. PMID:25404673

  9. Global dust sources detection using MODIS Deep Blue Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Remote sensing sensors are the most useful tool to locate dust sources. These sensors include microwaves, visible channels, and lidar. On the global scale, major dust source regions have been identified using polar orbiting satellite instruments. The MODIS Deep Blue algorithm has been particularly useful to detect small-scale sources such as floodplains, alluvial fans, rivers, and wadis , as well as to identify anthropogenic sources from agriculture. The recent release of Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products allows to extend dust source detection to the entire land surfaces, which is quite useful to identify mid to high latitude dust sources and detect not only dust from agriculture but fugitive dust from transport and industrial activities. This presentation will overview the advantages and drawbacks of using MODIS Deep Blue for dust detection, compare to other instruments (polar orbiting and geostationary). The results of Collection 6 with a new dust screening will be compared against AERONET. Applications to long range transport of anthropogenic dust will be presented.

  10. Aerosol and product yields from NO{sub 3} radical-initiated oxidation o/f selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, M.; Ljungstroem, E.; Waengberg, I.; Barnes, I.; Becker, K.H.

    1999-02-15

    Atmospheric transformation of monoterpenes gives products that may cause environmental consequences. In this work the NO{sub 3} radical-initiated oxidation of the monoterpenes {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-pinene, {Delta}{sup 3}-carene, and limonene has been investigated. All experiments were conducted in EUPHORE, the EUropean PHOto REactor facility in Valencia, Spain. The aerosol and product yields were measured in experiments with a conversion of the terpenes in the interval from 7 to 400 ppb. The lower end of the concentrations used are close to those measured in ambient pine forest air. Products were measured using long path in situ FTIR. Aerosol yields were obtained using a DMA-CPC system. The aerosol mass yields measured at low concentrations were <1, 10, 15, and 17% for {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-pinene, {Delta}{sup 3}-carene, and limonene, respectively. The total molar alkylnitrate yields were calculated to be 19, 61, 66, and 48%, and molar carbonyl compound yields were estimated to be 71, 14, 29, and 69% for {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-pinene, {Delta}{sup 3}-carene, and limonene, respectively. The aerosol yields were strongly dependent on the amounts of terpene reacted, whereas the nitrate and carbonyl yields do not depend on the amount of terpene converted. The principal carbonyl compound from {alpha}pinene oxidation was pinonaldehyde. In the case of limonene, endolim was tentatively identified and appears to be a major product. The reactions with {beta}-pinene and {Delta}{sup 3}-carene yielded 1--2% of nopinone and 2--3% caronaldehyde, respectively. The results show that it is not possible to use generalized descriptions of terpene chemistry, e.g., in mathematical models.

  11. The generation of aerosols by accidents which may occur during plant-scale production of micro-organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, J.; Pomeroy, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to simulate accidents which may occur during large-scale production of micro-organisms. Four types of accident, which were considered to be the most likely to result in the greatest hazard to health, were simulated using a bacterial model. The accidents were all concerned with faults occurring in the operation of the microbial fermenter. Gross contamination of surfaces occurred in all experiments, but only three types of accident produced a measurable aerosol. PMID:6350448

  12. Study of a CCP RF Dusty Plasma for the Production of Titan's Aerosols Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, G.; Cernogora, G.; Ouni, F.; Correia, J. J.; Cavarroc, M.; Boufendi, L.; Szopa, C.

    2008-09-07

    The CCP-RF discharge PAMPRE experiment produces analogues of Titan's aerosols. Here are presented the plasma characteristics as a function of gas mixtures and dust formation. Electronic density, optical emission spectroscopy, and self-bias voltage measurements are presented.

  13. Hygroscopic growth of size-resolved, emission-source classified, aerosol particles sampled across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, T.; Crosbie, E. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Mikoviny, T.; Wisthaler, A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is a key air quality parameter, impacting the radiation budget, visibility, and cloud formation. During the DC3 and SEAC4RS field campaigns (>300 total flight hours), measurements were made over 32 US states, Canada, the Pacific Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico, between the surface and 41,000 feet ASL. The aircraft research payloads included a suite of in-situ aerosol and gas phase instruments. The Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe (DASH-SP) and the Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) humidified nephelometer instrument applied different techniques to measure water uptake by aerosol particles at prescribed relative humidity values. Size-resolved growth factor (GF ≡ Dp,wet/Dp,dry) measurements by the DASH-SP are compared to bulk scattering measurements (f(RH) ≡ σscat,wet/σscat,dry) by the LARGE instrument. Spatial location and volatile organic compound tracers such as isoprene and acetonitrile are used to classify the origin of distinct air masses, including: forest fires, biogenic-emitting forests, agricultural use lands, marine boundary layer, urban, and rural background. Analyses of GF results by air mass origin are reported and results are compared with f(RH) measurements. A parameterization between the f(RH) and GF measurements and its potential uses are discussed.

  14. Operational Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean using INSAT-3D/Imager product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rastogi, G.; Chauhan, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean region is derived operationally for the first time from the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite INSAT-3D Imager data at 0.65 μm wavelength. Single visible channel algorithm based on clear sky composites gives larger retrieval error in AOD than other multiple channel algorithms due to errors in estimating surface reflectance and atmospheric property. However, since MIR channel signal is insensitive to the presence of most aerosols, therefore in present study, AOD retrieval algorithm employs both visible (centred at 0.65 μm) and mid-infrared (MIR) band (centred at 3.9 μm) measurements, and allows us to monitor transport of aerosols at higher temporal resolution. Comparisons made between INSAT-3D derived AOD (τI) and MODIS derived AOD (τM) co-located in space (at 1° resolution) and time during January, February and March (JFM) 2014 encompasses 1165, 1052 and 900 pixels, respectively. Good agreement found between τI and τM during JFM 2014 with linear correlation coefficients (R) of 0.87, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively. The extensive validation made during JFM 2014 encompasses 215 co-located AOD in space and time derived by INSAT 3D (τI) and 10 sun-photometers (τA) that includes 9 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and 1 handheld sun-photometer site. INSAT-3D derived AOD i.e. τI, is found within the retrieval errors of τI = ±0.07 ±0.15τA with linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.90 and root mean square error equal (RMSE) to 0.06. Present work shows that INSAT-3D aerosol products can be used quantitatively in many applications with caution for possible residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  15. Integrated Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Product using CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO and CloudSat Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Yan; Gibson, Sharon; Yi, Yuhong; Trepte, Qing; Wielicki, Bruce; Kato, Seiji; Winker, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the first integrated data set of global vertical profiles of clouds, aerosols, and radiation using the combined NASA A-Train data from the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and CloudSat. As part of this effort, cloud data from the CALIPSO lidar and the CloudSat radar are merged with the integrated column cloud properties from the CERES-MODIS analyses. The active and passive datasets are compared to determine commonalities and differences in order to facilitate the development of a 3- dimensional cloud and aerosol dataset that will then be integrated into the CERES broadband radiance footprint. Preliminary results from the comparisons for April 2007 reveal that the CERES-MODIS global cloud amounts are, on average, 0.14 less and 0.15 greater than those from CALIPSO and CloudSat, respectively. These new data will provide unprecedented ability to test and improve global cloud and aerosol models, to investigate aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, and to validate the accuracy of global aerosol, cloud, and radiation data sets especially in polar regions and for multi-layered cloud conditions.

  16. PIXE Analysis of Indoor Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Turley, Colin; Moore, Robert; Battaglia, Maria; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol samples collected in academic buildings at Union College to investigate the air quality in these buildings and the effectiveness of their air filtration systems. This is also the commissioning experiment for a new scattering chamber in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The aerosol samples were collected on Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates particles according to their aerodynamic size. The foils were bombarded with beams of 2.2-MeV protons from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator and the X-ray products were detected with an Amptek silicon drift detector. After subtracting the contribution from the Kapton foils, the X-ray energy spectra of the aerosol samples were analyzed using GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the samples. We will describe the collection of the aerosol samples, discuss the PIXE analysis, and present the results.

  17. Mars Sample Return mission utilizing in-situ propellant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Price, Steve

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study examining the potential of in-situ propellant production (ISPP) on Mars to aid in achieving a low cost Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. Two versions of such a mission were examined: a baseline version employing a dual string spacecraft, and a light weight version employing single string architecture with selective redundancy. Both systems employed light weight avionics currently being developed by Lockheed Martin, Jet Propulsion Lab and elsewhere in the aerospace community, both used a new concept for a simple, light weight parachuteless sample return capsule, both used a slightly modified version of the Mars Surveyor lander currently under development at Lockheed Martin for flight in 1998, and both used a combination of the Sabatier-electrolysis and reverse water gas shift ISPP systems to produce methane/oxygen propellant on Mars by combining a small quantity of imported hydrogen with the Martian CO2 atmosphere. It was found that the baseline mission could be launched on a Delta 7925 and return a 0.5 kg sample with 82 percent mission launch margin;over and beyond subsystem allocated contingency masses . The lightweight version could be launched on a Mid-Lite vehicle and return a 0.25 kg sample with 11 percent launch margin, over and above subsystem contingency mass allocations.

  18. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  19. Atmospheric oxidation of 1,3-butadiene: characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implication for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Docherty, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Kleindienst, T. E.

    2014-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas- and particle-phase products. The chemical composition of the gas phase and SOA was analyzed using derivative-based methods (BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, or DNPH) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the derivative compounds. The analysis showed the occurrence of more than 60 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phases, of which 31 organic monomers were tentatively identified. The major identified products include glyceric acid, d-threitol, erythritol, d-threonic acid, meso-threonic acid, erythrose, malic acid, tartaric acid, and carbonyls including glycolaldehyde, glyoxal, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, and peroxyacryloyl nitrate (APAN). Some of these were detected in ambient PM2.5 samples and could potentially serve as organic markers of 1,3-butadiene (13BD). Furthermore, a series of oligoesters were detected and found to be produced from esterification reactions among compounds bearing alcoholic groups and compounds bearing acidic groups. Time profiles are provided for selected compounds. SOA was analyzed for organic mass to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratio, effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), and aerosol yield. The average OM / OC ratio and SOA density were 2.7 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.05, respectively. The average ΔHvapeff was 26.1 ± 1.5 kJ mol-1, a value lower than that of isoprene SOA. The average laboratory SOA yield measured in this study at aerosol mass concentrations between 22.5 and 140.2 μg m-3 was 0.025 ± 0.011, a value consistent with the literature (0.021-0.178). While the focus of this study has been examination of the particle-phase measurements, the gas

  20. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, R. P.; Mason, G. S.; Miller, A. L.; Stipe, C. B.; Kearns, J. D.; Prier, M. W.; Rarick, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds.

  1. Note: A portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for rapid sampling and analysis of silicon-containing aerosols.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R P; Mason, G S; Miller, A L; Stipe, C B; Kearns, J D; Prier, M W; Rarick, J D

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument has been developed for measuring silicon-containing aerosols in near real-time using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The instrument uses a vacuum system to collect and deposit airborne particulate matter onto a translatable reel of filter tape. LIBS is used to analyze the deposited material, determining the amount of silicon-containing compounds present. In laboratory testing with pure silica (SiO2), the correlation between LIBS intensity for a characteristic silicon emission and the concentration of silica in a model aerosol was determined for a range of concentrations, demonstrating the instrument's plausibility for identifying hazardous levels of silicon-containing compounds. PMID:27250478

  2. Impact of Stronger Production and Loss Rates of Secondary Organic Aerosols on their Global Distribution and Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Cappa, C. D.; Madronich, S.; Jo, D. S.; Park, R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organic aerosols are observed to be the major constituents of submicron particles worldwide, and yet their atmospheric lifecycle including formation, ageing, and removal processes is poorly understood. Recent laboratory and ambient measurements suggest that both production yields and removal rates of chemically produced secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are much stronger and more diverse than currently assumed in chemistry-climate models (which typically consider wet deposition as the major loss process). In this study, we re-assess the global SOA distribution and budget with newly proposed SOA production and loss processes derived from these recent measurements, as well as from theoretical calculations. We evaluate and discuss the relative importance of removal pathways for organic vapors and particles (e.g. dry and wet deposition, photo-dissociation, evaporation, and heterogeneous surface reactions), and their effect on the SOA vertical distribution and budget using the GEOS-Chem global chemistry-transport model. We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these new developments in our understanding of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. Our results show strong changes in predicted vertical profiles of organic aerosols with higher SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, which appear to be in a better agreement with aircraft measurements.

  3. AMS+ALS: Kinetic and Product Studies of the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Aerosol at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J. H.; Wilson, K. R.; Kessler, S. H.; Browne, E. C.; Nah, T.; Smith, J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of condensed-phase organic species can have a major influence on the composition, properties, and impacts of organic aerosol (OA); however the rates and products of such "aging" reactions are poorly constrained. Here we describe a series of laboratory experiments aimed at better understanding one class of aging reactions, the heterogeneous oxidation of OA by gas-phase oxidants. Central to these experiments is the availability of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source at LBNL, which enables the implementation of VUV photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry. This technique allows for the real-time, speciated measurement of OA composition, yielding molecular information that is highly complementary to ensemble data from electron-impact ionization. OA composition is measured with both ionization schemes as a function of oxidant exposure within a flow reactor, providing detailed information on the kinetics and products of heterogeneous oxidation over multiple generations of oxidation. Specific topics investigated include the branching between functionalization and fragmentation of OA components, the formation of secondary organic aerosol from photolytically-generated radical species, and the heterogeneous aging of soot-associated organic species.

  4. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2012-08-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban Environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter <2.5 μm) resolved Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie FP7-EU framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the unique approach used is the simultaneous PIXE measurements at two monitoring sites: urban background (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (secondary sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by strong correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Beside apportioning the aerosol sources, some important air quality related conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both monitoring sites at similar concentrations regardless their different ventilation conditions; (2) by contrast, local industrial

  5. Comparison of ground based indices (API and AQI) with satellite based aerosol products.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sheng; Cao, Chun-Xiang; Singh, Ramesh P

    2014-08-01

    Air quality in mega cities is one of the major concerns due to serious health issues and its indirect impact to the climate. Among mega cities, Beijing city is considered as one of the densely populated cities with extremely poor air quality. The meteorological parameters (wind, surface temperature, air temperature and relative humidity) control the dynamics and dispersion of air pollution. China National Environmental Monitoring Centre (CNEMC) started air pollution index (API) as of 2000 to evaluate air quality, but over the years, it was felt that the air quality is not well represented by API. Recently, the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of the People's Republic of China (PRC) started using a new index "air quality index (AQI)" from January 2013. We have compared API and AQI with three different MODIS (MODIS - Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer, onboard the Terra/Aqua satellites) AOD (aerosol optical depth) products for ten months, January-October, 2013. The correlation between AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD was found to be reasonably good as compared with API, mainly due to inclusion of PM2.5 in the calculation of AQI. In addition, for every month, the correlation coefficient between AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD was found to be relatively higher in the month of February to May. According to the monthly average distribution of precipitation, temperature, and PM10, the air quality in the months of June-September was better as compared to those in the months of February-May. AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD show highly polluted days associated with dust event, representing true air quality of Beijing. PMID:24412562

  6. Validation of radiolabeling of drug formulations for aerosol deposition assessment of orally inhaled products.

    PubMed

    Devadason, Sunalene G; Chan, Hak-Kim; Haeussermann, Sabine; Kietzig, Claudius; Kuehl, Philip J; Newman, Stephen; Sommerer, Knut; Taylor, Glyn

    2012-12-01

    Radiolabeling of inhaler formulations for imaging studies is an indirect method of determining lung deposition and regional distribution of drug in human subjects. Hence, ensuring that the radiotracer and drug exhibit similar aerodynamic characteristics when aerosolized, and that addition of the radiotracer has not significantly altered the characteristics of the formulation, are critical steps in the development of a radiolabeling method. The validation phase should occur during development of the radiolabeling method, prior to commencement of in vivo studies. The validation process involves characterization of the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of drug in the reference formulation, and of both drug and radiotracer in the radiolabeled formulation, using multistage cascade impaction. We propose the adoption of acceptance criteria similar to those recommended by the EMA and ISAM/IPAC-RS for determination of therapeutic equivalence of orally inhaled products: (a) if only total lung deposition is being quantified, the fine particle fraction ratio of both radiolabeled drug and radiotracer to that of the reference drug should fall between 0.85 and 1.18, and (b) if regional lung deposition (e.g., outer and inner lung regions) is to be quantified, the ratio of both radiolabeled drug and radiotracer to reference drug on each impactor stage or group of stages should fall between 0.85 and 1.18. If impactor stages are grouped together, at least four separate groups should be provided. In addition, while conducting in vivo studies, measurement of the APSD of the inhaler used on each study day is recommended to check its suitability for use in man. PMID:23215848

  7. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  8. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  9. Development of a method for fast and automatic radiocarbon measurement of aerosol samples by online coupling of an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, G.; Zhang, Y. L.; Agrios, K.; Szidat, S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast and automatic method for radiocarbon analysis of aerosol samples is presented. This type of analysis requires high number of sample measurements of low carbon masses, but accepts precisions lower than for carbon dating analysis. The method is based on online Trapping CO2 and coupling an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS by means of a gas interface. It gives similar results to a previously validated reference method for the same set of samples. This method is fast and automatic and typically provides uncertainties of 1.5-5% for representative aerosol samples. It proves to be robust and reliable and allows for overnight and unattended measurements. A constant and cross contamination correction is included, which indicates a constant contamination of 1.4 ± 0.2 μg C with 70 ± 7 pMC and a cross contamination of (0.2 ± 0.1)% from the previous sample. A Real-time online coupling version of the method was also investigated. It shows promising results for standard materials with slightly higher uncertainties than the Trapping online approach.

  10. Evaluation of 1047-nm photoacoustic instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Zielinska, B; Rogers, C F; Sagebiel, J; Park, Kihong; Chow, Judith; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G; Kelly, K; Wagner, D; Sarofim, A; Lighty, J; Palmer, G

    2005-07-15

    A series of measurements have been performed at Hill Air Force Base to evaluate real-time instruments for measurements of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs emitted from spark and ignition compression vehicles. Vehicles were operated at idle or fast idle in one set of measurements and were placed under load on a dynamometer during the second series. Photoacoustic instruments were developed that operated at a wavelength of 1047 nm where gaseous interference is negligible, although sensitivity to black carbon is good. Compact, efficient, solid-state lasers with direct electronic modulation capabilities are used in these instruments. Black carbon measurements are compared with samples collected on quartz fiber filters that were evaluated using the thermal optical reflectance method. A measure of total particle-bound PAH was provided by photoelectric aerosol sensors (PAS) and is evaluated against a sum of PAH mass concentrations obtained with a filter-denuder combination. The PAS had to be operated with a dilution system held at approximately 150 degrees C for most of the source sampling to prevent spurious behavior, thus perhaps compromising detection of lighter PAHs. PA and PAS measurements were found to have a high degree of correlation, perhaps suggesting that the PAS can respond to the polycyclic nature of the black carbon aerosol. The PAS to PA ratio for ambient air in Fresno, CA is 3.7 times as large in winter than in summer months, suggesting that the PAS clearly does respond to compounds other than BC when the instrument is used without the heated inlet. PMID:16082972

  11. A High-Spatial-Resolution, Localized MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Product for Use in Air Quality Exposure Assessment During Large Wildfire Smoke Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Raffuse, S. M.; DeWinter, J. L.; Craig, K. J.; Jumbam, L. K.; Fruin, S.; Lurmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has potential use for determining the intra-urban variability of airborne particulate matter exposure during wildfire events; however, the standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD products have limitations for this application. Specifically, the 10x10 km resolution is too coarse for intra-urban population exposure assessments, the assumed aerosol optical properties are not representative of biomass burning aerosol, and the cloud masking algorithm misinterprets heavy smoke as clouds. We developed a localized MODIS AOD product at 1.5 and 2.5 km resolutions and tested the performance in northern California during the 2008 wildfires. The localized product's algorithm uses local biomass burning aerosol optical properties, local surface reflectance data, and a relaxed cloud filter. During the 2008 season, persistent heavy smoke was produced over northern California and the San Joaquin Valley for over two months. As California is both highly populated and covered with a relatively dense network of ground-based aerosol monitoring stations, this event provided an excellent opportunity to develop the AOD product and test its ability to predict aerosol concentrations on the ground to assess population exposure. We will present our methodology and discuss its potential for air quality and public health applications.

  12. Validation of MODIS aerosol product with in-situ AERONET data (a study case in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, M.; Leyva-Contreras, A.; Bonifaz, R.; Llamas, R.

    2009-12-01

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is known as blocking particles which avoid the transmission of solar radiation coming from the Sun, and is defined as the integral of the coefficient of extinction over a vertical column of the Atmosphere. This coefficient of extinction is also defined as the limited fraction of the irradiance over the trajectory at a specific wavelength. The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor provides aerosol data products all over the planet. However this data requires constant evaluation and validation using in-situ data such as the provided by the network of photometers managed by AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network). In this work, the procedure of validation of the MODIS AOT data using AERONET data in the wavelengths of 660 and 675 nm is presented. It is expected that using validate remote sensing data which provides spatial and temporal information about the AOT will help to a better understanding of the behavior of the complex atmospheric conditions which characterize the NW of Mexico and SW of the US such as the Mexican monsoon.

  13. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  14. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  15. Development, evaluation and comparison of two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde vapors and condensation aerosols in air† ‡

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in air have been developed, evaluated and compared (1) a reagent-coated solid sorbent HPLC-UV method and (2) an impinger-fluorescence method. In the first method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L min−1 with a sampler containing 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). After sampling, excess DNPH in ethyl acetate is added to the sampler prior to storage for 68 hours. The OPA-DNPH derivative is eluted with 4.0 mL of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for measurement by HPLC with a UV detector set at 3S5 nm. The estimated detection limit is 0.016 µg per sample or 0.067 µg m−3 (0.012 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of vapor spikes at levels of 1.2 to 6.2 µg were 96 to 101%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapor and condensation aerosols were 97 to 100%. In the second method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L mm−1 with a midget impinger containing 10 mL of DMSO solution containing N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. The fluorescence reading is taken 80 min after the completion of air sampling. Since the time of taking the fluorescence reading is critical, the reading is taken with a portable fluorometer. The estimated detection limit is 0.024 µg per sample or 0.1 µg m−3 (0.018 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of OPA vapor spikes at levels of 1.4 to 5.0 µg per sample were 97 to 105%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapors and condensation aerosols were 95 to 99%. The collection efficiency for a mixture of vapor and condensation aerosol was 99.4%. The two methods were compared side-by-side in a generation system constructed for producing controlled atmospheres of OPA vapor in air. Average air concentrations of OPA vapor found by both methods agreed within ±10%. PMID:26346658

  16. Technical Note: On the effect of water-soluble compounds removal on EC quantification by TOT analysis in urban aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzalunga, A.; Bernardoni, V.; Fermo, P.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, three different thermal protocols were tested on untreated and water-washed aerosol samples to study the influence of soluble organic and inorganic compounds on EC measurements. Moreover, analyses on the water soluble extracts were carried out. The aim was to find out the most suitable protocol to analyse samples collected in a heavily polluted area. Indeed, the tests were performed on real samples collected at an urban background station in the Po Valley, which is one of the main pollution hot-spots in Europe. The main differences among the tested protocols were the maximum temperature of the He step (i.e. 870 °C, 650 °C, and 580 °C) and the duration of the plateaus during the heating procedure. Our measurements evidenced the presence of a significant amount of weakly light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol evolving during the highest temperature step in He (i.e. 870 °C), which makes lower temperature protocols not suitable for EC determination in samples collected in heavily polluted areas like Milan.

  17. Diurnal Variation and Spatial Distribution Effects on Sulfur Speciation in Aerosol Samples as Assessed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES)

    PubMed Central

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Thumanu, Kanjana; Na Pattalung, Warangkana; Hirunyatrakul, Phoosak; Kittikoon, Itthipon; Ho, Kin Fai; Cao, Junji

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on providing new results relating to the impacts of Diurnal variation, Vertical distribution, and Emission source on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of aerosol samples. All aerosol samples used in the diurnal variation experiment were preserved using anoxic preservation stainless cylinders (APSCs) and pressure-controlled glove boxes (PCGBs), which were specially designed to prevent oxidation of the sulfur states in PM10. Further investigation of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra revealed that PM10 samples were dominated by S(VI), even when preserved in anoxic conditions. The “Emission source effect” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 was examined by comparing sulfur K-edge XANES spectra collected from various emission sources in southern Thailand, while “Vertical distribution effects” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 were made with samples collected from three different altitudes from rooftops of the highest buildings in three major cities in Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that neither “Emission source” nor “Vertical distribution” appreciably contribute to the characteristic fingerprint of sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum in PM10. PMID:22988545

  18. Global Long-Term SeaWiFS Deep Blue Aerosol Products available at NASA GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, Corey; Wei, Jennifer C.; Ostrenga, Dana M.; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Hsu, Nai-Yung; Kempler, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term climate data records about aerosols are needed in order to improve understanding of air quality, radiative forcing, and for many other applications. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provides a global well-calibrated 13- year (1997-2010) record of top-of-atmosphere radiance, suitable for use in retrieval of atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD). Recently, global aerosol products derived from SeaWiFS with Deep Blue algorithm (SWDB) have become available for the entire mission, as part of the NASA Making Earth Science data records for Use in Research for Earth Science (MEaSUREs) program. The latest Deep Blue algorithm retrieves aerosol properties not only over bright desert surfaces, but also vegetated surfaces, oceans, and inland water bodies. Comparisons with AERONET observations have shown that the data are suitable for quantitative scientific use [1],[2]. The resolution of Level 2 pixels is 13.5x13.5 km2 at the center of the swath. Level 3 daily and monthly data are composed by using best quality level 2 pixels at resolution of both 0.5ox0.5o and 1.0ox1.0o. Focusing on the southwest Asia region, this presentation shows seasonal variations of AOD, and the result of comparisons of 5-years (2003- 2007) of AOD from SWDB (Version 3) and MODIS Aqua (Version 5.1) for Dark Target (MYD-DT) and Deep Blue (MYD-DB) algorithms.

  19. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photo-oxidation under a range of controlled conditions (relative humidity or RH ~65-89%, volatile organic compound-to-NOx or VOC / NOx ~3-9 and NOx ~2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measurable amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e. in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photo-oxidation products of the minor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally isoprene-emitting landscapes in Southeast

  20. APPLICATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research project to develop tools and methodologies to measure aerosol chemical and particle dispersion through space. These tools can be used to devise pollution prevention strategies that could reduce occupant chemical exposures and guide manufactu...

  1. Probing aerosol formation by comprehensive measurements of gas phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, Mikael; Kleist, Einhard; Junninen, Heikki; Sipilä, Mikko; Petäjä, Tuukka; Pullinen, Iida; Springer, Monika; Andres, Stefanie; Rissanen, Matti; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Rubach, Florian; Tillman, Ralf; Lee, Ben H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Thornton, Joel; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas F.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive suite of chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) were deployed for chamber studies of monoterpene oxidation. The CIMS instruments were able to detect several different groups of compounds ranging from volatile to practically non-volatile. The compound groups showed very different behavior and correlations with aerosol number and mass. Results suggest that major gas phase contributors are not considered in current models.

  2. Influence of aerosol estimation on coastal water products retrieved from HICO images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Karen W.; Lamela, Gia

    2011-06-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is a hyperspectral sensor which was launched to the International Space Station in September 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been developing the Coastal Water Signatures Toolkit (CWST) to estimate water depth, bottom type and water column constituents such as chlorophyll, suspended sediments and chromophoric dissolved organic matter from hyperspectral imagery. The CWST uses a look-up table approach, comparing remote sensing reflectance spectra observed in an image to a database of modeled spectra for pre-determined water column constituents, depth and bottom type. In order to successfully use this approach, the remote sensing reflectances must be accurate which implies accurately correcting for the atmospheric contribution to the HICO top of the atmosphere radiances. One tool the NRL is using to atmospherically correct HICO imagery is Correction of Coastal Ocean Atmospheres (COCOA), which is based on Tafkaa 6S. One of the user input parameters to COCOA is aerosol optical depth or aerosol visibility, which can vary rapidly over short distances in coastal waters. Changes to the aerosol thickness results in changes to the magnitude of the remote sensing reflectances. As such, the CWST retrievals for water constituents, depth and bottom type can be expected to vary in like fashion. This work is an illustration of the variability in CWST retrievals due to inaccurate aerosol thickness estimation during atmospheric correction of HICO images.

  3. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  4. Cross-Characterization of Aerosol Properties from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors Facilitated by Regional Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol observations from space have become a standard source for retrieval of aerosol properties on both regional and global scales. Indeed, the large number of currently operational spaceborne sensors provides for unprecedented access to the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever to be available. Nonetheless, this resource remains under-utilized, largely due to the discrepancies and differences existing between the sensors and their aerosol products. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have designed and implemented an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) that facilitates the joint sampling of aerosol data from multiple sensors. MAPSS consistently samples aerosol products from multiple spaceborne sensors using a unified spatial and temporal resolution, where each dataset is sampled over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations together with coincident AERONET data samples. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between aerosol products from multiple sensors. Moreover, the well-characterized co-located ground-based AERONET data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products.

  5. Monitoring Airborne Dust from Source to Sink Using the e-Deep Blue Aerosol Products from VIIRS, MODIS, and Seawifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carletta, N.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust sources are typically located in very bright, arid desert regions across the globe. In the past, aerosol retrieval algorithms were unable to properly handle these bright surfaces which lead to large, persistent data gaps. In order to eliminate these gaps, the Deep Blue algorithm was developed and first entered into the MODIS operational stream in Collection 5.1. Since then, the Deep Blue algorithm has evolved to retrieve not only over bright surfaces, but also vegetated surfaces. This updated algorithm has been named the enhanced Deep Blue (e-Deep Blue) algorithm and has been successfully applied to reflectances from the Sea-viewing, Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, 1997-2010), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2000/2002-present), and now the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS, 2012-present) aboard the Suomi-NPP platform. This algorithm has been partnered with a new over-ocean algorithm for our SeaWiFS and VIIRS datasets. Due to the broad swath of VIIRS, daily global coverage is achieved at higher spatial resolution compared to MODIS and SeaWiFS. Thus, the evolution of dust can be tracked from source to sink, across both land and ocean using these satellite products. We introduce the basics of the e-Deep Blue algorithm along with our preliminary VIIRS e-Deep Blue products, including aerosol optical thickness at 550nm and Ǻngström exponent. Validation with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are also presented along with the intercomparisons between VIIRS Deep Blue and other satellite products.

  6. High-resolution mass spectrometry and molecular characterization of aqueous photochemistry products of common types of secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Romonosky, Dian E; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2015-03-19

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow-tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx-generated SOA had more unique visual appearance and indicated a lower extent of product overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen-containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone-driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents before and after photolysis showed the tendency to reduce the average number of atoms in the SOA compounds without a significant effect on the overall O/C and H/C ratios. SOA prepared by OH/NOx photooxidation of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and guaiacol were more resilient to photolysis despite being the most light-absorbing. The composition of SOA prepared by ozonolysis of

  7. Using MAIAC Aerosol Products to Estimate PM10 Concentrations in the Southeastern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnagara Puttaswamy, S.; Hu, X.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acute and chronic exposure to particulate matter has been linked to various adverse health effects. High PM levels including inhalable particles (PM10) and fine particles (PM2.5) are commonly found in large urban centers in the developing world. Unlike PM2.5 whose routine ground monitoring is very sparse, PM10 is regularly measured in many large cities in developing countries. In this analysis, we evaluate the potential for satellite aerosol remote sensing product to estimate PM10 levels. We chose AOD values in 2003 retrieved by the Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm based on MODIS measurements, which has a high spatial resolution of 1 km. Our study area is a 600 km x 600 km region centered in Atlanta, GA. Linear mixed effect (LME) models were developed with MAIAC AOD as the primary predictor variable, meteorology, PM10 emission locations and land use variables as secondary predictor variables. Daily PM10 concentrations measured at ~70 EPA air quality monitoring stations were used as the dependent variable. Model day of year was used as the grouping factor for the random effect of MAIAC AOD. We aggregated AOD and other covariates on 1 km, 3km, 5km and 10km resolution grids and similar LME models were developed for each spatial resolution to compare their abilities to capture the spatial patterns of PM10 mass concentrations at various scales. Our models show that MAIAC AOD, temperature, wind speed and PM 10 emissions source locations are statistically significant predictors of PM 10 at all the spatial scales. Model fitting R2 ranges from 0.35 in winter to 0.56 in the summer. Model performances show a slight decline as the grid resolution decreases. Although the performances of PM10 exposure models are not as good as those of PM2.5 models reported in the literature, these models can still provide spatially resolved PM10 levels at urban scale, which would enable preliminary PM10-related public health research in developing countries.

  8. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the fission product aerosol release during MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a light water reactor, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products during Molten Core Concrete Interactions (MCCI) are quantified using CORCON/MOD2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, CsO/sub 2/ and Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/ are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO/sub 2/ are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and CeO/sub 2/ increase with increased Zr content, while the releases of Te and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radiological releases is estimated to be significant; while the impact of the coking reaction on the aerosol production is insignificant.

  9. Statistical Modeling of Methane Production from Landfill Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gurijala, K. R.; Sa, P.; Robinson, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple-regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the simultaneous effects of 10 environmental factors on the rate of methane production (MR) from 38 municipal solid-waste (MSW) samples collected from the Fresh Kills landfill, which is the world's largest landfill. The analyses showed that volatile solids (VS), moisture content (MO), sulfate (SO(inf4)(sup2-)), and the cellulose-to-lignin ratio (CLR) were significantly associated with MR from refuse. The remaining six factors did not show any significant effect on MR in the presence of the four significant factors. With the consideration of all possible linear, square, and cross-product terms of the four significant variables, a second-order statistical model was developed. This model incorporated linear terms of MO, VS, SO(inf4)(sup2-), and CLR, a square term of VS (VS(sup2)), and two cross-product terms, MO x CLR and VS x CLR. This model explained 95.85% of the total variability in MR as indicated by the coefficient of determination (R(sup2) value) and predicted 87% of the observed MR. Furthermore, the t statistics and their P values of least-squares parameter estimates and the coefficients of partial determination (R values) indicated that MO contributed the most (R = 0.7832, t = 7.60, and P = 0.0001), followed by VS, SO(inf4)(sup2-), VS(sup2), MO x CLR, and VS x CLR in that order, and that CLR contributed the least (R = 0.4050, t = -3.30, and P = 0.0045) to MR. The SO(inf4)(sup2-), VS(sup2), MO x CLR, and CLR showed an inhibitory effect on MR. The final fitted model captured the trends in the data by explaining vast majority of variation in MR and successfully predicted most of the observed MR. However, more analyses with data from other landfills around the world are needed to develop a generalized model to accurately predict MSW methanogenesis. PMID:16535704

  10. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photooxidation under a range of controlled conditions (RH ∼65-89%, VOC/NOx ∼3-9 and NOx ∼2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line, chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene, but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measureable amounts of SOA via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e., in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photooxidation products of the minor VOCs co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally-isoprene emitting landscapes in Southeast Asia. Moreover, in general the amount of aerosol mass produced from the emissions of the principally

  11. Aldol Condensation Products and Polyacetals in Organic Films Formed from Reactions of Propanal in Sulfuric Acid at Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) Aerosol Acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, J. V. H.; Perez-Montano, S.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.; Van Wyngarden, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt. %) which is highly reflective towards UV and visible radiation. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles may also contain a significant amount of organic material. Experiments combining organics (propanal, glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal) with sulfuric acid at concentrations typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that have the potential to impact chemical, optical and/or cloud-forming properties of aerosols. In order to assess the potential for such films to impact aerosol chemistry or climate properties, experiments were performed to identify the chemical processes responsible for film formation. Surface films were analyzed via Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies and are shown to consist primarily of aldol condensation products and cyclic and linear polyacetals, the latter of which are likely responsible for separation from the aqueous phase.

  12. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  13. On-Line Measurement of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and TIme-Integrated Filter Sampling and Reference Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.-D.; Vannice, R.W.

    2003-05-20

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. They had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  14. On-Line Measurements of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and Time-Integrated Filter Sampling Reference Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.D.

    2003-05-15

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. We had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were subsequently analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  15. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Bird, James; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ceburnis, Darius; Chang, Rachel; Clark, Antony; deLeeuw, Gerrit; Deane, Grant; DeMott, Paul J.; Elliot, Scott; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fairall, Chris W.; Hawkins, Lelia; Hu, Yongxiang; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  16. Chemical characteristics of organic aerosol in Bab-Ezzouar (Algiers). Contribution of bituminous product manufacture.

    PubMed

    Yassaa, N; Meklati, B Y; Cecinato, A; Marino, F

    2001-10-01

    The organic compositions of atmospheric particulate matter from Bab-Ezzouar (Algiers) have been investigated to assess the air pollution levels suspected to be caused by asphalt product and yeast manufactures. After a medium-volume air sampling, soxhlet extraction, alumina elution and HPLC separation, the extracts were analysed by high-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The composition of n-alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) fractions reflected the petrogenic origin from the emission of asphalt materials production in addition to vascular plant wax emissions. In contrast, microbial activities seemed to play the main role for the presence of n-alkanoic acids at Bab-Ezzouar. The sole nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH) observed, i.e., 2-nitrofluoranthene (2NFA), was very likely to arise from gas-phase photochemical reaction of parent PAH in the atmosphere. The total aerial levels ranged from 75 to 206 ng m(-3) for n-alkanes, from 153 to 345 ng m(-3) for n-alkanoic acids and from 44 to 100 ng m(-3) for PAH and NPAH. Although the samples were collected during the hot season, the levels of these pollutants seemed to be important and of environmental concern, especially for PAH species. PMID:11592421

  17. Influence of Aerosol Acidity on the Chemical Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W.; Schlling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI- TOFMS). A number of first- , second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increased acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are suggested as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  18. Influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W. H.; Schilling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E. O.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-TOFMS). A number of first-, second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increased acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of organosulfates and nitrated organosulfates derived from a sesquiterpene. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are suggested as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  19. Influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W. H.; Schilling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E. O.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-TOFMS). A number of first-, second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increase of acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of organosulfates and nitrated organosulfates derived from a sesquiterpene. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are identified as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  20. Reactive uptake of ozone by proxies for organic aerosols: Surface-bound and gas-phase products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elan R.; Frost, Gregory J.; Rudich, Yinon

    2001-02-01

    Gas-phase and surface-bound products were determined for the reaction of ozone with self assembled monolayers of alkanes and terminal alkenes serving as proxies for atmospheric organic aerosols. The organic surfaces were characterized using infrared (IR) spectroscopy (direct absorption and attenuated total reflection) as well as contact angle measurements with water before and after the reaction with ozone. The contact angle of the organic surfaces was reduced by ˜20° owing to the reaction. Following the reaction, IR absorption due to the presence of carbonyls and carboxylic acids was observed on the surface. Gas-phase products were determined using infrared spectroscopy immediately above the reaction surface. Under dry conditions, gas-phase formaldehyde yields of 0.5±0.1 for organic monolayers of allyltrichlorosilane (C3=) and octenyltrichlorosilane (C8=) terminal alkenes were observed, in good agreement with the yields observed for gas phase ozonolysis of terminal alkenes. Surfaces of n-octane (C8) as well as processed alkene surfaces were nonreactive toward ozone. The reaction mechanism of ozone with the surface alkenes is discussed. Finally, the possible implications for the chemistry of organic aerosols are discussed and studied using a box model and realistic atmospheric scenarios.

  1. Synthesis and Analysis of Putative Terpene Oxidation Products and the Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles that Form from Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebben, C. J.; Strick, B. F.; Upshur, M.; Shrestha, M.; Velarde, L.; Lu, Z.; Wang, H.; Xiao, D.; Batista, V. S.; Martin, S. T.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The terpenes isoprene and α-pinene are abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by trees and oxidized in the atmosphere. However, the chemical processes involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles from VOCs are not well understood. In this work, we use a combined synthetic, analytical, and theoretical approach to gain a molecular level understanding of the chemistry involved in the formation of SOA particles from VOC precursors. To this end, we have synthesized putative products of isoprene and α-pinene oxidation and the oligomers that form from them. Specifically, we have focused on the epoxide and 2-methyltetraols that form from isoprene oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, as well as products of α-pinene ozonolysis. In our analysis, we utilize a spectroscopic technique called sum frequency generation (SFG). SFG is a coherent, surface-specific, vibrational spectroscopy that uses infrared and visible laser light fields, overlapped spatially and temporally at a surface, to probe vibrational transitions within molecules. Our use of this technique allows us to assess the chemical identity of aerosol-forming components at their surfaces, where interactions with the gas phase occur. The spectral responses from these compounds are compared to those of synthetic isoprene- and α-pinene-derived aerosol particles, as well as natural aerosol particles collected in tropical and boreal forests to begin to predict the constituents that may be present at the surfaces of these particles. In addition, isotope editing is utilized to gain a better understanding of α-pinene. The rigidity of this molecule makes it difficult to understand spectroscopically. The combination of synthesis with deuterium labeling, theory, and broadband and high-resolution SFG spectroscopy in the C-H and C-D stretching regions allow us to determine the orientation of this important molecule on a surface, which could have implications for its reactivity in the

  2. Comparison between the ASSET EZ4 NCO and Impinger Sampling Devices for Aerosol Sampling of 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate in Spray Foam Application.

    PubMed

    Puscasu, Silvia; Aubin, Simon; Cloutier, Yves; Sarazin, Philippe; Van Tra, Huu; Gagné, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) aerosol exposure evaluation in spray foam insulation application is known to be a challenge. Current available techniques are either not user-friendly or are inaccurate or are not validated for this application. A new sampler has recently been developed to address the user-friendliness issues with other samplers: the ASSET EZ4-NCO, but the use of this sampler in spray foam insulation applications has not been demonstrated or validated. Because of this, the current work was undertaken to provide a comparison of the ASSET sampler with an impinger method, considered to be the best available method in the context of spray foam insulation, and hence the pertinence of comparing this sampler to an impinger method, considered to be the best available method for measuring MDI monomer and oligomers for this particular application. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for MDI monomer and oligomer analysis was implemented based on the Supelco literature. It allows the analysis of MDI-dibutylamine (DBA) and MDI 3-ring-DBA with a minimum reported value of 5ng ml(-1), a dynamic range of 5-140ng ml(-1), precision <15% and accuracy >80%. This method was used to quantify MDI aerosols collected with the ASSET sampler in an MDI spray foam environment in parallel with the toluene/MOPIP impinger reference method. The ASSET sampler significantly underestimated the levels of MDI monomer and oligomers when compared to the reference method. The estimated bias was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI] 54-89%) for the monomer and 96% (95% CI 76-115%) for the oligomers. These results demonstrate the importance of evaluating each new sampler for each isocyanate application prior to a formal worker exposure evaluation. PMID:25851310

  3. The validation and comparison of the GOCI aerosol optical thickness products: a case study of Tianjin 8.12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hui; Jiang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    COMSGOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) is the first geostationary ocean color satellite in the world launched by South Korea in June 2010, which includes eight bands from the visible to the infrared band. GOCI aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 555nm was retrieved by atmospheric radiative transfer model based on two-stream approximation algorithm. Due to GOCI without near infrared band and has a high solar elevation angle, solar zenith angle must be recalibrated to solve the earth system albedo, and the surface reflectance solved by quack atmospheric correction and recalculated backward scatter coefficient. Evaluation of GOCIAOT with AERONET measurements showed that the average error becomes 0.107 from the original 0.393, that means GOCI aerosol optical thickness can be more accurately with the advanced two-stream approximation. Taking the eastern China in 3 and 4 December 2013 for example, comparing the GOCIAOT at 555nm, MODISAOT retrievals at 550nm, NPPAOT at 550nm and AERONET data products indicated that: take the AERONET data as reference, the error of three kinds of satellite data can be ordered as following: MODISAOT< GOCIAOT< NPPAOT and the GOCI-MODIS shows a bias of 0.02917 with the GOCI-NPP. GOCIAOT is 0.05714 generally bigger than that of MODISAOT. NPP-GOCI deviation is 0.10253. The deficiency of MODIS is its low spatial resolution and the high concentration of AOT will be mistaken for a cloud area. However, GOCI can well reflect the concentration and distribution of aerosols. Therefore, GOGI can provide real-time dynamic monitoring on China Eastern atmospheric environment and the accurate time event information of haze for each process can be obtained. Finally, applied GOCI to the "8.12 Tianjin bombings" and to monitor the migration and dispersion of pollutant.

  4. An Accuracy Assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO Version 2/Version 3 Daytime Aerosol Extinction Product Based on a Detailed Multi-Sensor, Multi-Platform Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP s level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. spaceborne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth s Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP s low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth s surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP s extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  5. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  6. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  7. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Influence Aerosol Variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Kahn, R. A.; Li, Q.; Yung, Y. L.; Tyranowski, T.; Geogdzhayev, I. V.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Torres, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the modulation of aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using satellite-based global aerosol products, including aerosol index (AI) from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus-7, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites. A composite analysis is performed for boreal winter, and the global pentad rainfall data from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) are used to identify MJO events. The MJO composites exhibit large variations in the TOMS AI and MODIS/AVHRR AOT over the equatorial Indian and western Pacific Oceans where MJO convection is active, as well as the tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean where MJO convection is relatively weak but the background aerosol level is relatively high. A strong inverse linear relationship between the TOMS AI and rainfall anomalies, but a weaker, less coherent positive correlation between the MODIS/AVHRR AOT and rainfall anomalies, were found. The Aerosol Robotic Network AOT pattern at Kaashidoo (73.5°E, 4.9°N) and Nauru (167°E, 0.5°S) is more consistent with MODIS and AVHRR. These results indicate a connection between the MJO, its associated rainfall and circulation variability, and the observed aerosol variations. Several physical and non-physical factors that may contribute to the observed aerosol-rainfall relationship, such as aerosol humidification effect, wet deposition, surface wind speed, phytoplankton, different sensor sensitivities (absorbing versus non-absorbing aerosols and upper versus lower tropospheric aerosols), sampling issue, and cloud contamination, are discussed. However, a clear causal explanation for the observed patterns remains elusive. Further investigation is needed to unravel this complex aerosol-rainfall relationship.

  8. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive fission product 131I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, 134Cs and 137Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m-3 in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of 134Cs and 137Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m-3) variation of stable cesium (133Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  9. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-15

    Radioactive fission product {sup 131}I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m{sup -3} in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m{sup -3}) variation of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  10. Sample damage during X-ray fluorescence analysis--case study on ammonium salts in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Van Meel, Katleen; Worobiec, Anna; Stranger, Marianne; Van Grieken, René

    2008-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can consist of, amongst others, compounds like NH(4)NO(3) or (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Such components can suffer radiation damage and/or evaporate during EDXRF measurements, providing errors on successively applied analysis. The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of measurements using conventional EDXRF on the volatile compounds and to compare it with the influence of polarized beam EDXRF using secondary targets (and hence indirect irradiation). The effect of different parameters (acquisition time, accelerating voltage, current and medium) on the concentration loss was studied. The measurements performed in vacuum during a long period lead to the highest losses of volatile compounds. The influence of direct irradiation was proved to be larger than the indirect variant. PMID:18688470

  11. 31 CFR 12.4 - Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tobacco products prohibited. 12.4 Section 12.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RESTRICTION OF SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS § 12.4 Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited. The distribution of free samples of tobacco products in or around any...

  12. 31 CFR 12.4 - Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tobacco products prohibited. 12.4 Section 12.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RESTRICTION OF SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS § 12.4 Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited. The distribution of free samples of tobacco products in or around any...

  13. 31 CFR 12.4 - Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tobacco products prohibited. 12.4 Section 12.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RESTRICTION OF SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS § 12.4 Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited. The distribution of free samples of tobacco products in or around any...

  14. 31 CFR 12.4 - Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tobacco products prohibited. 12.4 Section 12.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RESTRICTION OF SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS § 12.4 Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited. The distribution of free samples of tobacco products in or around any...

  15. 31 CFR 12.4 - Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tobacco products prohibited. 12.4 Section 12.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RESTRICTION OF SALE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS § 12.4 Distribution of free samples of tobacco products prohibited. The distribution of free samples of tobacco products in or around any...

  16. 27 CFR 25.53 - Submissions of samples of fermented products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... submit samples of: (a) Cereal beverage, saké, or any fermented product produced at the brewery, (b) Materials used in the production of cereal beverage, saké, or any fermented product; and (c) Cereal...

  17. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident. PMID:27301319

  18. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  19. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident. PMID:27301319

  20. Production and Study of Titan's Aerosols Analogues with A RF Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cernogora, G.; Correia, J. J.; Boufendi, L.; Jolly, A.

    2005-10-01

    The atmosphere of Titan, the biggest satellite of Saturn, contains aerosols produced by the organic chemistry induced by the photochemistry of N2 and CH4, the major gaseous atmospheric compounds. In spite of their importance for the properties of the Titan's atmosphere, and for organic chemistry, only few direct information are available about them because of the limitations of the observational techniques, and their processes of formation and growth are not understood. In order to bring answers to these questions, we developed a new type of laboratory simulation to produce analogues of Titan's aerosols (known as tholins) with a low pressure Radio Frequency plasma discharge. The main originality of this experiment (named PAMPRE) comes from its ability to produce particles in volume, as they are maintained in levitation by electrostatic forces compensating gravity, whereas the other experiments produce tholins on the reactors walls or a substrate. We initiated our investigations by a study of the properties of the produced particles as a function of the plasma operating conditions (i.e. amount of CH4 in N2, injected RF power, pressure, and gas flow). We here present the results of this study.

  1. Probing Molecular Associations of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Samples from CalNex 2010 with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. E.; Nguyen, T. B.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Hayes, P. L.; Liu, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Russell, L. M.; Nizkorodov, S.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    This project focuses on analyzing the identities of molecules that comprise oligomers in size resolved aerosol fractions. Since oligomers are generally too large and polar to be measured by typical GC/MS analysis, soft ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry is used to extend the range of observable compounds. Samples collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Los Angeles and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions have been analyzed with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and a high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The nano-DESI is a soft ionization technique that allows molecular ions to be observed and the Orbitrap has sufficient resolution to determine the elemental composition of almost all species above the detection limit. A large fraction of SOA is made up of high molecular weight oligomers which are thought to form through acid catalyzed reactions of photo-chemically processed volatile organic compounds (VOC). The formation of oligomers is influenced by the VOCs available, the amount of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate, and the magnitude of photo-chemical processing, among other potential influences. We present the elemental composition of chemical species in size resolved SOA samples with six-hour time resolution, providing the first time resolved data set for the study of these oligomers in atmospheric samples. We present a comparison of the degree of overlap between the ambient and chamber experiments as a novel method to examine sources for this fraction of SOA. Possible formation pathways and sources of observed compounds are analyzed by comparison to other concurrent measurements at the site.

  2. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

    2012-05-19

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  3. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne; Berntsen, Terje; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Gimoux, Paul; Gong, Sunling; Horowitz, Larry W.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevag, Alf; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, Gunnar; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z-alpha) is defined to quantitatively assess the models' performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z-alpha climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z-alpha than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z-alpha is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z-alpha is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  4. Atmospheric Oxidation of 1,3-Butadiene: Characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implication for PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas and pa...

  5. Introduction to MODIS Collection 6 'Deep Blue' aerosol products and strategy for cirrus-signal correction in AOD retrievals using 1.38 μm reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Hsu, N. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2012-12-01

    This study shows the characteristics of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products (hereafter, C006 DB products) and a strategy for correcting cirrus-signal in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. The C006 DB products have several changes over the C005, including extended coverage, surface reflectance model, aerosol microphysical model, and cloud screening, etc. One of the new features is the inclusion of pixel-level uncertainty estimates on the retrieved AOD. These uncertainty estimates have been determined based on a validation against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) direct-Sun AOD measurements, and are parameterized as a function of AOD, viewing geometry, and retrieval quality flag. This will provide users with a simple way to assess the uncertainty on Deep Blue AOD data for their particular application of interest. Preliminary results show strong agreement with AERONET, suggesting that the Deep Blue algorithm performs as well as other state-of-the-art satellite AOD datasets. In addition, a strategy for cirrus-signal correction in the retrieved AOD is presented. The cirrus reflectance at each wavelength to be used in the aerosol retrieval algorithms is determined by the relationships between reflectances at 1.38 μm and the aerosol bands and subtracted from the original TOA reflectance values assuming linear relationship for the optically thin case (ρ1.38 < 0.05). Since the 1.38 μm band is located in the strong water vapor absorption band, thus representing cirrus signal only, the slope between the 1.38 μm reflectance values and minimum reflectance values at each aerosol band for the corresponding values at 1.38 μm can be used to convert the 1.38 μm reflectance to the cirrus reflectance at each wavelength. Then, the cirrus-signal-corrected AOD can be retrieved by using the corrected reflectance data as input data into the aerosol retrieval algorithms. The retrieval results show that the AOD

  6. Atmospheric DMS and Biogenic Sulfur aerosol measurements in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Wentworth, G.; Burkart, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.; Sharma, S.; Desiree, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) and its oxidation products were measured on the board of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen and above melt ponds in the Arctic during July 2014 in the context of the NETCARE study which seeks to understand the effect of DMS and its oxidation products with respect to aerosol nucleation, as well as its effect on cloud and precipitation properties. The objective of this study is to quantify the role of DMS in aerosol growth and activation in the Arctic atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS samples were collected from different altitudes, from 200 to 9500 feet, aboard the POLAR6 aircraft expedition to determine variations in the DMS concentration and a comparison was made to shipboard DMS measurements and its effects on aerosol size fractions. The chemical and isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol size fractions was studied. Sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S) offer a way to determine the oceanic DMS contribution to aerosol growth. The results are expected to address the contribution of anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions. In addition, aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured at the same time within precipitation and fogs to compare with the characteristics of aerosols in each size fraction with the characteristics of the sulfate in each medium. This measurement is expected to explain the contribution of DMS oxidation in aerosol activation in the Arctic summer. Preliminary results from the measurement campaign for DMS and its oxidation products in air, fog and precipitation will be presented.

  7. Mass Spectral Observations of Submicron Aerosol Particles and Production of Secondary Organic Aerosol at an Anthropogenically Influenced Site during the Wet Season of GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sá, S. S.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Newburn, M. K.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Shilling, J. E.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Manzi, A. O.; Alexander, M. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Martin, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    As part of GoAmazon2014, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed to characterize the composition, size, and spectral markers present in submicron atmospheric aerosol particles at a site downwind of Manaus, Brazil, in the central Amazon basin. The focus was on the influence of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions on the measured aerosol particles, especially as related to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Through a combination of meteorology, emissions, and chemistry, the research site was affected by biogenic emissions from the tropical rainforest that were periodically mixed with urban outflow from the Manaus metropolitan area. Results from the first intensive operation period, from 1 February to 31 March 2014, show that for the wet season the PM1 mass concentration had typical values on order of 1 to 2 μg/m3. The organic species were dominant, followed by sulfate. The mass-diameter distribution of the particle population had a prevailing mode between 300 and 400 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, dva), and at times a smaller mode at finer size was also present. Highly oxidized organic material was frequently observed, characterized by a dominant peak at m/z 44. There was a diel trend in the elemental oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratio peaking in the afternoon. The analysis of the results aims at delineating the anthropogenic impact on the measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis by positive-matrix factorization (PMF) is applied to the time series of organic particle mass spectra. The factors and their loadings provide information on the relative and time-varying contributions of different sources and processes affecting the organic component of the aerosol particle phase. Relationships between AMS results and measurements from co-located instruments that provide information on anthropogenic and biogenic gas and particle tracers are investigated, toward the goal of improving the understanding of

  8. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols and particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3), and the coarse particles were found to have higher concentrations of amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition in the aerosol collected at Dome C had also changed compared to the coastal site, suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V Italica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material (as microorganisms or plant material) in the sample.

  9. Ballistic projectile metallurgical issues and fundamentals: Aerosol production in rod penetration erosion and erosion phenomena associated with railgun development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Brenda I.

    The issue is derived from ballistic erosion as it relates to nanoparticle production and respiration of these particles as a health concern ballistic erosion and ballistic erosion as it relates to railgun performance. A common thread between these two issues is dynamic recrystallization (DRX). DRX has been demonstrated to be the dominant mechanism for solid-state flow associated with ballistic projectile/target penetration and interaction, friction-stir welding phenomena, and other high-strain rate deformation phenomena. Aerosol particulates collected on filters from ballistic penetration and erosion events for W-Ni-Co and W-Ni-Fe kinetic energy rod projectiles penetrating steel target plates were observed to be highly cytotoxic after 48 h exposure to human epithelial A549 lung cells. The aerosol consisted of micron-size Fe particulates and nanoparticulate aggregates consisting of W, Ni or W, Co and some Fe, characterized by SEM and TEM, and using energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry by (EDS) for elemental analysis and mapping. Cytotoxic assays of micron and nano-size, manufactured metal particulates of W, Ni, Fe, and Co demonstrated that only the nanoparticulate elements demonstrated measurable cytotoxicity. Aluminum projectile (or armature) tribomaterial deposition onto copper conducting rails in an experimental solid-armature railgun system was observed, by optical, SEM and TEM. The extreme deformation at the aluminum/copper interface creates a solid-state flow regime by dynamic recrystallization which also leads to the erosion-product deposition. Melting of the low-temperature aluminum deposit also contributes to the rail damage and degradation of electromagnetic behavior. The creation of nano-grains by dynamic recrystallization allows for mixing at the aluminum/copper interface, and there is no evidence for traditional alloying.

  10. Effect of MODIS Terra radiometric calibration improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products: Validation and Terra/Aqua consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by ˜0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and ˜0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by ˜10% and ˜5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  11. Effect of MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration Improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue Aerosol Products: Validation and Terra/Aqua Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by approximately 0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and approximately 0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  12. Spatial Distribution of Accuracy of Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosols from space has been a subject of extensive research, with multiple sensors retrieving aerosol properties globally on a daily or weekly basis. The diverse algorithms used for these retrievals operate on different types of reflected signals based on different assumptions about the underlying physical phenomena. Depending on the actual retrieval conditions and especially on the geographical location of the sensed aerosol parcels, the combination of these factors might be advantageous for one or more of the sensors and unfavorable for others, resulting in disagreements between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the use of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to analyze and intercompare aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Based on this intercomparison, we are determining geographical locations where these products provide the greatest accuracy of the retrievals and identifying the products that are the most suitable for retrieval at these locations. The analyses are performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol products to available collocated ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations, during the period of 2006-2010 when all the satellite sensors were operating concurrently. Furthermore, we will discuss results of a statistical approach that is applied to the collocated data to detect and remove potential data outliers that can bias the results of the analysis.

  13. Characterization of particulate, metallic elements of TSP, PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) aerosols at a farm sampling site in Taiwan, Taichung.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Nan; Chu, Chia-Chium; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Fu, Peter Pi-Cheng; Yang, I-Lin; Chen, Ming-Hsiang

    2003-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles and metallic concentrations were monitored at the Experimental Farm of Tunghai University (EFTU) sampling site in this study. Total suspended particulate matter (TSP) was collected by using a PS-1 sampler at the farm-sampling site, in central Taiwan, from July 2001 to April 2002. At the same time, PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) were also measured with a Universal sampler from January 2002 to April 2002. Only subjects with the most complete data records on TSP sampling (N=43) and PM(10) sampling (N=23) were used in this analysis. Taichung Industrial Park, Taichung Kang Road (traffic) and a Hospital Incinerator surround the Experimental Farm of Tunghai University. Atmospheric concentrations of metallic elements were analyzed by a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-680/G). The results indicated that the metallic elements Mg, Cu and Mn were the largest components in the TSP fraction; the metallic elements Fe and Cd were the largest composition in the PM(2.5-10) fraction; however, the metallic elements Pb, Zn, Cr and Ni were the largest abundance in the PM(2.5) fraction. The atmospheric metallic elements in the TSP, PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) fractions came different emission sources, such as soil, traffic, industry and resuspended particles. PMID:12738209

  14. Evaluation of an in-injection port thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for analysis of non-polar organic compounds in ambient aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yu, Jian Zhen; Chow, Judith C; Zielinska, Barbara; Watson, John G; Sit, Elber Hoi Leung; Schauer, James J

    2008-07-25

    Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) is an alternative to solvent extraction (SE)-based GC/MS (SE-GC/MS) for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds in filter or impactor-collected aerosols. TD-GC/MS has no sample pretreatment and requires a small filter aliquot for detecting individual organic compounds. The performance of an in-injection port TD-GC/MS is evaluated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanes, iso-/anteiso-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, branched alkanes, cyclohexanes, alkenes, and phthalates in standards and ambient air samples. Replicate analysis for 132 organic compounds showed relative standard deviations <10%, with the majority <5%. Accuracy for 15 PAHs, determined with NIST standard reference material (SRM) 1649a urban dust, was within +/-5% of the certified values. TD-GC/MS and SE-GC/MS method comparisons for 14 Hong Kong ambient samples agreed within 11% for 106 non-polar compounds. For 19 Tong Liang, China samples, agreement was within 13% for 23 PAHs. PMID:18556009

  15. 25 CFR 309.10 - What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? 309.10 Section 309.10 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.10 What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? What constitutes an Indian...

  16. 25 CFR 309.10 - What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? 309.10 Section 309.10 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.10 What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? What constitutes an Indian...

  17. 25 CFR 309.10 - What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? 309.10 Section 309.10 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.10 What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? What constitutes an Indian...

  18. 25 CFR 309.10 - What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? 309.10 Section 309.10 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.10 What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? What constitutes an Indian...

  19. 25 CFR 309.10 - What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? 309.10 Section 309.10 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.10 What are some sample categories and examples of Indian products? What constitutes an Indian...

  20. 27 CFR 25.53 - Submissions of samples of fermented products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Submissions of samples of fermented products. 25.53 Section 25.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Miscellaneous Provisions Samples §...

  1. 27 CFR 25.53 - Submissions of samples of fermented products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Submissions of samples of fermented products. 25.53 Section 25.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Miscellaneous Provisions Samples §...

  2. 16 CFR 303.21 - Marking of samples, swatches, or specimens and products sold therefrom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS... samples, swatches, or specimens of textile fiber products subject to the Act are used to promote or effect sales of such textile fiber products, the samples, swatches, or specimens, as well as the...

  3. Release Storage and Disposal Program Product Sampling Support

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-07-19

    This document includes recommended capabilities and/or services to support transport, analysis, and disposition of Immobilized High-Level and Low-Activity Waste samples as requested by the US DOE-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) as specified in the Privatization Contract between DOE-ORP and BNFL Inc. In addition, an approved implementation path forward is presented which includes use of existing Hanford Site services to provide the required support capabilities.

  4. Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Jost, D. T.; Nyeki, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2000-08-01

    Concentrations of the aerosol particle surface area (SA) and aerosol-attached radon decay products 214Pb and 212Pb have been measured by means of an aerosol and a radon epiphaniometer at the Jungfraujoch research station (JFJ; 3454 m above sea level, Switzerland). These parameters exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with minimum values in winter and maximum values in summer. In summer, pronounced diurnal variations with a maximum at 1800 LST are often present. Highest concentrations and most pronounced diurnal variations occur during anticyclonic weather conditions in summer. Thermally driven vertical transport over alpine topography is responsible for this observation. During this synoptic condition, concentrations vary greatly with the 500 hPa wind direction, exhibiting low concentrations for NW-N winds and high concentrations for weak or S-SW winds. Lead-214 and SA are highly correlated during anticyclonic conditions, indicating transport equivalence of the gaseous 214Pb precursor, 222Rn, and of aerosol particles. When cyclonic lifting is the dominant vertical transport, wet scavenging of aerosol particles can explain the weak correlation of 214Pb and SA. This conclusion is corroborated by the 214Pb/SA ratio, being twice as high during cyclonic than during anticyclonic conditions. Lead-212 is a tracer for the influence of surface contact on a local scale due to its short lifetime of 15.35 hours. The analysis of this parameter suggests that high-alpine surfaces play an important role in thermally driven transport to the JFJ.

  5. Analysis of RDX and RDX Breakdown Products in Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Felt, Deborah R.; Larson, Steven L.; Wani, Altaf; Davis, Jeffrey L.

    2003-03-26

    The identification and quantification of explosives and their degradation products in soil and natural waters is helpful in the design of remediation technologies, mobility investigations and performing risk assessments. The objective of this study was to develop a method for the determination of the degradation of nitramine compounds, specifically hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The analytical methods developed in this study were based on reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using both C-18 and CN bonded silica columns to eliminate common interferences. Contaminant identification was further confirmed by performing spectral analysis of the compounds upon elution. The proposed method yields good separation of RDX from its degradation products and from other common energetic compounds. Method detection limits for the proposed method ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 mg/L. This method satisfies the need for analytical techniques to monitor the formation and subsequent degradation products of toxic and carcinogenic nitrosyl substituted nitramines.

  6. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  7. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS EXPERIMENTS FOR IMPROVED CHARACTERIZATION OF PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST) methodology for the sampling and analysis of products of incomplete combustion (PICs). ilot-scale incinerator was used to incinerate several volatile chlorinated organic compoun...

  8. Glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulphate seed aerosol: reaction products and reversibility of uptake under dark and irradiated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2008-12-01

    Chamber studies of glyoxal uptake onto neutral ammonium sulphate aerosol were performed under dark and irradiated conditions to gain further insight into processes controlling glyoxal uptake onto ambient aerosol. Organic fragments from glyoxal dimers and trimers were observed within the aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions; glyoxal oligomer formation and overall organic growth were found to be reversible under dark conditions. Analysis of high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectra provides evidence for irreversible formation of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) compounds in the aerosol. These compounds are likely to be imidazoles formed by reaction of glyoxal with the ammonium sulphate seed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time C-N compounds resulting from condensed phase reactions with ammonium sulphate seed have been detected in aerosol. Organosulphates were not detected under dark conditions. However, active oxidative photochemistry, similar to that found in cloud processing, was found to occur within aerosol during irradiated experiments. Organosulphates, carboxylic acids, and organic esters were identified within the aerosol. Our study suggests that both C-N compound formation and photochemical processes should be considered in models of secondary organic aerosol formation via glyoxal.

  9. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in