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Sample records for aerosol properties derived

  1. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  2. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of

  3. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  4. Baseline Maritime Aerosol: Methodology to Derive the Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite Measurements of the global distribution of aerosol and their effect on climate should be viewed in respect to a baseline aerosol. In this concept, concentration of fine mode aerosol particles is elevated above the baseline by man-made activities (smoke or urban pollution), while coarse mode by natural processes (e.g. dust or sea-spray). Using 1-3 years of measurements in 10 stations of the Aerosol Robotic network (ACRONET we develop a methodology and derive the optical thickness and properties of this baseline aerosol for the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Defined as the median for periods of stable optical thickness (standard deviation < 0.02) during 2-6 days, the median baseline aerosol optical thickness over the Pacific Ocean is 0.052 at 500 am with Angstrom exponent of 0.77, and 0.071 and 1.1 respectively, over the Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2014, using CESM1(WACCM): VOLCANIC AEROSOLS DERIVED FROM EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Michael J.; Schmidt, Anja; Easter, Richard; Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Ghan, Steven J.; Neely, Ryan R.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Conley, Andrew; Bardeen, Charles G.; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-03-06

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosol properties from volcanic and non-volcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone-loss enhancements of recent volcanic activity. Attribution of climate and ozone variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the apparent rate of global average temperature increases, and variable recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole. We have developed a climatology of global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2014 calculated based on volcanic and non-volcanic emissions of sulfur sources. We have complied a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions between 1990 and 2014, and a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in version 5 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, a component of the Community Earth System Model. Our climatology shows remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD), and with in situ measurements of aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD climatology represents a significant improvement over satellite-based analyses, which ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at mid- and high-latitudes. Our SAD climatology significantly improves on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses 60% of the SAD measured in situ. Our climatology of aerosol properties is publicly available on the Earth System Grid.

  6. Cloud Properties Derived from Visible and Near-infrared Reflectance in the Presence of Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Hofmann, O.; Kindel, B.; Gore, W.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R.; Platnick, S.; Daniel, J.; Garrett, T.

    2005-12-01

    The New England Air Quality Study - Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS-ITCT) experiment conducted in July-August 2004 included objectives on the effects of urban-industrial pollution aerosols on cloud radiative properties, the so-called indirect effect. Measurements of spectral irradiance covering the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared were made from two airborne platforms, the NOAA WP-3D and the Sky Research J-31, using identical Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFR). The SSFR measured the upwelling and downwelling spectral irradiance between 380-1670 nm from which the spectral albedo (ratio of upwelling to downwelling) and net (difference between downwelling and upwelling) irradiance were derived. Cloud spectral albedo was used to retrieve cloud particle effective radius, optical depth, and liquid water path. The robustness of the optical retrieval method will be examined by comparing the WP-3D SSFR retrievals to in situ measurements made with an FSSP-100 and an OAP 2D-C and to an independent retrieval using Miniaturized Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MIDAS), also on board the WP-3D. A sunphotometer was also deployed on the J-31, the14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14), providing aerosol optical depths at thirteen discrete wavelengths between 354-2138 nm. J-31 flights on 15, 20, and 31 July were of particular interest because AATS-14 data revealed the presence aerosol layers above clouds. Comparisons between SSFR-derived cloud properties and MODIS cloud retrievals were in close agreement when aerosol optical depth was less than 0.1. Over moderately thick clouds there is evidence that an enhanced aerosol layer, such as that encountered during the 20 July case, may affect the retrieved cloud properties. Such an influence must be distinguished from a true "aerosol indirect effect" in order to accurately quantify the amount by which aerosols modify cloud albedo.

  7. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties for Radiative Impact Assessments. Derived from Column Closure Analyses in TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip A.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the climate change of the past century and predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of aerosols over the Atlantic Ocean. Both experiments used remote and in situ measurements from aircraft and the surface, coordinated with overpasses by a variety of satellite radiometers. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the United States over the western Atlantic, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols over the eastern Atlantic from both Europe and Africa. These aerosols often have a marked impact on satellite-measured radiances. However, accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved aerosol optical depths (AODs) remains a difficult challenge. Here we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and ACE-2, with a focus on closure analyses that yield aerosol microphysical models for use in improved assessments of flux changes. We show how one such model gives computed radiative flux sensitivities (dF/dAOD) that agree with values measured in TARFOX and preliminary values computed for the polluted marine boundary layer in ACE-2. A companion paper uses the model to compute aerosol-induced flux changes over the North Atlantic from AVHRR-derived AOD fields.

  8. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  9. The detailed aerosol properties derived using GRASP Algorithm from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Fuertes, David; Huang, Xin; Derimian, Yevgeny; Ovigneur, Bertrand; Descloitres, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The presentation introduces a new aerosol product derived from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations using recently developed GRASP algorithm The GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm described by Dubovik et al. (2011, 2014) derives an extended set of aerosol parameters including detailed particle size distribution, spectral refractive index, single scattering albedo and the fraction of non-spherical particles. Over land GRASP simultaneously retrieves properties of both aerosol and underlying surface. The robust performance of algorithm was illustrated in a series of numerical tests and real data case studies. However, the algorithm is significantly slower than conventional look-up-table retrievals because it performs all radiative transfer calculations on-line. This is why the application of the algorithm for processing large volumes of satellite data was considered as unacceptably challenging task. During two last years GRASP algorithm and its operational retrieval environment has been significantly optimized, improved and adapted for processing extended set of observational data. Hence, here we demonstrate the first results of GRASP aerosol products obtained from large data sets of PARASOL/POLDER observations. It should be noted that in addition the core retrieved aerosol and surface parameters GRASP output may include a variety of user-oriented products including values of daily fluxes and aerosol radiative forcing. 1. Dubovik, O., M. Herman, A. Holdak, T. Lapyonok, D. Tanré, J. L. Deuzé, F. Ducos, A. Sinyuk, and A. Lopatin, "Statistically optimized inversion algorithm for enhanced retrieval of aerosol properties from spectral multi-angle polarimetric satellite observations", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975-1018, 2011. 2. Dubovik, O., T. Lapyonok, P. Litvinov, M. Herman, D. Fuertes, F. Ducos, A. Lopatin, A. Chaikovsky, B. Torres, Y. Derimian, X. Huang, M. Aspetsberger, and C. Federspiel "GRASP: a versatile

  10. Climate-relevant physical properties of molecular constituents for isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upshur, M. A.; Strick, B. F.; McNeill, V. F.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2014-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, formed from gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), contribute large uncertainties to the radiative forcing that is associated with aerosols in the climate system. Reactive uptake of surface-active organic oxidation products of BVOCs at the gas-aerosol interface can potentially decrease the overall aerosol surface tension and therefore influence their propensity to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we synthesize and measure some climate-relevant physical properties of SOA particle constituents consisting of the isoprene oxidation products α-, δ-, and cis- and trans-β-IEPOX (isoprene epoxide), as well as syn- and anti-2-methyltetraol. Following viscosity measurements, we use octanol-water partition coefficients to quantify the relative hydrophobicity of the oxidation products while dynamic surface tension measurements indicate that aqueous solutions of α- and trans-β-IEPOX exhibit significant surface tension depression. We hypothesize that the surface activity of these compounds may enhance aerosol CCN activity, and that trans-β-IEPOX may be highly relevant for surface chemistry of aerosol particles relative to other IEPOX isomers.

  11. A Comparison of Aerosol Properties Derived by Remote Sensing and in-situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; Gautier, C.

    2002-12-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol scattering properties obtained by the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the ARM CART site are compared to remote sensing estimates, based on irradiance observations from a Multi Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and radiance measurements from the Whole Sky Imager (WSI). The statistical relationship between the in-situ and remote-sensing parameters are determined at set of selected times with similar surface weather conditions (wind velocity, relative humidity, temperature etc.) One of the main goals of this project is to determine if variations in measured clear-sky radiation correlate with the variability seen by the ground-based AOS. Since the AOS is part of the very wide spread AERONET observational network, such a connection, if it exists, will help explain how global trends in aerosol production and transport will affect the global radiative energy budget.

  12. Deriving aerosol properties from measurements of the Atmosphere-Surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Zheng, Xiaobing; Li, Xin; Xie, Yisong; Liu, Enchao

    2015-10-01

    The Atmosphere-surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI) is a newly developed hyper-spectral apparatus by Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (AIOFM, CAS), measuring total spectral irradiance, diffuse spectral irradiance of atmosphere and reflected radiance of the land surface for the purpose of in-situ calibration. The instrument applies VIS-SWIR spectrum (0.4~1.0 μm) with an averaged spectral resolution of 0.004 μm. The goal of this paper is to describe a method of deriving both aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol modes from irradiance measurements under free cloudy conditions. The total columnar amounts of water vapor and oxygen are first inferred from solar transmitted irradiance at strong absorption wavelength. The AOD together with total columnar amounts of ozone and nitrogen dioxide are determined by a nonlinear least distance fitting method. Moreover, it is able to infer aerosol modes from the spectral dependency of AOD because different aerosol modes have their inherent spectral extinction characteristics. With assumption that the real aerosol is an idea of "external mixing" of four basic components, dust-like, water-soluble, oceanic and soot, the percentage of volume concentration of each component can be retrieved. A spectrum matching technology based on Euclidean-distance method is adopted to find the most approximate combination of components. The volume concentration ratios of four basic components are in accordance with our prior knowledge of regional aerosol climatology. Another advantage is that the retrievals would facilitate the TOA simulation when applying 6S model for satellite calibration.

  13. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  14. Variability of aerosol optical properties derived from in situ aircraft measurements during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Theodore L.; Masonis, Sarah J.; Covert, David S.; Ahlquist, Norman C.; Howell, Steven G.; Clarke, Antony D.; McNaughton, Cameron S.

    2003-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering (using nephelometers) and absorption (using particle/soot absorption photometers; PSAPs) in the Asian outflow region are presented. Aerosol particles were sampled through a new low turbulence inlet that proved very effective at transmitting coarse-mode particles. Noise and artifacts are characterized using in-flight measurements of particle-free air and measurements with identical instruments operated in parallel. For example, the sensitivities of PSAP noise to changing altitude, changing relative humidity (RH), and particle-loading on the internal filter are quantified. On the basis of these and previous instrument characterizations, we report averages, variations, and uncertainties of optical properties, focusing on data from approximately 300 level-leg samples obtained during 19 research flights in the spring of 2001. Several broad patterns emerge from this analysis. Two dominant components, fine-mode pollution and coarse-mode mineral dust, were observed to vary independently when separated using a cut point of 1 μm aerodynamic diameter at low RH. Fine-mode pollution was found to be moderately absorbing (single scatter albedo at low RH and 550 nm, ω = 0.88 ± 0.03; mean and 95% confidence uncertainty) and moderately hygroscopic (relative increase in scattering from 40% to 85% RH, fRH = 1.7 ± 0.2), while coarse-mode dust was found to have very low absorption (ω = 0.96 ± 0.01) and to be almost nonhygroscopic (fRH = 1.1 ± 0.1). These and other optical properties are intended to serve as constraints on optical models of the Asian aerosol for the purpose of satellite retrievals and calculations of direct radiative effects.

  15. Strategy to use the Terra Aerosol Information to Derive the Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Terra will derive the aerosol optical thickness and properties. The aerosol properties can be used to distinguish between natural and human-made aerosol. In the polar orbit Terra will measure aerosol only once a day, around 10:30 am. How will we use this information to study the global radiative impacts of aerosol on climate? We shall present a strategy to address this problem. It includes the following steps: - From the Terra aerosol optical thickness and size distribution model we derive the effect of aerosol on reflection of solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. In a sensitivity study we show that the effect of aerosol on solar fluxes can be derived 10 times more accurately from the MODIS data than derivation of the optical thickness itself. Applications to data over several regions will be given. - Using 1/2 million AERONET global data of aerosol spectral optical thickness we show that the aerosol optical thickness and properties during the Terra 10:30 pass are equivalent to the daily average. Due to the aerosol lifetime of several days measurements at this time of the day are enough to assess the daily impact of aerosol on radiation. - Aerosol impact on the top of the atmosphere is only part of the climate question. The INDOEX experiment showed that addressing the impact of aerosol on climate, requires also measurements of the aerosol forcing at the surface. This can be done by a combination of measurements of MODIS and AERONET data.

  16. Aircraft/Surface Derived Aerosol Optical Properties Near Hawaii for Satellite Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, John N.; Clarke, Antony; Lienert, Barry

    2001-01-01

    Due to the complexity of atmospheric aerosol, validation efforts are required to test satellite retrievals. Here we give an overview of our aircraft and ship validation measurements near Hawaii. Some examples of the measurements are shown which illustrate some of the variability we have encountered, This effort is ongoing and can provide important background measurements for satellite validation as well as radiation studies.

  17. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  18. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  19. Climate-relevant physical properties of molecular constituents relevant for isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upshur, M. A.; Strick, B. F.; McNeill, V. F.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2014-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, formed from gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), contribute large uncertainties to the radiative forcing that is associated with aerosols in the climate system. Reactive uptake of surface-active organic oxidation products of BVOCs at the gas-aerosol interface can potentially decrease the overall aerosol surface tension and therefore influence their propensity to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we synthesize and measure some climate-relevant physical properties of SOA particle constituents consisting of the isoprene oxidation products α-, δ-, and cis- and {trans-β-IEPOX (isoprene epoxide), as well as syn- and anti-2-methyltetraol. Following viscosity measurements, we use octanol-water partition coefficients to quantify the relative hydrophobicity of the oxidation products while dynamic surface tension measurements indicate that aqueous solutions of α- and trans-β-IEPOX exhibit significant surface tension depression. We hypothesize that the surface activity of these compounds may enhance aerosol CCN activity, and that trans-β-IEPOX may be highly relevant for surface chemistry of aerosol particles relative to other IEPOX isomers.

  20. Optical properties of mixed aerosol layers over Japan derived with multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yukari; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Pan, Xiaole; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kazuo; Uno, Itsushi

    2017-02-01

    Mixing state of aerosols and optical properties including lidar ratio, particle depolarization ratio, and Ångström exponent were investigated at Fukuoka in western Japan using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar (MMRL), various aerosol mass-concentration measurements, and a polarization optical particle counter during Winter-Spring 2015. Aerosol extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization at 355 and 532 nm and attenuated backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm are obtained from the MMRL measurements. Ten aerosol episodes were classified into three categories (air pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol) based on aerosol mass-concentration measurements in the fine-mode (particle diameter Dp<2.5 μm) and coarse-mode (2.5 μmaerosols. The lowest lidar ratio was obtained for marine case. Classification of aerosol types using the lidar ratio and particle depolarization ratio was conducted based on the results obtained in this study. The classified aerosol types almost corresponded to aerosol category obtained by previous studies. We found no remarkable correlation between the fraction of black carbon and the lidar ratio: this might be due to the complexity of the mixing state among various aerosols. The obtained lidar ratio was rather correlated with the ratio of PMf to PM10, representing the mixing state of fine- and coarse-mode particles.

  1. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  2. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

    2011-10-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  3. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  4. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland - natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have a SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095 μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. These estimates have implications for

  5. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, Tadas; North, Peter; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2015-04-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. A new method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences insize distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland/natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. The implications of this work for improved modeling of aerosol radiative effects, which are relevant to both climate modelling and satellite

  6. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  7. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground-based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near northern temperate and boreal forests for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types and plume age. Smallest fine mode median radius (Rfv) are attributed to plumes from cropland and/or natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grassland (0.157 μm) fires. North American evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller Rfv (0.164 μm) than plumes from Eurasian mixed forests (0.193 μm) and plumes attributed to the land cover types with sparse tree cover - open shrubland (0.185 μm) and woody savannas (0.184 μm). The differences in size distributions are related to inferred variability in plume concentrations between the land cover types. Significant differences are observed between day and night emissions, with daytime emissions showing larger particle sizes. Smoke is predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0

  8. Global aerosol optical properties and application to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol retrieval over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-07-01

    As more information about global aerosol properties has become available from remotely sensed retrievals and in situ measurements, it is prudent to evaluate this new information, both on its own and in the context of satellite retrieval algorithms. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from global Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometer sites, we perform cluster analysis to determine aerosol type as a function of location and season. We find that three spherical-derived types (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol) and one spheroid-derived types (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally describe the range of AERONET observed global aerosol properties. The fine-dominated types are separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (ω0), ranging from nonabsorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to moderately absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We identify the dominant aerosol type at each site, and extrapolate to create seasonal 1° × 1° maps of expected aerosol types. Each aerosol type is bilognormal, with dynamic (function of optical depth) size parameters (radius, standard deviation, volume distribution) and complex refractive index. Not only are these parameters interesting in their own right, they can also be applied to aerosol retrieval algorithms, such as to aerosol retrieval over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Independent direct-Sun AERONET observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (τ) are consistent the spectral dependence of the models, indicating that our derived aerosol models are relevant.

  9. Satellite Retrieval of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, G.; Robles Gonzalez, C.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Decae, R.

    SATELLITE RETRIEVAL of AEROSOL PROPERTIES G. de Leeuw, C. Robles Gonzalez, J. Kusmierczyk-Michulec and R. Decae TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory, The Hague, The Netherlands; deleeuw@fel.tno.nl Methods to retrieve aerosol properties over land and over sea were explored. The dual view offered by the ATSR-2 aboard ERS-2 was used by Veefkind et al., 1998. The retrieved AOD (aerosol optical depth) values compare favourably with collocated sun photometer measurements, with an accuracy of 0.06 +/- 0.05 in AOD. An algorithm developed for GOME on ERS-2 takes advantage of the low surface reflection in the UV (Veefkind et al., 2000). AOD values retrieved from ATSR-2 and GOME data over western Europe are consistent. The results were used to produce a map of mean AOD values over Europe for one month (Robles-Gonzalez et al., 2000). The ATSR-2 is al- gorithm is now extended with other aerosol types with the aim to apply it over the In- dian Ocean. A new algorithm is being developed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to be launched in 2003 on the NASA EOS-AURA satellite. It is expected that, based on the different scattering and absorption properties of various aerosol types, five major aerosol classes can be distinguished. The experience with the retrieval of aerosol properties by using several wavelength bands is used to develop an algorithm for Sciamachy to retrieve aerosol properties both over land and over the ocean which takes advantage of the wavelengths from the UV to the IR. The variation of the AOD with wavelength is described by the Angstrom parameter. The AOD and the Angstrom parameter together yield information on the aerosol size distribution, integrated over the column. Analysis of sunphotometer data indicates a relation between the Angstrom parameter and the mass ratio of certain aerosols (black carbon, organic carbon and sea salt) to the total particulate matter. This relation has been further explored and was applied to satellite data over land to

  10. Aerosol and Cloud Properties at the Huygens Entry Site as Derived from the Descent Imager/Spectral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doose, L. R.; Engel, S.; Tomasko, M. G.; Dafoe, L. E.; West, R.; Lemmon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe descended through Titan s atmosphere on January 14, 2005. The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument made optical measurements which constrain the nature and vertical distribution and of the aerosols in the atmosphere.

  11. Determination of Marine Aerosol Properties Using a Bistatic Nephelometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    light scattered by aerosols. The information derived from these measurements will enable accurate prediction of the aerosol optical properties and...consequently their effect on light propagation in the MABL. OBJECTIVES The objective of this work is to develop and deploy a new light scattering...instrument to remotely characterize atmospheric aerosols. The bi-static nephelometer (an instrument with separately pointed light source and detector that

  12. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  13. A COMPARISON OF CMAQ-BASED AEROSOL PROPERTIES WITH IMPROVE, MODIS, AND AERONET DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare select aerosol Properties derived from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model-simulated aerosol mass concentrations with routine data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer...

  14. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  15. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  16. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  17. An investigation of aerosol optical properties: Atmospheric implications and influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.

    An experimental, observational, and theoretical investigation of aerosol optical properties has been made in this work to study their implications and influences on the atmosphere. In the laboratory the scientific and instrumental methodology consisted of three parts, namely, aerosol generation, optical and mass concentration measurements, and computational calculations. In particular the optical properties of ammonium sulfate and caffeine aerosol were derived from measurements made with a transmissometer cell-reciprocal- integrating nephelometer (TCRIN), equipped with a laser beam at 632.8 nm, and by applying a Mie theory computer code The aerosol generators, optical equipment and calibration procedures were reviewed. The aerosol shape and size distribution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and the Gumprecht- Sliepcevich/Lipofsky-Green extinction-sedimentation method. In particular the spherical and cylindrical shape were considered. During this investigation, an alternative method for obtaining the optical properties of monodisperse spherical non-absorbing aerosol using a cell-transmissometer, which is based on a linearisation of the Lambert-Beer law, was found. In addition, adapting the TCRIN to electrooptical aerosol studies, the optical properties of a circular-cylindrical aerosol of caffeine were undertaken under the condition of random orientation in relation with the laser beam, and perpendicular orientation to it. A theoretical study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of aerosol to a change of shape under different polarisation modes. The aerosol optical properties, obtained previously in the laboratory, were then used to simulate the direct radiative forcing. The calculations and results were obtained by applying a one- dimensional energy-balance box model. The influence of atmospheric aerosol on the sky brightness due to a total solar eclipse was studied using the photometric and meteorological observations made during the

  18. Using Retrieved Aerosol Spectral Properties to Characterize Aerosol Composition and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral dependence of aerosol properties, such as aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA), can be used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, spectral AAOD and SSA measured in reality may differ from these extreme cases, due to the complicated composition and mixing states. In this study, we use spectral SSA and AAOD retrieved from AERONET measurements, assisted by CALIPSO aerosol type product and Mie calculations, to characterize aerosol mixtures over representative regions. Moreover, in addition to the monotonically increasing or decreasing AAOD and SSA spectra, we find the spectral dependence of these two parameters are frequently peaked (at 675 nm or 870 nm) over several places including East Asia, India, West Africa and South America. We thus suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Further analysis indicates that moderate mixing of black carbon with dust or organic carbon is mainly responsible for producing the SSA curvature. An optimization scheme was developed to match the observed AAOD and SSA spectra with Mie calculations assuming different aerosol composition and mixing states. Results suggest that while external mixing can explain most of the observed AAOD and SSA spectral dependence, internal mixing or core-shell mode is also likely under many circumstances, such as East Asia during winter and post-monsoon and winter seasons over India. This method offers the potential to quantitatively infer aerosol composition from these spectral measurements of aerosol optical properties.

  19. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  20. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo Derived from MODIS Reflectances over a Bright Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Martins, J.; Remer, L. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Stephens, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate TOA reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol is similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from MODIS Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two AERONET stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the SBDART model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from GERB, ARM, and CERES data. Spectral SSA values retrieved at Banizoumbou result in TOA forcing estimates that agree with CERES measurements

  1. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  2. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  3. Aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign, and implications for a single-channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth in spring from Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Hong, H.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    An aerosol model optimized for northeast Asia is updated with the inversion data from the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-northeast (NE) Asia campaign which was conducted during spring from March to May 2012. This updated aerosol model was then applied to a single visible channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from a Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the geostationary meteorological satellite, Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate AOD from a single visible channel measurement. For the single-channel retrieval, sensitivity tests showed that perturbations by 4 % (0.926 ± 0.04) in the assumed single scattering albedo (SSA) can result in the retrieval error in AOD by over 20 %. Since the measured reflectance at the top of the atmosphere depends on both AOD and SSA, the overestimation of assumed SSA in the aerosol model leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion data sets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) were categorized by SSAs at 675 nm of 0.92 ± 0.035 for spring (March, April, and May). After the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign in 2012, the SSA during spring showed a slight increase to 0.93 ± 0.035. In terms of the volume size distribution, the mode radius of coarse particles was increased from 2.08 ± 0.40 to 2.14 ± 0.40. While the original aerosol model consists of volume size distribution and refractive indices obtained before 2011, the new model is constructed by using a total data set after the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. The large volume of data in high spatial resolution from this intensive campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the new AOD data sets retrieved from a single-channel algorithm, which uses a precalculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an

  4. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  5. A comparison between aerosol properties and air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Nishimori, A.; Sato, M.

    A comparison between aerosol properties and air pollutants over urban cities in Japan S. Mukai, I. Sano, A. Nishimori and M. Sato Kinki University For understanding urban aerosols, sun/sky photometry and polarimetry with PSR-1000 (Opto. Research) have been undertaken over Higashi-Osaka since 1996. Multi-spectral photometers CE-318 (Cimel Electronique) and POM-100P (Prede Co.) are set up later for an AERONET site and a SKYNET site, respectively. Radiometers provide us with the optical thickness of aerosols and Ångström exponent. Another aerosol properties, e.g., size distribution, refractive index, etc., are retrieved based on the inversion method. Higashi-Osaka, which means east side of Osaka, is an industrial city located between Osaka bay and Mt.Ikoma. Anthropogenic aerosols produced by industrial activity and oceanic aerosols flying from Osaka bay are mixed together and trapped just around our site due to reflection from Mt.Ikoma. Therefore our city is famous for heavy air pollution, and aerosols here have a complicated feature mixing with the anthropogenic compound and natural one externally and/or internally. On the other hand, suspended particles matter (SPM) concentrations at ground level are compiled for these 10 years in this city. Strictly speaking, it is difficult to relate SPM data directly to the aerosol properties, however it is possible to say that SPM data represents the mass concentration of atmospheric particles at ground level. In other word, air pollutants could have some relations to the emission and transportation of aerosols. After several aerosol parameters are derived from the measurements and compared with the SPM data, the HYSPLIT4 backward trajectory analysis is adopted to search the origin of atmospheric particles. It is found that aerosol index shows a proportional correlation with SPM concentration, and that our aerosols are contaminated not only by surroundings but also the large scale phenomena, e.g. yellow sand event from China

  6. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  7. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol - Part 1: Source fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-10-01

    , which revealed a higher production of particles with Dp0<100 nm at regions with high biological activity. These findings suggest that the increase in the atmospheric aerosol modal sizes from winter to summer, reported by long-term observations in North Atlantic waters, is not directly due to an impact of the higher primary organic matter production occurring during warm periods. A novel sub-micrometric size-resolved source flux function, explicitly defined as a function of the diatomaceous exudate concentration, was derived from the size distribution measurements and the estimation of the fractional whitecap coverage. According to the defined parameterisation, a 300 μM OC<0.2 μm concentration of diatomaceous exudate in seawater produces an overall increment in the total source particle flux of ~20% with respect to the organics-free seawater case. The effect increases with decreasing particle size for Dp0<100 nm, resulting in multiplicative factors between 1.02-2 with respect to the particle flux generated from seawater devoid of marine organics. The total source flux derived from the presented parameterisation was compared to recent definitions of sea-spray source fluxes based on laboratory and field observations in the literature.

  8. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol - Part 1: Source fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of biogenic dissolved and colloidal organic matter on the production of submicron primary sea-spray aerosol was investigated via the simulation of bubble bursting in seawater enriched with phytoplankton-released organics. Seawater samples collected along a transect off the West African coast during the RHaMBLe cruise (RRS Discovery cruise D319), conducted as part of the SOLAS UK program, were analysed in order to identify the dominant oceanic algal species in a region of high biological activity. Cultures of microalgal strains representative of the species found in the collected seawater were grown in order to produce natural bioexudate. Colloidal plus dissolved organic fraction in this material remaining after <0.2 μm filtration (hereafter referred to as OC<0.2μm) was employed to prepare organic-enriched seawater proxies for the laboratory production of marine aerosol using a plunging-waterjet system as an aerosol generator. Submicron size distributions of aerosols generated from different organic monolayers and seawater proxies enriched with biogenic exudate were measured and compared with blanks performed with artificial seawater devoid of marine organics. A shift of the aerosol submicron size distribution toward smaller sizes and an increase in the production of particles with dry diameter (Dp0)<100 nm was repeatedly observed with increasing amounts of diatomaceous bioexudate in the seawater proxies used for aerosol generation. The effect was found to be sensitive to the organic carbon concentration in seawater and the algal exudate type. Diatomaceous exudate concentration >175 μM (OC<0.2μm) was required to observe a significant impact on the size distribution, which implies that effects are expected to be substantial only in high biological activity areas abundant with diatom algal populations. The laboratory findings were in agreement with analogous bubble-bursting experiments conducted with unfiltered oceanic seawater collected during the RHa

  9. Assessment of MODIS-Derived Visible and Near-IR Aerosol Optical Properties and their Spatial Variability in the Presence of Mineral Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Zhang, Q.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H.; Remer, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is among the most difficult aerosol species to measure quantitatively from space. In this paper, we evaluate MODIS retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the visible to the near-IR off the US West Coast using measurements taken by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer, AATS-14, during the EVE (Extended-MODIS-lambda Validation Experiment, 2004) campaign in April of 2004. In EVE, a total of 35 and 49 coincident over-ocean suborbital measurements at the nominal level-2 retrieval scale of 10 km x 10 km were collected for Terra and Aqua, respectively. For MODIS-Terra about 80% of the AOD retrievals are within the estimated uncertainty, DELTA tau = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau; this is true for both the visible (here defined to include 466-855 nm) and near-IR (here defined to include 1243-2119 nm) retrievals. For MODIS-Aqua about 45% of the AOD retrievals are within DELTA tau = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau; the fraction of near-IR retrievals that fall within this uncertainty range is about 27%. We found an rms difference of 0.71 between the sunphotometer snd MODIS-Aqua estimates of the visible (553-855 nm) Angstrom exponent, while the MODIS-Terra visible Angstrom exponents show an rms difference of only 0.29 when compared to AATS. The cause of the differences in performance between MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua could be instrument calibration and needs to be explored further. The spatial variability of AOD between retrieval boxes as derived by MODIS is generally larger than that indicated by the sunphotometer data.

  10. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  11. Comparison of POLDER Derived Aerosol Optical Thickness to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, J.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Chiapello, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Particulate Matter (PM) mass measured at the ground level is a common way to quantify the amount of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is used as a standard to evaluate air quality. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a daily monitoring of the aerosol load. However, there are no straightforward relationship between aerosol optical properties derived from the satellite sensor and the PM mass at the ground. This paper is focused on the use of Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectance (POLDER-2) derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) for the monitoring of PM2.5. We present a correlation study between PM2.5 data collected in the frame of the French Environmental protection agency, aerosol optical properties derived from Sun photometer measurements, and POLDER derived-AOT over the land. POLDER AOT retrieval algorithm over the land is based on the use of the measurement of the linear polarized light in the 670 nm and 865 nm channels. We show that only the fine fraction (below 0.3 μm) of the aerosol size distribution contributes to the signal in polarization and then to the POLDER derived-AOT and then is well suited for monitoring of fine particle. The correlation between POLDER AOT and PM2.5 is significant (R between 0.6 and 0.7) over several sites. We present a tentative evaluation of Air Quality Categories from satellite data.

  12. Background Maritime Aerosol: Their Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of human induced change in the aerosol concentration and properties, or the aerosol response to climate change (e.g. droughts producing fires or dust) should be measured relative to a "background aerosol". How to define this background aerosol, so that it is both measurable and useful? Here we use 10 stations located in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to answer this question. Using a data set of the spectral optical thickness measured by the Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET), extending 1-3 years, we find the background conditions for these stations. The oceanic background aerosol is the result of ocean emission and spray, and some residual long lived continental aerosol. Its source is very broadly spread and is expected to vary little in time. Pollution or dust sources are from specific locations, emitted and transported to the measuring site in specific combination of meteorological conditions. Therefore they are expected to vary with time. It follows that the background aerosol can be identified as the median for conditions with small variations. To define the background we compute the median of N consequent measurements. We use N=50 that in average cloudy conditions corresponds to 2-3 days of measurements and N=100 (4-5 days). Most high polluted or dusty conditions correspond to data sequences with high standard deviation (greater than 0.02 in optical thickness) and are excluded. From the remaining N point running medians with low standard deviations we derive again the median. This excludes those rare cases of pollution or dust that is stable during the N measurements. The results show that the background aerosol over the Pacific Ocean is characterize by optical thickness of 0.055 at 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 0.74. Over the Atlantic Ocean the values are 0.070 and 1.1 respectively, with little influence of the assumed value of N (50 or 100). The derivation of the background uses 20,000 and 5000 medians respectively that passed the

  13. 3D aerosol climatology over East Asia derived from CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongbo; Sun, Xuejin; Zhang, Chuanliang; Zhang, Riwei; Li, Yan; Li, Haoran

    2017-03-01

    The seasonal mean extinction coefficient profile (ECP), single scattering albedo (SSA), and scattering phase function (SPF) derived from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) version 3 Level 2 5-km aerosol profile product (2011-2014) were compiled into a three-dimensional (3D) aerosol climatology for East Asia. The SSA and SPF were calculated as the weighted averages of the scattering properties of the CALIOP aerosol subtypes. The weights were set to the occurrence frequencies of the subtypes. The single scattering properties of each subtype were extrapolated from the volume-based size distribution and complex refractive indexes based on Mie calculations. For the high-loading episodes (aerosol optical depth ≥ 0.6), the exponential ECP structures were most frequently observed over the farmland and desert areas, along with the uplifted ECP structures over the marine and coastal areas. Besides the desert areas, high-loading episodes also occurred over areas with frequent agricultural and industry activities. Unlike the conventional half-3D aerosol climatology (vertically constant SSA and SPF), this newly generated climatology specified SSA and SPF in the full-3D space (full-3D aerosol climatology). Errors on the shortwave radiative heating rate (SW RHR) due to the half-3D aerosol climatology approximation were quantified. The SW RHR errors were around ±1 K/day, implying that the half-3D aerosol climatology should be used with caution in climate modeling. This study is among the first to generate a full-3D aerosol climatology from the CALIOP data. This full-3D aerosol climatology is potentially useful for aerosol remote sensing and climate modeling.

  14. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  15. Measurements of Semi-volatile Aerosol and Its Effect on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2013-12-01

    Semi-volatile compounds, including particle-bound water, comprise a large part of aerosol mass and have a significant influence on aerosol lifecycle and its optical properties. Understanding the properties of semi-volatile compounds, especially those pertaining to gas/aerosol partitioning, is of critical importance for our ability to predict concentrations and properties of ambient aerosol. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of temperature and relative humidity on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder and a variable residence time constant temperature thermodenuder in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. It was found that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. The variable residence time thermodenuder data suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s, in contrast to other ambient observations. Preliminary analysis show that approximately 50% and 90% of total aerosol mass evaporated at temperatures of 100 C and 180C, respectively. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology. During course of this study, T50 (temperatures at which 50% aerosol mass evaporates) varied from 60 C to more than 120 C.

  16. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  17. Estimate of the aerosol properties over the ocean with POLDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuzé, J. L.; Goloub, P.; Herman, M.; Marchand, A.; Perry, G.; Susana, S.; Tanré, D.

    2000-06-01

    The wide field of view imaging spectroradiometer Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) developed by Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and operated aboard the Japanese heliosynchronous platform Advanced Earth Observation Satellite (ADEOS) from October 30, 1996, to June 30, 1997, provided the first global systematic measurements of the spectral, directional, and polarized characteristics of the solar radiation reflected by the Earth/atmosphere system. These original observational capabilities offer an opportunity to enhance the characterization of several components of the global environment, especially the oceanic and terrestrial vegetal primary production, the aerosol physical and optical properties, and the tridimensional structure and microphysics of clouds. Here we examine the remote sensing of aerosols over the oceans. In a first step the aerosol optical thickness and Ångström exponent are derived from the radiance measurements. In a second step the polarization measurements are used for the retrieval of the aerosol refractive index. The inversion algorithm assumes spherical, nonabsorbing particles with monomodal lognormal size distribution. The adequacy of this modeling is discussed for a representative set of aerosol observations. Successful retrieval is generally achieved in the presence of small aerosols with Ångström exponent larger than ˜1.0. For such particles, polarization may provide information on the particle refractive index. As the Ångstrom exponent of the particle decreases, the data fitting residual errors increase, especially in polarized light, which prevents the retrieval of the aerosol refractive index. The trends of the discrepancies point out two shortcomings of the aerosol modeling. The theoretical results systematically underestimate the contribution of small polarizing particles in the polarization measurements for side-scattering angles ranging from 80° to 120°. This indicates very probably that

  18. A case study of dust aerosol radiative properties over Lanzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Bao, J.; Zhou, B.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2010-02-01

    The vertical distribution of dust aerosol and its radiative properties are analysed using the data measured by the micropulse lidar, profiling microwave radiometer, sunphotometer, particulate monitor, and nephelometer at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) during a dust storm from 27 March to 29 March 2007. The analysis shows that the dust aerosol mainly exists below 2 km in height, and the dust aerosol extinction coefficient decreases with height. The temporal evolution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the dust storm is characterized by a sub-maximum at 22:00 (Beijing Time) on 27 March and a maximum at 12:00 on 28 March. The AOD derived by lidar is compared with that obtained by sunphotometer, and shows a good consistency. The PM10 concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient share identical variation trends, and their maximums both appear at 22:00 on 27 March. The aerosol extinction coefficient and relative humidity have the same trends and their maximums appear at identical heights, showing a correlation between extinction coefficient and relative humidity known as aerosol hygroscopicity. Nevertheless, the correlation between aerosol extinction coefficient and temperature cannot be obviously seen. The aerosol extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and PM10 concentration present good linear correlations. The correlation coefficients of the aerosol scattering coefficient and PM10 concentration, of aerosol extinction coefficient and PM10 concentration, and of aerosol extinction and scattering coefficient are respectively 0.98, 0.94, and 0.96.

  19. Desert dust aerosol air mass mapping in the western Sahara, using particle properties derived from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Müller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05-0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  20. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  1. Remote sensing of ocean color and aerosol properties: resolving the issue of aerosol absorption.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Du, T; Zhang, T

    1997-11-20

    Current atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms for ocean color sensors use measurements of the top-of-the-atmosphere reflectance in the near infrared, where the contribution from the ocean is known for case 1 waters, to assess the aerosol optical properties. Such measurements are incapable of distinguishing between weakly and strongly absorbing aerosols, and the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms fail if the incorrect absorption properties of the aerosol are assumed. We present an algorithm that appears promising for the retrieval of in-water biophysical properties and aerosol optical properties in atmospheres containing both weakly and strongly absorbing aerosols. By using the entire spectrum available to most ocean color instruments (412-865 nm), we simultaneously recover the ocean's bio-optical properties and a set of aerosol models that best describes the aerosol optical properties. The algorithm is applied to simulated situations that are likely to occur off the U.S. East Coast in summer when the aerosols could be of the locally generated weakly absorbing Maritime type or of the pollution-generated strongly absorbing urban-type transported over the ocean by the winds. The simulations show that the algorithm behaves well in an atmosphere with either weakly or strongly absorbing aerosol. The algorithm successfully identifies absorbing aerosols and provides close values for the aerosol optical thickness. It also provides excellent retrievals of the ocean bio-optical properties. The algorithm uses a bio-optical model of case 1 waters and a set of aerosol models for its operation. The relevant parameters of both the ocean and atmosphere are systematically varied to find the best (in a rms sense) fit to the measured top-of-the-atmosphere spectral reflectance. Examples are provided that show the algorithm's performance in the presence of errors, e.g., error in the contribution from whitecaps and error in radiometric calibration.

  2. Aerosols physical properties at Hada Al Sham, western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M. A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Hussein, T.; Aaltonen, V.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Almazroui, M.; Almehmadi, F. M.; Al Zawad, F. M.; Hakala, J.; Khoder, M.; Neitola, K.; Petäjä, T.; Shabbaj, I. I.; Hämeri, K.

    2016-06-01

    This is the first time to clearly derive the comprehensive physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia. Aerosol measurements station was established at a rural background area in the Western Saudi Arabia to study the aerosol properties. This study gives overview of the aerosol physical properties (PM10, PM2.5, black carbon and total number concentration) over the measurement period from November 2012 to February 2015. The average PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were 95 ± 78 μg m-3 (mean ± STD, at ambient conditions) and 33 ± 68 μg m-3 (at ambient conditions), respectively. As expected PM10 concentration was dominated by coarse mode particles (PM10-PM2.5), most probably desert dust. Especially from February to June the coarse mode concentrations were high because of dust storm season. Aerosol mass concentrations had clear diurnal cycle. Lower values were observed around noon. This behavior is caused by wind direction and speed, during night time very calm easterly winds are dominating whereas during daytime the stronger westerly winds are dominating (sea breeze). During the day time the boundary layer is evolving, causing enhanced mixing and dilution leading to lower concentration. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were comparable to values measured at close by city of Jeddah. Black carbon concentration was about 2% and 6% of PM10 and PM2.5 mass, respectively. Total number concentration was dominated by frequent new particle formation and particle growth events. The typical diurnal cycle in particle total number concentration was clearly different from PM10 and PM2.5.

  3. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than

  4. Deriving simple empirical relationships between aerodynamic and optical aerosol measurements and their application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different measurement techniques for aerosol characterization and quantification either directly or indirectly measure different aerosol properties (i.e. count, mass, speciation, etc.). Comparisons and combinations of multiple measurement techniques sampling the same aerosol can provide insight into...

  5. Satellite and ground-based study of optical properties of 1997 Indonesian Forest Fire aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Takeuchi, Nobuo; Herman, Jay R.

    Optical properties of biomass burning aerosols in the event of Indonesian forest fires in 1997 were studied by groundbased sky radiometry and satellite remote sensing with AVHRR and TOMS radiometers. The AVHRR-derived optical thickness distribution agreed with the distribution of TOMS-derived UV-absorbing aerosol index and with the optical thickness measured by sky radiometry and sunphotometry. The single scattering albedo of aerosols was fairly constant as 0.9 in the September-October period. Relationship between Ångström turbidity factor and exponent supported the polydispersion consisted of aged small particles. This observation was consistent with the fact that the retrieved volume size distribution by sky radiometry has a distinct accumulation mode with a peak radius of 0.25 µm. Those optical properties of smoke aerosols seem to reflect the specific chemical structure of Indonesian forest fire aerosols, i.e., a mixture of carbonaceous and sulfate particles.

  6. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  7. Measurement of Transport Properties of Aerosolized Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Airborne engineered nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), functionalized MWCNT, graphene, fullerene, silver and gold nanorods were characterized using a tandem system of a differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to obtain their airborne transport properties and understand their relationship to morphological characteristics. These nanomaterials were aerosolized using different generation methods such as electrospray, pneumatic atomization, and dry aerosolization techniques, and their airborne transport properties such as mobility and aerodynamic diameters, mass scaling exponent, dynamic shape factor, and effective density were obtained. Laboratory experiments were conducted to directly measure mobility diameter and mass of the airborne nanomaterials using tandem mobility-mass measurements. Mass scaling exponents, aerodynamic diameters, dynamic shape factors and effective densities of mobility-classified particles were obtained from particle mass and the mobility diameter. Microscopy analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was performed to obtain morphological descriptors such as envelop diameter, open area, aspect ratio, and projected area diameter. The morphological information from the TEM was compared with measured aerodynamic and mobility diameters of the particles. The results showed that aerodynamic diameter is smaller than mobility diameter below 500 nm by a factor of 2 to 4 for all nanomaterials except silver and gold nanorods. Morphologies of MWCNTs generated by liquid-based method, such as pneumatic atomization, are more compact than those of dry dispersed MWCNTs, indicating that the morphology depends on particle generation method. TEM analysis showed that projected area diameter of MWCNTs appears to be in reasonable agreement with mobility diameter in the size range from 100 – 400 nm. Principal component analysis of the obtained airborne particle

  8. Characterization of aerosol events based on the column integrated optical aerosol properties and polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandija, Florian; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Zawadzka, Olga

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties are very useful tools for analyzing their radiative effects, which are directly or indirectly related to the global radiation budget. Investigation of column-integrated aerosol optical properties is a worldwide and well-accepted method. The introduction of new methodologies, like those of operation with polarimetric measurements, represent a new challenge to interpret the measurement data and give more detailed information about the aerosol events and their characteristics. Aerosol optical properties during the period June - August 2015 in AERONET Strzyzow station in Poland were analyzed. The aerosol properties like aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, fine mode fraction, fine mode contribution on AOD, asymmetry parameter, single scattering angle are analyzed synergistically with the polarimetric measurements of the degree of polarization in different solar zenith and zenith viewing angles at several wavelengths. The overall results show that aerosol events in Strzyzow were characterized mostly by fine mode aerosols. Backward-trajectories suggest that the majority of air masses come from the west. The principal component of the aerosol load was urban/industrial contamination, especially from the inner part of the continent. Additionally, the maximal values of the degree of linear polarization were found to be dependent on the solar zenith and zenith viewing angles and aerosol optical properties like aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponent. These dependencies were further analyzed in a specific case with very high mean values of AOD500 (0.59) and AE440-870 (1.91). The diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties investigated during this special case, suggest that biomass burning products are the main cause of that aerosol load over the stations.

  9. North Atlantic Aerosol Radiative Impacts Based on Satellite Measurements and Aerosol Intensive Properties from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the impact of North Atlantic aerosols on the net short-wave flux at the tropopause by combining satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps with model aerosol properties determined via closure analyses in TARFOX and ACE 2. We exclude African dust, primarily by restricting latitudes to 25-60 N. The analyses use in situ aerosol composition measurements and air- and ship-borne sun-photometer measurements of AOD spectra. The aerosol model yields computed flux sensitivities (dFlux/dAOD) that agree with measurements by airborne flux radiometers in TARFOX. Its midvisible single-scattering albedo is 0.9. which is in the range obtained from in situ measurements of scattering and absorption in both TARFOX and ACE 2. Combining satellite-derived AOD maps with the aerosol model yields maps of 24-hour average net radiative flux changes. For simultaneous AVHRR, radiance measurements exceeded the sunphotometer AODs by about 0.04. However. shipboard sunphotometer and AVHRR AODs agreed Within 0.02 for data acquired during satellite overflights on two other days. We discuss attempts to demonstrate column closure within the MBL by comparing shipboard sunphotometer AODs and values calculated from simultaneous shipboard in-situ aerosol size distribution measurements. These comparisons were mostly unsuccessful, but they illustrate the difficulties inherent in this type of closure analysis. Specifically, AODs derived from near-surface in-situ size distribution measurements are extremely sensitive to the assumed hygroscopic growth model that itself requires an assumption of particle composition as a function of height and size, to the radiosonde-measured relative humidity, and to the vertical profile of particle number. We investigate further the effects of hygroscopic particle growth within the MBL by using shipboard lidar aerosol backscatter profiles together with the sunphotometer AOD.

  10. Intercomparison of aerosol physical and physical properties derived from surface radiometers and in-situ aircraft profiles over six Maryland sites during the DRAGON and DISCOVER-AQ campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, J. S.; Thornhill, K. L.; Holben, B. N.; Anderson, B. E.; Eck, T. F.; Giles, D. M.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Sinyuk, A.; Kenny, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project and international collaborators deployed more than 40 Cimel sunphotometers in the Baltimore-Washington, DC region for the summer 2011 DRAGON-USA (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network) campaign. This unprecedented mesoscale network was comprised of automatic sun/sky radiometers distributed with roughly 10km grid spacing (covering an area of ~60km x 120km) which operated continuously for more than two months. The DRAGON-USA campaign was concurrent with the NASA sponsored DISCOVER-AQ air quality experiment which performed 14 days of research flights in July concentrating on repeated multiple daily profile measurements of gaseous and particulate pollution over 6 primary sun photometer sites. Atmospheric conditions varied from clean and dry to extremely hazy and humid on flight days with corresponding aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm ranging from ~0.06 to ~0.90 and precipitable water (PW) ranging from ~1.5 cm to ~4.5 cm. In-situ aerosol properties were measured on the NASA P-3B by the NASA Langley Aerosol Group Experiment (LARGE) team using a suite of instruments to characterize ambient aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Size distributions were made with a custom scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an Ultrahigh Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) from Droplet Measurement Technologies, and Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS) from TSI. Aerosol optical measurements were made with a TSI-3563 3-wavelength integrating nephelometer and a 3-wavelength Radiance Research Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). We present preliminary comparisons of coincident single scattering albedo (at three wavelengths) and column integrated size distributions retrieved from the surface Cimel sunphotometer almucantar sky radiances and from aircraft in-situ observations during flight profiles at key sites.

  11. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  12. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  13. Use of the NASA GEOS-5 SEAC4RS Meteorological and Aerosol Reanalysis for assessing simulated aerosol optical properties as a function of smoke age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Buchard, V.; Govindaraju, R.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Russell, P. B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Wagner, N.; Lack, D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model, which includes an online aerosol module, provided chemical and weather forecasts during the SEAC4RS field campaign. For post-mission analysis, we have produced a high resolution (25 km) meteorological and aerosol reanalysis for the entire campaign period. In addition to the full meteorological observing system used for routine NWP, we assimilate 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra satellites), ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and the MISR instrument (over bright surfaces only). Daily biomass burning emissions of CO, CO2, SO2, and aerosols are derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We have also introduced novel smoke "age" tracers, which provide, for a given time, a snapshot histogram of the age of simulated smoke aerosol. Because GEOS-5 assimilates remotely sensed AOD data, it generally reproduces observed (column) AOD compared to, for example, the airborne 4-STAR instrument. Constraining AOD, however, does not imply a good representation of either the vertical profile or the aerosol microphysical properties (e.g., composition, absorption). We do find a reasonable vertical structure for aerosols is attained in the model, provided actual smoke injection heights are not much above the planetary boundary layer, as verified with observations from DIAL/HRSL aboard the DC8. The translation of the simulated aerosol microphysical properties to total column AOD, needed in the aerosol assimilation step, is based on prescribed mass extinction efficiencies that depend on wavelength, composition, and relative humidity. Here we also evaluate the performance of the simulated aerosol speciation by examining in situ retrievals of aerosol absorption/single scattering albedo and scattering growth factor (f(RH)) from the LARGE and AOP suite of instruments. Putting these comparisons in the context of smoke age as diagnosed by the model helps us to

  14. Relationship between column aerosol optical properties and surface aerosol gravimetric concentrations during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network - Northeast ASIA 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Seo, S.; Choi, M.; Kim, W. V.; Holben, B. N.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main objectives of Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) campaign in Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is to understand the relationship between the column optical properties of the atmosphere and the surface level air quality in terms of aerosols and gases. This study aims to identify the important parameters that affecting the relationship between those variables during the DRAGON - northeast Asia 2012 campaign. Column aerosol optical properties from ten Cimel sun photometers at DRAGON sites in Seoul, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) and particulate matter (PM10) sampling from 40 NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research of South Korea) measurement sites in Seoul during the period of 1st March - 31th May 2012 were employed in this study. The key parameters in relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM are reported to be aerosol vertical profile and hygroscopicity of the aerosols. The meteorological conditions including relative humidity, surface temperature, and wind speed that could affect those parameters were investigated.

  15. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  16. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Daniel

    sampled in Baltimore, MD with the PI-Neph. This study was centered on specific case studies where different aerosol conditions were experienced such as clean, haze episode, and transported smoke event. The approach employed consisted of dry and humid observations of ambient aerosols to compare them with total column products by AERONET. A relatively low difference between the phase function and the degree of linear polarization was measured at high and low RH. The small difference found in the scattering elements and their retrievals is attributed to the general aerosol composition in the region. It was observed that a RH increase causes the particles to scatter more light uniformly over all the scattering angles, and also, that the water uptake did not change markedly the particle's polarization properties. The comparison between in-situ and total column derived observations were highly correlated for most of the cases. The size distribution retrievals from the in-situ measurements were very comparable to the size distributions reported by AERONET, but only for the fine modes.

  17. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  18. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties from POLDER-PARASOL multi-angle photo-polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, O.; Litvinov, P.; Butz, A.

    2010-12-01

    The large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on clouds and climate is reflected in considerable discrepancies between different model simulations of the radiative forcing caused by these effects. Also, there exist even larger differences between values for radiative forcing calculated by models and those estimated from satellites (and model calculations constrained by satellite measurements). Relationships between aerosols and clouds derived from satellite measurements are subject to a number of important limitations. First of all, with current satellite aerosol products it is hard to determine which fraction of the aerosols is anthropogenic and which fraction is natural. Often the rather crude assumption is used that the fine mode contribution is fully anthropogenic. Furthermore, most aerosol types are strongly hygroscopic, which means that in an environment with high relative humidity (in the surrounding of clouds) the particle size increases considerably leading, in turn, to an increase in optical thickness. This effect may be misinterpreted as an apparent relation between aerosol concentration and cloud cover. Also, meteorology effects can be misinterpreted as apparent aerosol-cloud relationships. Accurate information on aerosol size and refractive index (related to chemical composition of aerosols and absorption) is needed to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic aerosols and to distinguish between aerosol effects on cloud formation and apparent relationships due to humidity and meteorology effects. Multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements have the potential to provide the necessary information on these aerosol properties. The POLDER instrument onboard the PARASOL micro-satellite is the only instrument currently in space that performs multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements. To fully exploit the information contained in these measurements a new type of retrieval algorithm is needed that retrieves detailed information on aerosol microphysical and

  19. Improved identification of the solution space of aerosol microphysical properties derived from the inversion of profiles of lidar optical data, part 2: simulations with synthetic optical data.

    PubMed

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Chemyakin, Eduard; Romanov, Anton

    2016-12-01

    We developed a mathematical scheme that allows us to improve retrieval products obtained from the inversion of multiwavelength Raman/HSRL lidar data, commonly dubbed "3 backscatter+2 extinction" (3β+2α) lidar. This scheme works independently of the automated inversion method that is currently being developed in the framework of the Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission and which is successfully applied since 2012 [Atmos. Meas. Tech.7, 3487 (2014)10.5194/amt-7-3487-2014; "Comparison of aerosol optical and microphysical retrievals from HSRL-2 and in-situ measurements during DISCOVER-AQ 2013 (California and Texas)," in International Laser Radar Conference, July 2015, paper PS-C1-14] to data collected with the first airborne multiwavelength 3β+2α high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The mathematical scheme uses gradient correlation relationships we presented in part 1 of our study [Appl. Opt.55, 9839 (2016)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.55.009839] in which we investigated lidar data products and particle microphysical parameters from one and the same set of optical lidar profiles. For an accurate assessment of regression coefficients that are used in the correlation relationships we specially designed the proximate analysis method that allows us to search for a first-estimate solution space of particle microphysical parameters on the basis of a look-up table. The scheme works for any shape of particle size distribution. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of the various solution spaces of the investigated aerosol microphysical data products if we apply this gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique. Surface-area concentration can be estimated with an uncertainty that is not worse than the measurement error of the underlying extinction coefficients. The retrieval uncertainty of the effective radius is as large as ±0.07  μm for fine mode particles and approximately

  20. A case study of dust aerosol radiative properties over Lanzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Bao, J.; Zhou, B.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2010-05-01

    The vertical distribution of dust aerosol and its radiative properties are analysed using the data measured by the micropulse lidar, profiling microwave radiometer, sunphotometer, particulate monitor, and nephelometer at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) during a dust storm from 27 March to 29 March 2007. The analysis shows that the dust aerosol mainly exists below 2 km in height, and the dust aerosol extinction coefficient decreases with height. The temporal evolution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the dust storm is characterized by a sub-maximum at 22:00 (Beijing Time), 27 March and a maximum at 12:00, 28 March. The AOD respectively derived by lidar and sunphotometer shows a good consistency. The PM10 concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient share similar variation trends, and their maximums both appear at 22:00, 27 March. The aerosol extinction coefficient and relative humidity have the similar trends and their maximums almost appear at the same heights, which presents a correlation between extinction coefficient and relative humidity known as aerosol hygroscopicity. The relative humidity is related with temperature, and then the temperature will affect the aerosol extinction properties by modifying the relative humidity condition. The aerosol extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and PM10 concentration present good linear correlations. The correlation coefficients of the aerosol scattering coefficients of 450, 520, and 700 nm and PM10 concentration, of aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved by lidar at 532 nm and PM10 concentration, and of aerosol extinction and scattering coefficient are respectively 0.98, 0.94, and 0.96.

  1. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to

  2. Aerosol optical properties from multiwavelength lidar measurements in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Doina; Talianu, Camelia; Carstea, Emil; Nemuc, Anca

    2009-09-01

    Vertically resolved profiles of optical properties of aerosols were measured using a multi-wavelength lidar system-RALI, set up at the scientific research center in Magurele, Bucharest area (44.35 N latitude, 26.03 E longitude) during 2008. The use of multiple laser wavelengths has enabled us to observe significant variations in backscatter profiles depending on the particle origins. An air mass backward trajectory analysis, using Hysplit-4, was carried out to track the aerosol plumes. Aerosols can serve as valuable tracers of air motion in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The height of layers in the lower troposphere from lidar signal was calculated using the gradient method- minima of the first derivative. The Richardson number method was used to estimate PBL height from the radio-soundings. We have used pressure, temperature and dew point profiles as well as the wind direction profiles from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) data base. The results were consistent with the ones obtained from LIDAR.

  3. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  4. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  5. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  6. Challenges in validating CFD-derived inhaled aerosol deposition predictions.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques have provided unprecedented opportunity for investigating inhaled particle deposition in realistic human airway geometries. Several recent articles describing local aerosol deposition predictions based upon "validated" CFD models have highlighted the challenges in validating local aerosol deposition predictions. These challenges include: (1) defining what is meant by validation; (2) defining appropriate experimental data for validation; and (3) determining when the agreement is not fortuitous. The term validation has numerous meanings, depending on the field and context in which it is used. For example, in computer programming it means the code executes as intended, to the experimentalist it means predicted results agree with matched experimental measurements, and to the risk assessor it implies that predictions using new parameters can be trusted. Based on the current literature it is not clear that a consensus exists for what constitutes a validated CFD model. It is also not clear what types of experimental data are needed or how closely the CFD input values and experimental conditions should be matched (similar or identical airway geometries, entrance airflow, or aerosol profiles) to validate CFD derived predictions. Due to the complexity of CFD computer codes and the multiplicity of deposition mechanisms, it is possible that total aerosol deposition may be accurately predicted and the resulting local particle deposition patterns are incorrect, or vice versa. Specific examples and suggestions for several challenges to experimentalists and modelers are presented.

  7. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  8. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  9. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  10. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  11. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  12. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  13. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  14. Influence of semi-volatile aerosol on physical and optical properties of aerosol in Kathmandu valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Shrestha, Kundan; Panday, Arnico

    2016-04-01

    A field study was conducted in the urban atmosphere of Kathmandu valley to study the influence of the semi-volatile aerosol fraction on physical and optical properties of aerosols. The study was carried out during the 2015 pre-monsoon period. Experimental setup consisted of air from an ambient air inlet being split to two sets of identical sampling instruments. The first instrument received the ambient sample directly, while the second instrument received the air sample through a thermodenuder (TDD). Four sets of experiments were conducted to understand aerosol number, size distribution, scattering and absorption properties using Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Aethalometer (AE33) and Nephelometer. The influence of semi-volatile aerosols was calculated from the fraction of particles evaporated in the TDD at set temparetures: room temperature, 50°C, 100°C, 150°C, 200°C, 250°C and 300°C. Results show that, with increasing temperature, the evaporated fraction of semi-volatile aerosol also increased. At room temperature the fraction of semi-volatile aerosols was 12% while at 300°C it was as high as to 49%. Aerosol size distribution analysis shows that with an increase in TDD temperature from 50°C to 300°C, peak mobility diameter of particles shifted from around 60nm to 40nm. However we found little change in effective diameter of aerosol size distribution with increase in set TDD temperature. The change in size of aerosols due to loss of semi-volatile component has a stronger influence (~70%) in higher size bins when compared to at lower size bins (~20%). Studies using the AE33 showed that absorption by black carbon (BC) is amplified due to influence of semi-volatile aerosols by upto 37% at 880nm wavelength. Similarly nephelometer measurements showed that upto 71% of total scattering was found to be contributed by semi-volatile aerosol fraction. The scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) of semi-volatile aerosol

  15. Updating CMAQ secondary organic aerosol properties relevant for aerosol water interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) compounds in CMAQ are updated with state-of-the-science estimates from structure activity relationships to provide consistency among volatility, molecular weight, degree of oxygenation, and solubility/hygroscopicity. These updated pro...

  16. Calibrated sky imager for aerosol optical properties determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Shields, J. E.; Karr, M. E.; Burden, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2008-11-01

    The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), has been tested to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440 870, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01), in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1) in 50% for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  17. Estimating aerosol light-scattering enhancement from dry aerosol optical properties at different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, Gloria; Jefferson, Anne; Sheridan, Patrick; Andrews, Elisabeth; Lyamani, Hassan; Ogren, John; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-05-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on the relative humidity (RH). Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. The scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is defined as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at a high and reference RH. Predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we explore the relationship between aerosol light-scattering enhancement and dry aerosol optical properties such as the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) at multiple sites around the world. The measurements used in this study were conducted by the US Department of Energy at sites where different aerosol types predominate (pristine marine, polluted marine, dust dominated, agricultural and forest environments, among others). In all cases, the scattering enhancement decreases as the SSA decreases, that is, as the contribution of absorbing particles increases. On the other hand, for marine influenced environments the scattering enhancement clearly increases as the contribution of coarse particles increases (SAE decreases), evidence of the influence of hygroscopic coarse sea salt particles. For other aerosol types the relationship between f(RH) and SAE is not so straightforward. Combining all datasets, f(RH) was found to exponentially increase with SSA with a high correlation coefficient.

  18. Sunphotometer network for monitoring aerosol properties in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Pereira, Alfredo; Vermote, E.; Reagan, J. A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Tanre, D.; Slutsker, I.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite platforms have provided a methodology for regional and global remote sensing of aerosols. New systems will significantly improve that capability during the EOS era; however, the voluminous 20 year record of satellite data has produced only regional snapshots of aerosol loading and have not yielded a data base of the optical properties of those aerosols which are fundamental to our understanding of their influence on climate change. The prospect of fully understanding the properties of the aerosols with respect to climate change is small without validation and augmentation by ancillary ground based observations. Sun photometry was demonstrated to be an effective tool for ground based measurements of aerosol optical properties from fire emissions. Newer technology has expanded routine sun photometer measurements to spectral observations of solar aureole and almucantar allowing retrievals of size distribution, scattering phase function, and refractive index. A series of such observations were made in Brazil's Amazon basin from a network of six simultaneously recording instruments deployed in Sep. 1992. The instruments were located in areas removed from local aerosol sources such that sites are representative of regional aerosol conditions. The overall network was designed to cover the counter clockwise tropospheric circulation of the Amazon Basin. Spectral measurements of sun, aureole and sky data for retrieval of aerosol optical thickness, particle size distribution, and scattering phase function as well as measurements of precipitable water were made during noncloudy conditions.

  19. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  20. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar systems (MPL) were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sunphotometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05 +/- 0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S-ratio) of 33 +/- 6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05/km (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S-ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20/km (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship-level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a PSAP were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S-ratio throughout the

  1. Aerosol measurements and validation of satellite-derived aerosol optical depth over the Kavaratti Cal-Val site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. N.; Suthar, N. M.; Patel, P. N.; Mathur, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are short-lived with a residual time of about a week in the lower atmosphere and are concentrated around the source of origin. Aerosols are produced by variety of natural processes as well as by anthropogenic activities; it gets distributed in the atmosphere through turbulent mixing as well as transported away from the source of origin and thus results in its large seasonal and spatial variability. In this study, the CIMEL sun-photometer measurements at Kavaratti calibration and validation site are used to characterize the aerosols' nature at the measurement site. Also, these in-situ measurements are used to validate the satellite sensor derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) parameter. The data analysis shows that the locally generated aerosols are mostly of marine aerosols and other natural aerosols are transported desert dust. The anthropogenic aerosols are transported from mainland and they are found during the pre-monsoon season. Also aerosol measurements for five years (2009 - 2015) are being planned for validating the satellite sensors derived AOD products namely: OceanSat2-OCM2, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua.

  2. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical properties by means of ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Gasteiger, Josef; Geiß, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years extended networks of ceilometers have been established by several national weather services. Based on improvements of the hardware performance of these single-wavelength backscatter lidars and their 24/7 availability they are increasingly used to monitor mixing layer heights and to derive profiles of the particle backscatter profile. As a consequence they are used for a wide range of applications including the dispersion of volcanic ash plumes, validation of chemistry transport models and air quality studies. In this context the development of automated schemes to detect aerosol layers and to identify the mixing layer are essential, in particular as the latter is often used as a proxy for air quality. Of equal importance is the calibration of ceilometer signals as a pre-requisite to derive quantitative optical properties. Recently, it has been emphasized that the majority of ceilometers are influenced by water vapor absorption as they operate in the spectral range of 905 - 910 nm. If this effect is ignored, errors of the aerosol backscatter coefficient can be as large as 50%, depending on the atmospheric water vapor content and the emitted wavelength spectrum. As a consequence, any other derived quantity, e.g. the extinction coefficient or mass concentration, would suffer from a significant uncertainty in addition to the inherent errors of the inversion of the lidar equation itself. This can be crucial when ceilometer derived profiles shall be used to validate transport models. In this presentation, the methodology proposed by Wiegner and Gasteiger (2015) to correct for water vapor absorption is introduced and discussed.

  3. Aerosol physical properties and their impact on climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Piskozub, Jacek; Drozdowska, Violetta; Gutowska, Dorota; Rozwadowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensing. Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies, and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. It was one of the reasons for the growth in the number of research programs dealing with marine aerosols. Sea salt aerosols are among the most abundant components of the atmospheric aerosol, and thus it exerts a strong influence on radiation, cloud formation, meteorology and chemistry of the marine atmosphere. An accurate understanding and description of these mechanisms is crucial to modeling climate and climate change. This work provides information on combined aerosol studies made with lidars and sun photometers onboard the ship and in different coastal areas. We concentrate on aerosol optical thickness and its variations with aerosol advections into the study area. We pay special attention to the problem of proper data collection and analyses techniques. We showed that in order to detect the dynamics of potential aerosol composition changes it is necessary to use data from different stations where measurements are made using the same techniques. The combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides comprehensive picture of aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01

  4. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  5. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March–May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls. PMID:24707452

  6. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties over Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Saponaro, Giulia; Virtanen, Timo; Rodriguez, Edith; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Atlaskina, Ksenia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides the spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud properties over a wide area. In our studies large data sets are used for statistical studies on aerosol and cloud interaction in an area over Fennoscandia, the Baltic Sea and adjacent regions over the European mainland. This area spans several regimes with different influences on aerosol cloud interaction such as a the transition from relative clean air over Fennoscandia to more anthropogenically polluted air further south, and the influence maritime air over the Baltic and oceanic air advected from the North Atlantic. Anthropogenic pollution occurs in several parts of the study area, and in particular near densely populated areas and megacities, but also in industrialized areas and areas with dense traffic. The aerosol in such areas is quite different from that produced over the boreal forest and has different effects on air quality and climate. Studies have been made on the effects of aerosols on air quality and on the radiation balance in China. The aim of the study is to study the effect of these different regimes on aerosol-cloud interaction using a large aerosol and cloud data set retrieved with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer (A)ATSR Dual View algorithm (ADV) further developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute and aerosol and cloud data provided by MODIS. Retrieval algorithms for aerosol and clouds have been developed for the (A)ATSR, consisting of a series of instruments of which we use the second and third one: ATSR-2 which flew on the ERS-2 satellite (1995-2003) and AATSR which flew on the ENVISAT satellite (2002-2012) (both from the European Space Agency, ESA). The ADV algorithm provides aerosol data on a global scale with a default resolution of 10x10km2 (L2) and an aggregate product on 1x1 degree (L3). Optional, a 1x1 km2 retrieval products is available over smaller areas for specific studies. Since for the retrieval of AOD no prior knowledge is needed on

  7. Improved identification of the solution space of aerosol microphysical properties derived from the inversion of profiles of lidar optical data, part 1: theory.

    PubMed

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Chemyakin, Eduard; Romanov, Anton

    2016-12-01

    Multiwavelength Raman/high spectral resolution lidars that measure backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm can be used for the retrieval of particle microphysical parameters, such as effective and mean radius, number, surface-area and volume concentrations, and complex refractive index, from inversion algorithms. In this study, we carry out a correlation analysis in order to investigate the degree of dependence that may exist between the optical data taken with lidar and the underlying microphysical parameters. We also investigate if the correlation properties identified in our study can be used as a priori or a posteriori constraints for our inversion scheme so that the inversion results can be improved. We made the simplifying assumption of error-free optical data in order to find out what correlations exist in the best case situation. Clearly, for practical applications, erroneous data need to be considered too. On the basis of simulations with synthetic optical data, we find the following results, which hold true for arbitrary particle size distributions, i.e., regardless of the modality or the shape of the size distribution function: surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99. We also find a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for the extinction coefficient versus (1) the ratio of the volume concentration to effective radius and (2) the product of the number concentration times the sum of the squares of the mean radius and standard deviation of the investigated particle size distributions. Besides that, we find that for particles of any mode fraction of the particle size distribution, the complex refractive index is uniquely defined by extinction- and backscatter-related Ångström exponents, lidar ratios at two wavelengths, and an effective radius.

  8. Influences of relative humidity on aerosol optical properties and aerosol radiative forcing during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung

    In situ measurements at Gosan, South Korea, and onboard C-130 aircraft during ACE-Asia were analyzed to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. The temporal variation of aerosol chemical composition at the Gosan super-site was highly dependent on the air mass transport pathways and source region. RH in the springtime over East Asia were distributed with very high spatial and temporal variation. The RH profile onboard C-130 aircraft measurements exhibits a mixed layer height of about 2 km. Aerosol scattering coefficient ( σsp) under ambient RH was greatly enhanced as compared with that at dry RH (RH<40%). From the aerosol optical and radiative transfer modeling studies, we found that the extinction and scattering coefficients are greatly enhanced with RH. Single scattering albedo with RH is also sensitively changed in the longer wavelength. Asymmetry parameter ( g) is gradually increased with RH although g decreases with wavelength at a given RH. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and RH of 50% increased to factors 1.24, 1.51, 2.16, and 3.20 at different RH levels 70, 80, 90, and 95%, respectively. Diurnal-averaged aerosol radiative forcings for surface, TOA, and atmosphere were increased with RH because AOD was increased with RH due to hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. This result implies that the hygroscopic growth due to water-soluble or hydrophilic particles in the lower troposphere may significantly modify the magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing both at the surface and TOA. However, the diurnal-averaged radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface, TOA, and atmosphere were decreased with increasing RH. The decrease of the forcing efficiency with RH results from the fact that increasing rate of aerosol optical depth with RH is greater than the increasing rate of aerosol radiative forcing with RH.

  9. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  10. Aerosol properties over south india during different seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprasad, P.; Babu, C. A.; Jayakrishnan, P. R.

    Aerosols play an important role in the radiation balance and cloud properties, thereby affect the entire climatology of the earth-atmosphere system. Besides natural sources like dust, seasalt and natural sulphates, anthropogenic activities also inject aerosols like soot and industrial sulphates. Of these sea-salt and sulphates scatter the solar radiation. Soot is an absorbing aerosol while soil dust and organic matters are partly absorbing aerosols. Wind and rainfall are major factors affecting the transportation and deposition of the aerosols. India is a country blessed with plenty of monsoon rains. Winter (December to February), summer (March to May), monsoon (June to September) and post monsoon (October to November) are the four seasons over the region. Aerosol properties vary according to the season. Natural aerosols blown from the deserts have a major role in the aerosol optical depth over India. Of this, dust from Arabian desert that is carried by the winds are most important. The aerosol optical depth of south India is entirely different from that of north India. Maximum aerosol concentration is found over Gangetic plane in most of the seasons, whereas entire south India shows less aerosol optical depth. In the present study the aerosol properties of south India is analysed in general. Particular analysis is carried out for the four regions in the east and west coasts around Chennai, Kolkotha, Mumbai and Cochin. Chennai and Kolkotha are situated in the east coast whereas Cochin and Mumbai are in the west coast. These are industrial cities in India. Chennai region does not get monsoon rainfall since it is situated in the leeward side of Western ghats. But in the post monsoon season Chennai gets good amount of rainfall. Other three regions get good amount of rainfall during monsoon season. The study uses Terra MODIS, TOMS, NCEP/NCAR and TRMM data. Aerosol properties are analysed using Terra MODIS and Nimbus TOMS data. The variations of the aerosol optical

  11. Absorbing aerosols at high relative humidity: linking hygroscopic growth to optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. Michel; Bar-Or, R. Z.; Bluvshtein, N.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Kostinski, A.; Borrmann, S.; Koren, I.; Koren, I.; Rudich, Y.

    2012-06-01

    One of the major uncertainties in the understanding of Earth's climate system is the interaction between solar radiation and aerosols in the atmosphere. Aerosols exposed to high humidity will change their chemical, physical, and optical properties due to their increased water content. To model hydrated aerosols, atmospheric chemistry and climate models often use the volume weighted mixing rule to predict the complex refractive index (RI) of aerosols when they interact with high relative humidity, and, in general, assume homogeneous mixing. This study explores the validity of these assumptions. A humidified cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS) and a tandem hygroscopic DMA (differential mobility analyzer) are used to measure the extinction coefficient and hygroscopic growth factors of humidified aerosols, respectively. The measurements are performed at 80% and 90%RH at wavelengths of 532 nm and 355 nm using size-selected aerosols with different degrees of absorption; from purely scattering to highly absorbing particles. The ratio of the humidified to the dry extinction coefficients (fRHext(%RH, Dry)) is measured and compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory. Using the measured hygroscopic growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing, the expected RIs using the volume weighted mixing rule are compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements. We found a weak linear dependence or no dependence of fRH(%RH, Dry) with size for hydrated absorbing aerosols in contrast to the non-monotonically decreasing behavior with size for purely scattering aerosols. No discernible difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 7% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference. However, for substances with growth factor less than 1.15 the volume weighted mixing rule assumption

  12. On deriving the accurate aerosol extinction profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere using the range dependent scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, M. V.; Radhakrishnan, S. R.; Mahadevanpillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2008-12-01

    Lidar has proven to be an effective instrument for obtaining high resolution profiles of atmospheric aerosols. Deriving the optical properties of aerosols from the experimentally obtained lidar data is one of the most interesting and challenging task for the atmospheric scientists. A few methods had been developed so far, to obtain the quantitative profiles of extinction and backscattering coefficient of aerosols from the pulsed backscattering lidar measurements. Most of the existing inversion methods assume a range independent value for the scattering ratio for inverting the lidar signal even though it is known that the scattering ratio depends on the nature of aerosols and as such range dependent. We used a modified Klett's method for the inversion of lidar signal that uses range dependent scattering ratio (s) for the characterization of atmospheric aerosols. This method provides the constants k and s for all the altitude regions of the atmosphere and leads to derive the aerosol extinction profile for the lidar data. In this paper we made a study on the errors involved in the extinction profiles derived using the range dependent scattering ratio and discuss the approach in this regard to obtain the accurate extinction profiles.

  13. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical Property Measurements Made During the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period and Their Effects on Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Hallar, A. G.; Arnott, W. P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ogren, J.; Schmid, B.; Luu, A.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult to measure aerosol properties. One of the main purposes of the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) flown in May, 2003 was to assess our ability to measure absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of aerosol optical properties made during the IOP. Measurements of aerosol absorption coefficient were made by Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter (U. Washington) and on the DOE Cessna 172 (NOAA-C,MDL). Aerosol absorption coefficient was also measured by a photoacoustic instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the IOP. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-AkC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Measurements of absorption coefficient from all of these instruments during appropriate periods are compared. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model.

  14. Deep Blue Retrievals of Asian Aerosol Properties During ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Cee; King, Michael D.; Herman, Jay R.

    2006-01-01

    During the ACE-Asia field campaign, unprecedented amounts of aerosol property data in East Asia during springtime were collected from an array of aircraft, shipboard, and surface instruments. However, most of the observations were obtained in areas downwind of the source regions. In this paper, the newly developed satellite aerosol algorithm called "Deep Blue" was employed to characterize the properties of aerosols over source regions using radiance measurements from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Based upon the ngstr m exponent derived from the Deep Blue algorithm, it was demonstrated that this new algorithm is able to distinguish dust plumes from fine-mode pollution particles even in complex aerosol environments such as the one over Beijing. Furthermore, these results were validated by comparing them with observations from AERONET sites in China and Mongolia during spring 2001. These comparisons show that the values of satellite-retrieved aerosol optical thickness from Deep Blue are generally within 20%-30% of those measured by sunphotometers. The analyses also indicate that the roles of mineral dust and anthropogenic particles are comparable in contributing to the overall aerosol distributions during spring in northern China, while fine-mode particles are dominant over southern China. The spring season in East Asia consists of one of the most complex environments in terms of frequent cloudiness and wide ranges of aerosol loadings and types. This paper will discuss how the factors contributing to this complexity influence the resulting aerosol monthly averages from various satellite sensors and, thus, the synergy among satellite aerosol products.

  15. Comparing the relationships between aerosol optical depth and cloud properties in observations and global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols impact the climate both directly, through their interaction with radiation and indirectly, via their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties. The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is highly uncertain. Many relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties have been observed using satellite data, but previous work has shown that some of these relationships are the product of the strong AOD-cloud fraction (CF) relationship. The confounding influence of local meteorology obscures the magnitude of any aerosol impact on CF, and so also the impact of aerosol on other cloud properties. For example, both AOD and CF are strongly influenced by relative humidity, which can generate a correlation between them. Previous studies have used reanalysis data to account for confounding meteorological variables. This requires knowledge of the relevant meteorological variables and is limited by the accuracy of the reanalysis data. Recent work has shown that by using the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to mediate the AOD-CF relationship, the impact of relative humidity can be significantly reduced. This method removes the limitations imposed by the finite accuracy of reanalysis data. In this work we investigate the impact of the CDNC mediation on the AOD-CF relationship and on the relationship between AOD and other cloud properties in global atmospheric models. By comparing pre-industrial and present day runs, we investigate the success of the CDNC mediated AOD-CF relationship to predict the change in CF from the pre-industrial to the present day using only observations of the present day relationships between clouds and aerosol properties. This helps to determine whether the satellite-derived relationship provides a constraint on the aerosol indirect forcing due to changes in CF.

  16. Remote Sensing of Spectral Aerosol Properties: A Classroom Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2006-01-01

    Bridging the gap between current research and the classroom is a major challenge to today s instructor, especially in the sciences where progress happens quickly. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland teamed up in designing a graduate class project intended to provide a hands-on introduction to the physical basis for the retrieval of aerosol properties from state-of-the-art MODIS observations. Students learned to recognize spectral signatures of atmospheric aerosols and to perform spectral inversions. They became acquainted with the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm over oceans, and methods for its evaluation, including comparisons with groundbased AERONET sun-photometer data.

  17. Meteorological and Aerosol effects on Marine Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Roberts, G.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Wang, Z.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Lin, J.; Nenes, A.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K.; Jonsson, H.; Albrecht, B. A.; Desiree, T. S.; Macdonald, A. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation and consequently their droplet distributions and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies provide detailed measurements in 6 case studies of both cloud thermodynamic properties and initial particle number distribution and composition, as well as the resulting cloud drop distribution and composition. This study uses simulations of a detailed chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce the observed cloud droplet distribution and composition. Four of the cases examined had a sub-adiabatic lapse rate, which was shown to have fewer droplets due to decreased maximum supersaturation, lower LWC and higher cloud base height, consistent with previous findings. These detailed case studies provided measured thermodynamics and microphysics that constrained the simulated droplet size distribution sufficiently to match the droplet number within 6% and the size within 19% for 4 of the 6 cases, demonstrating "closure" or consistency of the measured composition with the measured CCN spectra and the inferred and modeled supersaturation. The contribution of organic components to droplet formation shows small effects on the droplet number and size in the 4 marine cases that had background aerosol conditions with varying amounts of coastal, ship or other non-biogenic sources. In contrast, the organic fraction and hygroscopicity increased the droplet number and size in the cases with generated smoke and cargo ship plumes that were freshly emitted and not yet internally mixed with the background particles. The simulation results show organic hygroscopicity causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (<0.7%) with the exception of the cargo ship plume and smoke plume which increased absolute cloud reflectivity fraction by 0

  18. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  19. Overview of sun photometer measurements of aerosol properties in Scandinavia and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Gausa, M.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; Berjón, A.; Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; de Frutos, A. M.; Bennouna, Y.; Blindheim, S.; Myhre, C. L.; Zibordi, G.; Wehrli, C.; Kratzer, S.; Hakansson, B.; Carlund, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Herber, A.; Torres, B.

    2012-06-01

    An overview on the data of columnar aerosol properties measured in Northern Europe is provided. Apart from the necessary data gathered in the Arctic, the knowledge of the aerosol loading in nearby areas (e.g. sub-Arctic) is of maximum interest to achieve a correct analysis of the Arctic aerosols and transport patterns. This work evaluates data from operational sites with sun photometer measurements belonging either to national or international networks (AERONET, GAW-PFR) and programs conducted in Scandinavia and Svalbard. We enumerate a list of sites, measurement type and periods together with observed aerosol properties. An evaluation and analysis of aerosol data was carried out with a review of previous results as well. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) are the current parameters with sufficient long-term records for a first evaluation of aerosol properties. AOD (500 nm) ranges from 0.08 to 0.10 in Arctic and sub-Arctic sites (Ny-Ålesund: 0.09; Andenes: 0.10; Sodankylä: 0.08), and it is somewhat higher in more populated areas in Southern Scandinavia (AOD about 0.10-0.12 at 500 nm). On the Norwegian coast, aerosols show larger mean size (AE = 1.2 at Andenes) than in Finland, with continental climate (AE = 1.5 at Sodankylä). Columnar particle size distributions and related parameters derived from inversion of sun/sky radiances were also investigated. This work makes special emphasis in the joint and collaborative effort of the various groups from different countries involved in this study. Part of the measurements presented here were involved in the IPY projects Polar-AOD and POLARCAT.

  20. Enhanced water vapor in Asian dust layer: Entrainment processes and implication for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Jefferson, Anne; Choi, Suk-Jin; Cha, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Anderson, Theodore L.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    The entrainment process of water vapor into the dust layer during Asian dust events and the effect of water vapor associated with the Asian dust layer (ADL) on aerosol hygroscopic properties are investigated. The entrainment processes of water vapor into the ADL is examined by using a PSU/NCAR MM5 together with the backward trajectory model, radiosonde data, and remotely sensed aerosol vertical distribution data. Two dust events in the spring of 1998 and 2001 are examined in detail. The results reveal that the water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) derived by the MM5 fits in well with the WVMR observed by radiosonde, and is well coincident with the aerosol extinction coefficient ( σep) measured by the micro-pulse lidar. The temporal evolution of the vertical distributions of WVMR and σep exhibited similar features. On the basis of a well simulation of the enhanced water vapor within the dust layer by the MM5, we trace the dust storms to examine the entrainment mechanism. The enhancement of WVMR within the ADL was initiated over the mountainous areas. The relatively moist air mass in the well-developed mixing layer over the mountainous areas is advected upward from the boundary layer by an ascending motion. However, a large portion of the water vapor within the ADL is enhanced over the edge of a highland and the plains in China. This is well supported by the simulated WVMR and the wind vectors. Aircraft-based in situ measurements of the chemical and optical properties of aerosol enable a quantitative estimation of the effect of the enhanced WVMR on the aerosol hygroscopic properties. The submicron aerosol accompanied by the dust storm caused an increase of aerosol scattering through water uptakes during the transport. This increase could be explained by the chemical fact that water-soluble submicron pollution aerosols are enriched in the ADL.

  1. Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de; Berjon, A. J.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L.

    2013-05-10

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

  2. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume concentrations of steady-state secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were measured in several hydrocarbon/NOx irradiation experiments. These measurements were used to estimate the thermal behavior of the particles that may be formed in the atmosphere. These laborator...

  3. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  4. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom α, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause

  5. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  6. Optical Properties of Polymers Relevant to Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Ortiz, W.; Gomez-Hernandez, M. E.; Xu, W.; Guo, S.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a critical role in climate directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by modifying the cloud formation. Currently, the direct and indirect effects of aerosols represent the largest uncertainty in climate predictions models. Some aerosols are directly emitted, but the majority are formed in the atmosphere by the oxidation of gaseous precursors. However, the formation of aerosols at the molecular level is not fully characterized. Certain category of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which represent a significant fraction of the total aerosol burden, can be light-absorbing, also known as brown carbon. However, the overall contribution of SOA to the brown carbon and the related climate forcing is poorly understood. Such incomplete understanding is due in part to the chemical complexity of SOA and the lack of knowledge regarding SOA formation, transformation, and optical properties. Based on previous laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modeling studies, it has been suggested that the polymers and oligomers play an important role in the SOA formation. Atmospheric polymers could be produced by the hydration or heterogeneous reactions of epoxides and small α-dicarbonyls. Their aqueous chemistry products have been shown to give light-absorbing and high molecular weight oligomeric species, which increase the SOA mass production and alter the direct and indirect effect of aerosols. In this paper, the aerosol chemistry of small α-dicarbonyl compounds with amines is investigated and the associated optical properties are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The differences between primary, secondary and tertiary amines with glyoxal and methylglyoxal are evaluated in terms of SOA browning efficiency. Atmospheric implications of our present work for understanding the formation of light-absorbing SOA will be presented, particularly in terms of the product distribution of light-absorbing SOA formed by aqueous phase

  7. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  8. Inversion Techniques for Retrieving Detailed Aerosol Properties from Remote Sensing Observations: Achievements and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, O.

    2010-12-01

    applications. Specifically, the retrieval of detailed information about aerosol particle sizes, shape, absorption and composition (refractive index) from the observations by sun/sky-scanning radiometers has been developed and employed by worldwide AERONET network of ground-based radiometers. One of first retrievals of global aerosol emission sources from MODIS satellite observations have been suggested and realized using the same concept. Finally, the most recent results show a high potential of applying the methodology for deriving aerosol properties over bright land surfaces from POLDER multi-angle spectral polarimetric satellite observations using a new approach of simultaneous inversion of large groups of satellite pixels.

  9. A 19-Month Climatology of Marine Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Properties Derived From DOE ARM AMF Deployment at the Azores: Part I: Cloud Fraction and Single-Layered MBL Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Kennedy, Aaron; Minnis, Patrick; Wood, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A 19-month record of total, and single-layered low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high (> 6 km) cloud fractions (CFs), and the single-layered marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties has been generated from ground-based measurements taken at the ARM Azores site between June 2009 and December 2010. It documents the most comprehensive and longest dataset on marine cloud fraction and MBL cloud properties to date. The annual means of total CF, and single-layered low, middle, and high CFs derived from ARM radar-lidar observations are 0.702, 0.271, 0.01 and 0.106, respectively. More total and single-layered high CFs occurred during winter, while single-layered low CFs were greatest during summer. The diurnal cycles for both total and low CFs are stronger during summer than during winter. The CFs are bimodally distributed in the vertical with a lower peak at approx. 1 km and higher one between 8 and 11 km during all seasons, except summer, when only the low peak occurs. The persistent high pressure and dry conditions produce more single-layered MBL clouds and fewer total clouds during summer, while the low pressure and moist air masses during winter generate more total and multilayered-clouds, and deep frontal clouds associated with midlatitude cyclones.

  10. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land using PMAp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Ruediger; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolutions for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) is delivered as operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithms retrieve aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The next releases of PMAp will provide an extended set of aerosol and cloud properties which include AOD over land and an improved volcanic ash retrieval combining AVHRR and IASI. This presentation gives an overview on the existing product and the prototypes in development. The major focus is the discussion of the AOD retrieval over land implemented in the upcoming PMAp2 release. In addition, the results of our current validation studies (e.g. comparisons to AERONET, other satellite platforms and model data) are shown.

  11. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: An AQMEII-2 perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, G.; Hogrefe, C.; Bianconi, R.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Brunner, D.; Forkel, R.; Giordano, L.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Knote, C.; Langer, M.; Makar, P. A.; Pirovano, G.; Pérez, J. L.; San José, R.; Syrakov, D.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Wolke, R.; Žabkar, R.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model intercomparison, we used the bulk mass profiles of aerosol chemical species sampled over the locations of AERONET stations across Europe and North America to calculate the aerosol optical properties under a range of common assumptions for all models. Several simulations with parameters perturbed within a range of observed values are carried out for July 2010 and compared in order to infer the assumptions that have the largest impact on the calculated aerosol optical properties. We calculate that the most important factor of uncertainty is the assumption about the mixing state, for which we estimate an uncertainty of 30-35% on the simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The choice of the core composition in the core-shell representation is of minor importance for calculation of AOD, while it is critical for the SSA. The uncertainty introduced by the choice of mixing state choice on the calculation of the asymmetry parameter is the order of 10%. Other factors of uncertainty tested here have a maximum average impact of 10% each on calculated AOD, and an impact of a few percent on SSA and g. It is thus recommended to focus further research on a more accurate representation of the aerosol mixing state in models, in order to have a less uncertain simulation of the related optical properties.

  12. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  13. Identification of aerosol types over Indo-Gangetic Basin: implications to optical properties and associated radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Srivastava, A K; Singh, A K; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2015-08-01

    The aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are a mixture of sulfate, dust, black carbon, and other soluble and insoluble components. It is a challenge not only to identify these various aerosol types, but also to assess the optical and radiative implications of these components. In the present study, appropriate thresholds for fine-mode fraction and single-scattering albedo have been used to first identify the aerosol types over IGB. Four major aerosol types may be identified as polluted dust (PD), polluted continental (PC), black carbon-enriched (BCE), and organic carbon-enriched (OCE). Further, the implications of these different types of aerosols on optical properties and radiative forcing have been studied. The aerosol products derived from CIMEL sun/sky radiometer measurements, deployed under Aerosol Robotic Network program of NASA, USA were used from four different sites Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur, and Kanpur, spread over Pakistan and Northern India. PD is the most dominant aerosol type at Karachi and Jaipur, contributing more than 50% of all the aerosol types. OCE, on the other hand, contributes only about 12-15% at all the stations except at Kanpur where its contribution is ∼38%. The spectral dependence of AOD was relatively low for PD aerosol type, with the lowest AE values (<0.5); whereas, large spectral dependence in AOD was observed for the remaining aerosol types, with the highest AE values (>1.0). SSA was found to be the highest for OCE (>0.9) and the lowest for BCE (<0.9) type aerosols, with drastically different spectral variability. The direct aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and in the atmosphere was found to be the maximum at Lahore among all the four stations in the IGB.

  14. Martian aerosols: Near-infrared spectral properties and effects on the observation of the surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, Stephane; Mustard, John; Murchie, Scott; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Cerroni, Priscilla; Caradini, Angioletta

    1994-01-01

    Imaging sprectroscopic measurements (ISM) of Mars acquired by the ISM instrument on Phobos-2 are used to investigate the NIR spectral properties of aerosols and the effects of atmospheric scattering on inferred mineralogy of the surface. Estimates of aerosols spectra between 0.77 and 2.6 micrometers are derived above Tharsis and Ophir Planum. The spectral continua are consistent with the particle size distribution derived using data from the solar occultation experiment on-board the spacecraft (effective radius approximately = 1.2 micrometers, with an effective variance approximately = 0.2). The aerosols spectra contain water-ice absorption features and possibly absorptions due to clay and/or sulfates. The largest effect of the aerosols on surface spectra is in dark regions, where the continuum spectral slope becomes more negative and the 1-micrometers absorption due to Fe in pyroxene is shifted toward longer wavelengths. The effects of aerosols on spectra of bright regions are insufficiently large to change mineralogic interpretations based on ISM data, i.e., that bright regions in Tharsis are dominated spectrally by hematite, but that additional ferric minerals are probably present in other areas including Arabia.

  15. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Neely, Ryan R; Martinsson, Bengt G; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations. Key Points The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer is composed of sulfate, primary organics, and secondary organics The North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer is mostly composed of sulfate and secondary organics Aerosol Optical Depth of Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer increases by 0.002 from 2000 to 2010 PMID:26709320

  16. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  17. Radiative properties of the background aerosol: absorption component of extinction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Charlson, R J

    1985-07-19

    The light-scattering and light-absorption coefficients of the global background aerosol define its single-scatter albedo. Continuous, simultaneous measurements of these optical coefficients were made on a daily basis for the remote marine mid-troposphere; such measurements are essential for assessment of the effects of aerosol on atmospheric radiative transfer. Measurements of light-absorption coefficients made at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii were higher than expected, and the single-scatter albedo was lower than the value often used in radiative transfer models. Soot appears to be the most likely primary absorber, and hemispheric dispersal of this combustion-derived material is suggested.

  18. Aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties at regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Michaël; Barragan, Rubén; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Mallet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) program, the seasonal variability of the aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network; http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is examined in two regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean Basin: Ersa (Corsica Island, France) and Palma de Mallorca (Mallorca Island, Spain). A third site, Alborán (Alborán Island, Spain), with only a few months of data is considered for examining possible northeast-southwest (NE-SW) gradients of the aforementioned aerosol properties. The AERONET dataset is exclusively composed of level 2.0 inversion products available during the 5-year period 2011-2015. AERONET solar radiative fluxes are compared with ground- and satellite-based flux measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that AERONET fluxes are compared with measurements at the top of the atmosphere. Strong events (with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm greater than 0.4) of long-range transport aerosols, one of the main drivers of the observed annual cycles and NE-SW gradients, are (1) mineral dust outbreaks predominant in spring and summer in the north and in summer in the south and (2) European pollution episodes predominant in autumn. A NE-SW gradient exists in the western Mediterranean Basin for the aerosol optical depth and especially its coarse-mode fraction, which all together produces a similar gradient for the aerosol direct radiative forcing. The aerosol fine mode is rather homogeneously distributed. Absorption properties are quite variable because of the many and different sources of anthropogenic particles in and around the western Mediterranean Basin: North African and European urban areas, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, most forest fires and

  19. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations contain large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. The development and deployment of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sunphotometer network and SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile supersite are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To characterize the regional natural and anthropogenic aerosols, AERONET is an internationally federated network of unique sunphotometry that contains more than 250 permanent sites worldwide. Since 1993, there are more than 480 million aerosol optical depth observations and about 15 sites have continuous records longer than 10 years for annual/seasonal trend analyses. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instrument into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over eight years, SMART-COMMIT have gradually refine( and been proven vital for field deployment. In this paper, we will demonstrate the

  20. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.6±23.2 Mm-1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.8±2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Ångström exponent (å) (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.4±2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles (å = 1.0±0.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas

  1. Viscosity and electric properties of water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Sokolov, I. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The flow of water mist in a narrow duct has been studied experimentally. The profile of the velocity of drops has been measured, and the viscosity of the mist has been calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at low gradients of the rate of shear the viscosity of the mist can exceed that of clean air by tens and even hundreds of times. The electric charge of the drops has been measured. It has been found that the viscosity of the mist differs from that of clean air at gradients of the rate of shear that are less than the frequency of the establishment of electric equilibrium between the drops. A comparative analysis of the viscosities of the mist and a drop cluster has been carried out, and the dependence of the viscosity of the water aerosol on the radius and the charge of the drops has been predicted. The possible role of aerosols that contain submicron drops in the known "clear air turbulence" problem has been shown.

  2. Influence of the external mixing state of atmospheric aerosol on derived CCN number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, H.; McFiggans, G.; Henning, S.; Stratmann, F.

    2010-05-01

    We derived the range of particle hygroscopicities ($\\kappa$) that occurs in the atmosphere, based on literature data of measured hygroscopic growth or based on chemical composition. The derived $\\kappa$-values show that the atmospheric aerosol often is an external mixture with respect to hygroscopicity. Mean $\\kappa$ were derived for urban, rural, and marine aerosols for the different hygroscopic modes. Using these $\\kappa$ and exemplary particle number size distributions for the different aerosols, the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) was derived for two cases, (1) accounting for the less hygroscopic fraction of particles and (2) assuming all particles to have $\\kappa$ of the more hygroscopic mode. NCCN derived from measured particle hygroscopicity is overestimated for case (2). Overestimation of NCCN is largest for fresh continental aerosol and less pronounced for marine aerosol. With $\\kappa$ derived from bulk aerosol composition data, only the hygroscopicity of more soluble aerosol particles is captured. Bulk or even size-resolved composition data will be insufficient to predict NCCN under many conditions unless independent information about particle mixing state is available.

  3. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Properties under Thin Cirrus from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew Mark.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties using shortwave bands from passive satellite sensors, such as MODIS, is typically limited to cloud-free areas. However, if the clouds are thin enough (i.e. thin cirrus) such that the satellite-observed reflectance contains signals under the cirrus layer, and if the optical properties of this cirrus layer are known, the TOA reflectance can be corrected for the cirrus layer to be used for retrieving aerosol optical properties. To this end, we first correct the TOA reflectances in the aerosol bands (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 micron for ocean algorithm and 0.412, 0.47, and 0.65 micron for deep blue algorithm) for the effects of thin cirrus using 1.38 micron reflectance and conversion factors that convert cirrus reflectance in 1.38 micron band to those in aerosol bands. It was found that the conversion factors can be calculated by using relationships between reflectances in 1.38 micron band and minimum reflectances in the aerosol bands (Gao et al., 2002). Refer to the example in the figure. Then, the cirrus-corrected reflectance can be calculated by subtracting the cirrus reflectance from the TOA reflectance in the optically thin case. A sensitivity study suggested that cloudy-sky TOA reflectances can be calculated with small errors in the form of simple linear addition of cirrus-only reflectances and clear-sky reflectances. In this study, we correct the cirrus signals up to TOA reflectance at 1.38 micron of 0.05 where the simple linear addition is valid without extensive radiative transfer simulations. When each scene passes the set of tests shown in the flowchart, the scene is corrected for cirrus contamination and passed into aerosol retrieval algorithms.

  4. Correlation between model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and satellite-derived cloud optical depths: Indication of indirect effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Luo, C.; Saylor, R.; Streets, D.; Huang, Y.; Bergin, M.; Giorgi, F.

    2002-05-01

    We consider two independently derived data sets. The first represents the annually averaged distribution of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia as derived by a coupled regional climate/chemical transport model. The other is the annually averaged distributions of cloud optical depths and cloud amount over East Asia derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. We find a remarkable similarity in the distributions of model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and ISCCP-reported cloud optical depths, with both exhibiting a region of enhanced values extending over the east central portion of China, between the Sichuan Basin and the Yangtze Delta, and then in an easterly direction over the East China Sea, Japan, and South Korea, and the western edge of the Pacific Ocean. Linear regression between the estimated aerosol column burdens and the cloud optical depths yields an r2 > 0.6, indicating that the correlations are statistically significant at a confidence level that is >99.9% and that more than 60% of the variation in the cloud optical depths is related to variations in the anthropogenic aerosol abundances. Multivariate analysis involving the distributions of boundary layer relative humidity and precipitation over East Asia, as well as that of the model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and the ISCCP-reported cloud properties, indicates that the relationship between anthropogenic aerosols and cloud optical depth is unique to these two variables and not symptomatic of a more general mechanism involving the hydrologic cycle. Trend analysis of the ISCCP data suggests that there was an upward trend in cloud optical depths over areas in East Asia impacted by air pollution during the early 1990s that would have corresponded to the likely increase in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations over this period in East Asia in response to growing anthropogenic emissions. A likely explanation for these findings is that there

  5. Study of aerosol optical properties at Kunming in southwest China and long-range transport of biomass burning aerosols from North Burma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Che, H.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal variation of aerosol optical properties and dominant aerosol types at Kunming (KM), an urban site in southwest China, is characterized. Substantial influences of the hygroscopic growth and long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols on aerosol optical properties at KM are revealed. These results are derived from a detailed analysis of (a) aerosol optical properties (e.g. aerosol optical depth (AOD), columnar water vapor (CWV), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size distribution) retrieved from sunphotometer measurements during March 2012-August 2013, (b) satellite AOD and active fire products, (c) the attenuated backscatter profiles from the space-born lidar, and (d) the back-trajectories. The mean AOD440nm and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE440 - 870) at KM are 0.42 ± 0.32 and 1.25 ± 0.35, respectively. Seasonally, high AOD440nm (0.51 ± 0.34), low EAE440 - 870 (1.06 ± 0.34) and high CWV (4.25 ± 0.97 cm) during the wet season (May - October) contrast with their counterparts 0.17 ± 0.11, 1.40 ± 0.31 and 1.91 ± 0.37 cm during the major dry season (November-February) and 0.53 ± 0.29, 1.39 ± 0.19, and 2.66 ± 0.44 cm in the late dry season (March-April). These contrasts between wet and major dry season, together with the finding that the fine mode radius increases significantly with AOD during the wet season, suggest the importance of the aerosol hygroscopic growth in regulating the seasonal variation of aerosol properties. BB and Urban/Industrial (UI) aerosols are two major aerosol types. Back trajectory analysis shows that airflows on clean days during the major dry season are often from west of KM where the AOD is low. In contrast, air masses on polluted days are from west (in late dry season) and east (in wet season) of KM where the AOD is often large. BB air mass is found mostly originated from North Burma where BB aerosols are lifted upward to 5 km and then subsequently transported to southwest China via prevailing westerly winds.

  6. Production of satellite-derived aerosol climate data records: current status of the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    and the Aerosol_cci team Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (Phase 1: 2010 -2014; Phase 2: 2014-2017) intensive work has been conducted to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors ATSR (3 algorithms), PARASOL, MERIS (3 algorithms), synergetic AATSR/SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOMOS. Whereas OMI and GOMOS were used to derive absorbing aerosol index and stratospheric extinction profiles, respectively, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Ångström coefficient were retrieved from the other sensors. The cooperation between the project partners, including both the retrieval teams and independent validation teams, has resulted in a strong improvement of most algorithms. In particular the AATSR retrieved AOD is qualitatively similar to that from MODIS, usually taken as the standard, MISR and SeaWiFS. This conclusion has been reached form several different ways of validation of the L2 and L3 products, using AERONET sun photometer data as the common ground-truth for the application of both 'traditional' statistical techniques and a 'scoring' technique using spatial and temporal correlations. Quantitatively, the limited AATSR swath width of 500km results in a smaller amount of data. Nevertheless, the assimilation of AATSR-retrieved AOD, together with MODIS data, contributes to improving the in the ECMWF climate model results. In addition to the multi-spectral AOD, and thus the Ångström Exponent, also a per-pixel uncertainty is provided and validated. By the end of Aerosol_cci Phase 1 the ATSR algorithms have been applied to both ATSR-2 and AATSR resulting in an AOD time series of 17 years. In phase 2 this work is continued with a focus on the further improvement of the ATSR algorithms as well as those for the other instruments and algorithms, mentioned above, which in phase 1 were considered less mature. The first efforts are on the further characterization of the uncertainties and on better understanding of the

  7. Joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties from MSG/SEVIRI observations in the framework of aerosol_CCI2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damman, Alix; Zunz, Violette; Govaerts, Yves; Kaminski, Thomas; Voßbeck, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Meteosat satellites play an important role for the generation of consistent long time series of aerosol properties. This importance relies on (i) the long duration of past (Meteosat First Generation, MFG), present (Meteosat Second Generation, MSG) and future (Meteosat Third Generation, MTG) missions and (ii) their frequent cycle of acquisition that can be used to document the anisotropy of the surface and therefore the lower boundary condition for aerosol retrieval over land surfaces. The Package for the joint Inversion of Surface and Aerosol (PISA) is a new algorithm developed by Rayference and The Inversion Lab for the joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties. It relies on the inversion of a physically-based radiative transfer model accounting for the surface reflectance anisotropy and its coupling with aerosol scattering. The inversion scheme accounts for prior knowledge on the surface properties and smoothness constraints on the temporal variation of aerosols. PISA also provides the posterior uncertainty covariance matrix for the retrieved variables in every processed pixel. The package has been applied on Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) acquired by SEVIRI onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) in the VIS0.6, VIS0.8 and NIR1.6 spectral bands. Observations are accumulated during a certain period of time to sufficiently document the surface anisotropy and minimize the impact of clouds. The surface radiative properties are retrieved for this entire accumulation period during which they are supposed to be constant. Aerosol properties however are derived on an hourly basis. Based on PISA, a processing chain has been developed and applied on 2008 MSG/SEVIRI observations for some specific sub-domains of the Earth disk. For these processed sub-domains, the information content of each MSG/SEVIRI band will be analysed based on the prior and posterior uncertainty covariance matrices. This constitutes a first step

  8. Atmospheric Optical Properties and Spectral Analysis of Desert Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvgeni, D.; Karnieli, A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Maenhaut, W.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific background Aerosols can interact directly with solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering as well as absorption. In addition, they can indirectly alter the planetary albedo by modifying the properties of clouds. Objectives Investigations have been devoted to two main areas: (1) Aerosol climatology situation in the Negev desert, investigations of physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols, and study of the local and long-range transport trajectory of polluted air masses over the Negev desert; and (2) An estimation of the optical properties throughout the atmospheric column by surface measurements via performance of spectral and statistical analysis of the data received from two measurement systems. Results and conclusions Analyzed data from the Sede Boker site, in the Negev Desert of Israel, shows an increase in aerosol optical depth during the summer seasons and a decrease during winter. One of the possible reasons for this characteristic is an increase of the precipitable water (reaches 3.0-3.5 cm) due to a constant wind stream from the Mediterranean Sea in same time. The highest probability distribution of the aerosol optical depth is in the range of 0.15-0.20; and of the Angstrom parameter is in range of 0.83 - 1.07. During dust storm events, the scattering coefficient range at 670 nm and 440 nm wavelengths were inverted. It was discovered that the dust particles in this case had non-spherical character. Comparison between optical depth, measured through all atmospheric column, and scattering coefficient from surface measurements provides correlation coefficient (r) equal to 0.64. The Angstrom parameter, calculated via optical depth and via scattering coefficient, provides a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Thus we can obtain an estimate of the influence of the surface aerosol situation on column optical properties. The combined analysis of dust cloud altitude and optical depth as a function of the time indicates long-term transport and

  9. Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties over the ARM SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Strawa, A.; Provencal, B.; Covert, D.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rissman, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. To this end, the ARM program will conduct an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma. The IOP involves airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We will give an overview of early airborne results obtained aboard Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The aircraft will carry instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size including such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods. Aerosol optical depth and extinction will be measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore up- and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation will be measured using three different instruments. The up-looking radiation instruments will be mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, which will keep the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of 10 degrees. Additional effort will be directed toward measurement of cloud condensation nucleus concentration as a function of supersaturation and relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. This relation is central to description of the aerosol indirect effect.

  10. Aerosol retrievals from AVHRR radiances: effects of particle nonsphericity and absorption and an updated long-term global climatology of aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Geogdzhaev, I.; Liu, L.; Orgen, A.; Lacis, A.; Rossow, W.; Hovenier, J.; Volten, H.; Muñoz, O.

    2003-09-01

    The paper describes and discusses long-term global retrievals of aerosol properties from channel-1 and -2 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) radiances. We reconfirm the previously reached conclusion that the nonsphericity of dust-like and dry sea salt aerosols can lead to very large errors in the retrieved optical thickness if one mistakenly applies the scattering model for spherical particles. Comparisons of single-scattering albedo and Ångström exponent values retrieved from the AVHRR data and those measured in situ at Sable Island indicate that the currently adopted value 0.003 can be a reasonable choice for the imaginary part of the aerosol refractive index in the global satellite retrievals. Several unexpected features in the long-term satellite record indicate a serious problem with post-launch calibration of channel-2 radiances from the NOAA-11 spacecraft. We solve this problem by using a simple re-calibration procedure removing the observed artifacts and derive a global climatology of aerosol optical thickness and size over the oceans for the period extending from July 1983 to December 1999. The global monthly mean optical thickness and Ångström exponent of tropospheric aerosols show no significant trends over the entire period and oscillate around the average values 0.145 and 0.75, respectively. The Northern hemisphere means optical thickness systematically exceeds that averaged over the Southern hemisphere. The AVHRR retrieval results during the period affected by the Mt. Pinatubo eruption are consistent with the retrievals of the stratospheric aerosol optical thickness based on Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) data. Time series of the aerosol optical thickness and Ângström exponent derived for four separate geographic regions exhibit varying degrees of seasonal variability controlled by local meteorological events and/or anthropogenic activities.

  11. Formation of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and its influence on biogenic SOA properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, E. U.; Hallquist, M.; Kristensen, K.; Glasius, M.; Bohn, B.; Fuchs, H.; Kammer, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Nehr, S.; Rubach, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wu, H.-C.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic precursors has been studied exposing reaction mixtures to natural sunlight in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany. Several experiments with exclusively anthropogenic precursors were performed to establish a relationship between yield and organic aerosol mass loading for the atmospheric relevant range of aerosol loads of 0.01 to 10 μg m-3. The yields (0.5-9%) were comparable to previous data and further used for the detailed evaluation of the mixed biogenic and anthropogenic experiments. For the mixed experiments a number of different oxidation schemes were addressed. The reactivity, the sequence of addition, and the amount of the precursors influenced the SOA properties. Monoterpene oxidation products, including carboxylic acids and dimer esters were identified in the aged aerosol at levels comparable to ambient air. OH radicals were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence, which allowed for establishing relations of aerosol properties and composition to the experimental OH dose. Furthermore, the OH measurements in combination with the derived yields for anthropogenic SOA enabled application of a simplified model to calculate the chemical turnover of the anthropogenic precursor and corresponding anthropogenic contribution to the mixed aerosol. The estimated anthropogenic contributions were ranging from small (≈8%) up to significant fraction (>50%) providing a suitable range to study the effect of aerosol composition on the aerosol volatility (volume fraction remaining at 343 K: 0.86-0.94). The anthropogenic aerosol had higher oxygen to carbon ratio O/C and was less volatile than the biogenic fraction. However, in order to produce significant amount of anthropogenic SOA the reaction mixtures needed a higher OH dose that also increased O/C and provided a less volatile aerosol. A strong positive correlation was found between changes in volatility and O/C with the exception during dark

  12. Midinfrared optical properties of petroleum oil aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, K. P.; Bruce, C. W.

    1994-08-01

    The mass normalized absorption and extinction coefficients were measured for fog oil aerosol at 3.4 micrometers with a combined photoacoustic and transmissometer system. An extinction spectral profile was determined over a range of infrared (IR) wavelengths from 2.7 to 4.0 micrometers by an IR scanning transmissometer. The extinction spectrum was mass normalized by referencing it to the photoacoustic portion of the experiment. A corresponding Mie calculation was conducted and compared with the above measurements. Agreement is good for the most recent optical coefficients. An extrapolation of this data to other similar petroleum products such as kerosene or diesel fuel that exhibit similar bulk absorption characteristics were briefly examined.

  13. Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties at Four North American Surface Monitoring Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delene, David J.; Ogren, John A.

    2002-03-01

    Aerosol optical properties measured over several years at surface monitoring stations located at Bondville, Illinois (BND); Lamont, Oklahoma (SGP); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (WSA); and Barrow, Alaska (BRW), have been analyzed to determine the importance of the variability in aerosol optical properties to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The amount of aerosol present is of primary importance and the aerosol optical properties are of secondary importance to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The mean aerosol light absorption coefficient (ap) is 10 times larger and the mean aerosol scattering coefficient (sp) is 5 times larger at the anthropogenically influenced site at BND than at BRW. The aerosol optical properties of single scattering albedo (o) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) have variability of approximately ±3% and ±8%, respectively, in mean values among the four stations. To assess the importance of the variability in o and b on top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing calculations, the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (F/) is calculated. The F/ is defined as the aerosol forcing (F) per unit optical depth () and does not depend explicitly on the amount of aerosol present. Based on measurements at four North American stations, radiative transfer calculations that assume fixed aerosol properties can have errors of 1%-6% in the annual average forcing at the top of the atmosphere due to variations in average single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction among the sites studied. The errors increase when shorter-term variations in aerosol properties are considered; for monthly and hourly timescales, errors are expected to be greater than 8% and 15%, respectively, approximately one-third of the time. Systematic relationships exist between various aerosol optical properties [ap, o, b, F/, and Ångström exponent (å)] and the amount of aerosol present (measured by sp) that are qualitatively similar but quantitatively

  14. Sensitivity metric approach for retrieval of aerosol properties from multiangular and multispectral polarized radiances.

    PubMed

    Miecznik, Grzegorz; Illing, Rainer; Petroy, Shelley; Sokolik, Irina N

    2005-07-10

    Linearly polarized radiation is sensitive to the microphysical properties of aerosols, namely, to the particle-size distribution and refractive index. The discriminating power of polarized radiation increases strongly with the increasing range of scattering angles and the addition of multiple wavelengths. The polarization and directionality of the Earth's reflectances (POLDER) missions demonstrate that some aerosol properties can be successfully derived from spaceborne polarimetric, multiangular measurements at two visible wavelengths. We extend the concept to analyze the retrieval capabilities of a spaceborne instrument with six polarimetric channels at 412, 445, 555, 865, 1250, and 2250 nm, measuring approximately 100 scattering angles covering a range between 50 and 150 deg. Our focus is development of an analysis methodology that can help quantify the benefits of such multiangular and multispectral polarimetric measurements. To that goal we employ a sensitivity metric approach in a framework of the principal-component analysis. The radiances and noise used to construct the sensitivity metric are calculated with the realistic solar flux for representative orbital viewing geometries, accounting for surface reflection from the ground, and statistical and calibration errors of a notional instrument. Spherical aerosol particles covering a range of representative microphysical properties (effective radius, effective variance, real and imaginary parts of the refractive index, single-scattering albedo) are considered in the calculations. We find that there is a limiting threshold for the effective size (approximately 0.7 microm), below which the weak scattering intensity results in a decreased signal-to-noise ratio and minimal polarization sensitivity, precluding reliable aerosol retrievals. For such small particles, close to the Rayleigh scattering limit, the total intensity provides a much stronger aerosol signature than the linear polarization, inspiring retrieval

  15. GRASP Algorithm: retrieval of the aerosol properties over land surface from satellite observations (solicited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Aspetsberger, Michael; Planer, Wolfgang; Federspiel, Christian; Fuertes, David

    The GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm has been developed for enhanced characterization of the properties of both aerosol and land surface from diverse remote sensing observations. The concept of the algorithm is described in details by Dubovik et al. (2011). The algorithm is based on highly advanced statistically optimized fitting implemented as Multi-Term Least Square minimization (Dubovik, 2004) and deduces nearly 50 unknowns for each observed site. The algorithm derives a set of aerosol parameters similar to that derived by AERONET including detailed particle size distribution, the spectral dependence on the complex index of refraction and the fraction of non-spherical particles. The algorithm uses detailed aerosol and surface models and fully accounts for all multiple interactions of scattered solar light with aerosol, gases and the underlying surface. All calculations are done on-line without using traditional look-up tables. In addition, the algorithm can use the new multi-pixel concept - a simultaneous fitting of a large group of pixels with additional constraints limiting the time variability of surface properties and spatial variability of aerosol properties. This principle provides a possibility to improve retrieval for multiple observations even if the observations are not exactly co-incident or co-located. Significant efforts have been spent for optimization and speedup of the GRASP computer routine and retrievals from satellite observations. For example, the routine has been adapted for running at GPGPUs accelerators. Originally GRASP has been developed for POLDER/PARASOL multi-viewing imager and later adapted to a number of other satellite sensors such as MERIS at polar-orbiting platform and COCI/GOMS geostationary observations. The results of numerical tests and results of applications to real data will be presented. REFERENCES: Dubovik, et al.,“Statistically optimized inversion algorithm for enhanced

  16. Influence of Surface Seawater and Atmospheric Conditions on the Ccn Activity of Ocean-Derived Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Hakala, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean-derived aerosols are produced from direct injection into the atmosphere (primary production) and gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere (secondary production). These different production mechanisms result in a broad range of particle sizes that has implications for the impact of ocean-derived aerosol on climate. The chemical composition of ocean-derived aerosols is a result of a complex mixture of inorganic sea salt and organic matter including polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, microorganisms and their fragments, and secondary oxidation products. Both production mechanisms and biological processes in the surface ocean impact the ability of ocean-derived aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In addition, CCN activity can be impacted by atmospheric processing that modifies particle size and composition after the aerosol is emitted from the ocean. To understand relationships between production mechanism, surface ocean biology, and atmospheric processing, measurements were made of surface ocean chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter; nascent sea spray aerosol freshly emitted from the ocean surface; and ambient marine aerosol. These measurements were made along the coast of California and in the North Atlantic between the northeast US and Bermuda. These regions include both eutrophic and oligotraphic waters and, thus, provide for observations over a wide range of ocean conditions.

  17. Influence of Delhi Pollution on Aerosol Properties Over Greater Noida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.; Kumar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of Delhi Pollution on Aerosol Properties over Greater NoidaManish Sharma1, Ramesh P. Singh2 and Rajesh Kumar3 1Research and Technology Development Centre, Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. 2School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange 92866, USA 3School of Basic Sciences and Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. Delhi capital of India is highly polluted during winter and summer seasons. Due to dominant westerly winds the air mass influence its neighboring city Greater Noida which is located 60 km south east of Delhi. Detailed analysis of multi satellite data and ground observations have been carried out during 2001-2015. The ground observation and satellite data show dynamic aerosol optical parameters over Greater Noida. During winter and summer seasons, dominant westerly wind outflow pollutants of Delhi that mix with the local anthropogenic emissions of Greater Noida influencing aerosol properties at different pressure levels. The characteristics of trace gases and aerosol parameters over Delhi and Greater Noida will be presented. The air quality is severely affected from the outflow of pollutants from Delhi which is threat to people living in the area. Due to dominant winds the air mass further transported towards eastern parts of Indo-Gangetic plains affecting weather conditions of the major cities.

  18. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  19. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas F.; Goger, Brigitta; Poulain, Laurent; Schlag, Patrick; Miettinen, Pasi; Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele; Klein Baltink, Henk; Bas Henzing, J. S.; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS; for hygroscopic growth) were deployed on a Zeppelin NT airship within the PEGASOS project. This allowed one to investigate the development of the different layers within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), providing a unique in situ data set for airborne aerosol particles properties in the first kilometre of the atmosphere. Profiles measured during the morning hours on 20 June 2012 in the Po Valley, Italy, showed an increased nitrate fraction at ˜ 100 m above ground level (a.g.l.) coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth compared to ˜ 700 m a. g. l. This result was derived from both measurements of the aerosol composition and direct measurements of the hygroscopicity, yielding hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 0.34 ± 0.12 and 0.19 ± 0.07 for 500 nm particles, at ˜ 100 and ˜ 700 m a. g. l., respectively. The difference is attributed to the structure of the PBL at this time of day which featured several independent sub-layers with different types of aerosols. Later in the day the vertical structures disappeared due to the mixing of the layers and similar aerosol particle properties were found at all probed altitudes (mean κ ≈ 0.18 ± 0.07). The aerosol properties observed at the lowest flight level (100 m a. g. l.) were consistent with parallel measurements at a ground site, both in the morning and afternoon. Overall, the aerosol particles were found to be externally mixed, with a prevailing hygroscopic fraction. The flights near Cabauw in the Netherlands in the fully mixed PBL did not feature altitude-dependent characteristics. Particles were also externally mixed and had an even larger hygroscopic fraction compared to the results in Italy. The mean κ from

  20. Aerosol optical properties variations over the southern and northern slopes of the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Ma, Yaoming; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun; Zhu, Zhikun

    2013-04-01

    The Himalayas is the highest mountain on the earth. It blocks off the aerosols obviously, especially during the monsoon seasons. The aerosol optical properties derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) dataset over the southern (Pokhara station in Nepal and EVK2-CNR station in Nepal) and northern (Qomolangma(Mt. Everest) station (QOMS_CAS) in Tibet, China) slopes of the Himalayas are analyzed in this study. The low aerosol optical depth (AOD) at QOMS_CAS and EVK2-CNR indicates they are background sites in Himalaya regions. AOD at Pokhara is much higher than the former two sites with a seasonal variation pattern. This is maybe because Pokhara is more influenced by human activities and India summer monsoon. There are both fine and coarse particle mode aerosol in all three sites. Diurnal variation of AOD and Ångström exponent (AE) has a wide range at all three stations. QOMS_CAS mostly influenced by distant sources reveals AOD has no diurnal cycle in all seasons. Simultaneously, there are smaller particles in the morning and late afternoon, however, particles are larger at noon. The diurnal variation at Pokhara shows a higher AOD value in the morning and late afternoon, and reaches its minimum at noon except JJA (June to August). In all seasons, AOD at EVK2-CNR increases continuously during a day, and reaches maximum at late afternoon due to evolution of mountain-valley flows. AE indicating the particle size has no fixed mode at Pokhara and EVK2-CNR. The aerosols in the northern slope are mostly from distinct regions, and transport from the upper troposphere to atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) probably. The changes of ABL make no apparent effect on aerosol daytime variation. Conversely, the aerosols in the southern slope are mostly from local regions, and maybe spread upwards from the ground gradually. Atmospheric mixing layer height changes with the evolution of the ABL, which diffuses aerosols in the troposphere. Therefore, this process leads aerosol daytime

  1. Vertical Profiles of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Condensation Nuclei, Optical Aerosol, Aerosol Optical Properties, and Aerosol Volatility Measured from Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.; Snider, J. R.; Vali, G.

    1998-01-01

    Under the support of this grant a balloon-borne gondola containing a variety of aerosol instruments was developed and flown from Laramie, Wyoming, (41 deg N, 105 deg W) and from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E). The gondola includes instruments to measure the concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), optically detectable aerosol (OA.) (r greater than or equal to 0.15 - 2.0 microns), and optical scattering properties using a nephelometer (lambda = 530 microns). All instruments sampled from a common inlet which was heated to 40 C on ascent and to 160 C on descent. Flights with the CN counter, OA counter, and nephelometer began in July 1994. The CCN counter was added in November 1994, and the engineering problems were solved by June 1995. Since then the flights have included all four instruments, and were completed in January 1998. Altogether there were 20 flights from Laramie, approximately 5 per year, and 2 from Lauder. Of these there were one or more engineering problems on 6 of the flights from Laramie, hence the data are somewhat limited on those 6 flights, while a complete data set was obtained from the other 14 flights. Good CCN data are available from 12 of the Laramie flights. The two flights from Lauder in January 1998 were successful for all measurements. The results from these flights, and the development of the balloon-bome CCN counter have formed the basis for five conference presentations. The heated and unheated CN and OA measurements have been used to estimate the mass fraction of the aerosol volatile, while comparisons of the nephelometer measurements were used to estimate the light scattering, associated with the volatile aerosol. These estimates were calculated for 0.5 km averages of the ascent and descent data between 2.5 km and the tropopause, near 11.5 km.

  2. Aerosol Particle Property Comparisons Between MISR and AERONET Retrieved Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOT) data from the Multi-angle ImagingSpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite have already been systematically compared with ground-based data from the AERONET network. As a result of that study, MISR data are now being reprocessed with improved aerosol algorithms and aerosol models. The follow-on study reported here systematically compares MISR and AERONET particle micro-physical properties. This project is currently underway. Our goal is to use the statistical power of numerous AERONET measurements to map the behavior of the MISR property retrievals, identify strength and surprises in the MISR data, and use this information both to refine further the MISR retrieval algorithms and to assess the likely error envelopes in the MISR products. Multi-year data from 36 carefully chosen sites having good long-term measurement records are stratified by broad classes of aerosol air mass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, pollution, and continental aerosols. Available AERONET spectral AOT measurements for two-hour windows around MISR overpass times are interpolated to MISR wavelengths and averaged, and AOT variability over the two-hour window is noted. Sky-scan AERONET data, taken only once an hour, are also were interpolated to MISR wavelengths, and are averaged over a four-hour window provided the variability is smaller than MISR sensitivity to particle properties based on previous work. MISR retrievals over the 17.6 km standard retrieval regions that include the AERONET sites are preferentially used for the comparison. The MISR measurements are averages of over all "successful" aerosol type models in the MISR algorithm climatology, where success is measured by the degree to which multi-angle, multi-spectral top-of-atmosphere radiances match modeled radiances, using several chi-squared tests. Angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, and size distribution mean values and variance

  3. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A.; Ahern, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkila, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J.; Petdjd, T. T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between degree of oxidation and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), the CCN activity (κCCN) and the degree of aerosol oxidation (represented by the atomic O:C ratio) were measured for α-pinene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), m-xylene and α pinene/m-xylene mixture SOA generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. Our results show that both HGF and κCCN increase with O:C. The TMB and m-xylene SOA were, respectively, the least and most hygroscopic of the system studied. An average HGF of 1.25 and a κCCN of 0.2 were measured at O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The HGF based κ(κHGF) under predicted the κCCN values of 20 to 50% for all but the TMB SOA. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we define the extent to which the hygroscopic properties of SOA particles can be predicted from their oxidation level and provide parameterizations suitable for interpreting ambient data.

  4. Aircraft observations of the physical and radiative properties of biomass aerosol particles during SAFARI-2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, S. R.; Haywood, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    An initial analysis will be shown from the ~80 h of data collected between 2--18 September 2000 by the UK Met Office C-130 aircraft during the dry season campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000). The talk will concentrate on the physical and optical properties of the biomass aerosol. The evolution of the particle size spectrum and its optical properties at emission and after ageing will be shown. The vertical distribution of the biomass plume over the land and sea will be compared in view of the local meteorology. A generalised three log-normal model is shown to represent aged biomass aerosol over the sea areas, both in terms of the number and mass particle size spectra, but also derived optical properties (e.g. asymmetry factor, single scatter albedo (ω 0) and extinction coefficient) as calculated using Mie theory and appropriate refractive indices. ω 0 was determined independently using a particle soot absorption photometer (giving the absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 0.567 μ m) and a nephelometer (giving the scattering coefficients at 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65 μ m). Good agreement was found between the measurements and those obtained from the Mie calculations and observed size distributions. A typical value of ω 0 at 0.55 μ m for aged biomass aerosol was 0.90. The radiative properties of the biomass aerosol over both land and sea will be summarised. Stratocumulus cloud was present on some of the days over the sea and the surprising lack of interaction between the elevated biomass plume (containing significant levels of cloud condensation nuclei) and the cloud capping the marine boundary layer will be illustrated. Using the cloud-free and cloudy case studies we can begin to elucidate the levels of direct and indirect forcing of the biomass aerosol on a regional scale. >http://www.mrfnet.demon.co.uk/africa/SAFARI2000.htm

  5. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Bardeen, Charles G; Mills, Michael J; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M; Neely, Ryan R

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  6. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  7. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size‐resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1‐CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial‐temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground‐based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data. PMID:27668039

  8. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation, determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs, representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties, depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveals that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  9. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveal that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  10. The analysis of in situ and retrieved aerosol properties measured during three airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Chelsea A.

    Aerosols can directly influence climate, visibility, and photochemistry by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. Aerosol chemical and physical properties determine how efficiently a particle scatters and/or absorbs incoming short-wave solar radiation. Because many types of aerosol can act as nuclei for cloud droplets (CCN) and a smaller population of airborne particles facilitate ice crystal formation (IN), aerosols can also alter cloud-radiation interactions which have subsequent impacts on climate. Thus aerosol properties determine the magnitude and sign of both the direct and indirect impacts of aerosols on radiation-dependent Earth System processes. This dissertation will fill some gaps in our understanding of the role of aerosol properties on aerosol absorption and cloud formation. Specifically, the impact of aerosol oxidation on aerosol spectral (350nm < lambda< 500nm) absorption was examined for two biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-S aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Spring and Summer 2008. Spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved using actinic flux measured aboard the NASA DC-8 was used to calculate the aerosol absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE) for a 6-day-old plume on April 17 th and a 3-hour old plume on June 29th. Higher AAE values for the April 17th plume (6.78+/-0.38) indicate absorption by aerosol was enhanced in the ultraviolet relative to the visible portion of the short-wave spectrum in the older plume compared to the fresher plume (AAE= 3.34 0.11). These differences were largely attributed to the greater oxidation of the organic aerosol in the April 17th plume which can arise either from the aging of primary organic aerosol or the formation of spectrally-absorbing secondary organic aerosol. The validity of the actinic flux retrievals used above were also evaluated in this work by the comparison of SSA retrieved using

  11. Studies of seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties with use of remote techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2014-05-01

    According to the IPCC report, atmospheric aerosols due to their properties -extinction of Sun and Earth radiation and participation in processes of creation of clouds, are among basic "unknowns" in climate studies. Aerosols have large effect on the radiation balance of the Earth which has a significant impact on climate changes. They are also a key issue in the case of remote sensing measurements. The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols depend not only on their type but also on physical parameters such as pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction. The wide range of properties in which atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's climate is the reason of high unrelenting interest of scientists from different disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology. Numerous studies have dealt with aerosol optical properties, e.g. Dubovik et al. (2002), but only in a few have regarded the influence of meteorological parameters on the optical properties of aerosols in the Baltic Sea area. Studies of aerosol properties over the Baltic were conducted already in the last forty years, e.g. Zielinski T. et. al. (1999) or Zielinski T. & A. Zielinski (2002). The experiments carried out at that time involved only one measuring instrument -e.g. LIDAR (range of 1 km) measurements and they were conducted only in selected areas of the Polish coastal zone. Moreover in those publications authors did not use measurements performed on board of research vessel (R/V Oceania), which belongs to Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Science (IO PAN) or data received from satellite measurements. In 2011 Zdun and Rozwadowska performed an analysis of all data derived from the AERONET station on the Gotland Island. The data were divided into seasons and supplemented by meteorological factors. However, so far no comprehensive study has been carried out for the entire Baltic Sea area. This was the reason to conduct further research of SEasonal Variations of Aerosol optical depth over the Baltic

  12. Intercomparison between aerosol optical properties by a PREDE skyradiometer and CIMEL sunphotometer over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H.; Shi, G.; Uchiyama, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, X.

    2007-11-01

    This study compares the aerosol optical and physical properties simultaneously measured by a SKYNET PREDE skyradiometer and AERONET/PHOTONS CIMEL sunphotometer at a location in Beijing, China. Aerosol optical properties (AOP) including the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (α), volume size distribution, single scattering albedo (ω) and the complex refractive index were compared. The difference between the two types of instruments was less than 1.3% for the AOD and less than 4% for the single scattering albedo below the wavelength of 670 nm. There is a difference between the volume size distribution patterns derived from two instruments, which is probablely due to difference of measurement protocols and inversion algorithms for the respective instruments. AOP under three distinct weather conditions (background, haze, and dust days) over Beijing were compared by using the retrieved skyradiometer and sunphotometer data combined with MODIS satellite results, pyranometer measurements, PM10 measurements, and backtrajectory analysis. The results show that the significant difference of AOP under background, haze, and dust days over Beijing is probablely due to different aerosol components under distinct weather conditions.

  13. Intercomparison between aerosol optical properties by a PREDE skyradiometer and CIMEL sunphotometer over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H.; Shi, G.; Uchiyama, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, X.

    2008-06-01

    This study compares the aerosol optical and physical properties simultaneously measured by a SKYNET PREDE skyradiometer and AERONET/PHOTONS CIMEL sunphotometer at a location in Beijing, China. Aerosol optical properties (AOP) including the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (α), volume size distribution, single scattering albedo (ω) and the complex refractive index were compared. The difference between the two types of instruments was less than 1.3% for the AOD and less than 4% for the single scattering albedo below the wavelength of 670 nm. There is a difference between the volume size distribution patterns derived from two instruments, which is probably due to difference of measurement protocols and inversion algorithms for the respective instruments. AOP under three distinct weather conditions (background, haze, and dust days) over Beijing were compared by using the retrieved skyradiometer and sunphotometer data combined with MODIS satellite results, pyranometer measurements, PM10 measurements, and backtrajectory analysis. The results show that the significant difference of AOP under background, haze, and dust days over Beijing is probably due to different aerosol components under distinct weather conditions.

  14. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  15. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  16. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  17. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  18. A Characterization of Arctic Aerosols as Derived from Airborne Observations and their Influence on the Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, A.; Stone, R.; Liu, P. S.; Li, S.; Sharma, S.; Neuber, R.; Birnbaumn, G.; Vitale, V.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic climate is influenced by aerosols that affect the radiation balance at the surface and within the atmosphere. Impacts depend on the composition and concentration of aerosols that determine opacity, which is quantified by the measure of aerosol optical depth (AOD). During winter and spring, aerosols are transported into the Arctic from lower latitude industrial regions. Trans-Arctic flight missions PAMARCMiP (Polar Airborne Measurements and Arctic Regional Climate Model Simulation Project) of the German POLAR 5 during spring 2009 and spring 2011 provided opportunities to collect a comprehensive data set from which properties of the aerosol were derived, including AOD. Measurements were made from near the surface to over 4 km in altitude during flights between Svalbard, Norway and Pt. Barrow, Alaska. These, along with measurements of particle size and concentration, and black carbon content (BC) provide a three-dimensional characterization of the aerosols encountered along track. The horizontal and vertical distribution of Arctic haze, in particular, was evaluated. During April 2009, the Arctic atmosphere was variably turbid with total column AOD (at 500 nm) ranging from ~ 0.12 to > 0.35, where clean background values are typically < 0.06 (Stone et al., 2010). The haze was concentrated within and just above the surface-based temperature inversion layer. Few, distinct elevated aerosol layers were observed, also with an aerosol airborne Lidar. The presence of these haze layers in the Arctic atmosphere during spring reduced the diurnally averaged net shortwave irradiance, which can cause cooling of the surface, depending on its Albedo (reflectivity). An overview of both campaigns will be given with results presented in the context of historical observations and current thinking about the impact aerosols have on the Arctic climate. Stone, R.S., A. Herber, V. Vitale, M. Mazzola, A. Lupi, R. Schnell, E.G. Dutton, P. Liu, S.M. Li, K. Dethloff, A. Lampert, C. Ritter

  19. Measurements of ocean derived aerosol off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Hakala, J.; PetäJä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Covert, D. S.; Cappa, C. D.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K. L.; Nuaaman, I.; McLaren, R.; Massoli, P.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.; Keene, W. C.

    2012-06-01

    Reliable characterization of particles freshly emitted from the ocean surface requires a sampling method that is able to isolate those particles and prevent them from interacting with ambient gases and particles. Here we report measurements of particles directly emitted from the ocean using a newly developed in situ particle generator (Sea Sweep). The Sea Sweep was deployed alongside R/V Atlantis off the coast of California during May of 2010. Bubbles were generated 0.75 m below the ocean surface with stainless steel frits and swept into a hood/vacuum hose to feed a suite of aerosol instrumentation on board the ship. The number size distribution of the directly emitted, nascent particles had a dominant mode at 55-60 nm (dry diameter) and secondary modes at 30-40 nm and 200-300 nm. The nascent aerosol was not volatile at 230°C and was not enriched in SO4=, Ca++, K+, or Mg++above that found in surface seawater. The organic component of the nascent aerosol (7% of the dry submicrometer mass) volatilized at a temperature between 230 and 600°C. The submicrometer organic aerosol characterized by mass spectrometry was dominated by non-oxygenated hydrocarbons. The nascent aerosol at 50, 100, and 145 nm dry diameter behaved hygroscopically like an internal mixture of sea salt with a small organic component. The CCN/CN activation ratio for 60 nm Sea Sweep particles was near 1 for all supersaturations of 0.3 and higher indicating that all of the particles took up water and grew to cloud drop size. The nascent organic aerosol mass fraction did not increase in regions of higher surface seawater chlorophyll but did show a positive correlation with seawater dimethylsulfide (DMS).

  20. Measurements of ocean derived aerosol off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Hakala, J.; PetäJä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Covert, D. S.; Cappa, C. D.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K. L.; Nuaaman, I.; McLaren, R.; Massoli, P.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.; Keene, W. C.

    2011-11-01

    Reliable characterization of particles freshly emitted from the ocean surface requires a sampling method that is able to isolate those particles and prevent them from interacting with ambient gases and particles. Here we report measurements of particles directly emitted from the ocean using a newly developed in situ particle generator (Sea Sweep). The Sea Sweep was deployed alongside R/V Atlantis off the coast of California during May of 2010. Bubbles were generated 0.75 m below the ocean surface with stainless steel frits and swept into a hood/vacuum hose to feed a suite of aerosol instrumentation on board the ship. The number size distribution of the directly emitted, nascent particles had a dominant mode at 55-60 nm (dry diameter) and secondary modes at 30-40 nm and 200-300 nm. The nascent aerosol was not volatile at 230°C and was not enriched in SO4=, Ca++, K+, or Mg++above that found in surface seawater. The organic component of the nascent aerosol (7% of the dry submicrometer mass) volatilized at a temperature between 230 and 600°C. The submicrometer organic aerosol characterized by mass spectrometry was dominated by non-oxygenated hydrocarbons. The nascent aerosol at 50, 100, and 145 nm dry diameter behaved hygroscopically like an internal mixture of sea salt with a small organic component. The CCN/CN activation ratio for 60 nm Sea Sweep particles was near 1 for all supersaturations of 0.3 and higher indicating that all of the particles took up water and grew to cloud drop size. The nascent organic aerosol mass fraction did not increase in regions of higher surface seawater chlorophyll but did show a positive correlation with seawater dimethylsulfide (DMS).

  1. Studing Taklamakan aerosol properties with Lidar (STAPL)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependent on the ...

  2. Optical properties of aerosols in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorov, Yu. V.; Keller, H. U.; Rodin, A. V.

    2008-04-01

    In the frame of fractal modeling of tholin aggregates we made a systematic analysis of their optical properties. Ballistic particle-cluster aggregation (BPCA) and diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of spherical primary particles (monomers) identical in material composition were considered. Aggregates composed of identical particles (monodisperse cluster), as well as of size-distributed particles (polydisperse cluster), were simulated. To calculate the light-scattering models, the code based on the superposition T-matrix method is used. Orientationally averaged properties of light scattering by model particles were extracted, and the normalized phase function and the degree of linear polarization were calculated as functions of scattering angle. We concluded that: (a) aggregation mechanism as well as specific internal structure of the clusters play only a minor role, and for the future it is not necessary to investigate aggregates of different types; (b) the intensity is very sensitive both to the size parameter of forming particles x and to the size parameter of the aggregates X; (c) characterization of the aggregates by the number of monomers is insufficient to retrieve physical properties of aggregates from optical measurement; and (d) it is very desirable to include into the analysis polarization data calculated for the different clusters.

  3. Evaluation of Aerosol Properties in GCMs using Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Jiang, J. H.; Su, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from natural or anthropogenic sources have profound impacts on the regional and global climate. Currently the radiative forcing of aerosols predicted by global climate models remains highly uncertain, representing the largest uncertainty in climate predictions. The uncertainty mainly arises from the complicated aerosol chemical and physical properties, coarse emission inventories for pre-cursor gases as well as unrealistic representations of aerosol activation and cloud processing in global climate models. In this study, we will utilize multiple satellite measurements including MODIS, MISR and CALIPSO to quantitatively evaluate aerosol simulations from climate models. Our analyses show that the global means in AOD climatology from NCAR CAM5 and GFDL AM3 simulations are comparable with satellite measurements. However, the overall correlation coefficient between the AOD spatial patterns from CAM5 and satellite is only 0.4. Moreover, at finer scales, the magnitude of AOD in CAM5 is much lower than satellite measurements for most of the non-dust regions, especially over East Asia. GFDL AM3 shows better AOD simulations over East Asia. The underestimated AOD over remote maritime areas in CAM5 was attributed to the unrealistic wet removal processes in convective clouds of CAM5. Over continents, biases on AOD could stem from underestimations in the emissions inventory and unresolved sub-grid variations of relative humidity due to the model's coarse resolution. Uncertainty from emission inventory over developing countries in East Asia will be assessed using the newly updated Regional Emission inventory in Asia (REAS) and Multi-resolution Emission Inventory in China (MEIC) in the model simulations.

  4. Optical and radiative properties of aerosols over Desalpar, a remote site in western India: Source identification, modification processes and aerosol type discrimination.

    PubMed

    Patel, Piyushkumar N; Dumka, U C; Kaskaoutis, D G; Babu, K N; Mathur, Alok K

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties are analyzed for the first time over Desalpar (23.74°N, 70.69°E, 30m above mean sea level) a remote site in western India during October 2014 to August 2015. Spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements were performed using the CIMEL CE-318 automatic Sun/sky radiometer. The annual-averaged AOD500 and Ångström exponent (α440-870) values are found to be 0.43±0.26 and 0.69±0.39, respectively. On the seasonal basis, high AOD500 of 0.45±0.30 and 0.61±0.34 along with low α440-870 of 0.41±0.27 and 0.41±0.35 during spring (March-May) and summer (June-August), respectively, suggest the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols, while significant contribution from anthropogenic sources is observed in autumn (AOD500=0.47±0.26, α440-870=1.02±0.27). The volume size distribution and the spectral single-scattering albedo also confirm the presence of coarse-mode aerosols during March-August. An overall dominance of a mixed type of aerosols (~56%) mostly from October to February is found via the AOD500 vs α440-870 relationship, while marine aerosols contribute to ~18%. Spectral dependence of α and its second derivative (α') are also used for studying the aerosol modification processes. The average direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) computed via the SBDART model is estimated to range from -27.08Wm(-2) to -10.74Wm(-2) at the top of the atmosphere, from -52.21Wm(-2) to -21.71Wm(-2) at the surface and from 10.97Wm(-2) to 26.54Wm(-2) within the atmosphere. This atmospheric forcing translates into heating rates of 0.31-0.75Kday(-1). The aerosol properties and DARF are also examined for different trajectory clusters in order to identify the sources and to assess the influence of long-range transported aerosols over Desalpar.

  5. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    of aerosol properties in a marine environment from the boundary layer to the free troposphere. The analysis of these data will help us understand the role of aerosol aging, vertical transport and distribution in a marine environment.

  6. Satellite-based Assessment of Global Warm Cloud Properties Associated with Aerosols, Atmospheric Stability, and Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chin, Mian; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines variability in marine low cloud properties derived from semi-global observations by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, as linked to the aerosol index (AI) and lower-tropospheric stability (LTS). AI is derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (Terra MODIS) sensor and the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transportation (GOCART) model, and is used to represent column-integrated aerosol concentrations. LTS is derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and represents the background thermodynamic environment in which the clouds form. Global statistics reveal that cloud droplet size tends to be smallest in polluted (high-AI) and strong inversion (high-LTS) environments. Statistical quantification shows that cloud droplet size is better correlated with AI than it is with LTS. Simultaneously, the cloud liquid water path (CLWP) tends to decrease as AI increases. This correlation does not support the hypothesis or assumption that constant or increased CLWP is associated with high aerosol concentrations. Global variability in corrected cloud albedo (CCA), the product of cloud optical depth and cloud fraction, is very well explained by LTS, while both AI and LTS are needed to explain local variability in CCA. Most of the local correlations between AI and cloud properties are similar to the results from the global statistics, while weak anomalous aerosol-cloud correlations appear locally in the regions where simultaneous high (low) AI and low (high) LTS compensate each other. Daytime diurnal cycles explain additional variability in cloud properties. CCA has the largest diurnal cycle in high-LTS regions. Cloud droplet size and CLWP have weak diurnal cycles that differ between clean and polluted environments. The combined results suggest that investigations of marine low cloud radiative forcing and its relationship to hypothesized aerosol indirect effects must consider the combined effects of aerosols

  7. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  8. Optical properties of mineral dust aerosol in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Claas H.

    2017-02-01

    The optical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol in the thermal infrared (TIR) are examined by means of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) measurements and radiative transfer (RT) simulations. The measurements were conducted within the scope of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment 2 (SAMUM-2) at Praia (Cape Verde) in January and February 2008. The aerosol radiative effect in the TIR atmospheric window region 800-1200 cm-1 (8-12 µm) is discussed in two case studies. The first case study employs a combination of IASI measurements and RT simulations to investigate a lofted optically thin biomass burning layer with emphasis on its potential influence on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval. The second case study uses ground based measurements to establish the importance of particle shape and refractive index for benchmark RT simulations of dust optical properties in the TIR domain. Our research confirms earlier studies suggesting that spheroidal model particles lead to a significantly improved agreement between RT simulations and measurements compared to spheres. However, room for improvement remains, as the uncertainty originating from the refractive index data for many aerosol constituents prohibits more conclusive results.

  9. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  10. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  11. Hygroscopic, Morphological, and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Cheek, L.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Littleton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust is a significant source of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. In the Texas Panhandle, daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots are routinely observed in conjunction with increased cattle activity in the late afternoons and early evenings. We conducted a field study to characterize size-selected agricultural aerosols with respect to hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties and to attempt to identify any correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle and have used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity. To characterize the size distribution of agricultural aerosols as a function of time, A GRIMM aerosol spectrometer and Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer and Counter (SMPS) measurements were simultaneously performed in an overall size range of 11 nm to 20 µm diameters at a cattle feedlot. Complementary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles was performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the EDS analysis, an ammonia scrubber was used to collect ammonia and ammonium in the gas and particulate phases, respectively. The concentration of these species was quantified offline via UV spectrophotometry at 640 nanometers. The results of this study will provide important particulate emission data from a feedyard, needed to improve our understanding of the role of agricultural particulates in local and regional air quality.

  12. Ice Nucleation Properties of Amospherically Aged Biomass Burning Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polen, M.; Lawlis, E.; Sullivan, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning can sometimes emit surprisingly active ice nucleating particles, though these emissions are not at all consistent between biomass fuel sources and burns. Soot from biomass combustion has been attributed to some but not all of the ice nucleating potential of biomass burning aerosol (BBA), while fossil fuel combustion soot emits very weak ice nucleants. The causes of the sometimes significant but variable ice nucleating ability of BBA are still largely unknown. BBA experiences significant atmospheric aging as the plume evolves and mixes with background air, yet almost no reports exploring the effects of atmospheric aging on the freezing properties of BBA have been made. We have performed some of the first experiments to determine the effects of simulated atmospheric aging on these ice nucleation properties, using a chamber reactor. The fresh and aged BBA was collected for subsequent droplet freezing array analysis using an impinger sampler to collect aerosol in water, and by deposition onto substrates in a MOUDI sampler. Droplets containing the chamber particles were then suspended in oil on a cold plate for freezing temperature spectrum measurement. Aging of Sawgrass flaming-phase combustion BBA by exposure to hydroxyl radicals (from H2O2 photolysis) enhanced the ice nucleation ability, observed by a shift to warmer droplet freezing temperatures by ~2-3°C. The changes in the aerosol's chemical composition during aging were observed using a laser ablation single-particle mass spectrometer and a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer. We will report our observations of the effects of other types of simulated aging (including photochemistry under high and low NOx conditions, dark ozonolysis, and nitric acid exposure) on Sawgrass and BBA from other grass and palm fuels.

  13. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds, refractory brown and black carbon, heavy metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases. Aerosol organic matter normally contains semivolatile material th...

  14. Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect at the Top of the Atmosphere Over Cloud Free Ocean Derived from Four Years of MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    2006-01-01

    A four year record of MODIS spaceborne data provides a new measurement tool to assess the aerosol direct radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere. MODIS derives the aerosol optical thickness and microphysical properties from the scattered sunlight at 0.55-2.1 microns. The monthly MODIS data used here are accumulated measurements across a wide range of view and scattering angles and represent the aerosol s spectrally resolved angular properties. We use these data consistently to compute with estimated accuracy of +/-0.6W/sq m the reflected sunlight by the aerosol over global oceans in cloud free conditions. The MODIS high spatial resolution (0.5 km) allows observation of the aerosol impact between clouds that can be missed by other sensors with larger footprints. We found that over the clear-sky global ocean the aerosol reflected 5.3+/-0.6W/sq m with an average radiative efficiency of 49+/-2W/sq m per unit optical thickness. The seasonal and regional distribution of the aerosol radiative effects are discussed. The analysis adds a new measurement perspective to a climate change problem dominated so far by models.

  15. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  16. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  17. Formation of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and its influence on biogenic SOA properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, E. U.; Hallquist, M.; Kristensen, K.; Glasius, M.; Bohn, B.; Fuchs, H.; Kammer, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Nehr, S.; Rubach, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wu, H.-C.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2013-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic precursors has been studied exposing reaction mixtures to natural sunlight in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany. In this study aromatic compounds served as examples of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) and a mixture of α-pinene and limonene as an example for biogenic VOC. Several experiments with exclusively aromatic precursors were performed to establish a relationship between yield and organic aerosol mass loading for the atmospheric relevant range of aerosol loads of 0.01 to 10 μg m-3. The yields (0.5 to 9%) were comparable to previous data and further used for the detailed evaluation of the mixed biogenic and anthropogenic experiments. For the mixed experiments a number of different oxidation schemes were addressed. The reactivity, the sequence of addition, and the amount of the precursors influenced the SOA properties. Monoterpene oxidation products, including carboxylic acids and dimer esters were identified in the aged aerosol at levels comparable to ambient air. OH radicals were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence, which allowed for establishing relations of aerosol properties and composition to the experimental OH dose. Furthermore, the OH measurements in combination with the derived yields for aromatic SOA enabled application of a simplified model to calculate the chemical turnover of the aromatic precursor and corresponding anthropogenic contribution to the mixed aerosol. The estimated anthropogenic contributions were ranging from small (≈8%) up to significant fraction (>50%) providing a suitable range to study the effect of aerosol composition on the aerosol volatility (volume fraction remaining (VFR) at 343 K: 0.86-0.94). The aromatic aerosol had higher oxygen to carbon ratio O/C and was less volatile than the biogenic fraction. However, in order to produce significant amount of aromatic SOA the reaction mixtures needed a higher OH dose that also

  18. Aerosols optical properties in Titan's Detached Haze Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, Benoit; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; West, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Titan's Detached Haze Layer (DHL) was first observed in 1983 by Rages and Pollack during the Voyager 2 is a consistent spherical haze feature surrounding Titan's upper atmosphere and detached from the main haze. Since 2005, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument on board the Cassini mission performs a continuous survey of the Titan's atmosphere and confirmed its persistence at 500 km up to the equinox (2009) before its drop and disappearance in 2012 (West et al. 2011). Previous analyses showed, that this layer corresponds to the transition area between small spherical aerosols and large fractal aggregates and play a key role in the aerosols formation in Titan's atmosphere (Rannou et al. 2000, Lavvas et al. 2009, Cours et al. 2011).In this talk we will present the UV photometric analyses based on radiative transfer inversion to retrieve aerosols particles properties in the DHL (bulk and monomer radius and local density) performed on ISS observations taken from 2005 to 2007.References:- Rages and Pollach, Icarus 55 (1983)- West, et al., Icarus 38 (2011)- Rannou, et al., Icarus 147 (2000)- Lavvas, et al., Icarus 201 (2009)- Cours, et al., ApJ Lett. 741 (2015)

  19. Profiling aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties in ambient conditions by combining in situ and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Nenes, Athanasios; Marinou, Eleni; Solomos, Stavros; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Nott, Graeme J.; Allan, James; Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Coe, Hugh; Percival, Carl; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    We present the In situ/Remote sensing aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (IRRA) that combines airborne in situ and lidar remote sensing data to retrieve vertical profiles of ambient aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties, employing the ISORROPIA II model for acquiring the particle hygroscopic growth. Here we apply the algorithm on data collected from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during the ACEMED campaign in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vertical profiles of aerosol microphysical properties have been derived successfully for an aged smoke plume near the city of Thessaloniki with aerosol optical depth of ˜ 0.4 at 532 nm, single scattering albedos of ˜ 0.9-0.95 at 550 nm and typical lidar ratios for smoke of ˜ 60-80 sr at 532 nm. IRRA retrieves highly hydrated particles above land, with 55 and 80 % water volume content for ambient relative humidity of 80 and 90 %, respectively. The proposed methodology is highly advantageous for aerosol characterization in humid conditions and can find valuable applications in aerosol-cloud interaction schemes. Moreover, it can be used for the validation of active space-borne sensors, as is demonstrated here for the case of CALIPSO.

  20. Upper-atmosphere Aerosols: Properties and Natural Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is rich in its variety of particulate matter, which ranges from meteorite debris, to sulfate aerosols, to polar stratospheric ice clouds. Volcanic eruptions strongly perturb the stratospheric sulfate (Junge) layer. High-altitude 'noctilucent' ice clouds condense at the summer mesopause. The properties of these particles, including their composition, sizes, and geographical distribution, are discussed, and their global effects, including chemical, radiative, and climatic roles, are reviewed. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of water and nitric acid in the form of micron-sized ice crystals. These particles catalyze reactions of chlorine compounds that 'activate' otherwise inert chlorine reservoirs, leading to severe ozone depletions in the southern polar stratosphere during austral spring. PSCs also modify the composition of the polar stratosphere through complex physiocochemical processes, including dehydration and denitrification, and the conversion of reactive nitrogen oxides into nitric acid. If water vapor and nitric acid concentrations are enhanced by high-altitude aircraft activity, the frequency, geographical range, and duration of PSCs might increase accordingly, thus enhancing the destruction of the ozone layer (which would be naturally limited in geographical extent by the same factors that confine the ozone hole to high latitudes in winter). The stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer reflects solar radiation and increases the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the surface and possibly altering the climate. Major volcanic eruptions, which increase the sulfate aerosol burden by a factor of 100 or more, may cause significant global climate anomalies. Sulfate aerosols might also be capable of activating stratospheric chlorine reservoirs on a global scale (unlike PCSs, which represent a localized polar winter phenomenon), although existing evidence suggests relatively minor perturbations in chlorine chemistry. Nevertheless, if

  1. Optical properties of aerosols at Grand Canyon National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.

    Visibility in the United States is expected to improve over the next few decades because of reduced emissions, especially sulfur dioxide. In the eastern United States, sulfates make up about 60-70% of aerosol extinction, while in the inner mountain west that fraction is only about 30%. In the inner mountain west, carbon aerosols make up about 35% of extinction, while coarse mass contributes between 15 and 25% depending on how absorption is estimated. Although sulfur dioxide emissions are projected to decrease, carbon emissions due to prescribed fire activity will increase by factors of 5-10, and while optical properties of sulfates have been extensively studied, similar properties of carbon and coarse particles are less well understood. The inability to conclusively apportion about 50% of the extinction budget motivated a study to examine aerosol physio-chemical-optical properties at Grand Canyon, Arizona during the months of July and August. Coarse particle mass has usually been assumed to consist primarily of wind-blown dust, with a mass-scattering efficiency between about 0.4 and 0.6 m 2 g -1. Although there were episodes where crustal material made up most of the coarse mass, on the average, organics and crustal material mass were about equal. Furthermore, about one-half of the sampling periods had coarse-mass-scattering efficiencies greater than 0.6 m 2 g -1 and at times coarse-mass-scattering efficiencies were near 1.0 m 2 g -1. It was shown that absorption by coarse- and fine-particle absorption were about equal and that both fine organic and sulfate mass-scattering efficiencies were substantially less than the nominal values of 4.0 and 3.0 m 2 g -1 that have typically been used.

  2. Effect of aging on morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalizov, A. F.; Xue, H.; Pagels, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Zhang, R.

    2009-12-01

    Soot from incomplete combustion represents one of the major forms of particulate matter pollution, profoundly impacting human health, air quality, and climate. The direct and indirect radiative effects of soot aerosol depend on particle composition and morphology, which may vary significantly when aerosol is subjected to atmospheric aging. We will present an overview of a comprehensive set of experimental measurements performed in our laboratory at Texas A&M to study the effect of internal mixing with atmospheric species on morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of combustion soot. In our experiments, size-classified soot aerosol was exposed to 0.1 - 1000 ppb (part per billion) mixing ratios of sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic organic acids and resulting changes particle morphology and mixing state under dry and humid conditions were characterized through mass-mobility measurements by aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM) and tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA). Light absorption and scattering cross-sections for well-characterized fresh and coated soot aerosol were derived using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer in order to assess the effect of atmospheric processing on the radiative properties of atmospheric soot. Internally mixed soot shows significant changes in particle morphology, increasing with the mass fraction of the coating material and relative humidity. Restructuring was the strongest for aggregates coated by sulfuric and glutaric acids whereas succinic acid coating did not result in observable morphology change. Sulfuric acid - coated particles experienced large hygroscopic growth at sub-saturated conditions and activated to cloud droplets at atmospherically relevant supersaturations. Furthermore, coating and subsequent hygroscopic growth considerably altered the optical properties of soot aerosol, increasing light scattering and absorption cross-sections. We found that irreversible restructuring of soot

  3. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  4. Microphysical, chemical and optical aerosol properties in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Ülle; Reinart, Aivo; Pugatshova, Anna; Tamm, Eduard; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2008-11-01

    The microphysical structure, chemical composition and prehistory of aerosol are related to the aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in the UV spectral range. The aim of this work is the statistical mapping of typical aerosol scenarios and adjustment of regional aerosol parameters. The investigation is based on the in situ measurements in Preila (55.55° N, 21.00° E), Lithuania, and the AERONET data from the Gustav Dalen Tower (58 N, 17 E), Sweden. Clustering of multiple characteristics enabled to distinguish three aerosol types for clear-sky periods: 1) clean maritime-continental aerosol; 2) moderately polluted maritime-continental aerosol; 3) polluted continental aerosol. Differences between these types are due to significant differences in aerosol number and volume concentration, effective radius of volume distribution, content of SO 4- ions and Black Carbon, as well as different vertical profiles of atmospheric relative humidity. The UV extinction, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Ångstrom coefficient α increased with the increasing pollution. The value α = 1.96 was observed in the polluted continental aerosol that has passed over central and eastern Europe and southern Russia. Reduction of the clear-sky UV index against the aerosol-free atmosphere was of 4.5%, 27% and 41% for the aerosol types 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

  5. Titan's aerosol optical properties with VIMS observations at the limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannou, Pascal; Seignovert, Benoit; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The study of Titan properties with remote sensing relies on a good knowledge of the atmosphere properties. The in-situ observations made by Huygens combined with recent advances in the definition of methane properties enable to model and interpret observations with a very good accuracy. Thanks to these progresses, we can analyze in this work the observations made at the limb of Titan in order to retrieve information on the haze properties as its vertical profiles but also the spectral behaviour between 0.88 and 5.2 µm. To study the haze layer and more generally the source of opacities in the stratosphere, we use some observation made at the limb of Titan by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We used a model in spherical geometry and in single scattering, and we accounted for the multiple scattering with a parallel plane model that evaluate the multiple scattering source function at the plane of the limb. Our scope is to retrieve informations about the vertical distribution of the haze, its spectral properties, but also to obtain details about the shape of the methane windows to desantangle the role of the methane and of the aerosols. We started our study at the latitude of 55°N, with a image taken in 2006 with a relatively high spatial resolution (for VIMS). Our preliminary results shows the spectral properties of the aerosols are the same whatever the altitude. This is a consequence of the large scale mixing. From limb profile between 0.9 and 5.2 µm, we can probe the haze layer from about 500 km (at 0.9 µm) to the ground (at 5.2 µm). We find that the vertical profile of the haze layer shows three distinct scale heights with transitions around 250 km and 350 km. We also clearly a transition around 70-90 km that may be due to the top of a condensation layer.

  6. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkilä, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. The hygroscopic growth factor at 90% RH (HGF90%), the CCN activity ($\\kappa$ORG,CCN) and the level of oxidation (atomic O:C ratio) of the SOA particles were measured. Both HGF90% and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN increased with O:C; the HGF90% varied linearly with O:C, while $\\kappa$ORG,CCN mostly followed a nonlinear trend. An average HGF90% of 1.25 and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN of 0.19 were measured for O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The $\\kappa$ORG values estimated from the HGF90% ($\\kappa$ORG,HGF) were 20 to 50% lower than paired $\\kappa$ORG,CCN values for all SOA particles except 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), the least hygroscopic of the SOA systems. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we show that differences in hygroscopic behavior among the investigated SOA systems may correspond to differences in elemental composition.

  7. Aerosol Optical Thickness Derived From Atmospheric Transmittance Using Spectroradiometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee San, Hslim; Matjafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, Abdul K.; Chow Jeng, C. J.

    section The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of hand held spectroradiometer measurements for the retrieval AOT values Twenty-six stations were chosen randomly around Penang Island and the atmospheric transmittance measurements were collected using a handheld spectroradiometer The corresponding PM10 concentrations were measured using a portable DustTrak Aerosol Monitor 8520 simultaneously with the measurements of the transmittance data The AOT values were calculated using the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law Linear relationship was found between AOT and PM10 values in this study Finally a PM10 map was created using Kriging interpolation technique The result of the study showed the potential of a spectroradiometer data for the retrieval of AOT and PM10 to provide the air pollution information

  8. Climatology of aerosol optical properties near the New England coast: preparation for the Two Column Aerosol Program (TCAP) field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, C. M.; Chand, D.; Berg, L.; Kassianov, E.; Chapman, E.

    2011-12-01

    A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to provide observations with which to evaluate the uncertainty in model simulations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their relation to estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and hence, to climate. To meet this objective, detailed ground-based aerosol measurements will be made via deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) at Cape Cod, Massachusetts for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012. These measurements will be supported by two scheduled aircraft campaigns using the ARM Aerial Facility's (AAF) G-1 aircraft and the NASA B-200 aircraft in July 2012 and again in February 2013. Each campaign will include sampling within two atmospheric columns using the aircrafts; one column will be located directly over, or very close to, Cape Cod, while the second will be over a relatively remote maritime location. This preliminary study presented here is designed to select the optimum location of the second, remote maritime atmospheric column using the mean and standard deviation of previously observed AODs from surface and space. An area with the large variability in AOD will be considered as a potential location for evaluation of the outputs from atmospheric models. In this study, we present regional climatological values of (1) AOD from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua satellite platforms; (2) single scattering albedo from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) satellite; (3) the vertical distribution of aerosol layers from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite; and (4) the long term aerosol optical properties from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) surface sunphotometer at Martha's Vineyard, MA. Seasonal and geographical variations in these quantities will be analyzed and possible explanations will be presented based on

  9. Validation of Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties over Northeast Asia for Five Years from GOSAT TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, S.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Go, S.; Lim, H.; Goo, T. Y.; Nakajima, T.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution by look-up tables, which is used in retrieving optical properties of aerosol using inversion products from Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer observation. To improve the accuracy of aerosol algorithm, first, this algorithm considered the annually estimated radiometric degradation factor of TANSO-CAI suggested by Kuze et al. (2014). Second, surface reflectance was determined by two methods: one using the clear sky composite method from CAI measurements and the other the database from MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) surface reflectance data. At a given pixel, the surface reflectance is selected by using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) depending on season (Hsu et al., 2013). In this study, the retrieved AODs were compared with those of AERONET and MODIS dataset for different season over five years. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show reasonable agreement with correlation coefficients of 0.65 ~ 0.97 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.2 for the whole period, depending on season and sites. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show agreements with correlation coefficients of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.0, depending on season and regions. The results show reasonably good correlation, however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance of TANSO-CAI due to its 3-days revisit orbit characteristics.

  10. Ground-based remote sensing of aerosol optical properties and their radiative impacts in PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Boru; Deng, XueJiao; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Fei; Zou, Yu; Deng, Tao; Liu, Xiantong

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol direct effects on surface irradiance were explored by using 7 years' ground-based broadband and spectral radiation data at Panyu, the main site of atmospheric composition monitoring in Pearl River Delta (PRD) . Aerosol optical properties were derived from a Sun photometer, and the radiations were calculated by SBDART model. Results demonstrated that in dry seasons(from October to next February), the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm was 0.535, and more than 60% AOD was in a range of 0.2-0.6. Due to the fact that few dust taken place in PRD region, the course mode of weak or strong absorbing aerosol was negligible. However, the proportion of fine mode, weak radiation absorbing particle was about 9.52%, with the Angstrom exponent (α440/470) = 1.30, single scatter co-albedo (ω0) =0.04.Up to 90% of the aerosol was dominated by fine mode, strong absorbing particles, as given by mean α440/470 = 1.35, ω0 =0.14. Because of strong absorption, the variations in aerosol concentration significantly heated the air, and cooled down the surface. The annual mean shortwave direct radiation forcing at the surface (SFC), inside the atmosphere (ATM), and at the top of atmosphere (TOA) was -33.51

  11. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  12. Satellite-derived aerosol radiative forcing from the 2004 British Columbia wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, S.; Leighton, H.

    2008-01-01

    The British Columbia wildfires of 2004 was one of the largest wildfire events in the last ten years in Canada. Both the shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) are investigated using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. Relationships between the radiative forcing fluxes (??F) and wildfire aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.55 ??m (??0.55) are deduced for both noontime instantaneous forcing and diurnally averaged forcing. The noontime averaged instantaneous shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA are 45.8??27.5 W m-2 and -12.6??6.9 W m-2, respectively for a selected study area between 62??N and 68??N in latitude and 125??W and 145??W in longitude over three mainly clear-sky days (23-25 June). The derived diurnally averaged smoke aerosol shortwave radiative forcing is 19.9??12.1 W m-2 for a mean ??0.55 of 1.88??0.71 over the same time period. The derived ??F-?? relationship can be implemented in the radiation scheme used in regional climate models to assess the effect of wildfire aerosols.

  13. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S K; Vinoj, V; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 μg m-3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (>1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (<1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  14. Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F D; Mohr, C; D'Ambro, E L; Lutz, A; Riedel, T P; Gaston, C J; Iyer, S; Zhang, Z; Gold, A; Surratt, J D; Lee, B H; Kurten, T; Hu, W W; Jimenez, J; Hallquist, M; Thornton, J A

    2016-03-01

    We present measurements as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during which atmospheric aerosol particles were comprehensively characterized. We present results utilizing a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). We focus on the volatility and composition of isoprene derived organic aerosol tracers and of the bulk organic aerosol. By utilizing the online volatility and molecular composition information provided by the FIGAERO-CIMS, we show that the vast majority of commonly reported molecular tracers of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is derived from thermal decomposition of accretion products or other low volatility organics having effective saturation vapor concentrations <10(-3) μg m(-3). In addition, while accounting for up to 30% of total submicrometer organic aerosol mass, the IEPOX-derived SOA has a higher volatility than the remaining bulk. That IEPOX-SOA, and more generally bulk organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. is comprised of effectively nonvolatile material has important implications for modeling SOA derived from isoprene, and for mechanistic interpretations of molecular tracer measurements. Our results show that partitioning theory performs well for 2-methyltetrols, once accretion product decomposition is taken into account. No significant partitioning delays due to aerosol phase or viscosity are observed, and no partitioning to particle-phase water or other unexplained mechanisms are needed to explain our results.

  15. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  16. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can exist not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase (1,2). Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols (1,2,3), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments (4), and field measurements (5) suggest that liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ inorganic particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core-shell and partially engulfed. A core-shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles in particular for organic phases containing absorbing molecules, e.g. brown carbon. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. Our ternary model system consist of ammonium sulfate (AS)/ Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)/ and water (H2O). Carminic acid (CA) was added as a proxy for an absorbing organic compound to the system. The behavior of single droplets of above ternary mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same ternary mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. In addition, Mie-code modeling is used to predict the absorption efficiency of the same ternary system and the result will be compared with the data obtained from EDB experiment. We also intend to determine the occurrence of

  17. MACv2-SP: a parameterization of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties and an associated Twomey effect for use in CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Fiedler, Stephanie; Kinne, Stefan; Peters, Karsten; Rast, Sebastian; Müsse, Jobst; Smith, Steven J.; Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    A simple plume implementation of the second version (v2) of the Max Planck Institute Aerosol Climatology, MACv2-SP, is described. MACv2-SP provides a prescription of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties and an associated Twomey effect. It was created to provide a harmonized description of post-1850 anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing for climate modeling studies. MACv2-SP has been designed to be easy to implement, change and use, and thereby enable studies exploring the climatic effects of different patterns of aerosol radiative forcing, including a Twomey effect. MACv2-SP is formulated in terms of nine spatial plumes associated with different major anthropogenic source regions. The shape of the plumes is fit to the Max Planck Institute Aerosol Climatology, version 2, whose present-day (2005) distribution is anchored by surface-based observations. Two types of plumes are considered: one predominantly associated with biomass burning, the other with industrial emissions. These differ in the prescription of their annual cycle and in their optical properties, thereby implicitly accounting for different contributions of absorbing aerosol to the different plumes. A Twomey effect for each plume is prescribed as a change in the host model's background cloud-droplet population density using relationships derived from satellite data. Year-to-year variations in the amplitude of the plumes over the historical period (1850-2016) are derived by scaling the plumes with associated national emission sources of SO2 and NH3. Experiments using MACv2-SP are performed with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. The globally and annually averaged instantaneous and effective aerosol radiative forcings are estimated to be -0.6 and -0.5 W m-2, respectively. Forcing from aerosol-cloud interactions (the Twomey effect) offsets the reduction of clear-sky forcing by clouds, so that the net effect of clouds on the aerosol forcing is small; hence, the clear-sky forcing, which is more

  18. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  19. Assessing the oxidative potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Amanda J.; Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is known to contribute to adverse health effects, such as asthma, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major component of PM2.5 and can be enhanced by atmospheric oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide. However, whether biogenic SOA contributes to adverse health effects remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and SOA for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in light of the recent recognition that atmospheric oxidation of isoprene in the presence of acidic sulfate aerosol is a major contributor to the global SOA burden. The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to characterize the ROS generation by the isoprene-derived epoxides, trans-β-isoprene epoxydiol (trans-β-IEPOX) and methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE), and their hydrolysis products, the 2-methyltetrol diastereomers (2-MT), 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG), their organosulfate derivatives, as well as an isoprene-derived hydroxyhydroperoxide (ISOPOOH). In addition, ROS generation potential was evaluated for total SOA produced from photooxidation of isoprene and methacrolein (MACR) as well as from the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX and MAE onto acidified sulfate aerosol. The high-NOx regime, which yields 2-MG-, MAE- and MACR-derived SOA has a higher ROS generation potential than the low-NOx regime, which yields 2-MT, IEPOX- and isoprene-derived SOA. ISOPOOH has an ROS generation potential similar to 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ), suggesting a significant contribution of aerosol-phase organic peroxides to PM oxidative potential. MAE- and MACR-derived SOA show equal or greater ROS generation potential than reported in studies on diesel exhaust PM, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of isoprene-derived SOA.

  20. Real-time continuous characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from isoprene epoxydiols in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor.

    PubMed

    Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Croteau, Philip L; Marth, Wendy J; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S; Shaw, Stephanie L; Knipping, Eladio M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Jayne, John T; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D

    2013-06-04

    Real-time continuous chemical measurements of fine aerosol were made using an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) during summer and fall 2011 in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. Organic mass spectra measured by the ACSM were analyzed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), yielding three conventional factors: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA). An additional OOA factor that contributed to 33 ± 10% of the organic mass was resolved in summer. This factor had a mass spectrum that strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.74) to that obtained from laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from synthetic isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX). Time series of this additional factor is also well correlated (r(2) = 0.59) with IEPOX-derived SOA tracers from filters collected in Atlanta but less correlated (r(2) < 0.3) with a methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE)-derived SOA tracer, α-pinene SOA tracers, and a biomass burning tracer (i.e., levoglucosan), and primary emissions. Our analyses suggest IEPOX as the source of this additional factor, which has some correlation with aerosol acidity (r(2) = 0.3), measured as H(+) (nmol m(-3)), and sulfate mass loading (r(2) = 0.48), consistent with prior work showing that these two parameters promote heterogeneous chemistry of IEPOX to form SOA.

  1. Critical Reflectance Derived from MODIS: Application for the Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption over Desert Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb sunlight. Smoke particles are aerosols, as are sea salt, particulate pollution and airborne dust. When you look down at the earth from space sometimes you can see vast palls of whitish smoke or brownish dust being transported by winds. The reason that you can see these aerosols is because they are reflecting incoming sunlight back to the view in space. The reason for the difference in color between the different types of aerosol is that the particles arc also absorbing sunlight at different wavelengths. Dust appears brownish or reddish because it absorbs light in the blue wavelengths and scatters more reddish light to space, Knowing how much light is scattered versus how much is absorbed, and knowin that as a function of wavelength is essential to being able to quantify the role aerosols play in the energy balance of the earth and in climate change. It is not easy measuring the absorption properties of aerosols when they are suspended in the atmosphere. People have been doing this one substance at a time in the laboratory, but substances mix when they are in the atmosphere and the net absorption effect of all the particles in a column of air is a goal of remote sensing that has not yet been completely successful. In this paper we use a technique based on observing the point at which aerosols change from brightening the surface beneath to darkening it. If aerosols brighten a surface. they must scatter more light to space. If they darken the surface. they must be absorbing more. That cross over point is called the critical reflectance and in this paper we show that critical reflectance is a monotonic function of the intrinsic absorption properties of the particles. This parameter we call the single scattering albedo. We apply the technique to MODIS imagery over the Sahara and Sahel regions to retrieve the single scattering albedo in seven wavelengths, compare these retrievals to ground

  2. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  3. Remote Marine Aerosol: A Characterization of Physical, Chemical and Optical Properties and their Relation to Radiative Transfer in the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    Our research effort is focused on improving our understanding of aerosol properties needed for optical models for remote marine regions. This includes in-situ and vertical column optical closure and involves a redundancy of approaches to measure and model optical properties that must be self consistent. The model is based upon measured in-situ aerosol properties and will be tested and constrained by the vertically measured spectral differential optical depth of the marine boundary layer, MBL. Both measured and modeled column optical properties for the boundary layer, when added to the free-troposphere and stratospheric optical depth, will be used to establish spectral optical depth over the entire atmospheric column for comparison to and validation of satellite derived radiances (AVHRR).

  4. Background Southeast United States Aerosol Optical Properties and Their Dependence Upon Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlyszyn, C.; West, M.; Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects on SE U.S. radiation budget are highly-seasonal. Aerosol loading is much higher in summer, due largely to high levels of biogenic secondary organic aerosol and sulfates. Aerosol loading is lowest in winter. Aerosol optical properties relevant to radiative forcing have been measured continuously at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research facility (AppalAIR) since the summer of 2009. AppalAIR is the only site in the eastern US to house co-located NOAA ESRL and NASA AeroNET instrumentation and is located in the mountains of Boone, NC. Lower tropospheric sub-micron (PM1) light scattering and absorption coefficients measured over seven summers and six winters are presented here, in addition to PM1 organic and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations measured during summers 2012-2013 as well as winter 2013. The objective is to determine the influence of aerosol sources and meteorology along the air mass back-trajectories on aerosol loading and composition. PM1 aerosol mass was dominated by organic aerosol and sulfate during the periods measured. Aerosol light scattering and organic aerosol concentrations were positively correlated during summer with temperature and solar flux along the parcel back-trajectory and negatively-correlated with rainfall along the back-trajectory. Wet deposition was a major factor in the difference between the upper and lower scattering coefficient quartiles for both summer and winter. Summer PM1 light scattering coefficient declined by approximately 30-40% since 2009, with smaller decreases during winter months. Long-term studies of aerosol optical properties from the regionally-representative AppalAIR site are necessary to determine the relationships between changing SE U.S. air quality and aerosol effects on regional climate and weather.

  5. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  6. North Atlantic Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos: TARFOX and ACE-2 Results and Their Relation to Radiative Effects Derived from Satellite Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Rood, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Bergstrom and Russell estimated direct solar radiative flux changes caused by atmospheric aerosols over the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean under cloud-free and cloudy conditions. They excluded African dust aerosols, primarily by restricting calculations to latitudes 25-60 N. As inputs they used midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps derived from AVHRR satellite measurements and aerosol intensive properties determined primarily in the 1996 IGAC Troposheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). Those aerosol intensive properties, which included optical depth wavelength dependence and spectra of single scattering albedo (SSA) and scattering asymmetry parameter, were also checked against initial properties from the 1997 North Atlantic Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 2). Bergstrom and Russell investigated the sensitivity of their derived flux changes to assumed input parameters, including midvisible AOD, SSA, and scattering asymmetry parameter. Although the sensitivity of net flux change at the tropopause to SSA was moderate over the ocean (e.g., a SSA uncertainty of 0.07 produced a flux-change uncertainty of 21%), the sensitivity over common land surfaces can be much larger. Also, flux changes within and below the aerosol layer, which affect atmospheric stability, heating rates, and cloud formation and persistence, are quite sensitive to aerosol SSA. Therefore, this paper focuses on the question: "What have we learned from TARFOX and ACE 2 regarding aerosol single scattering albedo?" Three techniques were used in TARFOX to determine midvisible SSA. One of these derived SSA as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from aerosol properties. Another technique combined airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption by nephelometer and absorption photometer. A third technique obtained SSA from best-fit complex refractive indices derived by comparing

  7. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  8. Laboratory Measurements of the Effect of Sulfuric and Organic Acid Coatings on the Optical Properties of Carbon Soot Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H.; Khalizov, A.; Zhang, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol particles perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiative balance through scattering and absorption of the solar energy. Soot or black carbon, produced during combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels, is the major component responsible for light absorption by aerosol particles. The variation in the reported mass-specific absorption cross-sections (MAC) of fresh soot and increased light absorption by aged soot aerosols internally mixed with non-absorbing materials are the major factors leading to large uncertainties in the evaluation of the aerosol optical effects. We have investigated the optical properties of submicron carbon soot aerosols during simulated atmospheric processing with sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic organic acids. Internally mixed soot particles with known size, morphology, and the mixing state were produced by exposing the size-classified, flame-generated soot to sulfuric acid and organic acid vapor. Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot were measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively; light absorption was derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. Mass-specific absorption cross-sections for fresh and internally mixed soot aggregates were calculated using the measured effective densities of soot cores. The optical properties of fresh soot were independent of the relative humidity (RH). Internally mixed soot exhibited significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of the coating material and RH. Sulfuric acid was found to cause greater enhancement in soot optical properties than organic acids. The higher absorption and scattering resulted in the increased single scattering albedo of coated soot aerosol. The measurements indicate that the irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules is a major contributor to the enhanced optical properties of internally mixed soot.

  9. Analysis of aerosol optical and microphysical properties observed during the DC3 field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Schuster, G. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) consisted of 18 research flights from Salina, KS. During cloud inflow and outflow surveys, various aged aerosol layers and plumes, including biomass burning, were sampled by the NASA DC-8 aircraft which was equipped with a broad suite of instruments for aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties. As a result, the DC3 dataset includes detailed aerosol number size distribution, bulk aerosol mass concentration, black carbon mass concentration, and mass size distribution for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organics, together with scattering and absorption coefficients. We use this comprehensive dataset to perform a detailed closure analysis to examine the consistency between the observed aerosol properties and the literature reported aerosol refractive index values. In this context, we report aerosol observations, and comparisons between the aerosol mass and number size distribution for various aerosol layers. Closure tests will also be presented in terms of the impact of the aerosol composition and size distribution on the scattering and absorption.

  10. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  11. Aerus-GEO: newly available satellite-derived aerosol optical depth product over Europe and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, D.; Roujean, J. L.; Ceamanos, X.; Six, B.; Suman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The major difficulty in detecting the aerosol signal from visible and near-infrared remote sensing observations is to reach the proper separation of the components related to the atmosphere and the surface. A method is proposed to circumvent this issue by exploiting the directional and temporal dimensions of the satellite signal through the use of a semi-empirical kernel-driven model for the surface/atmosphere coupled system. This algorithm was implemented by the ICARE Data Center (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr), which operationally disseminates a daily AOD product at 670 nm over the MSG disk since 2014. The proposed method referred to as AERUS-GEO (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method - application to GEO data) is applied to three spectral bands (0.6 mm, 0.8 mm, and 1.6 mm) of MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) observations, which scan Europe, Africa, and the Eastern part of South America every 15 minutes. The daily AOD estimates at 0.63μm has been extensively validated. In contrast, the Angstrom coefficient is still going through validation and we will show the differences between the MSG derived Angstrom exponent with that of CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) near-real time aerosol product. The impact of aerosol type on the aerosol radiative forcing will be presented as a part of future development plan.

  12. Optical properties of salt aerosols with and without inclusions as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Margaret E.; Attwood, Alexis R.; Galpin, Tyler

    2016-05-01

    Salt aerosols will undergo deliquescence as humidity is increased. This deliquescent transition dramatically affects the ability of aerosols to extinguish light. It is known that the relative humidity is very high in the viscous sublayer at the ocean surface (~98%) but decreases to an average of 80% in the surface layer. We present results of an investigation of the impact of inclusions on the deliquescence point and correlated optical properties of salt aerosols.

  13. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud Properties During the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobelspiesse, K.; Cairns, B.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Stohl, A.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of Direct Climate Forcing (DCF) due to aerosols in cloudy areas has historically been a difficult task, mainly because of a lack of appropriate measurements. Recently, passive remote sensing instruments have been developed that have the potential to retrieve both cloud and aerosol properties using polarimetric, multiple view angle, and multi spectral observations, and therefore determine DCF from aerosols above clouds. One such instrument is the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), an airborne prototype of a sensor on the NASA Glory satellite, which unfortunately failed to reach orbit during its launch in March of 2011. In the spring of 2006, the RSP was deployed on an aircraft based in Veracruz, Mexico, as part of the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign. On 13 March, the RSP over flew an aerosol layer lofted above a low altitude marine stratocumulus cloud close to shore in the Gulf of Mexico. We investigate the feasibility of retrieving aerosol properties over clouds using these data. Our approach is to first determine cloud droplet size distribution using the angular location of the cloud bow and other features in the polarized reflectance. The selected cloud was then used in a multiple scattering radiative transfer model optimization to determine the aerosol optical properties and fine tune the cloud size distribution. In this scene, we were able to retrieve aerosol optical depth, the fine mode aerosol size distribution parameters and the cloud droplet size distribution parameters to a degree of accuracy required for climate modeling. This required assumptions about the aerosol vertical distribution and the optical properties of the coarse aerosol size mode. A sensitivity study was also performed to place this study in the context of future systematic scanning polarimeter observations, which found that the aerosol complex refractive index can also be observed accurately if the aerosol optical depth is

  14. Optical Properties and Aging of Light Absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew E.; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-14

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA), commonly referred to as “brown carbon (BrC)”, has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various VOC precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficients (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organonitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible and UV light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed-SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.

  15. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  16. Radiative properties of Bay of Bengal aerosols: Spatial distinctiveness and source impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. Suresh; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Kumar, V. H. Arun; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-03-01

    Simultaneous and collocated measurements of spectrally resolved scattering and absorption coefficients and mass concentration of near-surface composite aerosols in the marine atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal (BOB), along with incoming shortwave (0.3-3 μm) global solar radiation and columnar spectral aerosol optical depths (AOD), were made on a research cruise during the winter phase of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (W-ICARB). The aerosol radiative properties revealed distinct spatial features associated with the contrasting outflows from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and East Asia. Both scattering and absorption coefficients depicted very high values (>200 and >15 Mm-1) over the northwestern and southeastern BOB and extremely low values (<50 and <10 Mm-1) over the central BOB. The mean value of the total scattering coefficient at 550 nm (˜123.7 ± 85.3 Mm-1) over the entire BOB during winter was higher than the mean values (˜94 ± 47 Mm-1) reported for the premonsoon season. While SSA at 550 nm showed very low values (<0.8) over a very large region in the central BOB and moderately low values over the southern BOB (˜0.85-0.9), the columnar AOD varied from the least values of ˜0.1 over the northeastern BOB to the highest values of ˜0.8 over the northwestern BOB. While significant cooling was observed at the top of the atmosphere and surface over the northwestern BOB, the atmospheric forcing was found to be significantly high (˜15 W m-2) over the southern BOB, where the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ARFE) at the surface was also found to be high. Examination of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived fire count along with the advection pathways revealed a strong contribution from the emissions of biomass smoke from East Asia, which might be contributing to the enhanced aerosol induced warming over the southern BOB. However, the ARFE at the surface was low over the northwestern BOB, where the

  17. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  18. Aerosol Characterization and New Instrumentation for Better Understanding Snow Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Snow albedo is determined by snowpack thickness and grain size, but also affected by contamination with light-absorbing, microscopic (e.g., mineral dust, combustion aerosols, bio-aerosols) and macroscopic (e.g., microalgae, plant debris, sand, organisms) compounds. Most currently available instruments for measuring snow albedo utilize the natural, downward flux of solar radiation and the reflected upward flux. This reliance on solar radiation (and, thus, large zenith angles and clear-sky conditions) leads to severe constraints, preventing characterization of detailed diurnal snow albedo cycles. Here, we describe instrumentation and methodologies to address these limitations with the development and deployment of new snow radiation sensors for measuring surface spectral and in-snow radiative properties. This novel instrumentation will be tested at the CRREL/UCSB Eastern Sierra (CUES) Snow Study Site at Mammoth Mountain, which is extensively instrumented for characterizing snow properties including snow albedo and surface morphology. However, it has been lacking instrumentation for the characterization of aerosols that can be deposited on the snow surface through dry and wet deposition. Currently, we are installing aerosol instrumentation at the CUES site, which are also described. This includes instruments for the multi-wavelength measurement of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and for the characterization of aerosol size distribution. Knowledge of aerosol concentration and physical and optical properties will allow for the study of aerosol deposition and modification of snow albedo and for establishing an aerosol climatology for the CUES site.

  19. Aerosol particle properties in a South American megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulke, Ana; Torres-Brizuela, Marcela; Raga, Graciela; Baumgardner, Darrel; Cancelada, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    The subtropical city of Buenos Aires is located on the western shore of Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of Argentina. It is the second largest metropolitan area in South America, with a population density of around 14 thousand people per km2. When all 24 counties of the Great Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area are included it is the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around fifteen million inhabitants. The generalized worldwide trend to concentrate human activities in urban regions that continue to expand in area, threatens the local and regional environment. Air pollution in the Buenos Aires airshed is due to local sources (mainly the mobile sources, followed by the electric power plants and some industries) and to distant sources (like biomass burning, dust, marine aerosols and occasionally volcanic ash) whose products arrive in the city area due to the regional transport patterns. Previous research suggests that ambient aerosol particle concentrations should be considered an air quality problem. A field campaign was conducted in Buenos Aires in 2011 in order to characterize some aerosol particles properties measured for the first time in the city. Measurements began in mid- April and continued until December. The field observations were done in a collaborative effort between the Universities of Mexico (UNAM) and Buenos Aires (UBA). A suite of instruments was installed on the roof of an UBA laboratory and classroom buildings (34.54° S, 58.44° W) at an altitude of approximately 30 m above sea level. The measurements included the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN) larger than approximately 50 nm, the mass concentration of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), the scattering (Bscat) and absorption (Babs) coefficients at 550 nm and the vertical profiles of backscattered light from aerosols at a wavelength of 910 nm using a ceilometer. In addition, a weather station recorded the meteorological

  20. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating aerosol properties has implications for the formation of Arctic clouds, resulting in impacts on cloud lifetime, precipitation processes, and radiative forcing. There are many remaining uncertainties and large discrepancies regarding modeled and observed Arctic aerosol properties, illustrating the need for more detailed observations to improve simulations of Arctic aerosol and more generally, projections of the components of the aerosol-driven processes that impact sea ice loss/gain. In particular, the sources and climatic effects of Arctic aerosol particles are severely understudied. Here, we present a comprehensive, long-term record of aerosol observations from the North Slope of Alaska baseline site at Barrow. These measurements include sub- and supermicron (up to 10 μm) total mass and number concentrations, sub- and supermicron soluble inorganic and organic ion concentrations, submicron metal concentrations, submicron particle size distributions, and sub- and supermicron absorption and scattering properties. Aerosol extinction and number concentration measurements extend back to 1976, while the remaining measurements were implemented since. Corroboration between the chemical, physical, and optical property measurements is evident during periods of overlapping observations, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. During the Arctic Haze in the winter/spring, high concentrations of long-range transported submicron sea salt, mineral dust, industrial metals, pollution (non-sea salt sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), and biomass burning species are observed concurrent with higher concentrations of particles with sizes that span the submicron range, enhanced absorption and scattering coefficients, and largest Ångström exponents. The summer is characterized by high concentrations of small biogenic aerosols (< 100 nm) and low extinction coefficients. Fall is characterized by clean conditions, with supermicron sea salt representing the dominant aerosol

  1. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  2. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  3. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  4. Microphysical properties of transported biomass burning aerosols in coastal regions, and application to improving retrievals of aerosol optical depth from SeaWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the limited measurement capabilities of heritage and current spaceborne passive imaging radiometers, algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related quantities must make assumptions relating to aerosol microphysical properties and surface reflectance. Over the ocean, surface reflectance can be relatively well-modelled, but knowledge of aerosol properties can remain elusive. Several field campaigns and many studies have examined the microphysical properties of biomass burning (smoke) aerosol. However, these largely focus on properties over land and near to the source regions. In coastal and open-ocean regions the properties of transported smoke may differ, due to factors such as aerosol aging, wet/dry deposition, and mixture with other aerosol sources (e.g. influence of maritime, pollution, or mineral dust aerosols). Hence, models based on near-source aerosol observations may be less representative of such transported smoke aerosols, introducing additional uncertainty into satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This study examines case studies of transported smoke from select globally-distributed coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. These are used to inform improved models for over-ocean transported smoke aerosol for AOD retrievals from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). These models are used in an updated version of the SeaWiFS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval (SOAR) algorithm, which has been combined with the Deep Blue algorithm over land to create a 13-year (1997-2010) high-quality record of AOD over land and ocean. Applying these algorithms to other sensors will enable the creation of a long-term global climate data record of spectral AOD.

  5. Estimates of the aerosol indirect effect over the Baltic Sea region derived from 12 years of MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponaro, Giulia; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; Rodriguez, Edith; Virtanen, Timo; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2017-02-01

    Retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the Aqua satellite, 12 years (2003-2014) of aerosol and cloud properties were used to statistically quantify aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) over the Baltic Sea region, including the relatively clean Fennoscandia and the more polluted central-eastern Europe. These areas allowed us to study the effects of different aerosol types and concentrations on macro- and microphysical properties of clouds: cloud effective radius (CER), cloud fraction (CF), cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud-top height (CTH). Aerosol properties used are aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (AE) and aerosol index (AI). The study was limited to low-level water clouds in the summer. The vertical distributions of the relationships between cloud properties and aerosols show an effect of aerosols on low-level water clouds. CF, COT, LWP and CTH tend to increase with aerosol loading, indicating changes in the cloud structure, while the effective radius of cloud droplets decreases. The ACI is larger at relatively low cloud-top levels, between 900 and 700 hPa. Most of the studied cloud variables were unaffected by the lower-tropospheric stability (LTS), except for the cloud fraction. The spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud parameters and ACI, here defined as the change in CER as a function of aerosol concentration for a fixed LWP, shows positive and statistically significant ACI over the Baltic Sea and Fennoscandia, with the former having the largest values. Small negative ACI values are observed in central-eastern Europe, suggesting that large aerosol concentrations saturate the ACI.

  6. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  7. Aerosol physicochemical properties in relation to meteorology: Case studies in urban, marine, and arid settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna

    Atmospheric aerosols are a highly relevant component of the climate system affecting atmospheric radiative transfer and the hydrological cycle. As opposed to other key atmospheric constituents with climatic relevance, atmospheric aerosol particles are highly heterogeneous in time and space with respect to their size, concentration, chemical composition and physical properties. Many aspects of their life cycle are not understood, making them difficult to represent in climate models and hard to control as a pollutant. Aerosol-cloud interactions in particular are infamous as a major source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Field measurements are an important source of information for the modeling community and can lead to a better understanding of chemical and microphysical processes. In this study, field data from urban, marine, and arid settings are analyzed and the impact of meteorological conditions on the evolution of aerosol particles while in the atmosphere is investigated. Particular attention is given to organic aerosols, which are a poorly understood component of atmospheric aerosols. Local wind characteristics, solar radiation, relative humidity and the presence or absence of clouds and fog are found to be crucial factors in the transport and chemical evolution of aerosol particles. Organic aerosols in particular are found to be heavily impacted by processes in the liquid phase (cloud droplets and aerosol water). The reported measurements serve to improve the process-level understanding of aerosol evolution in different environments and to inform the modeling community by providing realistic values for input parameters and validation of model calculations.

  8. Absorbing and scattering aerosols over the source region of biomass burning emissions: Implications in the assessment of optical and radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Srivastava, Rohit; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, Darshan

    2016-02-01

    The current study focuses on the assessment of model simulated optical and radiative properties of aerosols incorporating the measured chemical composition of aerosol samples collected at Patiala during October, 2011-February, 2012. Monthly average mass concentration of PM2.5, elemental carbon (EC), primary organic carbon (POC), water-soluble (WS) and insoluble (INS) aerosols ranged from 120 to 192, 6.2 to 7.2, 20 to 39, 59 to 111 and 35 to 90 μg m-3, respectively. Mass concentration of different components of aerosols was further used for the assessment of optical properties derived from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) model simulations. Microtops based measured aerosol optical depth (AOD500) ranged from 0.47 to 0.62 showing maximum value during November and December, and minimum during February. Ångström exponent (α380-870) remained high (>0.90) throughout the study period except in February (0.74), suggesting predominance of fine mode particles over the study region. The observed ratio of scattering to absorbing aerosols was incorporated in OPAC model simulations and single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) so obtained ranged between 0.80 and 0.92 with relatively low values during the period of extensive biomass burning. In the present study, SBDART based estimated values of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface (SRF) and top of the atmosphere (TOA) ranged from -31 to -66 Wm-2 and -2 to -18 W m-2 respectively. The atmospheric ARF, ranged between + 18 and + 58 Wm-2 resulting in the atmospheric heating rate between 0.5 and 1.6 K day-1. These results signify the role of scattering and absorbing aerosols in affecting the magnitude of aerosol forcing.

  9. Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated by photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa; Li, Jiangjun; Wang, Dong

    2014-05-12

    The refractive index (RI) is the fundamental characteristic that affects the optical properties of aerosols, which could be some of the most important factors influencing direct radiative forcing. The secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by the photooxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene (BTEX) under low-NOx and high-NOx conditions are explored in this study. The particles generated in our experiments are considered to be spherical, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, and nonabsorbent at a wavelength of 532 nm, as determined by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The retrieved RIs at 532 nm for the SOAs range from 1.38-1.59, depending on several factors, such as different precursors and NOx levels. The RIs of the SOAs are altered differently as the NOx concentration increases as follows: the RIs of the SOAs derived from benzene and toluene increase, whereas those of the SOAs derived from ethylbenzene and m-xylene decrease. Finally, by comparing the experimental data with the model values, we demonstrate that the models likely overestimate the RI values of the SOA particles to a certain extent, which in turn overestimates the global direct radiative forcing of the organic particles.

  10. Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated by photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa; Li, Jiangjun; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    The refractive index (RI) is the fundamental characteristic that affects the optical properties of aerosols, which could be some of the most important factors influencing direct radiative forcing. The secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by the photooxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene (BTEX) under low-NOx and high-NOx conditions are explored in this study. The particles generated in our experiments are considered to be spherical, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, and nonabsorbent at a wavelength of 532 nm, as determined by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The retrieved RIs at 532 nm for the SOAs range from 1.38–1.59, depending on several factors, such as different precursors and NOx levels. The RIs of the SOAs are altered differently as the NOx concentration increases as follows: the RIs of the SOAs derived from benzene and toluene increase, whereas those of the SOAs derived from ethylbenzene and m-xylene decrease. Finally, by comparing the experimental data with the model values, we demonstrate that the models likely overestimate the RI values of the SOA particles to a certain extent, which in turn overestimates the global direct radiative forcing of the organic particles. PMID:24815734

  11. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  12. Physico-chemical properties of aerosols in Sao Paulo, Brazil and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Luiza Godoy, Maria; Godoy, Jose Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an increasingly important role. Sao Paulo is a megacity with a population of about 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in Sao Paulo is bellow WMO standards for aerosol particles and ozone. Many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission characteristics, we are running a source apportionment study in Sao Paulo focused on the mechanisms of organic aerosol formation. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles). This study comprises four sampling sites with continuous measurements for one year, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, O3, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to measure in real time VOCs and aerosol composition, respectively. Trace elements were measured using XRF and OC/EC analysis was determined with a Sunset OC/EC instrument. A TSI Nephelometer with 3 wavelengths measure light scattering and a MAAP measure black carbon. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10,000 and 35,000 cm-3, mostly concentrated in the nucleation and Aitken modes, with a peak in size at 80

  13. Use of MODIS-Derived Fire Radiative Energy to Estimate Smoke Aerosol Emissions over Different Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2003-01-01

    Biomass burning is the main source of smoke aerosols and certain trace gases in the atmosphere. However, estimates of the rates of biomass consumption and emission of aerosols and trace gases from fires have not attained adequate reliability thus far. Traditional methods for deriving emission rates employ the use of emission factors e(sub x), (in g of species x per kg of biomass burned), which are difficult to measure from satellites. In this era of environmental monitoring from space, fire characterization was not a major consideration in the design of the early satellite-borne remote sensing instruments, such as AVHRR. Therefore, although they are able to provide fire location information, they were not adequately sensitive to variations in fire strength or size, because their thermal bands used for fire detection saturated at the lower end of fire radiative temperature range. As such, hitherto, satellite-based emission estimates employ proxy techniques using satellite derived fire pixel counts (which do not express the fire strength or rate of biomass consumption) or burned areas (which can only be obtained after the fire is over). The MODIS sensor, recently launched into orbit aboard EOS Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites, have a much higher saturation level and can, not only detect the fire locations 4 times daily, but also measures the at-satellite fire radiative energy (which is a measure of the fire strength) based on its 4 micron channel temperature. Also, MODIS measures the optical thickness of smoke and other aerosols. Preliminary analysis shows appreciable correlation between the MODIS-derived rates of emission of fire radiative energy and smoke over different regions across the globe. These relationships hold great promise for deriving emission coefficients, which can be used for estimating smoke aerosol emissions from MODIS active fire products. This procedure has the potential to provide more accurate emission estimates in near real

  14. Aerosol Properties Downwind of Biomass Burns Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buseck, Peter R

    2016-04-01

    We determined the morphological, chemical, and thermal properties of aerosol particles generated by biomass burning during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) campaign during the wildland fire season in the Pacific Northwest from July to mid-September, 2013, and in October, 2013 from prescribed agricultural burns in the lower Mississippi River Valley. BBOP was a field campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The morphological information was both two-dimensional, as is typical of most microscopy images and that have many of the characteristic of shadows in that they lack depth data, and three-dimensional (3D). The electron tomographic measurements will provided 3D data, including the presence and nature of pores and interstices, and whether the individual particles are coated by or embedded within other materials. These microphysical properties were determined for particles as a function of time and distance from the respective sources in order to obtain detailed information regarding the time evolution of changes during aging.

  15. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  16. Thermochemical, cloud condensation nucleation ability and optical properties of alkyl aminium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, A.; Bluvshtein, N.; Segre, E.; Segev, L.; Flores, J.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The increased interest in the chemistry of alkylamines and their possible roles in the atmosphere increased recently due to field observations of the correlation between new particle formation and post nucleation growth events and the presence of alkylamines in their cationic form. Due to their high saturation vapor pressure it is unlikely that short chain alkylamines will contribute to particle formation or growth by condensation. Therefore, it was previously suggested that their contribution to particulate phase is the result of acid-base reactions between the basic alkylamines and atmospherically relevant acids such as sulfuric and nitric acid. In this study we present laboratory data on the thermochemical, CCN activity and optical properties of selected atmospherically relevant alkyl aminium sulfate salts: Monomethyl aminium sulfate (MMAS), dimethyaminium sulfate (DMAS), trimethylaminium sulfate, monoethylaminium sulfate (MEAS), diethylaminium sulfate (DEAS) and triethylaminium sulfate (TEAS)). We found that the vapor pressure of these aminium salts is 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonium sulfate and as such they can contribute to new aerosols and secondary aerosols formation. We infer that these species have very high CCN activity, with hygroscopicity parameter that is lower but close to that ammonium sulfate. Finally, we present the optical properties of these alkyl aminium sulfate salts between 360 and 420 nm. These compounds are less scattering than ammonium sulfate and show minimal wavelength dependence in this range. These compounds also do not absorb light. These derived parameters can contribute to the better understanding and characterization of the role that these compounds play in atmospheric chemical reactions, gas-solid partitioning and their possible contribution to the microphysical and radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  17. Polluted dust derived from long-range transport as a major end member of urban aerosols and its implication of non-point pollution in northern China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Sun, Y B; Weiss, D; Liang, L J; Chen, H Y

    2015-02-15

    The contribution of polluted dust transported from local and distal sources remains poorly constrained due to their similar geophysical and geochemical properties. We sampled aerosols in three cities in northern China (Xi'an, Beijing, Xifeng) during the spring of 2009 to determine dust flux, magnetic susceptibility and elemental concentrations. Combining dust fluxes with wind speed and regional visibility records enabled to differentiate between dust transported from long range and derived from local sources, while the combination of magnetic susceptibility and enrichment factors (EF) of heavy metals (Pb, Zn) allowed to distinguish natural aerosols from polluted ones. Our results indicate that polluted dust from long-range transport became a major end member of urban dust aerosols. Human settlements as its potential sources were confirmed by a pollutant enriched regional dust event originating from populated areas to the south as inferred by back trajectory modeling, implying their non-point source nature of dust pollution.

  18. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-01-01

    deviations are explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite observations is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by new generation PARASOL algorithm was accomplished. The AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved by the algorithm over Kyiv were compared with the closest AERONET retrievals within two hour of satellite overpass time and the stable atmospheric conditions.

  19. Systematic aerosol characterization by combining GOME-2 UV Aerosol Indices with trace gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Stammes, P.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    The task of determining aerosol type using passive remote sensing instruments is a daunting one. First, because the variety in aerosol (optical) properties is very large; and second, because the effect of aerosols on the detected top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectrum is smooth and mostly featureless. In addition, spectrometers like GOME-2 have a coarse spatial resolution, which makes aerosol characterization even more difficult due to interferences with clouds. On account of these problems, we do not attempt to derive aerosol properties from single measurements: instead, we combine time series of UV Aerosol Index and trace gas concentrations to derive the dominating aerosol type for each season. Aside from the Index values and trace gas concentrations themselves, the correlation between UV Aerosol Indices (which are indicative of aerosol absorption) with NO2, HCHO, and CHOCHO columns - or absence of it - provides clues to the (main) source of the aerosols in the investigated region and time range. For example: a high correlation of HCHO and Absorbing Aerosol Index points to aerosols from biomass burning, highly correlated CHOCHO, HCHO, and SCattering Index indicate biogenic secondary organic aerosols, and coinciding high NO2 concentrations with high SCattering Index values are associated with industrial and urban aerosols. We here present case studies for several regions to demonstrate the suitability of our approach. Then, we introduce a method to systematically derive the dominating aerosol type on a global scale on time scales varying from monthly to yearly.

  20. Linking surface in-situ measurements to columnar aerosol optical properties at Hyytiälä, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Ehn, M.; Hong, J.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Petäjä, T.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient optical properties of aerosols strongly depend on the particles' hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. The key parameter to describe the influence of RH on the particle light scattering is the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value. Knowledge of this hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for climate forcing calculations and is needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. We will present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland, which was part of the EU-FP7 project PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study). Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground by a humidified nephelometer was found to be significantly lower (1.53 ± 0.24 at RH=85% and wavelength λ=450 nm) than observed at other European sites (Zieger et al., 2013). One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the boreal aerosol as measured by an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the ground based in-situ measurements. Our measurements allowed to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient. Together with intensive aircraft measurements (lasting one month) of the particle number size distribution and ambient humidity, different columnar values were determined and compared to direct measurements and inversions of the AERONET Sun photometer (e.g., the columnar aerosol volume size distribution). The aerosol optical depth strongly correlated (R2≈0.9 for λ=440 nm to R2≈0.6 for λ=1020 nm) with the in situ derived values, but was significantly lower compared to the direct measurements of the Sun photometer (slope ≈0.5). This was explained by the loss of

  1. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  2. Mount St. Helens related aerosol properties from solar extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Kleckner, E.W.; Stokes, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    The optical extinction due to the introduction of aerosols and aerosol-precursors into the troposphere and stratosphere during the major eruptive phase of Mount St. Helens, Washington, is quantified. The concentration is on the two-week period centered on the major eruption of 22 July 1980. (ACR)

  3. Importance of Physico-Chemical Properties of Aerosols in the Formation of Arctic Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, S. A.; Girard, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in the Arctic weather and climate system but interactions between aerosols, clouds and radiation are poorly understood. Consequently, it is essential to fully understand their properties and especially their formation process. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing reveal the existence of two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. TIC-1 are composed by non-precipitating very small (radar-unseen) ice crystals whereas TIC-2 are detected by both sensors and are characterized by a low concentration of large precipitating ice crystals. It is hypothesized that TIC-2 formation is linked to the acidification of aerosols, which inhibit the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN). As a result, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions, resulting to a smaller concentration of larger ice crystals. Over the past 10 years, several parameterizations of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation have been developed to reflect the various physical and chemical properties of aerosols. These parameterizations are derived from laboratory studies on aerosols of different chemical compositions. The parameterizations are also developed according to two main approaches: stochastic (that nucleation is a probabilistic process, which is time dependent) and singular (that nucleation occurs at fixed conditions of temperature and humidity and time-independent). This research aims to better understand the formation process of TICs using a newly-developed ice nucleation parameterizations. For this purpose, we implement some parameterizations (2 approaches) into the Limited Area version of the Global Multiscale Environmental Model (GEM-LAM) and use them to simulate ice clouds observed during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Arctic Cloud (ISDAC) in Alaska. We use both approaches but special attention is focused on the new parameterizations of the singular approach. Simulation

  4. Temporal evolution of aerosol derived from N2-Raman lidar at a Mediterranean coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Following the temporal variability of the aerosols in the atmospheric column on coastal areas is challenging. In situ ground-based or integrated column properties are not enough to understand the sea-continent exchange processes and identify the sources of particles. Now classical approach using the synergy between passive (e.g. sunphotometer) and active (e.g. backscatter lidar) instruments gives only a partial view of the aerosol properties, because they could be highly heterogeneous in the lower and middle troposphere. On June-July 2014, an automatic N2-Raman lidar (355 nm) was installed at a coastal site close to Toulon in the South of France. Using the coupling between cross-polarized elastic and N2-Raman channels, various aerosol natures are identified all along the time and against the altitude. Specific regularization algorithms have been tested to improve the aerosol classification. The results of these tests will be presented in terms of sensitivity studies based on the Monte Carlo approach. Selecting the most appropriate inversion method of the lidar profiles, the aerosol types encountered during the field campaign will be presented. We will also discuss their origin and the sea-continent exchanges including the sea breeze effect. We will see that a proper identification of particles passes through analyses coupling satellite observations and air mass trajectory studies. Acknowledgments: The experiments have been funded by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and the Centre national de la recherchescientifique (CNRS). We thank Université de Toulon (SeaTech Engineering School) for their hosts. The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Labex IPSL, is also acknowledged for its support in the data simulations and analyses.

  5. The surface aerosol optical properties in the urban area of Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Chen, Pulong; Hu, Qiduo; Yang, Xiu-qun; Fu, Congbin; Zhu, Jialei

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies of aerosol optical properties are useful for reducing uncertainties in estimations of aerosol radiative forcing and forecasting visibility. In this study, the observed near-surface aerosol optical properties in urban Nanjing are analysed from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show that near-surface urban aerosols in Nanjing are mainly from local emissions and the surrounding regions. They have lower loadings but are more scattering than aerosols in most cities in China. The annual mean aerosol extinction coefficient (EC), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP) at 550 nm are 381.96 Mm-1, 0.9 and 0.57, respectively. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than its scattering coefficient (SC). However, the absorbing aerosol has a larger Ångström exponent (AAE) value, 1.58 at 470/660 nm, about 0.2 larger than the scattering aerosols (SAE). All the aerosol optical properties follow a near-unimodal pattern, and their values are mostly concentrated around their averages, accounting for more than 60 % of the total samplings. Additionally, they have substantial seasonality and diurnal variations. High levels of SC and AAC all appear in winter due to higher aerosol and trace gas emissions. AAE (ASP) is the smallest (largest) in summer, possibly because of high relative humidity (RH) which also causes considerably larger SC and smaller SAE, although intensive gas-to-particle transformation could produce a large number of finer scattering aerosols in this season. Seasonality of EC is different from the columnar aerosol optical depth. Larger AACs appear during the rush hours of the day while SC and back-scattering coefficient (Bsp) only peak in the early morning. Aerosols are fresher in the daytime than at night-time, leading to their larger Ångström exponent and smaller ASP. Different temporal variations between AAC and SC cause the aerosols to be more absorbing (smaller SSA) in autumn

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Properties Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Monache, Luca Delle

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This thesis will use data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) which is the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000-March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and the measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  7. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W. H.; North, P. R. J.

    2015-04-01

    We develop a method to derive aerosol properties over land surfaces using combined spectral and angular information, such as available from ESA Sentinel-3 mission, to be launched in 2015. A method of estimating aerosol optical depth (AOD) using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3. The method aims to improve the estimation of AOD, and to explore the estimation of fine mode fraction (FMF) and single scattering albedo (SSA) over land surfaces by inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model. The surface model includes a general physical model of angular and spectral surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values to the physical model. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground-based sun photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  8. Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Yuan; Kuang, Zhongyu; Fang, Sihua; Chen, Yonghang; Kang, Yanming; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Daoyuan; Fu, Yingying

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai was conducted based on the data obtained from a micro pulse lidar. There was a distinct difference in layer thickness and extinction coefficient under the two types of weather conditions. Aerosols were concentrated below 1 km and the aerosol extinction coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 1.50 km-1 on haze days. In contrast, aerosols with smaller extinction coefficients (0.20-0.35 km-1) accumulated mainly from the surface to 2 km on floating dust days. The seasonal variations of extinction and aerosol optical depth (AOD) for both haze and floating dust cases were similar—greatest in winter, smaller in spring, and smallest in autumn. More than 85% of the aerosols appeared in the atmosphere below 1 km during severe haze and floating dust weather. The diurnal variation of the extinction coefficient of haze exhibited a bimodal shape with two peaks in the morning or at noon, and at nightfall, respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient gradually increased throughout the day during floating dust weather. Case studies showed that haze aerosols were generated from the surface and then lifted up, but floating dust aerosols were transported vertically from higher altitude to the surface. The AOD during floating dust weather was higher than that during haze. The boundary layer was more stable during haze than during floating dust weather.

  9. An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications representative of aerosol source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (τ) and single scattering albedo (ωo) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption (i.e., ωo and absorption Ångström exponent (αabs)) and size (i.e., extinction Ångström exponent (αext) and fine mode fraction of τ) relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to (1) determine the averageωo and αabs at each site (expanding upon previous work), (2) perform a sensitivity study on αabs by varying the spectral ωo, and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral ωo averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < δωo ≤ 0.02 decrease) than in previous work, and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of αabs show significant overlap among aerosol type categories, and at least 10% of the αabs retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral ωo by ±0.03 induces significant αabs changes from the unperturbed value by at least ˜±0.6 for Dust, ˜±0.2 for Mixed, and ˜±0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The ωo440nm and αext440-870nmrelationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  10. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  11. On the variation of aerosol properties over Finland based on the optical columnar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Arola, A.; Amiridis, V.; Lihavainen, H.; de Leeuw, G.

    2012-10-01

    Long-range aerosol transport over Finland has been studied using ground-based sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical properties. Cimel sunphotometers were used at an urban site (Helsinki), a rural site (Hyytiälä) and a semiurban site (Kuopio) and PFR sunphotometer measurements were made at two rural sites, Jokioinen and Sodankylä. The CIMEL measurements are part of the AERONET (Aerosol robotic network) network and Jokioinen and Sodankylä are GAW-PFR (Global Atmosphere Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) Associate Stations. Sunphotometers provide information on local columnar aerosol properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (ÅE) that were used to investigate the aerosol content and aerosol type in this region. A set of representative event days, i.e. days with high turbidity, covering the time period between March 2006 and June 2010 has been selected for further analysis. For these days the AOD results were combined with air mass back trajectories to provide information about the air mass origin, especially for cases with moderate turbidity produced by long-range transported aerosols from mid latitudes to Finland. As expected, episodes with high AOD are connected with the transport of polluted air masses originating from the east or southeast or from industrial areas in Central Europe. We distinguished events with long range transported air pollution from cases where pollution was accumulated in the area due to the local meteorological factors.

  12. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  13. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; ...

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  14. Aerosol optical properties over the midcontinental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Markham, Brian L.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Aro, Theo. O.

    1992-01-01

    Solar and sky radiation measurements were analyzed to obtain aerosol properties such as the optical thickness and the size distribution. The measurements were conducted as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment during the second intensive field campaign (IFC) from June 25 to July 14, 1987, and the fifth IFC from July 25 to August 12, 1989, on the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas. Correlations with climatological and meteorological parameters show that during the period of observations in 1987, two types of air masses dominated the area: an air mass with low optical thickness and low temperature air associated with a northerly breeze, commonly referred to as the continental air, and an air mass with a higher optical thickness and higher temperature air associated with a southerly wind which we call 'Gulf air'. The size distributions show a predominance of the larger size particles in 'Gulf air'. Because of the presence of two contrasting air masses, correlations with parameters such as relative humidity, specific humidity, pressure, temperature, and North Star sky radiance reveal some interesting aspects. In 1989, clear distinctions between continental and Gulf air cannot be made; the reason for this will be discussed.

  15. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  16. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: Properties overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds and fragments, refractory carbon, metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases and substituents [Hays et al., 2004]. Aerosol organic matter no...

  17. AERUS-GEO: A newly available satellite-derived aerosol optical depth product over Europe and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, D.; Ceamanos, X.; Six, B.; Roujean, J.-L.

    2014-11-01

    This article presents a new aerosol optical depth (AOD) product delivered in near real time by the ICARE Data and Services Center to the scientific community. The AERUS-GEO (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method-application to GEOstationary data) product is derived from observations from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite covering Europe, Africa, and part of Asia and South America. The retrieval method exploits the directional information contained in the series of 96 MSG observations per day of the Earth's disk to derive a daily averaged AOD. The performances of this product are similar to those of other widely used satellite-derived AOD. This article illustrates the advantages of the spatial (3 km at best) and temporal (daily) resolution of the AERUS-GEO product to monitor particular aerosol activity (e.g., volcanic eruptions) or to study given phenomena (e.g., the impact of topography on aerosol loading).

  18. Atmospheric aerosol variability and properties in lowermost tropical free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, Radovan; Hamburger, Thomas; Ström, Johan; Tunved, Peter; Schmeissner, Tina; Matisans, Modris; Calderon, Silvia; Hoffman, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    The long-term measurements of aerosol number and size distributions in tropical free troposphere (FT) were carried out from 2007 until 2009. The measurements took place at the high altitude Atmospheric Research Station Pico Espejo located on top of the Sierra Nevada mountain ridge at 4765 m a.s.l. nearby the city of Mérida, Venezuela. Analysis of aerosol number concentration, size distribution and light absorbing aerosol focuses mainly on possible links to the atmospheric general circulation in the tropics and seasonality driven changes in biomass burning activity. Repeatable annual and diurnal cycles of the particle number concentration were observed.

  19. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  20. The impact of air mass advection on aerosol optical properties over Gotland (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdun, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Anna; Kratzer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, measurements of aerosol optical properties from the Gotland station of the AERONET network, combined with a two-stage cluster analysis of back trajectories of air masses moving over Gotland, were used to identify the main paths of air mass advection to the Baltic Sea and to relate them to aerosol optical properties, i.e. the aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength λ = 500 nm, AOT (500) and the Ångström exponent for the spectral range from 440 to 870 nm, α(440,870). One- to six-day long back trajectories ending at 300, 500 and 3000 m above the station were computed using the HYSPLIT model. The study shows that in the Gotland region, variability in aerosol optical thickness AOT(500) is more strongly related to advections in the boundary layer than to those in the free troposphere. The observed variability in AOT(500) was best explained by the advection speeds and directions given by clustering of 4-day backward trajectories of air arriving in the boundary layer at 500 m above the station. 17 clusters of 4-day trajectories arriving at altitude 500 m above the Gotland station (sea level) derived using two-stage cluster analysis differ from each other with respect to trajectory length, the speed of air mass movement and the direction of advection. They also show different cluster means of AOT(500) and α(440,870). The cluster mean AOT(500) ranges from 0.342 ± 0.012 for the continental clusters M2 (east-southeast advection with moderate speed) and 0.294 ± 0.025 for S5 (slow south-southeast advection) to 0.064 ± 0.002 and 0.069 ± 0.002 for the respective marine clusters L3 (fast west-northwest advection) and M3 (north-northwest advection with moderate speed). The cluster mean α(440,870) varies from 1.65-1.70 for the short-trajectory clusters to 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.06 ± 0.03 for the Arctic marine cluster L4 (fast inflow from the north) and marine cluster L5 (fast inflow from the west) respectively.

  1. Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Yan, Fang; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C; Feng, Yan; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Shang; Pinto, Joseph P; Carmichael, Gregory R

    2015-04-21

    Organic aerosols (OAs) in the atmosphere affect Earth's energy budget by not only scattering but also absorbing solar radiation due to the presence of the so-called "brown carbon" (BrC) component. However, the absorptivities of OAs are not represented or are poorly represented in current climate and chemical transport models. In this study, we provide a method to constrain the BrC absorptivity at the emission inventory level using recent laboratory and field observations. We review available measurements of the light-absorbing primary OA (POA), and quantify the wavelength-dependent imaginary refractive indices (kOA, the fundamental optical parameter determining the particle's absorptivity) and their uncertainties for the bulk POA emitted from biomass/biofuel, lignite, propane, and oil combustion sources. In particular, we parametrize the kOA of biomass/biofuel combustion sources as a function of the black carbon (BC)-to-OA ratio, indicating that the absorptive properties of POA depend strongly on burning conditions. The derived fuel-type-based kOA profiles are incorporated into a global carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory, and the integrated kOA values of sectoral and total POA emissions are presented. Results of a simple radiative transfer model show that the POA absorptivity warms the atmosphere significantly and leads to ∼27% reduction in the amount of the net global average POA cooling compared to results from the nonabsorbing assumption.

  2. A New, Physically Based Algorithm, for Retrieving Aerosol Properties over Land from MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Mattoo, S.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2004-12-01

    The MODerate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) has been successfully retrieving aerosol properties, beginning in early 2000 from Terra and from mid 2002 from Aqua. Over land, the retrieval algorithm makes use of three MODIS channels, in the blue, red and infrared wavelengths. As part of the validation exercises, retrieved spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT) has been compared via scatterplots against spectral AOT measured by the global Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). On one hand, global and long term validation looks promising, with two-thirds (average plus and minus one standard deviation) of all points falling between published expected error bars. On the other hand, regression of these points shows a positive y-offset and a slope less than 1.0. For individual regions, such as along the U.S. East Coast, the offset and slope are even worse. Here, we introduce an overhaul of the algorithm for retrieving aerosol properties over land, to include more physical, less empirical assumptions. The new algorithm will include surface type information, instead of assuming globally fixed ratios of visible to infrared surface reflectance. It will include updated aerosol optical properties to reflect the growing aerosol retrieved from eight-plus years of AERONET operation. The effects of polarization will be including during lookup table creation, using vector RT calculations. Most importantly, the new algorithm does not assume that aerosol is transparent in the infrared channel. This new formulation will invert reflectance observed in the three channels (blue, red, and infrared), rather than performing iterative single channel retrievals.

  3. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  4. Vacuum FTIR observation on hygroscopic properties and phase transition of malonic acid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xu; Zhang, Yun; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach based on a combination of a pulse relative humidity (RH) controlling system and a rapid scan vacuum FTIR spectrometer was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic property and phase transition of malonic acid (MA) aerosols. By using this approach, both water vapor amount around the aerosols and water content within aerosols with sub-second time resolution were obtained. Based on the features of FTIR absorbing bands, it can be known that the evolution of hydrogen-bonding structures of malonic acid aerosols took place from (H2O)n-MA to MA-MA accompanying with phase transition in the dehumidifying process. And in present paper, the stepwise efflorescence of MA aerosols and nucleation rates at different RHs are first reported. Our observation has shown that the efflorescence of MA started at ∼17% RH and the nucleation rates increased with decreasing RH.

  5. Improved aerosol radiative properties as a foundation for solar geoengineering risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Keith, D. W.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2016-07-01

    Side effects resulting from the deliberate injection of sulfate aerosols intended to partially offset climate change have motivated the investigation of alternatives, including solid aerosol materials. Sulfate aerosols warm the tropical tropopause layer, increasing the flux of water vapor into the stratosphere, accelerating ozone loss, and increasing radiative forcing. The high refractive index of some solid materials may lead to reduction in these risks. We present a new analysis of the scattering efficiency and absorption of a range of candidate solid aerosols. We utilize a comprehensive radiative transfer model driven by updated, physically consistent estimates of optical properties. We compute the potential increase in stratospheric water vapor and associated longwave radiative forcing. We find that the stratospheric heating calculated in this analysis indicates some materials to be substantially riskier than previous work. We also find that there are Earth-abundant materials that may reduce some principal known risks relative to sulfate aerosols.

  6. “Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites”

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David

    2015-01-13

    Project goals; Characterize the aerosol and ice vertical distributions over the ARM NSA site, and in particular to discriminate between elevated aerosol layers and ice clouds in optically thin scattering layers; Characterize the water vapor and aerosol vertical distributions over the ARM Darwin site, how these distributions vary seasonally, and quantify the amount of water vapor and aerosol that is above the boundary layer; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds; and Use the high temporal Raman lidar data to continue to characterize the turbulence within the convective boundary layer and how the turbulence statistics (e.g., variance, skewness) is correlated with larger scale variables predicted by models.

  7. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  8. Characterization of aerosol properties from polarimetric satellite observations using GRASP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Huang, Xin; Lopatin, Anton; Fuertes, David; Derimian, Yevgeny

    2016-04-01

    GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) is recently developed (Dubovik et al. 2011, 2014) sophisticated algorithm of new generation. The algorithm retrieves aerosol and surface properties simultaneously. It realizes statistically optimized fitting using multi-pixel concept when the retrieval is implemented simultaneously for a large group of satellite pixels. This allows for using additional a priori information about limited variability of aerosol of surface properties in time and/or space. GPASP searches in continuous space of solutions and doesn't utilize look-up-tables. GRASP doesn't use any location specific information about aerosol or surface type in the each observed pixel, and the results are essentially driven by observations. However GRASP retrieval takes longer computational time compare to most conventional algorithms. This main practical challenge of employing GRASP has been addressed during last two years and GRASP algorithm has been significantly optimized and adapted to operational needs. As a result of this optimization and GRASP has been accelerated to the level acceptable for processing large volumes of satellite observations. Recently GRASP has been applied to multi-years archives of PARASO/POLDER. The analysis of the results shows that GRASP retrievals provide rather robust and comprehensive aerosol characterization including such properties as absorption and aerosol type even for observations over bright surfaces and for monitoring very high aerosol loading events (with AOD up to 3 or 4). In addition, the attempts to estimate such aerosol characteristics as aerosol height, air quality, radiative forcing, etc. have been made. The results and illustrations will be presented.

  9. Some Technical Aspects of a CALIOP and MODIS Data Analysis that Examines Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    CALIOP shows stronger near-cloud changes in aerosol properties at higher cloud fractions. Cloud fraction variations explain a third of near-cloud changes in overall aerosol statistics. Cloud fraction and aerosol particle size distribution have a complex relationship.

  10. Reconstruction of Aerosol Properties from Forward-scattering Intensities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    image aerosol particles using digital holography in a flow- through, contact-free manner. Particles in an aerosol stream are illuminated by a...triggered, pulsed laser and the pattern produced by the interference of this light with that scattered by the particles is recorded by a digital camera...The recorded pattern constitutes a digital hologram from which an image of the particles is computationally reconstructed using a fast Fourier

  11. Source Strength and Scattering Properties of Organic Marine Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-20

    aerosol LONG-TERM GOAL My long term goal is to quantify the role played by sea salt in radiative scattering in the marine environment. This project studies...the number of aerosol particles produced from sea salt under different marine conditions. Studying the chemical composition of those particles...provides important information about their behavior in the atmosphere. OBJECTIVES I would like to see whether the number of sea salt particles observed in

  12. A Global Survey of Shipboard Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties over the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Quinn, P.; Bartholomew, M. J.

    2001-12-01

    Marine aerosols contribute to the global albedo in two ways: direct scattering of incoming solar radiation to space (the direct effect) and modulation of the scattering properties of marine clouds (the indirect effect). The shortwave scattering and absorption characteristics of the marine atmosphere vary widely in space and time due to the variety of aerosol types, aerosol concentrations, and cloud structures that can be present. Aerosols over the oceans may originate from a variety of sources. Some are locally produced by wind-wave interaction while others are advected over great distances by the wind. In clear skies, advected continental aerosols can have a significantly different radiative impact than those that are locally produced. In cloudy skies, continental aerosol can cause modifications to the cloud droplet distribution in marine boundary layer clouds. Therefore, it is important to understand the spatial, temporal, and physical characteristics of aerosol over the world's oceans. Although information about aerosol optical properties over the world's oceans is critical, shipboard sun photometer measurements of these properties are relatively sparse. As part of our NASA SIMBIOS work and with additional support from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Program (ARM) program, the number of shipboard measurements has increased exponentially due to the development of a marine version of the Fast-Rotating, Shadow-band spectral Radiometer (FRSR). This instrument makes continuous, semi-automated shipboard measurements of the direct-normal, diffuse, and global irradiance in seven channels (415 nm, 500 nm, 610 nm, 660 nm, 862 nm, 936 nm, and broadband) and does not require a mechanically stabilized platform, thereby making it cost effective and reliable. The aerosol optical thickness is computed continuously from the direct-normal component of irradiance using calibration constants obtained using the Langley technique. The FRSR has been deployed on

  13. Remote sensing of aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate by the combination of sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi; Higuchi, Yuji; Hayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Atsushi; Aoki, Kazuma

    2017-02-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from combining the measurements of the sky radiometer in SKYNET and the lidar in AD-Net. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, real and imaginary parts of the refractive index, and size distribution. The solar heating rate was estimated from these parameters. The algorithm was applied to the transported dust case, and the detailed vertical structures of the optical properties and the solar heating rate and their relationship were shown. For the validation of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, the vertical profile of the aerosol size distribution from the surface to the altitude of about 3 km was directly observed by the optical particle counter on board the glider. The comparison of the SKYLIDAR derived extinction coefficient with that estimated from OPC measurements showed that the SKYLIDAR result had a bias error due to the optimization of aerosol parameters to the optical thickness measured by the sky radiometer.

  14. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  15. Physical and chemical properties of aerosols at a coastal site Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Chand, D.; Wood, R.; Wallace, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Shaw, G. E.; Krejci, R.; Fochesatto, G. J.; Gallardo, L.

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) Regional Experiment (REx) and associated modeling program is an improved understanding of aerosol indirect effects over the southeast Pacific (SEP). Details on the program are available online at www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/. To this end, detailed aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made during REx at a coastal land site at Paposo (25o 0.4' S, 70o 27.011' W, 690 masl) in northern Chile, a site ideally positioned for studying continental aerosol sources advecting over the SEP. We present initial analysis of data from Paposo. Detailed measurements of aerosol properties were made from mid October to mid November 2008. Observations from optical particle counters (OPC), nephelometers, aethalometer, scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the chemical analysis of the submicron aerosols samples collected on teflon filters are being used in this study. Large variations in aerosols parameters were observed which corresponded with changes in meteorology, as determined using trajectory analysis. Ion Chromatograph (IC) analysis of submicron aerosol samples shows that about 41% of submicron mass is sulfate. The light scattering coefficient shows a strong non-linear correlation with aerosol size observed using an OPC. Detailed results will be presented in the AGU meeting.

  16. Climatological Aspects of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S.N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Dubovik O.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse mode desert dust combined with fine mode combustion generated aerosols (from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources) were investigated at three locations that are in and/or downwind of major global aerosol emission source regions. Multiyear monitoring data at Aerosol Robotic Network sites in Beijing (central eastern China), Kanpur (Indo-Gangetic Plain, northern India), and Ilorin (Nigeria, Sudanian zone of West Africa) were utilized to study the climatological characteristics of aerosol optical properties. Multiyear climatological averages of spectral single scattering albedo (SSA) versus fine mode fraction (FMF) of aerosol optical depth at 675 nm at all three sites exhibited relatively linear trends up to 50% FMF. This suggests the possibility that external linear mixing of both fine and coarse mode components (weighted by FMF) dominates the SSA variation, where the SSA of each component remains relatively constant for this range of FMF only. However, it is likely that a combination of other factors is also involved in determining the dynamics of SSA as a function of FMF, such as fine mode particles adhering to coarse mode dust. The spectral variation of the climatological averaged aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) was nearly linear in logarithmic coordinates over the wavelength range of 440-870 nm for both the Kanpur and Ilorin sites. However, at two sites in China (Beijing and Xianghe), a distinct nonlinearity in spectral AAOD in logarithmic space was observed, suggesting the possibility of anomalously strong absorption in coarse mode aerosols increasing the 870 nm AAOD.

  17. Classification of aerosol radiative properties during African desert dust intrusions over southeastern Spain by sector origins and cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Quirantes, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-03-01

    The main goal of this study is to analyze the dependence of columnar aerosol optical and microphysical properties on source region and transport pathways during desert dust intrusions over Granada (Spain) from January 2005 to December 2010. Columnar aerosol properties have been derived from a non-spherical inversion code using the solar extinction measurements and sky radiances in the principal plane. Two classification methods of the African air masses ending at the study location were used by means of the HYSPLIT back-trajectories analysis. The first one, based on desert dust origin sources, discriminated the optical properties only for sector B (corresponding to western Sahara, northwest Mauritania and southwest Algeria). The particles present marked absorbing properties (low value of single scattering albedo at all wavelengths) during the desert dust events when the air masses were transported from sector A (north Morocco, northwest Algeria). This result may be related to the mixing of desert dust with anthropogenic pollutants from North African industrial areas in addition to the mixing with local anthropogenic aerosol and pollutants transported from European and Mediterranean areas. The second classification method was based on a statistics technique called cluster classification which allows grouping the air masses back trajectories with similar speed and direction of the trajectory. This method showed slight differences in the optical properties between the several transport pathways of air masses. High values of the aerosol optical depth and low mean values of the Angström parameter were associated with longer transport pathways over desert dust sources and slowly moving air masses. Both classification methods showed that the fine mode was mixed with coarse mode, being the fine mode fraction smaller than 55%.

  18. Evaluating the representation of aerosol optical properties using an online coupled model over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Peña, Laura; Baró, Rocío; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Brunner, Dominik; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric aerosol particles on the Earth's climate mainly depend on their optical, microphysical and chemical properties, which modify the Earth's radiative budget. The aerosol radiative effects can be divided into direct and semi-direct effects, produced by the aerosol-radiation interactions (ARIs), and indirect effects, produced by aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs). In this sense the objective of this work is to assess whether the inclusion of aerosol radiative feedbacks in the online coupled WRF-Chem model improves the modelling outputs over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) and surrounding water areas. For this purpose, the methodology is based on the evaluation of modelled aerosol optical properties under different simulation scenarios. The evaluated data come from two WRF-Chem simulations for the IP differing in the inclusion/no-inclusion of ARIs and ACIs (RF/NRF simulations). The case studies cover two episodes with different aerosol types over the IP in 2010, namely a Saharan dust outbreak and a forest fire episode. The evaluation uses observational data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE). Experimental data of aerosol vertical distribution from the EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) Granada station are used for checking the models. The results indicate that for the spatial distribution the best-represented variable is AOD and the largest improvements when including the aerosol radiative feedbacks are found for the vertical distribution. In the case of the dust outbreak, a slight improvement (worsening) is produced over the areas with medium (high/low) levels of AOD(-9 % / +12 % of improvement) when including the aerosol radiative feedbacks. For the wildfire episode, improvements of AOD representation (up to 11 %) over areas further away from emission sources are estimated

  19. Aerosol optical properties and types over the tropical urban region of Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Rani Sharma, Anu; Kvs, Badarinath; Kambezidis, H. D.

    India is densely populated, industrialized and in the recent years has witnessed an impressive economic development. Aerosols over and around India not only affect the Indian monsoon but also the global climate. The growing population coupled with revolution in industry has resulted in higher demands for energy and transport. With more and more urbanization the usage pattern of fossil and bio-fuels are leading to changes in aerosol properties, which may cause changes in precipitation and can decelerate the hydrological cycle. Over urban areas of India aerosol emissions from fossil fuels such as coal, petrol and diesel oil dominate. Further-more, the Indian subcontinent exhibits different land characteristics ranging from vegetated areas and forests to semiarid and arid environments and tall mountains. India experiences large seasonal climatic variations, which result in extreme temperatures, rainfall and relative humidity. These meteorological and climatic features introduce large variabilities in aerosol op-tical and physico-chemical characteristics at spatial and temporal scales. In the present study, seasonal variations in aerosol properties and types were analysed over tropical urban region of Hyderabad, India during October 2007-September 2008 using MICROTOPS II sun photometer measurements. Higher aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are observed in premonsoon, while the variability of the ˚ngstrüm exponent (α) seems to be more pronounced with higher values A in winter and premonsoon and lower in the monsoon periods. The AOD at 500 nm (AOD500 ) is very large over Hyderabad, varying from 0.46±0.17 in postmonsoon to 0.65±0.22 in premon-soon periods. A discrimination of the different aerosol types over Hyderabad is also attempted using values of AOD500 and α380-870. Such discrimination is rather difficult to interpret since a single aerosol type can partly be identified only under specific conditions (e.g. anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning or dust

  20. Radiative forcing of climate in the western Antarctic Peninsula: Effects of cloud, surface, and aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Allison Mccomiskey

    2003-12-01

    Polar regions are expected to show early and extreme responses to a rise in average global temperatures. The region west of the Antarctic Peninsula has shown a significant rise in temperature of the past half century while temperatures over the rest of the continent are decreasing. Approximately half of the warming over the western Antarctic Peninsula has been explained by changes in atmospheric circulation. This research has examined local climate feedback processes involving aerosols, clouds, and surface properties relative to sea ice cover, to explain the remainder of the warming, and addresses the most appropriate approach in examining local radiative processes. Two data sets are used: a highly resolved ground-based data set from the spring and summer season of 1999 2000 at Palmer Station, Antarctica and a 14 year satellite-derived data set. A three- dimensional radiative transfer model is shown to perform better than the plane-parallel models traditionally used for this application. Aerosol concentrations are low, as expected, and have a typical optical depth of 0.05 which has little effect on surface radiation budgets and climate feedback processes. An absorption process is found on three clear-sky days that accounts for 5 20 W·m-2 of energy absorbed by the atmosphere. The absorption process is of unknown origin. Cloud properties over the short- and long-term were found to be invariant with time and changes in temperature except in the summer season. Cloud radiative forcing was negative throughout the 14 year time period, but the majority of this effect was attributed to changes in surface properties (decreasing reflectance) rather than increasing cloud amount or thickness. The trend in cloud cover over the long-term and the effect of clouds on climate appears to be different in the region of the western Antarctic Peninsula than in the Arctic.

  1. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  2. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  3. Hygroscopic Properties of Aircraft Engine Exhaust Aerosol Produced From Traditional and Alternative Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Chen, G.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols constitute an important component of anthropogenic climate forcing, of which aerosol-cloud interactions remain poorly understood. It is currently thought that the ability of these aerosols to alter upper tropospheric cirrus cloud properties may produce radiative forcings many times larger than the impact of linear contrails alone and which may partially offset the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation (Burkhardt and Karcher, Nature, 2011). Consequently, it is important to characterize the ability of these engine-emitted aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to form clouds. While a number of studies in the literature have examined aerosol-cloud interactions for laboratory-generated soot or from aircraft engines burning traditional fuels, limited attention has been given to how switching to alternative jet fuels impacts the ability of engine-emitted aerosols to form clouds. The key to understanding these changes is the aerosol hygroscopicity. To address this need, the second NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX-II) was conducted in 2011 to examine the aerosol emissions from the NASA DC-8 under a variety of different engine power and fuel type conditions. Five fuel types were considered including traditional JP-8 fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsh (FT) fuel , sulfur-doped FT fuel (FTS) , hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuel, and a 50:50 blend of JP-8 with HRJ. Emissions were sampled from the DC-8 on the airport jetway at a distance of 145 meters downwind of the engine by a comprehensive suite of aerosol instrumentation that provided information on the aerosol concentration, size distribution, soot mass, and CCN activity. Concurrent measurements of carbon dioxide were used to account for plume dilution so that characteristic emissions indices could be determined. It is found that both engine power and fuel type significantly influence the hygroscopic properties of

  4. Hygroscopic properties of urban aerosols and their cloud condensation nuclei activities measured in Seoul during the MAPS-Seoul campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Najin; Park, Minsu; Yum, Seong Soo; Park, Jong Sung; Song, In Ho; Shin, Hye Jung; Ahn, Joon Young; Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Hwajin; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Lee, Gangwoong

    2017-03-01

    Aerosol physical properties, chemical compositions, hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities were measured in Seoul, the highly populated capital city of Korea, during the Megacity Air Pollution Studies (MAPS-Seoul) campaign, in May-June 2015. The average aerosol concentration for particle diameters >10 nm was 11787 ± 7421 cm-3 with dominant peaks at morning rush hours and in the afternoon due to frequent new particle formation (NPF) events. The average CCN concentration was 4075 ± 1812 cm-3 at 0.6% supersaturation, with little diurnal variation. The average hygroscopicity parameter (κ) value determined using a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) ranged 0.17-0.27 for a range of particle diameters (30-150 nm). The κ values derived using the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data with three different methods were 0.32-0.34, significantly higher than those from HTDMA due to the uncertainties in the hygroscopicity values of different chemical compositions, especially organics and black carbon. Factors affecting the aerosol hygroscopicity seemed to be traffic and chemical processes during the NPF events. The CCN concentration predicted based on HTDMA κ data showed very good agreement with the measured one. Because of the overestimation of κ, CCN closure with the predicted CCN concentration based on AMS κ data over-predicted CCN concentration although the linear correlation between measured and predicted CCN concentration was still very good.

  5. AERONET-based microphysical and optical properties of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-09-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad ''families'' of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA ∼0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA ∼0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA ∼0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysical/optical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  6. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  7. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  8. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  9. Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2007-07-01

    Aerosols exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently there is a need to represent aerosol effects in global climate models, and models have begun to include representations of these effects. However, the treatment of aerosols in current global climate models is presently highly simplified, omitting many important processes and feedbacks. Consequently there is need for substantial improvement. Here we describe the U. S. Department of Energy strategy for improving the treatment of aerosol properties and processes in global climate models. The strategy begins with a foundation of field and laboratory measurements that provide the basis for modules of selected aerosol properties and processes. These modules are then integrated in regional aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with field measurements. Issues of scale are then addressed so that the modules can be applied to global aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with global satellite measurements. Finally, the validated set of modules are applied to global climate models for multi-century simulations. This strategy can be applied to successive generations of global climate models.

  10. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  11. Sensitivity of thermal infrared sounders to the chemical and micro-physical properties of UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulphate aerosols and their chemical and micro-physical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact to the UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealized UTLS sulphate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulphuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interferring parameters like the ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile

  12. Relationship between CCN activation properties and oxidation level of aerosol organics observed during recent field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Zhang, Q.; Xu, J.; Setyan, A.; Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Allan, J. D.; Taylor, J.; Jimenez, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Organic compounds are an important component of atmospheric aerosol, and can contribute upward of ~90% of total fine aerosol mass. Atmospheric aerosols often consist of hundreds of organic species, and their hygroscopicities are not well understood. This incomplete understanding limits our ability to accurately simulate aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum and therefore the aerosol indirect effects, which remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period. In this study, the hygroscopicity of aerosol organics characterized during three recent field campaigns, CalNex-LA (Pasadena, California), CARES (Cool, CA), and Aerosol lifecycle IOP (Upton, NY), is presented. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles, which were mixtures of both inorganic and organic species, is first determined from the size-resolved activation efficiency spectrum. Based on measured aerosol chemical composition, the hygroscopicity of organics is then derived from the particle hygroscopicity by subtracting the contribution of inorganic species, whose hygroscopicities are well understood. During the three field studies, organic aerosols were characterized within a number of representative air masses, including urban plumes and those dominated by biogenic emissions. Aerosol organics measured by HR-ToF-AMS exhibit various degrees of photochemical aging, with the atomic O:C ratio ranges from ~0.35 to ~0.65. The hygroscopicity of organics is well correlated with its O:C ratio, increasing from 0.07 at the O:C ratio of 0.35 to 0.16 at the O:C ratio of 0.65. This suggests that to the first order, a simple, semi-empirical parameterization of organic aerosol hygroscopicity based on oxidation level can be developed for global models. While the measurements show that aerosol organics can substantially influence the droplet growth kinetics by modifying particle critical supersaturation, size-classified organic particles exhibit essentially identical growth

  13. Aerosol Optical Properties Characterization By Means Of The CNR-IMAA Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Pappalardo, G.

    2007-12-01

    A Raman/elastic lidar for tropospheric aerosol study is operational at CNR-IMAA (40°36'N, 15°44'E, 760 m above sea level) since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET. Since August 2005, this system provides aerosol backscatter coefficient profiles at 1064 nm, and independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 and 532 nm. In this way, lidar ratio (i.e. extinction to backscatter ratio) profiles at 355 and 532 nm are also obtained. In addition, depolarization ratio measurements at 532 nm are obtained by means of detection of components of backscattered light polarized perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the linearly polarized transmitted laser beam. Depolarization ratio measurements provide information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles, while lidar ratio measurements and wavelength dependences of both backscatter and extinction are important for aerosol characterization in terms of aerosol type and size. In addition, high quality multi-wavelength measurements (3 backscatter + 2 extinction) can allow the determination of microphysical aerosol properties (refractive index, single-scattering albedo and effective particles radii). Systematic measurements are performed three times per week according to the EARLINET schedule since May 2000, and further measurements are performed in order to investigate particular events, like dust intrusions, volcanic eruptions and forest fires. This extended dataset allows the optical characterization of aerosol located close to the surface, namely in the Planetary Boundary Layer, as well as in the free troposphere. In the free troposphere, an high occurrence of Saharan dust intrusions at CNR-IMAA (about 1 day of Saharan dust intrusion every 10 days) has been identified by means of back-trajectory analysis and in accordance with satellite images, because of the short distance from the Sahara region. In addition, CNR-IMAA is pretty close to Etna, the largest European

  14. Photoelectrochemical Properties of Graphene and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Adán-Más, Alberto; Wei, Di

    2013-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives combine a numerous range of supreme properties that can be useful in many applications. The purpose of this review is to analyse the photoelectrochemical properties of pristine graphene, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and their impact on semiconductor catalysts/quantum dots. The mechanism that this group of materials follows to improve their performance will be cleared by explaining how those properties can be exploited in several applications such as photo-catalysts (degradation of pollutants) and photovoltaics (solar cells). PMID:28348339

  15. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 2. Hygroscopic growth properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Friedman, Beth; Gross, Deborah S.; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Spichtinger, Peter; Gysel, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-10

    Sub-arctic aerosols were sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Scientific Research Station Stordalen site in northern Sweden with an instrument setup consisting of a custom-built Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) connected in series to a single particle mass spectrometer. Aerosol chemical composition in the form of bipolar single particle mass spectra was determined as a function of hygroscopic growth both in situ and in real time. The HTDMA was deployed at a relative humidity of 82% and particles with a dry mobility diameter of 260 nm were selected. Aerosols from two distinct airmasses were analyzed during the sampling period. Sea salt aerosols were found to be the dominant particle group with the highest hygroscopicity. High intensities of sodium and related peaks in the mass spectra were identified as exclusive markers for large hygroscopic growth. Particles from biomass combustion were found to be the least hygroscopic aerosol category. Species normally considered soluble (e.g., sulfates and nitrates) were found in particles ranging from high to low hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the signal intensities of the peaks related to these species did not correlate with hygroscopicity.

  16. Uncertainties in Carbonaceous Aerosol Emissions, Scavenging Parameterizations, and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T.; Kinne, S.; Klimont, Z.; Sun, H.; van Aardenne, J.; van der Werf, G.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of human influence on climate are especially hindered by poor constraint on the amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the atmosphere. Coordination of observation and model analyses attempt to constrain particle absorption amount, however these are limited by uncertainties in aerosol emission estimates, model scavenging parameterization, aerosol size assumption, contributions from organic aerosol absorption, air concentration observational techniques and by sparsity of data coverage. We perform multiple simulations using GISS modelE and six present-day emission estimates for black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) (Bond et al 2004 middle and upper estimates, IIASA, EDGAR, GFED v1 and v2); for one of these emissions we apply 4 different BC/OC scavenging parameterizations. The resulting concentrations will be compared with a new compilation of observed BC/OC concentrations. We then use these model concentrations, together with effective radius assumptions and estimates of OC absorption to calculate a range of carbonaceous aerosol absorption. We constrain the wavelength-dependent model τ- absorption with AERONET sun-photometer observations. We will discuss regions, seasons and emission sectors with greatest uncertainty, including those where observational constraint is lacking. We calculate the range of model radiative forcing from our simulations and discuss the degree to which it is constrained by observations.

  17. Beyond the Alphabet Soup: Molecular Properties of Aerosol Components Influence Optics. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Components within atmospheric aerosols exhibit almost every imaginable model of chemical bonding and physical diversity. The materials run the spectrum from crystalline to amorphous, covalent to ionic, and have varying viscosities, phase, and hygroscopicity. This seminar will focus on the molecular properties of materials that influence the optical behavior of aerosols. Special focus will be placed on the polarizability of materials, hygroscopic growth, and particle phase.

  18. Calculation of aerosol optical properties under different assumptions on mixing state, refractive index, density and hygroscopicity: uncertainties and importance of representation of aerosol mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. We used the FlexAOD post-processing tool to calculate the optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (g)) from chemistry-transport model aerosol profiles, using a wide range of assumptions on aerosol chemical and physical properties. We calculated that the most important factor of uncertainty is the assumption about the mixing state, for which we estimate an uncertainty of 30-35% on the simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The choice of the core composition in the core-shell representation is of minor importance for calculation of AOD, while it is critical for the SSA. Other factors of uncertainty tested here have a maximum average impact of 10% each on calculated AOD, and an impact of a few percent on SSA and g. We then tested simple parameterizations of the aerosol mixing state, expressed as a function of the aerosol aging, and verified that they may be helpful in reducing the uncertainty when comparing simulations with AERONET retrievals.

  19. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  20. Technical Note: Determination of aerosol optical properties by a calibrated sky imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Shields, J. E.; Karr, M. E.; Olmo, F. J.; Burden, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2009-09-01

    The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), has been tested with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) at the Southern Great Plain site (SGP) to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440-870 nm, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01), in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1) in 50% of the cases for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  1. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  2. Two-Channel Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Properties: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1999-01-01

    In order to reduce current uncertainties in the evaluation of the direct and indirect effects of tropospheric aerosols on climate on the global scale, it has been suggested to apply multi-channel retrieval algorithms to the full period of existing satellite data. This talk will outline the methodology of interpreting two-channel satellite radiance data over the ocean and describe a detailed analysis of the sensitivity of retrieved aerosol parameters to the assumptions made in different retrieval algorithms. We will specifically address the calibration and cloud screening issues, consider the suitability of existing satellite data sets to detecting short- and long-term regional and global changes, compare preliminary results obtained by several research groups, and discuss the prospects of creating an advanced retroactive climatology of aerosol optical thickness and size over the oceans.

  3. Detailed Characterization of aerosol properties from satellite Observations using GRASP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, O.; Litvinov, P.; Lapyonok, T.; Ducos, F.; Huang, X.; Lopatin, A.; Fuertes, D.; Torres, B.

    2015-12-01

    GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) is rather sophisticated algorithm was developed recently by Dubovik et al. (2011, 2014) with objective of achieving more complete and accurate aerosols and surface retrieval. Specifically, GPASP searches in continuous space of solutions and doesn't utilize look-up-tables. It based on highly elaborated statistically optimized fitting. For example, it uses multi-pixel retrieval when statistically optimized inversion is implemented simultaneously for a group of satellite pixels. This allows using additional a priori information about limited variability of aerosol of surface properties in time and/or space. As a result, GRASP doesn't use any specific information about aerosol or surface type in the each observed pixel, and the results are essentially driven by observations. However GRASP retrieval takes longer computational time compare to most conventional algorithms that is the main practical challenge of employing GRASP for massive data processing. Nonetheless, in last two years, GRASP has been significantly optimized and adapted to operational needs. As a result of this optimization, GRASP has been accelerated to the level acceptable for processing large volumes of satellite observations. Recently GRASP has been applied to multi-years archives of PARASO/POLDER and ENVISAT/MERIS. Based, on the preliminary analysis GRASP results are very promising for comprehensive characterization of aerosol even for observations over bright surfaces and for monitoring very high aerosol loading events (with AOD 2 or 3). In addition, it was made the attempts to estimate such aerosol characteristics as aerosol height, air mass, radiative forcing, aerosol type, etc. The results and illustrations will be presented.

  4. Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity

  5. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, K.; Praveen, P. S.; Thomas, R. M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wilcox, E.; Bender, F. A.-M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood, as changes in atmospheric conditions due to aerosol may change the expected magnitude of indirect effects by altering cloud properties in unexpected ways. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season. In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements of atmospheric precipitable water vapor and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds were made, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol. Here we present evidence of a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP which becomes clear after the data are filtered to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region. We then use the aircraft and ground observatory measurements to explore the mechanisms behind the observed aerosol-LWP correlation. We determine that increased boundary-layer humidity lowering the cloud base is responsible for the observed increase in cloud liquid water. Large-scale analysis indicates that high pollution cases originate with a highly-polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly direction. This polluted mass exhibits higher temperatures and humidity than the clean case, the former of which may be attributable to heating due to aerosol absorption of solar radiation over the subcontinent. While high temperature conditions dispersed along with the high-aerosol

  6. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  7. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  8. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  9. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  10. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-07-01

    explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has a stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite observations is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by a new generation PARASOL algorithm was evaluated. The comparison of AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved from the POLDER/PARASOL observations over Kyiv with the closest AERONET retrievals within 30 min of satellite overpass time and with a cloudless day shows acceptable agreement of the aerosol dynamics. The correspondence of those data is observed even for extreme AOT440 value 1.14, which was caused by the forest and peat fires in August 2010.

  11. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; ...

    2016-09-19

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16–36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated withmore » an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding  ∼  100 µg m−3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0  ×  10−13 cm3 molec−1 s−1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (>  1  ×  1012 molec cm−3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH =  0.59 ± 0.33 in SE US and γOH =  0.68 ± 0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake. No decrease of kOH was observed as OH concentrations increased. These observations of physicochemical

  12. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peng, Zhe; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Baumann, Karsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Koss, Abigail R.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex B.; Kim, Saewung; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16–36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated with an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding ~100 µg m-3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0 ×10-13 cm3 molec-1 s-1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (> 1 × 1012 molec cm-3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH = 0.59±0.33 in SE US and γOH = 0.68±0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake

  13. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peng, Zhe; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Baumann, Karsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Koss, Abigail R.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex B.; Kim, Saewung; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-09-01

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16-36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated with an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding ˜ 100 µg m-3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0 × 10-13 cm3 molec-1 s-1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (> 1 × 1012 molec cm-3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH = 0.59 ± 0.33 in SE US and γOH = 0.68 ± 0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake. No decrease of kOH was observed as OH concentrations increased. These observations of physicochemical properties of IEPOX-SOA can help to constrain OA impact on air quality and climate.

  14. Aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Hamre, B.; Frette, Ø.; Blindheim, S.; Stebel, K.; Sobolewski, P.; Toledano, C.; Stamnes, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations at Andenes (69.28° N, 16.01° E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77.00° N, 15.56° E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2011. The four-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund both were 0.10. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.25 and 1.37, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.1 in 64% and 86% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar seasonal variation of the aerosol size distribution although one site is in an arctic area while the other site is in a sub-arctic area.

  15. Aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øyvind; Muyimbwa, Dennis; Blindheim, Sandra; Stebel, Kerstin; Sobolewski, Piotr; Toledano, Carlos; Stamnes, Jakob J

    2016-02-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations at Andenes (69.28°N, 16.01°E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77.00°N, 15.56°E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2013. The five/six-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund both were 0.09. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.29 and 1.34, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.1 in 68% and 84% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar aerosol size distribution during summer although one site is in an arctic area while the other site is in a subarctic area.

  16. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Wilcox, Eric M.; Bender, Frida A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m-2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol-LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly

  17. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Hygroscopic Properties at the Look Rock Site during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Li, X.; Surratt, J. D.; Hicks, W.; Bairai, S. T.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is to characterize the climate-relevant properties of aerosols over the southeastern United States at the interface of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. As part of the SOAS campaign, the UCD cavity ringdown/photoacoustic spectrometer was deployed to make in-situ measurements of aerosol light extinction, absorption and sub-saturated hygroscopicity at the Look Rock site (LRK) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The site is influenced by substantial biogenic emissions with varying impacts from anthropogenic pollutants, allowing for direct examination of the optical and hygroscopic properties of anthropogenic-influenced biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA). During the experiment period, the average dry aerosol extinction (Bext), absorption (Babs) coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 532 nm were 30.3 × 16.5 Mm-1, 1.12 × 0.78 Mm-1 and 0.96 × 0.06. The Babs at 532 nm was well correlated (r2 = 0.79) with the refractory black carbon (rBC) number concentration determined by a single particle soot spectrometer (SP2). The absorption by black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) and the absorption enhancement due to the 'lensing' effect were quantified by comparing the Babs of ambient and thermo-denuded aerosols at 405 nm and 532 nm. The optical sub-saturated hygroscopic growth factor was derived from extinction and particle size distribution measurements at dry and elevated relative humidity. In addition, to explore the extent to which ammonia mediated chemistry leads to BrC formation, as suggested in recent laboratory studies(1,2), we performed an NH3 perturbation experiment in-situ for 1 week during the study, in which ambient aerosols were exposed to approximately 100 ppb NH3 with a residence time of ~ 3hr. The broader implications of these observational data at LRK will be discussed in the context of the concurrent gas and aerosol chemical

  18. Determination of the broadband optical properties of biomass burning aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    The direct and semi-direct effects of atmospheric aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are still the two of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of anthropogenic radiative forcing. In this study we developed a new approach for determining high sensitivity broadband UV-Vis spectrum (300-650 nm) of extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo and the complex refractive index for continuous, spectral and time dependent, monitoring of polydisperse aerosols population. This new approach was applied in a study of biomass burning aerosol. Extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients (αext, αsca, αabs, respectively) were continually monitored using photoacoustic spectrometer coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer (PA-CRD-AS) at 404 nm, a dual-channel Broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer (BBCES) at 315-345 nm and 390-420 nm and a three channel integrating nephelometer (IN) centered at 457, 525 and 637 nm. During the biomass burning event, the measured aerosol number concentration increased by more than an order of magnitude relative to other week nights and the mode of the aerosols size distribution increased from 40-50 nm to 110nm diameter. αext and αsca increased by a factor of about 5.5 and 4.5, respectively. The αabs increased by a factor over 20, indicating a significant change in the aerosol overall chemical composition. The imaginary part of the complex RI at 404nm increased from its background level at about 0.02 to a peak of about 0.08 and the SSA decreased from 0.9 to about 0.6. Significant change of the absorption spectral dependence indicates formation of visible-light absorbing compounds. The mass absorption cross section of the water soluble organic aerosol (MACWSOA) reached up to about 12% of the corresponding value for black carbon (BC) at 450 nm and up to 30% at 300 nm. These results demonstrate the importance of biomass burning in understanding global and regional radiative forcing.

  19. Influence of biogenic pollen on optical properties of atmospheric aerosols observed by lidar over Gwangju, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Müller, Detlef; Lee, Hanlim; Choi, Tae Jin

    2013-04-01

    For the first time, optical properties of biogenic pollen, i.e., backscatter coefficients and depolarization ratios at 532 nm were retrieved by lidar observations. The extinction coefficient was derived with the assumption of possible values of the extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratio. We investigate the effect of the pollen on the optical properties of the observed atmospheric aerosols by comparing lidar and sun/sky radiometer measurements carried out at the lidar site. The observations were made with a depolarization lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science & Technology (GIST) in Gwangju, Korea (35.13°N, 126.50°E) during an intensive observational period that lasted from 5 to 7 May 2009. The pollen concentration was measured with a Burkard trap sampler at the roof top of the Gwangju Bohoon hospital which is located 1 km away from the lidar site. During the observation period, high pollen concentrations of 1360, 2696, and 1952 m-3 day-1 were measured on 5, 6, and 7 May, respectively. A high lidar depolarization ratio caused by biogenic pollen was only detected during daytime within the planetary boundary layer which was at 1.5-2.0 km height above ground during the observational period. The contribution of biogenic pollen to the total backscatter coefficient was estimated from the particle depolarization ratio. Average hourly values of pollen optical depth were retrieved by integrating the pollen extinction coefficients. We find average values of 0.062 ± 0.037, 0.041 ± 0.028 and 0.067 ± 0.036 at 532 nm on 5, 6, and 7 May, respectively. The contribution of pollen optical depth to total aerosol optical depth was 2-34%. The sun/sky radiometer data show that biogenic pollen can affect optical properties of atmospheric aerosol by increasing aerosol optical depth and decreasing the Ångström exponent during daytime during the season of high pollen emission.

  20. Cloud activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Jimenez, J.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols strongly influence the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). Currently, the indirect effects of aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period. This large uncertainty is in part due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets under climatically relevant supersaturations. During CalNex study, size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum and aerosol chemical composition were measured at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California from May 15 to June 6, 2010. Monodispersed aerosol particles are first classified using a differential mobility analyzer at sizes ranging from 25 to 320 nm. The activation efficiency of the classified aerosol, defined as the ratio of its CCN concentration (characterized by a DMT CCN counter) to total CN concentration (measured by a condensation particle counter, TSI 3771), is derived as a function of both particle size and supersaturation, which ranges from 0.08% to 0.39%. Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). In most of days, increases in aerosol mode diameter, organics mass loading, and aerosol organics volume fraction were observed from 10:00 AM to 15:00 PM. These increases are attributed to formation of secondary organic aerosols through photochemical reactions. On average, the aerosol was dominated by organics (~65% by volume), with the contribution from ammonium sulfate (~20%) and ammonium nitrate (~15%), and the balance being made up of elemental carbon. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis shows the oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) (~75%) was the dominant organics component. Additionally, the organics O:C ratio was within a narrow range of 0.50±0.12. Particle overall

  1. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  2. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  3. Contrasting influences of aerosols on cloud properties during deficient and abundant monsoon years.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin; Dave, Prashant; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2017-03-24

    Direct aerosol radiative forcing facilitates the onset of Indian monsoon rainfall, based on synoptic scale fast responses acting over timescales of days to a month. Here, we examine relationships between aerosols and coincident clouds over the Indian subcontinent, using observational data from 2000 to 2009, from the core monsoon region. Season mean and daily timescales were considered. The correlation analyses of cloud properties with aerosol optical depth revealed that deficient monsoon years were characterized by more frequent and larger decreases in cloud drop size and ice water path, but increases in cloud top pressure, with increases in aerosol abundance. The opposite was observed during abundant monsoon years. The correlations of greater aerosol abundance, with smaller cloud drop size, lower evidence of ice processes and shallower cloud height, during deficient rainfall years, imply cloud inhibition; while those with larger cloud drop size, greater ice processes and a greater cloud vertical extent, during abundant rainfall years, suggest cloud invigoration. The study establishes that continental aerosols over India alter cloud properties in diametrically opposite ways during contrasting monsoon years. The mechanisms underlying these effects need further analysis.

  4. Contrasting influences of aerosols on cloud properties during deficient and abundant monsoon years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Nitin; Dave, Prashant; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2017-03-01

    Direct aerosol radiative forcing facilitates the onset of Indian monsoon rainfall, based on synoptic scale fast responses acting over timescales of days to a month. Here, we examine relationships between aerosols and coincident clouds over the Indian subcontinent, using observational data from 2000 to 2009, from the core monsoon region. Season mean and daily timescales were considered. The correlation analyses of cloud properties with aerosol optical depth revealed that deficient monsoon years were characterized by more frequent and larger decreases in cloud drop size and ice water path, but increases in cloud top pressure, with increases in aerosol abundance. The opposite was observed during abundant monsoon years. The correlations of greater aerosol abundance, with smaller cloud drop size, lower evidence of ice processes and shallower cloud height, during deficient rainfall years, imply cloud inhibition; while those with larger cloud drop size, greater ice processes and a greater cloud vertical extent, during abundant rainfall years, suggest cloud invigoration. The study establishes that continental aerosols over India alter cloud properties in diametrically opposite ways during contrasting monsoon years. The mechanisms underlying these effects need further analysis.

  5. Contrasting influences of aerosols on cloud properties during deficient and abundant monsoon years

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nitin; Dave, Prashant; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Direct aerosol radiative forcing facilitates the onset of Indian monsoon rainfall, based on synoptic scale fast responses acting over timescales of days to a month. Here, we examine relationships between aerosols and coincident clouds over the Indian subcontinent, using observational data from 2000 to 2009, from the core monsoon region. Season mean and daily timescales were considered. The correlation analyses of cloud properties with aerosol optical depth revealed that deficient monsoon years were characterized by more frequent and larger decreases in cloud drop size and ice water path, but increases in cloud top pressure, with increases in aerosol abundance. The opposite was observed during abundant monsoon years. The correlations of greater aerosol abundance, with smaller cloud drop size, lower evidence of ice processes and shallower cloud height, during deficient rainfall years, imply cloud inhibition; while those with larger cloud drop size, greater ice processes and a greater cloud vertical extent, during abundant rainfall years, suggest cloud invigoration. The study establishes that continental aerosols over India alter cloud properties in diametrically opposite ways during contrasting monsoon years. The mechanisms underlying these effects need further analysis. PMID:28337991

  6. Micro-physical properties of carbonaceous aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Tápai, Cs.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the authors propose laser ablation as a highly versatile tool for carbonaceous aerosol generation. The generated carbonaceous particles can be used as a model aerosol for atmospheric black carbon. Various microphysical properties including mass concentration, size distribution and morphology of aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a high purity graphite sample were investigated in detail. These measurements proved that the proposed method can be used to generate both primary particles and fractal aggregates with a high yield. As a further advantage of the method the size distribution of the generated aerosol can cover a wide range, and can be tuned accurately with laser fluence, the ambient composition or with the volumetric flow rate of the carrier gas.

  7. Recent Field Measurements of Ice Nuclei Concentration Relation to Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; McMeeking, G.; Prenni, A. J.; Hill, T. C.; Franc, G. D.; Sullivan, A. P.; Garcia, E.; Tobo, Y.; Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Anderson, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is expected that atmospheric variability of ice nuclei concentrations is governed by a variety of factors related to aerosol physical and chemical properties. Not all particles contribute equally due to the special nature of ice nuclei. The "size requirement" of ice nuclei (Pruppacher and Klett, 1997), partly related to the typical aerosol compositions known to act as ice nuclei (e.g., mineral dust particles, certain biological particles), leads to the relation of ice nuclei number concentrations to larger aerosol concentrations in some cases, but we emphasize here the additional relation to aerosol chemistry. Recent atmospheric ice nuclei measurements focused on biomass burning, mineral dust, pollution and biological particles will be discussed to highlight new assessment of their source contributions on the basis of physical, chemical and biological analysis. Pruppacher, H. R., and J. D. Klett, 1997: Microphysics of Clouds and Precipitation (2nd Edition), Kluwer Academic Press, Dordrecht, 954 pp.

  8. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  9. Retrieval of Intensive Aerosol Properties from MFRSR observations: Partly Cloudy Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-09-30

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible spectral range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  10. Aerosol Property Comparison Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Monache, Luca Delle

    2002-05-01

    This thesis determines what, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth surface are representative of those within the entire air column. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site at the Southern Great Plains, the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are routinely made. Flight legs during the one-year period from March 2000 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by use of an objective mixing height determination technique. Correlations between aerosol properties measured at the surface and those within and above the ABL were computed. Aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface were found representative of values within the ABL, but not of within the free atmosphere.

  11. A study of regional aerosol radiative properties and effects on ultraviolet-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Deluisi, J. J.; Saxena, V. K.; Barnard, W. F.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Vergamini, A. J.

    1998-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted in western North Carolina to investigate the relationship between aerosol optical properties and atmospheric transmission. Two research measurement sites in close horizontal proximity but at different altitudes were established to measure the transmission of UV radiation through a slab of atmosphere. An identical set of radiation sensing instruments, including a broadband UV-B radiometer, a direct Sun pyrheliometer, a shadowband radiometer, and a spectral photometer, was placed at both sites, a mountaintop site (Mount Gibbes 35.78°N, 82.29°W, 2004 m elevation) and a valley site (Black Mountain, North Carolina 35.66°N, 82.38°N, 951 m elevation). Aerosol size distribution sampling equipment was located at the valley site. Broadband solar pseudo-optical depth and aerosol optical depths at 415 nm, 500 nm, and 673 nm were measured for the lowest 1-km layer of the troposphere. The measurements exhibited variations based on an air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. Broadband UV-B transmission through the layer also displayed variations relating to air mass source region. Spectral UV transmission revealed a dependence upon wavelength, with decreased transmission in the UV-B region (300-320 nm) versus UV-A region (320-363.5 nm). UV-B transmission was found to be negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth. Empirical relations were developed to allow prediction of solar noon UV-B transmission if aerosol optical depth at two visible wavelengths (415 and 500 nm) is known. A new method was developed for determining aerosol optical properties from the radiation and aerosol size distribution measurements. The aerosol albedo of single scatter was found to range from 0.75 to 0.93 and the asymmetry factor ranged from 0.63 to 0.76 at 312 nm, which is close to the peak response of human skin to UV radiation.

  12. Aerosol impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds and precipitation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Gharaylou, M.

    2017-03-01

    Through modifying the number concentration and size of cloud droplets, aerosols have intricate impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds, which together influence precipitation processes. Aerosol-cloud interactions for a mid-latitude convective cloud system are investigated using a two-moment aerosol-aware bulk microphysical scheme implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Three sensitivity experiments with initial identical dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, but different cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were conducted. Increased aerosol number concentration has resulted in more numerous cloud droplets of overall smaller sizes, through which the optical properties of clouds have been changed. While the shortwave cloud forcing is significantly increased in more polluted experiments, changes in the aerosol number concentration have negligible impacts on the longwave cloud forcing. For the first time, it is found that polluted clouds have higher cloud base heights, the feature that is caused by more surface cooling due to a higher shortwave cloud forcing, as well as a drier boundary layer in the polluted experiment compared to the clean. The polluted experiment was also associated with a higher liquid water content (LWC), caused by an increase in the number of condensation of water vapor due to higher concentration of hygroscopic aerosols acting as condensation nuclei. The domain-averaged accumulated precipitation is little changed under both polluted and clean atmosphere. Nevertheless, changes in the rate of precipitation are identified, such that under polluted atmosphere light rain is reduced, while both moderate and heavy rain are intensified, confirming the fact that if an ample influx of water vapor exists, an increment of hygroscopic aerosols can increase the amount of precipitation.

  13. Aerosol Properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A Mesoscale Perspective from the TIGERZ Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo \\Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51degN, 80.23deg E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering 50 sq km around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi \\bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to 0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for 10 C20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption.Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA > or = 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA 0 had moderate correlation (R(sup 2) = 0.52-69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale \\distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  14. Effects of morphology on the radiative properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols with different aging status.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianhai; Wu, Yu; Chen, Hao

    2014-06-30

    Light absorbing carbon aerosols play a substantial role in climate change through radiative forcing, which is the dominant absorber of solar radiation. Radiative properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols are strongly dependent on the morphological factors and the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components. This study focuses on the morphological effects on the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. Three types aerosols with different aging status such as freshly emitted BC particles, thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols, heavily coated light absorbing carbon aerosols are studied. Our study showed that morphological factors change with the aging of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols to result in a dramatic change in their optical properties. The absorption properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols can be enhanced approximately a factor of 2 at 0.67 um, and these enhancements depend on the morphological factors. A larger shell/core diameter ratio of volume-equivalent shell-core spheres (S/C), which indicates the degree of coating, leads to stronger absorption. The enhancement of absorption properties accompanies a greater enhancement of scattering properties, which is reflected in an increase in single scattering albedo (SSA). The enhancement of single scattering albedo due to the morphological effects can reach a factor of 3.75 at 0.67 μm. The asymmetry parameter has a similar yet smaller enhancement. Moreover, the corresponding optical properties of shell-and-core model determined by using Lorenz -Mie solutions are presented for comparison. We found that the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosol can differ fundamentally from those calculated for the Mie theory shell-and-core model, particularly for thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols. Our studies indicate that the complex morphology

  15. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  16. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  17. Deriving aerosol hygroscopic mixing state from size-resolved CCN activity and HR-ToF-AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, Abhishek

    2016-10-01

    The ability of a particle to uptake water and form a cloud droplet depends on its hygroscopicity. To understand its impact on cloud properties and ultimately radiative forcing, knowledge of chemically-resolved mixing state information or the one based on hygroscopic growth is crucial. Typically, global models assume either pure internal or external mixing state which might not be true for all conditions and sampling locations. To investigate into this, the current study employed an indirect approach to infer the probable mixing state. The hygroscopic parameters derived from κ-Kohler theory using size-resolved CCN measurements (κCCN) and bulk/size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements (κAMS) were compared. The accumulation mode particles were found to be more hygroscopic (κCCN = 0.24) than Aitken mode (κCCN = 0.13), perhaps due to increased ratio of inorganic to organic mass fraction. The activation diameter calculated from size-resolved CCN activity measurements at 5 different supersaturation (SS) levels varied in the range of 115 nm-42 nm with κCCN = 0.13-0.23 (avg = 0.18 ± 0.10 (±1σ)). Further, κAMS>κCCN was observed possibly due to the fact that organic and inorganic mass present in the Aitken mode was not correctly represented by bulk chemical composition and size-resolved fractional contribution of oxidized OA was not accurately accounted. Better correlation of organic fraction (forg) and κCCN at lower SS explained this behaviour. The decrease in κCCN with the time of the day was more pronounced at lower SS because of the relative mass reduction of soluble inorganic species by ∼17%. Despite the large differences between κ measured from two approaches, less over-prediction (up to 18%) between measured and predicted CCN concentration suggested lower impact of chemical composition and mixing state at higher SS. However, at lower SS, presences of externally mixed CCN-inactive aerosols lead to CCN over-prediction reflecting the

  18. Aerosol Properties From Combined Oxygen A Band Radiances and Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new aerosol retrieval technique based on combing high-resolution A band spectra with lidar profiles. Our goal is the development of a technique to retrieve aerosol absorption, one of the critical parameters affecting the global radiation budget and one which is currently poorly constrained by satellite measurements. Our approach relies on two key factors: 1) the use of high spectral resolution (17,000:1) measurements which resolve the A-band line structure, and 2) the use of co-located lidar profile measurements to constrain the vertical distribution of scatterers in the forward model. The algorithm has been developed to be applied to observations from the CALIPSO and OCO-2 satellites, flying in formation as part of the A-train constellation. We describe the approach and present simulated retrievals to illustrate performance potential.

  19. Continuous measurements of Arctic boundary layer aerosol physical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Lihavainen, H.; Laurila, T. J.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Reshetnikov, A.; Ivakhov, V.; Uttal, T.; Makshtas, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic and northern boreal regions of Eurasia are experiencing rapid environmental changes due to pressures by human activities. The largest anthropogenic climate forcings are due to aerosol particles and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Arctic environment is highly sensitive to changes in aerosol concentrations or composition, largely due to the high surface reflectance for the most part of the year. Concentrations of aerosols in winter and spring Arctic are affected by 'Arctic Haze', a phenomenon suggested to arise from the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes and further strengthened by the strong stratification of the Arctic wintertime atmosphere. Sources and transport patterns of aerosols into the Arctic are, however, not fully understood. In order to monitor the changes within the Arctic region, as well as to understand the sources and feedback mechanisms, direct measurements of aerosols within the Arctic are needed. So far, direct year-round observations have been inadequate especially within the Russian side of the Arctic. This is the reason why a new climate observatory was founded on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, in Tiksi, Russia. Tiksi meteorological observatory in northern Siberia (71_360N; 128_530E) has been operating since 1930s. Recently, it was upgraded and joint in the network of the IASOA, in the framework of the International Polar Year Activity project. The project is run in collaboration between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Roshydromet (AARI and MGO units), government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The research activities of FMI in Tiksi include e.g. continuous long-term measurements of aerosol particle physical and optical properties. Measurements were initiated in summer 2010 and further extended in summer 2013. Together with the FMI measurements in Pallas GAW station in northern Finland since 1999

  20. Optical properties and cross-sections of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrush, E.; Brown, D. M.; Salciccioli, N.; Gomes, J.; Brown, A.; Siegrist, K.; Thomas, M. E.; Boggs, N. T.; Carter, C. C.

    2010-04-01

    There is an urgent need to develop standoff sensing of biological agents in aerosolized clouds. In support of the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System (JBSDS) program, lidar systems have been a dominant technology and have shown significant capability in field tests conducted in the Joint Ambient Breeze Tunnel (JABT) at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). The release of biological agents in the open air is forbidden. Therefore, indirect methods must be developed to determine agent cross-sections in order to validate sensor against biological agents. A method has been developed that begins with laboratory measurements of thin films and liquid suspensions of biological material to obtain the complex index of refraction from the ultraviolet (UV) to the long wave infrared (LWIR). Using that result and the aerosols' particle size distribution as inputs to Mie calculations yields the backscatter and extinction cross-sections as a function of wavelength. Recent efforts to model field measurements from the UV to the IR have been successful. Measurements with aerodynamic and geometric particle sizers show evidence of particle clustering. Backscatter simulations of these aerosols show these clustered particles dominate the aerosol backscatter and depolarization signals. In addition, these large particles create spectral signatures in the backscatter signal due to material absorption. Spectral signatures from the UV to the IR have been observed in simulations of field releases. This method has been demonstrated for a variety of biological simulant materials such as Ovalbumin (OV), Erwinia (EH), Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) and male specific bacteriophage (MS2). These spectral signatures may offer new methods for biological discrimination for both stand-off sensing and point detection systems.

  1. Optical properties of aerosol emissions from biomass burning in the tropics, BASE-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Setzer, Alberto W.; Tanre, Didre D.; Ward, Darold E.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based and airborne measurements of biomass-burning smoke particle optical properties, obtained with a view to aerosol-absorption properties, are presented as a function of time and atmospheric height. The wavelength dependence of the optical thickness can be explained by a log-normal size distribution, with particles' effective radius varying between 0.1 and 0.2 microns. The strong correlation noted between aerosol particle profile and CO profile indicates that smoke particulates constitute a good tracer for emission trace gases from tropical biomass burning.

  2. Chemical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Phimai, Thailand by intensive surface measurements and satellite data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Thana, B.; Takamura, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Yabuki, M.; Oikawa, E.; Nakajima, T.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were measured at the Observatory of Atmospheric Research, in Phimai, Thailand, a key station of SKYNET, during 2006-2008. In the surface measurement, mass concentrations and major chemical components in fine and coarse aerosols were analyzed, and the optical properties such as AOT and SSA were measured by skyradiometer. Analysis of MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data was made for wild fire activities and aerosol distribution, respectively. In this paper, the following topics are summarized. The surface wind pattern in dry season was divided into the three periods as follows; D1 (Oct.-Nov.) with northeasterly monsoon, D3 (middle March-April) with southerly wind, and D2 (Dec.-early March) with a transit stage between D1 and D3. Wet season in southwesterly monsoon was from May to September. The concentration ratio of BC/nss-SO4 showed that the dominant PM2.5 aerosols in D1 were due to long-range transport of air pollutants emitted from urban/industrial area of east Asia. In contrast, most of aerosols in D3 were derived from biomass burning in Indochina, because the activity of biomass burning was highest in the latter D2 and early D3 period, by the analysis of the fire database in MODIS and of BC/nss-SO4. The mass concentration in PM2.5 showed a clear seasonal variation with the maximum in D2. On the contrary, AOT showed the maximum in D3, and which could be attributed to an increase in the vertical thickness of high aerosol concentration in the boundary layer by the CALIOP data analysis. Dust particles in D1 were directly transported from east Asia, and re-suspension of soil dusts was dominant in D2 because the surface soil became dry. In D3, soil dusts were re-suspended with the thermal plume caused by biomass burning. In contrast, high dust particles measured in the wet season was due to long range transport of dust aerosols from western desert area by the CALIOP data analysis.

  3. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration (ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation (VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  4. A study of the aerosol radiative properties needed to compute direct aerosol forcing in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaocai; Saxena, V. K.; Wenny, B. N.; Deluisi, J. J.; Yue, G. K.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2000-10-01

    To assess the direct radiative forcing due to aerosols in southeastern United States where a mild cooling is under way, an accurate set of data describing the aerosol radiative properties are needed. We report here aerosol optical depth (AOD) and diffuse to-direct solar irradiance ratio (DDR) at three operational wavelengths (415, 500, 673 nm) determined by using Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) at two sites (a mountain top site: Mount Gibbes, 35.78°N, 82.29°W, 2006 m mean sea level (msl); a valley site: Black Mountain, 35.66°N, 82.38°W, 951 m msl), which are separated horizontally by 10 km and vertically by 1 km. The characteristics AOD and DDR were determined from the field measurements obtained during 1995. It was found that the representative total AOD values at 500 nm at the valley site for highly polluted (HP), marine (M) and continental (C) air masses were 0.68±0.33, 0.29±0.19, and 0.10±0.04, respectively. The fact that the ratio of the mean 1 km layer optical depth to total mean optical depth at 500 nm from the valley site was 71% indicates that the major portion of the atmospheric aerosol was located in the lowest 1 km surface boundary layer (SBL). There was a significant linear correlation between the DDR and the total AOD at both sites. A simple, fast, and operative search-graph method was used to retrieve the columnar size distribution (number concentration N effective radius reff, and geometric standard deviation σg) from the optical depth observations at the three operational wavelengths. The ground albedo, single-scattering albedo, and imaginary part of the refractive index are calculated using a mathematically unique procedure involving a Mie code and a radiative transfer code in conjunction with the retrieved aerosol size distribution, AOD, and DDR. It was found that N, reff, and σg were in the range of 1.9×10 to 1.7×104 cm-3, 0.09-0.68 μm, and 1.12-2.70, respectively. The asymmetry factor and single-scattering albedo

  5. Climatology of aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-C.; Hamre, B.; Frette, Ø.; Stamnes, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET stations at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, 379 m altitude) and Hornsund (77° N, 15° E, 10 m altitude) for the period 2008-2010. The three-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500) at Andenes and Hornsund were 0.11 and 0.10, respectively. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500) than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.18 and 1.37, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.0 in 68% and 93% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar seasonal variation of the aerosol size distribution although one site is in an Arctic area while the other site is in a sub-arctic area.

  6. Global Retrieval of Aerosol Properties from Sources to Sinks By MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2005-01-01

    Mineral dust and smoke aerosols play an important role in both climate forcing and oceanic productivity throughout the entire year. Due to the relatively short lifetime (a few hours to about a week), the distributions of these airborne particles vary extensively in both space and time. Consequently, satellite observations are needed over both source and sink regions for continuous temporal and spatial sampling of dust and smoke properties. However, despite their importance, the high spatial resolution satellite measurements of these aerosols near their sources have been lacking, In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as MODIS and SeaWiFS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over land, including desert and semi-desert regions. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. Our results show that the dust plumes lifted from the deserts near India/Pakistan border, and over Afghanistan, and the Arabian Peninsula are often observed by MODIS to be transported along the Indo-Gangetic Basin and mixed with the fine mode pollution particles generated by anthropogenic activities in this region, particularly during the pre-monsoon season (April-May). These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine

  7. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The time-averaged indirect aerosol effects within 200 km downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002-2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2-8 μm at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Wm-2 at distances of 150-400 km from the volcano, with much greater local (< 80 km) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to

  8. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S.K.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The timeaveraged indirect aerosol effects within 200 kilometers downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002- 2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2 - 8 micrometers at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Watts per square meter at distances of 150 - 400 kilometers from the volcano, with much greater local (less than 80 kilometers) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted

  9. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-05

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  10. Regional trends of aerosol optical depth and their impact on cloud properties over Southern India using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, K. Rama; Obul Reddy, K. Raja; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Arafath, S. MD.; Kumar Reddy, N. Siva; Rao, T. Chakradhar; Reddy, T. Lokeswara; Reddy, R. Ramakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Remote sensing of global aerosols has constituted a great scientific interest in a variety of applications related to global warming and climatic change. In the present study we investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical properties and its impact on various properties of clouds over Southern India for the last ten years (2005-2014) by using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data retrieved from the onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. The spatial distributions of annual mean lowest Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) value is observed in Bangalore (BLR) (0.22±0.04) and the highest AOD value is noted in Visakhapatnam (VSK) (0.39±0.05). Similarly high Fine Mode Fraction (FMF) is noticed over VSK and Thiruvananthapuram (TVM), while lower values are observed in Anantapur (ATP), Hyderabad (HYD), Pune (PUNE) and BLR. From the results, a negative correlation was found between AOD and Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) where as, a positive correlation was observed between AOD and Cloud Fraction (CF), Water Vapor (WV) over the selected regions. Monthly average AOD and FMF are plotted for analysis of the trends of aerosol loading in a long-term scale and both values showed statistically significant enhancing trend over all regions as derived from the MODIS measurements. Further, the annual variation of spatial correlation between MODIS and MISR (Multi - Angle Imaging Spectro Radiometer) AOD has been analyzed and the correlation coefficients are found to be higher in two of the regions VSK and PUNE (>0.8), and considerably lower for TVM (<0.7).

  11. Study on aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in cloudy weather in the Guangzhou region.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tao; Deng, XueJiao; Li, Fei; Wang, ShiQiang; Wang, Gang

    2016-10-15

    Currently, Guangzhou region was facing the problem of severe air pollution. Large amount of aerosols in the polluted air dramatically attenuated solar radiation. This study investigated the vertical optical properties of aerosols and inverted the height of boundary layer in the Guangzhou region using the lidar. Simultaneously, evaluated the impact of different types of clouds on aerosol radiation effects using the SBDART. The results showed that the height of the boundary layer and the surface visibility changed consistently, the average height of the boundary layer on the hazy days was only 61% of that on clear days. At the height of 2km or lower, the aerosol extinction coefficient profile distribution decreased linearly along with height on clear days, but the haze days saw an exponential decrease. When there was haze, the changing of heating rate of atmosphere caused by the aerosol decreased from 3.72K/d to 0.9K/d below the height of 2km, and the attenuation of net radiation flux at the ground surface was 97.7W/m(2), and the attenuation amplitude was 11.4%; when there were high clouds, the attenuation was 125.2W/m(2) and the attenuation amplitude was 14.6%; where there were medium cloud, the attenuation was 286.4W/m(2) and the attenuation amplitude was 33.4%. Aerosol affected mainly shortwave radiation, and affected long wave radiation very slightly.

  12. Hygroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol Measured with an HTDMA in an Urban Background Site in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Becerril, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of high aerosol hygroscopic growth in Madrid is mainly limited to specific atmospheric conditions, such as local stagnation episodes, which take place in winter time. One of these episodes was identified in December 2014 and the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) measurements obtained in such episode were analysed in order to know the influence of the meteorological conditions on aerosol hygroscopic properties. The prevailing high atmospheric stability triggered an increase of the particle total concentration during the study period, with several peaks that exceeded 4.0 104 particles cm-3, as well as an increase in the inorganic fraction of the aerosol, the NO3- concentration, which in this case corresponded to 25% of the total PM1 non-refractory composition. The aerosol hygroscopic growth distribution was bimodal during the episode, with an average GF around 1.2 for the five dry particle sizes measured and an average GF spread ≥ 0.15. In addition, it is important to note that when a reduction in the concentrations of NO3- is observed, it coincides with a decrease of the GF and its spread. These data suggest, on the one hand, a high degree of external mixing state of the aerosol during the episode and, on the other hand, a notable association between the GF and the inorganic fraction of the aerosol.

  13. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai.

  14. Aircraft measurements of aerosol properties during GoAmazon - G1 and HALO inter-comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Cecchini, M. A.; Wang, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Longo, K.; Martin, S. T.; Schmid, B.; Weinzierl, B.; Krüger, M. L.; Zöger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2013). This large uncertainty is partially a result of our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturations. One objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Green Ocean Amazon Project (GoAmazon2014/5) is to understand the influence of the emission from Manaus, a tropical megacity, on aerosol size, concentration, and chemical composition, and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum. The GoAmazon2014/5 study was an international campaign with the collaboration efforts from US, Brazil and Germany. During the intensive operation period, in the dry season (Sep. 1st - Oct. 10th, 2014), aerosol concentration, size distributions, and CCN spectra, both under pristine conditions and inside the Manaus plume, were characterized in-situ from the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) research aircraft and German HALO aircraft during 4 coordinated flights on Sep. 9th, Sep. 16th, Sep 21st and Oct. 1st, 2014. During those four flights, aerosol number concentrations and CCN concentrations at two supersaturations (0.25% and 0.5%) were measured by condensation particle counters (CPCs) and a DMT dual column CCN counter onboard both G-1 and HALO. Aerosol size distribution was also measured by a Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS) aboard the G-1 and is compared with the size distribution from Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), which were deployed both on the G-1 and the HALO. Good agreement between the aerosol properties measured from the two aircraft has been achieved. The vertical profiles of aerosol size distribution and CCN spectrum will be discussed.

  15. Variation of aerosol optical properties from AERONET observation at Mt. Muztagh Ata, Eastern Pamirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ni; Wu, Guangjian; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhang, Chenglong; Xu, Tianli; Lazhu

    2015-02-01

    Using data from the ground-based remote sensing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), and volume size distribution were investigated for the period June to December 2011 at Mt. Muztagh Ata (Muztagata), Eastern Pamirs. The monthly average values of AOD (500 nm) and α (440-870 nm) varied from 0.08 ± 0.02 to 0.16 ± 0.11, and from 0.56 ± 0.06 to 0.93 ± 0.28, respectively. The daily AOD averages 0.14 ± 0.07, with the maximum (0.5) occurring in August and the minimum (0.05) occurring in November. A small increase in AOD is expected with a noticeable decrease in the α value. The daily α averages 0.70 ± 0.27, and most exponents are less than 1, indicating the majority of larger aerosol particles. The volume size distribution of aerosol particles shows bimodal log-normal characteristics, with a fine mode radius of 0.2 μm and a coarse mode radius of 3 μm. The MODIS AOD and AERONET AOD display a similar variation, while the former is always noticeably higher than the latter with a difference of 0.1-0.4, indicating that the MODIS data might overestimate the aerosol load. Our results indicate that high aerosol volume concentration occurs in summer with the dominance of coarse particles over Muztagh Ata. The low AOD shows a clean atmosphere in this region, revealing that it is an atmospheric background site for continental aerosol monitoring.

  16. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode.

  17. Understanding the Effect of Aerosol Properties on Cloud Droplet Formation during TCAP Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cziczo, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The formation of clouds is an essential element in understanding the Earth’s radiative budget. Liquid water clouds form when the relative humidity exceeds saturation and condensedphase water nucleates on atmospheric particulate matter. The effect of aerosol properties such as size, morphology, and composition on cloud droplet formation has been studied theoretically as well as in the laboratory and field. Almost without exception these studies have been limited to parallel measurements of aerosol properties and cloud formation or collection of material after the cloud has formed, at which point nucleation information has been lost. Studies of this sort are adequate when a large fraction of the aerosol activates, but correlations and resulting model parameterizations are much more uncertain at lower supersaturations and activated fractions.

  18. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  19. Investigation of aerosol distribution patterns and its optical properties at different time scale by using LIDAR system and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fuyi; Khor, Wei Ying; Hee, Wan Shen; Choon, Yeap Eng; San, Lim Hwee; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is a major health-impairment issue in Malaysia especially during southeast monsoon period (June-September) due to the active open burning activities. However, hazy days were an issue in Penang, Malaysia during March, 2014. Haze intruded Penang during March and lasted for a month except for the few days after rain. Rain water had washed out the aerosols from the atmosphere. Therefore, this study intends to analyse the aerosol profile and the optical properties of aerosol during this haze event and after rain. Meanwhile, several days after the haze event (during April, 2014) were also analyzed for comparison purposes. Additionally, the dominant aerosol type (i.e., dust, biomass burning, industrial and urban, marine, and mixed aerosol) during the study period was identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) against the Angstrom exponent.

  20. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive degassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important for assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius of 4-8 μm at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may also capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  1. An operational retrieval algorithm for determining aerosol optical properties in the ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Thomas E.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Slusser, James R.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Goering, Christian D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a number of practical considerations concerning the optimization and operational implementation of an algorithm used to characterize the optical properties of aerosols across part of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. The algorithm estimates values of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at seven wavelengths in the UV, as well as total column ozone (TOC) and wavelength-independent asymmetry factor (g) using direct and diffuse irradiances measured with a UV multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV-MFRSR). A novel method for cloud screening the irradiance data set is introduced, as well as several improvements and optimizations to the retrieval scheme which yield a more realistic physical model for the inversion and increase the efficiency of the algorithm. Introduction of a wavelength-dependent retrieval error budget generated from rigorous forward model analysis as well as broadened covariances on the a priori values of AOD, SSA and g and tightened covariances of TOC allows sufficient retrieval sensitivity and resolution to obtain unique solutions of aerosol optical properties as demonstrated by synthetic retrievals. Analysis of a cloud screened data set (May 2003) from Panther Junction, Texas, demonstrates that the algorithm produces realistic values of the optical properties that compare favorably with pseudo-independent methods for AOD, TOC and calculated Ångstrom exponents. Retrieval errors of all parameters (except TOC) are shown to be negatively correlated to AOD, while the Shannon information content is positively correlated, indicating that retrieval skill improves with increasing atmospheric turbidity. When implemented operationally on more than thirty instruments in the Ultraviolet Monitoring and Research Program's (UVMRP) network, this retrieval algorithm will provide a comprehensive and internally consistent climatology of ground-based aerosol properties in the UV spectral range that can be used

  2. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive de-gassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius ranging from 48 microns at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties, and our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the preindustrial marine atmosphere.

  3. Effects of data assimilation on the global aerosol key optical properties simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaomei; Dai, Tie; Schutgens, Nick A. J.; Goto, Daisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Shi, Guangyu

    2016-09-01

    We present the one month results of global aerosol optical properties for April 2006, using the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) coupled with the Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), by assimilating Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF). The simulated AOD, Ångström Exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are validated by independent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations over the global sites. The data assimilation has the strongest positive effect on the AOD simulation and slight positive influences on the AE and SSA simulations. For the time-averaged globally spatial distribution, the data assimilation increases the model skill score (S) of AOD, AE, and SSA from 0.55, 0.92, and 0.75 to 0.79, 0.94, and 0.80, respectively. Over the North Africa (NAF) and Middle East region where the aerosol composition is simple (mainly dust), the simulated AODs are best improved by the data assimilation, indicating the assimilation correctly modifies the wrong dust burdens caused by the uncertainties of the dust emission parameterization. Assimilation also improves the simulation of the temporal variations of the aerosol optical properties over the AERONET sites, with improved S at 60 (62%), 45 (55%) and 11 (50%) of 97, 82 and 22 sites for AOD, AE and SSA. By analyzing AOD and AE at five selected sites with best S improvement, this study further indicates that the assimilation can reproduce short duration events and ratios between fine and coarse aerosols more accurately.

  4. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  5. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  6. Optical and chemical properties of aerosols transported to Mount Bachelor during spring 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Perry, K. D.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    We report on springtime 2010 observations of aerosol optical properties and size-resolved elemental composition from Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO; 2763 meters above sea level). Observations included multiwavelength aerosol scattering and absorption, made with a nephelometer and a particle soot absorption photometer, and size-resolved composition, made using a rotating DRUM impactor with substrates analyzed by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. Our main tool for investigating variability in composition was empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. In April, dust and sulfate explained 96% of the variance in the observed fine composition and accounted for the majority of the fine mode scattering. Three coincident Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation overpasses also identified aerosol layers classified as dust or polluted dust over MBO. Later in the spring, we deduce that organics and nitrate comprised more than 50% of the submicrometer aerosol mass. We used the EOF analysis to identify systematic relationships between composition and optical properties. We observed dust accompanied by anthropogenic pollutants including sulfate. When present, dust aerosol controlled ˜30% of the variability in the wavelength dependence of fine mode scattering. Many of the samples containing sulfate had absorption Ångstrom exponents near 1, suggesting black carbon was also present. Most of the sulfate was in the fine mode, but sulfate was also observed on coarse aerosols, and we inferred that much of the coarse sulfur was coated on the dust or had formed CaSO4 during transport. The relationships between Fe, Ca, Al, and Si observed at MBO were consistent with previous observations of Asian dust transported to North America.

  7. Aerosol Properties Changes of Northeast Asia due to a Severe Dust Storm in April 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xingfa; Zhang, Xingying; Wang, Weihe; Ren, Suling

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing the aerosol properties changes due to the dust storm named as "China's Great Wall of Dust" oriented from Taklimakan desert in April, 2014. Dust identification IDDI (Infrared Difference Dust Index) images from FY-2E and true color composite images from FY-3C MERSI (Medium Resolution Spectral Imager) show the breakout and transport of the dust storm.From 4-day forward air mass trajectories, the dusty air masses were mostly transported within the lower boundary layer(<3km) over the Northwest China on April 23rd and April 24th, however they were progressively increasing in altitude to above 5km above the surface when they reached the central part of north China region (32°N-42°N; 105°E-123°E). 3-hourly data records at surface stations suggest that anticyclonic circulation occupying southern Xinjiang basin and cyclonic circulation maintaining in Mongolia formed the typical Synoptic condition which leaded to the strong dust storm. Aerosol Index (AI) results of TOU (Total Ozone Unit) aboard FY-3B are first developed and used in studying the affected areas due to the dust storm. The retrieved aerosol indexes show sensitivity to the dust particles. The dust affected areas agree with the synoptic meteorological condition analysis, which prove the synoptic meteorological condition is the main reason for the break out and transport of the dust storm. Anomalies of the average MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) distributions over Northeast Asia during the dust storm to the average of that in April between 2010-2014 show high aerosol loading due to the dust storm. Compared with the 5-year average AOD in April, aerosol loading during this dust storm was much higher, with AOD values at 550nm up to 2.9 observed over the northwest China.The dust storm also brought different change in the aerosol microphysical properties between Beijing and Dalanzadgad. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals

  8. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    DOE PAGES

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; ...

    2016-04-27

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV)more » and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m–2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol–LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a

  9. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Wilcox, Eric M.; Bender, Frida A.-M.

    2016-04-27

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.

    In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m–2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.

    We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol–LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the

  10. Optical and Structural Properties of Aerosols Emitted from Open Biomass Burning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Lewis, K.; Gyawali, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Arnott, W. P.

    2010-12-01

    Open biomass burning including wildland fires and agricultural burning emits substantial quantities of carbonaceous aerosols into the atmosphere. Fuel, soil, and atmospheric conditions largely determine the combustion phase. High temperature flaming combustion emits black aerosols, generally consisting of fractal-like chain aggregates that have a high black carbon content and therefore strongly absorb visible light. Low temperature, smoldering combustion, on the other hand, emits fairly white aerosols, often consisting of near-spherical particles that have high organic carbon content. While this organic carbon is traditionally considered to cause negligent absorption of visible light, more recent studies have shown that organic carbon from biomass burning often contains brown carbon. Brown carbon is a component of organic carbon, optically defined by its increasing light absorption toward shorter wavelengths. The physical characteristics of biomass combustion aerosol particles are determined by a combination of their morphology, monomer size, and shape, all of which can be determined from electron microscopy and image analysis. Here, we review optical and structural properties of aerosols emitted from open biomass burning with a focus on relevance for radiative forcing and climate change and satellite remote sensing. This review is followed by a discussion of measurements and modeling of brown carbon optical properties, of associated metrics such as the Ångström absorption coefficient, and of future research needs.

  11. [Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosol Particles in North Suburb of Nanjing in Spring].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Ze-feng; Li, Yan-weil; Qin, Xin; Miao, Qing; Shen, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles have significant effects on spectral distribution, CCN activation, climate forcing, human health and so on. A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) was utilized to analyze the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the northern suburb of Nanjing during 16 April to 21 May, 2014. At relative humidity (RH) of 90%, for particles with dry diameters 30-230 nm, the probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF) shows a distinct bimodal pattern, with a dominant more-hygroscopic group and a smaller less-hygroscopic group. A contrast analysis between day and night suggests that, aerosol particles during day time have a stronger hygroscopicity and a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group than that at night overall. Aerosol particles during night have a higher degree of externally mixed state. Backward trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT mode reveals that, the sampling site is mainly affected by three air masses. For aitken nuclei, northwest continental air masses experience a longer aging process and have a stronger hygroscopicity. For condensation nuclei, east air masses have a stronger hygroscopicity and have a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group. Aerosol particles in local air masses have a high number fraction of more-hygroscopic group in the whole diameter range.

  12. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  13. In situ observations of aerosol physical and optical properties in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Hyvarinen, A.; Hooda, R. K.; Raatikainen, T. E.; Sharma, V.; Komppula, M.

    2012-12-01

    The southern Asia, including India, is exposed to substantial quantities of particulate air pollution originating mainly from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Besides serious adverse health effects, these aerosols cause a large reduction of solar radiation at the surface accompanied by a substantial atmospheric heating, which is expected to have significant influences on the air temperature, crop yields, livestock and water resources over the southern Asia. The various influences by aerosols in this region depend crucially on the development of aerosol emissions from household, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sectors. The main purpose of this study is to investigate several measured aerosol optical and physical properties. We take advantage of observations from two measurement stations which have been established by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and The Energy and Resources Institute. Another station is on the foothills of Himalayas, in Mukteshwar, about 350 km east of New Delhi at elevation about 2 km ASL. This site is considered as a rural back