Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol research laboratory

  1. Aerosol Dynamics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Mondy, L.A.

    1990-04-01

    In past five years, Department 1510 has developed a state-of-the-art Aerosol Dynamics Laboratory (ADL). This report documents the current instrumentation and capabilities that exist in this laboratory. The ADL was developed from a variety of sources, with a primary contribution from Department 1510's Independent Research and Development program in aerosol dynamics. Current capabilities of the ADL include: (1) generation of calibration-quality monodisperse particles with diameters between 0.005 to 100 {mu}m, (2) real-time measurement of particle size distributions for particle diameters between 0.01 and 100 {mu}m, (3) in situ, real-time measurement of particle size distributions for particle diameters between 0.3 and 100 {mu}m, and (4) real-time measurement of particle charge distributions for particle diameters between 0.01 and 1.0 {mu}m. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Research highlights: laboratory studies of the formation and transformation of atmospheric organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; Lin, Vivian S

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles are emitted from a variety of anthropogenic and natural precursors and have direct impacts on climate, by scattering solar irradiation and nucleating clouds, and on health, by causing oxidative stress in the lungs when inhaled. They may also form from gaseous precursors, creating complex mixtures of organic and inorganic material. The chemical composition and the physical properties of aerosols will evolve during their one-week lifetime which will consequently change their impact on climate and health. The heterogeneity of aerosols is difficult to model and thus atmospheric aerosol research strives to characterize the mechanisms involved in nucleating and transforming particles in the atmosphere. Recent advances in four laboratory studies of aerosol formation and aging are highlighted here.

  3. A State-of-the-Art Experimental Laboratory for Cloud and Cloud-Aerosol Interaction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, Charles M.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    The state of the art for predicting climate changes due to increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere with high accuracy is problematic. Confidence intervals on current long-term predictions (on the order of 100 years) are so large that the ability to make informed decisions with regard to optimum strategies for mitigating both the causes of climate change and its effects is in doubt. There is ample evidence in the literature that large sources of uncertainty in current climate models are various aerosol effects. One approach to furthering discovery as well as modeling, and verification and validation (V&V) for cloud-aerosol interactions is use of a large "cloud chamber" in a complimentary role to in-situ and remote sensing measurement approaches. Reproducing all of the complex interactions is not feasible, but it is suggested that the physics of certain key processes can be established in a laboratory setting so that relevant fluid-dynamic and cloud-aerosol phenomena can be experimentally simulated and studied in a controlled environment. This report presents a high-level argument for significantly improved laboratory capability, and is meant to serve as a starting point for stimulating discussion within the climate science and other interested communities.

  4. Laboratory studies of reactions of atmospheric gases with components of mineral dust aerosol and research in chemical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer Dianne

    Mineral dust aerosol surfaces provide a medium in the atmosphere for heterogeneous chemistry to occur, which can alter the chemical balance of the Earth's atmosphere. It is becoming increasingly clear that the heterogeneous chemistry of these aerosols is a function of relative humidity (RH), as water on the surface of these particles can enhance or inhibit reactivity depending on the reaction. In this thesis, the uptake of water on clays and oxides was investigated, as well as phase transitions for atmospherically relevant salts. Reactions of carbon dioxide and nitric acid on oxide particles in the presence and absence of water were also examined. Following the reaction of HNO 3 on an alumina surface, photoirradiation experiments were preformed to determine the effect of irradiation on the adsorbed nitrate. The results presented in this thesis provide insight into the heterogeneous reactivity of mineral dust aerosol in the presence and absence of co-adsorbed water, as well as a fundamental understanding of water uptake on soluble and insoluble aerosols. A new method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, was developed to attempt to obtain a better fundamental understanding of different mineral dust components. In addition to the laboratory research, research in chemical education is also presented in this thesis. Two different types of work being done in the area of chemical education are shown. First a new experiment was implemented into an undergraduate physical chemistry course. The technique, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, was chosen for its ability to expose students to a technique that is commonly used in laboratory research as well as the ease for which high quality results can be obtained. Students used ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor sulfate, SO 42-, adsorption on TiO2 thin films. Second, the role of cognitive load and problem difficulty was accessed with data acquired while students completed an introductory-level chemistry word problem using a web-based tool

  5. Proceedings of the 1979 Chemical System Laboratory Scientific Conference on Obscuration and Aerosol Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Chem. 56, 955 (1953). 5. Lord Rayleigh ( Strutt , J. W.), The Theory of Sound, (Dover, New York 1877, revised 1894, reprinted 1945). 6. Brazier-Smith, P...4892 ANDREO, DR. ROBERT H. Johns Hopkins University BICKEL, DR. WILLIAM Applied Physics Laboratory Department of Physics Johns Hopkins Road University of...Clusters Extinction Rayleigh Scattering Variational Methods (CnntnitPd) 2&, ABSTRACT ( t oe am ee Mi N jege.y mid idersify by block ntmmber) - Thirty

  6. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  7. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  8. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  9. Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleidman, Richard; Kaufman, Yoram; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The newly established Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER) located at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt MD is dedicated to fostering interdisciplinary research in all aspects of aerosol science. AEROCENTER will be an incubator for innovative new analysis of existing data and ideas for new space missions. The plan is to tap and harvest ideas from a broad international and interdisciplinary science community and to incorporate these ideas into NASA's aerosol research effort for understanding and predicting the aerosol effect on climate and the environment. In order to achieve this goal the center aims to host several established and developing scientists for a period of 3-6 months each year. AEROCENTER will also develop a new technical infrastructure that will integrate the present aerosol research activities and data resources of GSFC/Greenbelt and GSFC/GISS, increase efficiency in the use of NASA remote sensing data, and increase the involvement of a larger national and international scientific community. The center aims to institutionalize and extend the present knowledge base within NASA into a national resource for the education and research communities.

  10. Plasma laboratory simulations of Titan's aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.; Boufendi, L.; Coll, P.; Bernard, J.-M.; Pintassilgo, C.

    2005-10-31

    Titan, the biggest satellite of Saturn, have a dense atmosphere mainly composed of N2 and a few amount of CH4. High energy solar photons and electrons from the magnetosphere of Saturn generate a wide range of organic species from simple volatiles to organic solid particles. All around Titan, a dense and opaque brown aerosol layers prevents the observation of the soil. To get more information on Titan's atmosphere, the Cassini-Huygens space probes launched in 1997 and the Huygens module descend in the atmosphere of Titan on the 14th January 2005.Before the Cassini-Huygens program, laboratory simulation approach was already initiated for the production of analogues of Titan's aerosols, named 'tholins'. Different types of plasmas have been used. Elementary analysis of 'tholins' have also been done. From plasma modelling, the Electron Energy Distribution Function is calculated and compared to the solar energy spectrum. Some results on composition of tholins produced in RF plasmas are presented: morphology from MEB observation, elemental composition. A tentative of correlation between plasma properties and tholins composition is done.

  11. National Exposure Research Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ecosystems Research Division of EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory, conducts research on organic and inorganic chemicals, greenhouse gas biogeochemical cycles, and land use perturbations that create stressor exposures and potentia risk

  12. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  13. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  14. NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  15. Laboratory studies of stratospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of the two sets of projects funded by the NASA grant NAG2-632, namely investigations of various thermodynamic and nucleation properties of the aqueous acid system which makes up stratospheric aerosols, and measurements of reaction probabilities directly on ice aerosols with sizes corresponding to those of polar stratospheric cloud particles. The results of these investigations are of importance for the assessment of the potential stratospheric effects of future fleets of supersonic aircraft. In particular, the results permit to better estimate the effects of increased amounts of water vapor and nitric acid (which forms from nitrogen oxides) on polar stratospheric clouds and on the chemistry induced by these clouds.

  16. Green Building Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, David Jean

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  17. An Aerosolized Brucella spp. Challenge Model for Laboratory Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the optimal aerosol dosage of Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308) and B. melitensis (S16M) in a laboratory animal model of brucellosis, dosages of 10**3 to 10**10 CFU were nebulized to mice. Although tissue weights were minimally influenced, total colony-forming units (CFU) per tis...

  18. Hygroscopicity of Early Earth and Titan Laboratory Aerosol Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.; Beaver, M. R.; Freedman, M. A.; Toon, O. B.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    We have explored the ability of organic hazes, known to exist in the atmosphere of Titan and postulated to have existed in the Archean Earth atmosphere, to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). These laboratory aerosol analogs are generated via UV-photolysis of early Earth and Titan analog gas mixtures and are designed to mimic the present day atmospheric conditions on Titan and the early Earth atmosphere before the rise of oxygen. Water uptake is observed to occur on the early Earth and Titan aerosol analogs at relative humidities of 80% - 90% via optical growth measurements using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy. We find the optical growth of these aerosols is similar to known slightly-soluble organic acids, such as phthalic and pyromellitic acids. On average, the optical growth of the early Earth analog is slightly larger than the Titan analog. In order to translate our measurements obtained in a subsaturated regime into the CCN ability of these particles, we rely on the hygroscopicity parameter κ, developed by Petters & Kreidenweis (2007). We retrieve κ = 0.17±0.03 and 0.06±0.01 for the early Earth and Titan analogs, respectively. This early Earth analog hygroscopicity value indicates that the aerosol could activate at reasonable water vapor supersaturations. We use previous aerosol mass spectrometry results to correlate the chemical structure of the two types of analog with their hygroscopicity. The hygroscopicity of the early Earth aerosol analog, coupled with the apparent lack of other good CCN during the Archean, helps explain the role of the organic haze in the indirect effect of clouds on the early Earth and indicates that it may have had a significant impact on the hydrological cycle.

  19. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  20. Disinfection of Aerosolized Pathogenic Fungi on Laboratory Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Richard H.; Green, Theron D.; Chambers, Richard C.; Jones, Marian W.

    1964-01-01

    The effect of several fungicides on laboratory surfaces contaminated with the culture (spore) phase of aerosolized Blastomyces dermatitidis, Coccidioides immitis, and Histoplasma capsulatum was ascertained. The culture (spore) phase was more resistant to the action of the fungicides than was the tissue (yeast) phase. The addition of a wetting agent increased the efficiency of several fungicides. The time required for disinfection with a given concentration of fungicide, or the concentration required to disinfect within a given time, can be determined by interpolating the plotted graphs. PMID:14131365

  1. Laboratory study of selected personal inhalable aerosol samplers.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Wrobel, Richard; Kauffer, Edmond; Witschger, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    Assessment of inhalable dust exposure requires reliable sampling methods in order to measure airborne inhalable particles' concentrations. Many inhalable aerosol samplers can be used but their performances widely vary and remain unknown in some cases. The sampling performance of inhalable samplers is strongly dependent on particle size and ambient air velocity. Five inhalable aerosol samplers have been studied in two laboratory wind tunnels using polydisperse glass-beads' test aerosol. Samplers tested were IOM sampler (UK), two versions of CIP 10-I sampler, v1 and v2 (F), 37-mm closed face cassette sampler (USA), 37-mm cassette fitted up with an ACCU-CAP insert (USA), and Button sampler (USA). Particle size-dependent sampling efficiencies were measured in a horizontal wind tunnel under a 1 m s(-1) wind velocity and in a vertical tunnel under calm air, using a specific method with Coulter(R) counter particle size number distribution determinations. Compared with CEN-ISO-ACGIH sampling criteria for inhalable dust, the experimental results show fairly high sampling efficiency for the IOM and CIP 10-I v2 samplers and slightly lower efficiencies for the Button and CIP 10-I v1 samplers. The closed face cassette (4-mm orifice) produced the poorest performances of all the tested samplers. This can be improved by using the ACCU-CAP internal capsule, which prevents inner wall losses inside the cassette. Significant differences between moving air and calm air sampling efficiency were observed for all the studied samplers.

  2. Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

  3. Guidelines for the aerosol climatic effects special study: An element of the NASA climate research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Research to help develop better understanding of the role of aerosols in the Earth's radiative balance is summarized. Natural volcanic injections of aerosols into the stratosphere to understand and model any resultant evidence of climate change are considered. The approach involves: (1) measurements from aircraft, balloon and ground based platforms which complement and enhance the aerosol information derived from satellite data; (2) development of instruments required for some of these measurements; (3) theoretical and laboratory work to aid in interpreting and utilizing space based and in situ data; and (4) preparation for and execution of concentrated observations of stratospheric aerosols following a future large volcanic eruption.

  4. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A.; Ahern, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkila, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J.; Petdjd, T. T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between degree of oxidation and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), the CCN activity (κCCN) and the degree of aerosol oxidation (represented by the atomic O:C ratio) were measured for α-pinene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), m-xylene and α pinene/m-xylene mixture SOA generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. Our results show that both HGF and κCCN increase with O:C. The TMB and m-xylene SOA were, respectively, the least and most hygroscopic of the system studied. An average HGF of 1.25 and a κCCN of 0.2 were measured at O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The HGF based κ(κHGF) under predicted the κCCN values of 20 to 50% for all but the TMB SOA. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we define the extent to which the hygroscopic properties of SOA particles can be predicted from their oxidation level and provide parameterizations suitable for interpreting ambient data.

  5. Laboratory simulations of Titan's atmosphere: organic gases and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cabane, M; Chassefière, E

    1995-01-01

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has been observed by remote sensing for many years, both from interplanetary probes (Pioneer and Voyager's flybys) and from the Earth. Its N2 atmosphere, containing a small fraction of CH4 (approximately 2%), with T approximately 90 K and P approximately 1.5 bar at the ground level, is irradiated by solar UV photons and deeply bombarded by energetic particles, i.e. Saturn mangetospheric electrons and protons, interplanetary electrons and cosmic rays. The resulting energy deposition, which takes place mainly below 1000 km, initiates chemical reactions which yield gaseous hydrocarbons and nitriles and, through polymerisation processes, solid aerosol particles which grow by coagulation and settle down to the ground. At the present time, photochemical models strongly require the results of specific laboratory studies. Chemical rate constants are not well known at low temperatures, charged-particle-induced reactions are difficult to model and laboratory simulations of atmospheric processes are therefore of great interest. Moreover, the synthesis of organic compounds which have not been detected to date provides valuable information for future observations. The origin and chemical composition of aerosols depend on the nature of chemical and energy sources. Their production from gaseous species may be monitored in laboratory chambers and their optical or microphysical properties compared to those deduced from the observations of Titan's atmosphere. The development of simulation chambers of Titan's extreme conditions is necessary for a better understanding of past and future observations. Space probes will sound Titan's atmosphere by remote sensing and in situ analysis in the near future (Cassini-Huygens mission). It appears necessary, as a preliminary step to test on-board experiments in such chambers, and as a final step, when new space data have been acquired, to use them for more general scientific purposes.

  6. Unintended emission of nanoparticle aerosols during common laboratory handling operations.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Virginia; Irusta, Silvia; Balas, Francisco; Navascues, Nuria; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-08-30

    Common laboratory operations such as pouring, mashing in an agate mortar, transferring with a spatula, have been assessed as potential sources for emission of engineered nanoparticles in simulated occupational environments. Also, the accidental spilling from an elevated location has been considered. For workplace operations, masses of 1500 or 500mg of three dry-state engineered nanoparticles (SiO2, TiO2 and Ce-TiO2) with all dimensions under 30nm, and one fibrous nanomaterial (MWCNT) with diameter under 10nm and length about 1.5μm were used. The measured number emission factors (NEF) for every operation and material in this work were in the range of 10(5) #s(-1). The traceability of emitted nanoparticles has been improved using Ce-doping on TiO2 nanoparticles. With this traceable material it was possible to show that generated aerosol nanoparticles are rapidly associated with background particles to form large-sized aerosol agglomerates.

  7. Naval Research Laboratory Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    1930 1940 1950 1960 1920 Aqueous Film Forming Foam 1966 Plan-Position Indicator Gamma - Ray Radiography Liquid Thermal Diffusion Process...Synthetic lubricants Improved Aircraft Canopy Deep Ocean Search First U.S. radar patents Submarine, airborne & OTH radars & IFF First Detection of X... Rays from the Sun submarine life support Over the Horizon Radar The Navy and Marine Corps Corporate Laboratory Dragon Eye UAV 2002 Navy

  8. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment

  9. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkilä, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. The hygroscopic growth factor at 90% RH (HGF90%), the CCN activity ($\\kappa$ORG,CCN) and the level of oxidation (atomic O:C ratio) of the SOA particles were measured. Both HGF90% and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN increased with O:C; the HGF90% varied linearly with O:C, while $\\kappa$ORG,CCN mostly followed a nonlinear trend. An average HGF90% of 1.25 and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN of 0.19 were measured for O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The $\\kappa$ORG values estimated from the HGF90% ($\\kappa$ORG,HGF) were 20 to 50% lower than paired $\\kappa$ORG,CCN values for all SOA particles except 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), the least hygroscopic of the SOA systems. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we show that differences in hygroscopic behavior among the investigated SOA systems may correspond to differences in elemental composition.

  10. Virtual robotics laboratory for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Gerard T.

    1995-09-01

    We report on work currently underway to put a robotics laboratory onto the Internet in support of teaching and research in robotics and artificial intelligence in higher education institutions in the UK. The project is called Netrolab. The robotics laboratory comprises a set of robotics resources including a manipulator, a mobile robot with an on-board monocular active vision head and a set of sonar sensing modules, and a set of laboratory cameras to allow the user to see into the laboratory. The paper will report on key aspect of the project aimed at using multimedia tools and object-oriented techniques to network the robotics resources and to allow them to be configured into complex teaching and experimental modules. The paper will outline both the current developments of Netrolab and provide a perspective on the future development of networked virtual laboratories for research.

  11. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  12. Naval Research Laboratory 1983 Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    U.S. military, industry , and academia. During 1983, NRL celebrated 60 years of research. To keep pace with naval and national needs, the Laboratory has...that the Laboratory is a dynamic family working together to promote the programs, progress, and innovations that will continue to foster discoveries...inventiveness, and scientific advances for the Navy of the future. v’- . . ..,-. . . . . . . . . o ., .- A .7 . ;-..-. DEDICATION iii PREFACE v Capt

  13. Data Fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy, Lidar, and In-Situ Laboratory Data for Detecting Aerosols from Biomass Burning Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Arnott, W. P.; Schläpfer, D.; McGill, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols absorb and scatter solar and thermal infrared radiation, thereby altering the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. This is called the aerosol direct effect. Remote sensing of aerosols from satellites is essential to obtain the contribution of anthropogenic emission to the radiative balance. It is necessary to be able to map their presence and abundance using remote measurements. If we can quantify the occurrence of aerosols from biomass burning using remote sensing, we can improve our understanding of the direct radiative effect. This study uses airborne remote sensing data to understand, identify, and quantify smoke aerosols in the atmosphere. In particular, using Imaging Spectroscopy and lidar data to detect the presence and abundance of aerosols. Airborne remote sensing data was collected over the active Simi Valley wildfire on October 27, 2003 in Southern California. The Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was flown on a commercially operated Twin Otter aircraft at an altitude of 6 km, and collected 224 channels of radiance data from 380 - 2400 nm with 10 nm spectral resolution. Shortly after the AVIRIS data collection, the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) was flown on the NASA ER-2 at an altitude of 20 km. CPL is a three wavelength instrument that operates at 1064, 532, and 355 nm, with a 30 m vertical and 200 m horizontal resolution. Controlled laboratory measurements of aerosol optics from burning various woods and grasses provide insight and refinement of our understanding of remote sensing data for biomass burning aerosol. In 2006 and 2007 a two-phase project was conducted at the US Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory to characterize particulate matter generated by biomass burning. The Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME) is supported by the Joint Fire Science Program and is a cooperative effort between the National Park Service, the Desert Research Institute, and Colorado State University. FLAME was a series

  14. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  16. SESAME/Environmental Research Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Research Laboratories (ERL) have been designated as the basic research group of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ERL performs an integrated program of research and research services directed toward understanding the geophysical environment, protecting the environment, and improving the forecasting ability of NOAA. Twenty-four laboratories located throughout the United States comprise ERL. The Project SESAME (Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment) Planning Office is a project office within ERL. SESAME is conceived as a joint effort involving NOAA, NASA, NSF, and the atmospheric science community to lay the foundation for improved prediction of severe convective storms. The scientific plan for SESAME includes a phased buildup of analysis, modeling, instrumentation development and procurement, and limited-scale observational activities.

  17. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    concentrations using a Licor LI-7000 and dew point (Buck Research Instruments model CR-1A). A suite of experiments was conducted in which the; (i) Aerosol particle composition was varied (4 chemical compounds) (ii) Aerosol particle GMD was varied (40-80 nm) (iii) Aerosol particle total number concentration was varied (2 orders of magnitude) (iv) Tree type was varied (using a range of species and alternately lacquering the trees to prevent active uptake) (v) Light, water vapor content and CO2 concentrations inside the chamber were varied in order to mimic the range of conditions observed at our experimental particle flux site in southern Indiana (see related abstract by Pryor and Hornsby that describes the in situ flux estimates). The results of these laboratory experiments are used to quantify the relative importance of these factors in dictating aerosol particle uptake and specifically the importance of the foliage collection mechanisms at the leaf scale and deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements.

  18. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no

  19. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    ARL-TR-7710 ● JUNE 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse by Theron...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7710 ● JUNE 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Network Science Research...Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse by Andrew J Toth Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL and Theron Trout Stormfish

  20. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  1. Present role of PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy

    2015-11-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s nearly half of the elemental analyses of atmospheric aerosol samples were performed by PIXE. Since then, other techniques for elemental analysis became available and there has been a steady increase in studies on organic aerosol constituents and other aspects of aerosols, especially in the areas of nucleation (new particle formation), optical properties, and the role of aerosol particles in cloud formation and properties. First, a brief overview and discussion is given of the developments and trends in atmospheric aerosol analysis and research of the past three decades. Subsequently, it is indicated that there is still invaluable work to be done by PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research, especially if one teams up with other aerosol researchers and performs complementary measurements, e.g., on small aerosol samples that are taken with high-time resolution. Fine examples of such research are the work done by the Lund group in the CARIBIC aircraft studies and the analysis of circular streaker samples by the Florence PIXE group. These and other examples are presented and other possibilities of PIXE are indicated.

  2. Current and Future Perspectives of Aerosol Research at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Ichoku, Charles; Randles, Cynthia; Yuan, Tianle; Da Silva, Arlindo M.; Colarco, Peter R.; Kim, Dongchul; Levy, Robert; Sayer, Andrew; Chin, Mian; Giles, David; Holben, Brent; Welton, Ellsworth; Eck, Thomas; Remer, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols are tiny atmospheric particles that are emitted from various natural and anthropogenic sources. They affect climate through direct and indirect interactions with solar and thermal radiation, clouds, and atmospheric circulation (Solomon et al. 2007). The launch of a variety of sophisticated satellite-based observing systems aboard the Terra, Aqua, Aura, SeaWiFS (see appendix for all acronym expansions), CALIPSO, and other satellites in the late 1990s to mid-2000s through the NASA EOS and other U.S. and non-U.S. programs ushered in a golden era in aerosol research. NASA has been a leader in providing global aerosol characterizations through observations from satellites, ground networks, and field campaigns, as well as from global and regional modeling. AeroCenter (http://aerocenter.gsfc.nasa.gov/), which was formed in 2002 to address the many facets of aerosol research in a collaborative manner, is an interdisciplinary union of researchers (200 members) at NASA GSFC and other nearby institutions, including NOAA, several universities, and research laboratories. AeroCenter hosts a web-accessible regular seminar series and an annual meeting to present up-to-date aerosol research, including measurement techniques; remote sensing algorithms; modeling development; field campaigns; and aerosol interactions with radiation, clouds, precipitation, climate, biosphere, atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and human health. The 2013 annual meeting was held at the NASA GSFC Visitor Center on 31 May 2013, which coincided with the seventh anniversary of the passing of Yoram Kaufman, a modern pioneer in satellite-based aerosol science and the founder of AeroCenter. The central theme of this year's meeting was "current and future perspectives" of NASA's aerosol science and satellite missions.

  3. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  4. Molecular transformations accompanying the aging of laboratory secondary organic aerosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aging of fresh secondary organic aerosol, generated by alpha-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor, was studied by passing it through a second reaction chamber where hydroxyl radicals were generated. Two types of experiments were performed: plug injection experiments where the particle mass a...

  5. METAL AEROSOL FORMATION IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes experiments performed using an 82 kW (280,000 Btu/hr) refractory-lined horizontal tunnel combustor to examine the aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) produced by simulated nickel, cadmium, and lead wastes injected into an incineration environment. Metal c...

  6. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  7. THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field data collections for the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) have completed one-half of the planned study design. The DEARS is collecting personal, residential indoor, residential outdoor and central community monitoring data involving particulate matter, v...

  8. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  9. Laboratory and Ambient Studies Using an Automated Semi-Continuous Single-Particle Aerosol Raman Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, D., III; Hill, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Single-particle Raman spectra can yield extensive information about in-situ ambient particulate composition. However, Raman spectral measurements of individual aerosol particles typically require collection of samples in the field followed by offline Raman spectral measurements in a laboratory. The process requires considerable operator time. We report results obtained with an automated, single-particle Aerosol Raman Spectrometer built by Battelle, which is the core of Battelle's Resource Effective Bioidentification System (REBS). This instrument collects aerosol particles onto a metallized polymer tape and simultaneously measures Raman spectra of particles obtained during the previous collection period. At the end of each collection period (typically 15 minutes), the tape is advanced and the next collection and measurement period is begun. In this way, particles are semi-continuously sampled and their Raman spectra are measured. We show laboratory data from different sizes of polystyrene latex spheres. We also show results from calcium sulfate particles, vehicular emission soot, and other particles. We discuss the influence of imaging time on the quality of the Raman spectra measured and on the ability of the instrument to resolve aerosol particles. Finally, we present results from an outdoor sampling period during the summer of 2015 where the instrument ran unattended for more than one week collecting particles and measuring their Raman spectra. We suggest that the routine use of such an automated particle-sampling instrument should increase our understanding of inorganic and organic aerosols including biological aerosols and sources and fates of these particles.

  10. Aerosol optical depth as observed by the Mars Science Laboratory REMS UV photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Zorzano, María-Paz; Lemmon, Mark; Martín-Torres, Javier; Mendaza de Cal, Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Systematic observations taken by the REMS UV photodiodes on a daily basis throughout the landed Mars Science Laboratory mission provide a highly useful tool for characterizing aerosols above Gale Crater. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the approximately 1.75 Mars Years of observations taken to date taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the extended field of view of the REMS UV photodiodes. The retrievals show in detail the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, which is punctuated with numerous short timescale events of increased optical depth. Dust deposition onto the photodiodes is accounted for by comparison with aerosol optical depth derived from direct imaging of the Sun by Mastcam. The effect of dust on the photodiodes is noticeable, but does not dominate the signal. Cleaning of dust from the photodiodes was observed in the season around Ls=270°, but not during other seasons. Systematic deviations in the residuals from the retrieval fit are indicative of changes in aerosol effective particle size, with larger particles present during periods of increased optical depth. This seasonal dependence of aerosol particle size is expected as dust activity injects larger particles into the air, while larger aerosols settle out of the atmosphere more quickly leading to a smaller average particle size over time.

  11. Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2007-07-01

    Aerosols exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently there is a need to represent aerosol effects in global climate models, and models have begun to include representations of these effects. However, the treatment of aerosols in current global climate models is presently highly simplified, omitting many important processes and feedbacks. Consequently there is need for substantial improvement. Here we describe the U. S. Department of Energy strategy for improving the treatment of aerosol properties and processes in global climate models. The strategy begins with a foundation of field and laboratory measurements that provide the basis for modules of selected aerosol properties and processes. These modules are then integrated in regional aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with field measurements. Issues of scale are then addressed so that the modules can be applied to global aerosol models, which are evaluated by comparing with global satellite measurements. Finally, the validated set of modules are applied to global climate models for multi-century simulations. This strategy can be applied to successive generations of global climate models.

  12. Aerosol Optical Depth as Observed by the Mars Science Laboratory REMS UV Photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. D.; Zorzano, M.-P.; Lemmon, M.; Martin-Torres, J.; Mendaza de Cal, T.

    2017-01-01

    Systematic observations taken by the REMS UV photodiodes on a daily basis throughout the landed Mars Science Laboratory mission provide a highly useful tool for characterizing aerosols above Gale Crater. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the approximately two Mars Years of observations taken to date taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the extended field of view of the REMS UV photodiodes. The retrievals show in detail the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, which is punctuated with numerous short timescale events of increased optical depth. Dust deposition onto the photodiodes is accounted for by comparison with aerosol optical depth derived from direct imaging of the Sun by Mastcam. The effect of dust on the photodiodes is noticeable, but does not dominate the signal. Cleaning of dust from the photodiodes was observed in the season around Ls=270deg, but not during other seasons. Systematic deviations in the residuals from the retrieval fit are indicative of changes in aerosol effective particle size, with larger particles present during periods of increased optical depth. This seasonal dependence of aerosol particle size is expected as dust activity injects larger particles into the air, while larger aerosols settle out of the atmosphere more quickly leading to a smaller average particle size over time. A full description of these observations, the retrieval algorithm, and the results can be found in Smith et al. (2016).

  13. Photobiology Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Photobiology Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL. The photobiology group's research is in four main areas: (1) Comprehensive studies of fuel-producing photosynthetic, fermentative, and chemolithotrophic model microorganisms; (2) Characterization and engineering of redox enzymes and proteins for fuel production; (3) Genetic and pathway engineering of model organisms to improve production of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels; and (4) Studies of nanosystems using biological and non-biological materials in hybrid generation. NREL's photobiology research capabilities include: (1) Controlled and automated photobioreactors and fermenters for growing microorganisms under a variety of environmental conditions; (2) High-and medium-throughput screening of H{sub 2}-producing organisms; (3) Homologous and heterologous expression, purification, and biochemical/biophysical characterization of redox enzymes and proteins; (4) Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gases, metabolites, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; (5) Genetic and pathway engineering and development of novel genetic toolboxes; and (6) Design and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-based biofuel cells and energy conversion nanodevices.

  14. Aerosol Transmission of Hantaan and Related Viruses to Laboratory Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    5011 Abstract. Hantaan. Seoul. and Puumala viruses were transmitted to 12-16-week-old female Wistar Rattus norvegicits by inhalation. The rodent...et al. showed in- Viruses used were the prototype HTN (strain tercage transmission ofHTN virus between cages 76-118) virus isolated in 1976," SEO...passed among bank voles. Additionally, aerosolized in Vero E-6 cells 8 times. HTN’ and SEO’ viruses were suspected as the Female outbred Wistar Crl:(WR

  15. Aerosol Formation In The Free Troposphere: Aircraft and Laboratory Measurements of Ionic and Gaseous Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.

    Aerosol formation seems to be very efficient in the upper troposphere (UT) as in- dicated by the frequent presence of numerous very small and therefore very young aerosol particles. Aersosol formation proceeds via nucleation of supersaturated low volatility trace gases (LVG) involving either a homogeneous (HONU) or an ion- induced (INU) mechanism. LVG experience rapid removal by condenstation on prefer- ably pre-existing aerosol particles and therefore LVG must be formed locally in the UT by photochemical conversion of precursor gases. A prominent example is gaseous sulfuric acid which is formed from SO2. This SO2 originates at least in the northern hemisphere mostly from fossil fuel combustion at ground-level and to some part origi- nates also from jet aircraft cruising in the UT. Other conceivable LVG's are low volatil- ity organic compounds. After formation by nucleation new particles may experience condensational growth involving LVG. Alternatively new particles may experience scavenging by attachment to pre-existing larger particles. The LVG-concentration has a strong influence on the growth-rate of new particles and thereby on the possibil- ity for growth to the size of a cloud condensation nucleus. Unfortunately present knowledge on free tropospheric LVG is rather poor. Here will be reported free tropo- spheric aircraft-based measurements of ionic and gaseous aerosol-precursors. These include both measurements in the "background" FT as well as measurements in ex- haust plumes of jet aircraft cruising in the UT. Furthermore accompanying new labo- ratory investigations of INU and measurements behind aircraft jet engines at ground- level will also be adressed.

  16. A novel aerosol generator for homogenous distribution of powder over the lungs after pulmonary administration to small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Tonnis, Wouter F; Bagerman, Marieke; Weij, Michel; Sjollema, Jelmer; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate powder formulations for pulmonary administration in pre-clinic research, the powder should be administered to the lungs of small laboratory animals. To do so properly, a device is needed that generates particles small enough to reach deep into the lungs. In this study a newly developed aerosol generator was tested for pulmonary administration of powder to the lungs of mice and its performance was compared to the only currently available device, the Penn-Century insufflator. Results showed that both devices generated powder particles of approximately the same size distribution, but the fine particle fraction needed for deep lung administration was strongly improved when the aerosol generator was used.Imaging studies in mice showed that powder particles from the aerosol generator deposited into the deep lung, where powder from the Penn-Century insufflator did not reach further than the conducting airways.Furthermore, powder administered by using the aerosol generator was more homogenously distributed over the five individual lungs lobes than powder administrated by using the Penn-Century insufflator.

  17. The formation of sulfate and elemental sulfur aerosols under varying laboratory conditions: implications for early earth.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, H Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Trainer, Melissa G; Farmer, Delphine K; Jimenez, Jose L; McKay, Christopher P; Toon, Owen B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-10-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 × 10(9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) by UV light with λ < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S(8)) and sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO(2) either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H(2)) or methane (CH(4)), increased the formation of S(8). With UV photolysis, formation of S(8) aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO(2) pressure; and S(8) is only formed at a 2% SO(2) mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO(2) mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH(4). We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH(4) and moderate amounts of SO(2). The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed. Key Words: S-MIF-Archean atmosphere-Early Earth-Sulfur aerosols.

  18. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  19. Absorbing Aerosols: Field and Laboratory Studies of Black Carbon and Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. C.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, absorbing aerosols are thought to be the most uncertain factor in atmospheric climate models (~0.4-1.2 W/m2), and the 2nd most important factor after CO2 in global warming (1.6 W/m2; Ramanathan and Carmichael, Nature Geoscience, 2008; Myhre, Science, 2009). While most well-recognized atmospheric aerosols, e.g., sulfate from power-plants, have a cooling effect on the atmosphere by scattering solar radiation, black carbon (BC or soot) absorbs sunlight strongly which results in a warming of the atmosphere. Dust particles are also present globally and can absorb radiation, contributing to a warmer and drier atmosphere. Direct on-line measurements of BC and hematite, an absorbing dust aerosol, can be made with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), which measures the mass of the particles by incandescence on an individual particle basis. Measurements from the SP2 are combined with absorption measurements from the three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm and the ultraviolet photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-UV) at 375 nm to determine wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MACs). Laboratory aerosol samples include flame-generated soot, fullerene soot, Aquadag, hematite, and hematite-containing dusts. Measured BC MAC's compare well with published values, and hematite MAC's are an order of magnitude less than BC. Absorbing aerosols measured in the laboratory are compared with those from ambient aerosols measured during the Las Conchas fire and BEACHON-RoMBAS. The Las Conchas fire was a wildfire in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico that burned over 100,000 acres during the Summer of 2011, and BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) is a field campaign focusing on biogenic aerosols at the Manitou Forest Observatory near Colorado Springs, CO in Summer 2011. Optical properties and size

  20. Earth Resources Laboratory research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The accomplishments of the Earth Resources Laboratory's research and technology program are reported. Sensors and data systems, the AGRISTARS project, applied research and data analysis, joint research projects, test and evaluation studies, and space station support activities are addressed.

  1. Laboratory studies on secondary organic aerosol formation from terpenes.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Miao, Yunkun; Sierau, Berko; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) following the ozonolysis of terpene has been investigated intensively in recent years. The enhancement of SOA yields from the acid catalysed reactions of organics on aerosol surfaces or in the bulk particle phase has been receiving great attention. Recent studies show that the presence of acidic seed particles increases the SOA yield significantly (M. S. Jang and R. M. Kamens, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2001, 35, 4758, ref. 1; M. S. Jang, N. M. Czoschke, S. Lee and R. M. Kamens, Science, 2002, 298, 814, ref. 2; N. M. Czoschke, M. Jang and R. M. Kamens, Atmos. Environ., 2003, 37, 4287, ref. 3; M. S. Jang, B. Carroll, B. Chandramouli and R. M. Kamens, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2003, 37, 3828, ref. 4; Y. Iinuma, O. Böge, T. Gnauk and H. Herrmann, Atmos. Environ., 2004, 38, 761, ref. 5; S. Gao, M. Keywood, N. L. Ng, J. Surratt, V. Varutbangkul, R. Bahreini, R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 10147, ref. 6). More detailed studies report the formation of higher molecular weight products in SOA (refs. 5 and 6; M. P. Tolocka, M. Jang, J. M. Ginter, F. J. Cox, R. M. Kamens and M. V. Johnston, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2004, 38, 1428, ref. 7; S. Gao, N. L. Ng, M. Keywood, V. Varutbangkul, R. Bahreini, A. Nenes, J. He, K. Y. Yoo, J. L. Beauchamp, R. P. Hodyss, R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2004, 38, 6582, ref. 8) which could result in a non-reversible uptake of organics into the particle phase. Most of the past studies concentrated on the characterisation of the yields of enhanced SOA and its composition from ozonolysis of terpenes in the presence or absence of acidic and neutral seed particles. Recent findings from cyclohexene ozonolysis show that the presence of OH scavengers can also significantly influence the SOA yield. Our new results from the IfT chemistry department aerosol chamber on terpene ozonolysis in the presence of OH scavengers show that the presence of hydroxyl

  2. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  3. A mobile remote sensing laboratory for water vapor, trace gas, aerosol, and wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; White, W.; Tulloch, W.; DeSlover, D.

    1993-03-19

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a mobile field laboratory for remote measurement of atmospheric processes and observables that are important in global climate change, dispersal of hazardous materials, and atmospheric pollution. Specific observables of interest are water vapor, trace gases, aerosol size and density, wind, and temperature. The goal is to study atmospheric processes continuously for extended periods in remote field locations. This laboratory has just reached field ready status with sensors for aerosol and trace gas measurement based on established techniques. A development program is underway to enhance the sensor suite with several new techniques and instruments that are expected to significantly extend the state of the art in remote trace gas analysis. The new sensors will be incorporated into the lab during the next two years.

  4. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) is the only science and technology (S&T) organization for the Air Force . Accordingly, AFRL fulfills a mission to...Readership survey is sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Thank you in advance for your...Base Defense AFRL researchers participated in the Robotic Physical Security Experiment, conducted at

  5. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  6. The Formation of Sulfate and Elemental Sulfur Aerosols Under Varying Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, H. Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Farmer, Delphine K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; McKay, Christopher P.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 x 10(exp 9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by UV light with lambda < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfuric acid (H2S04) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO2 either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4), increased the formation of S8. With UV photolysis, formation of S8 aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO2 pressure; and S8 is only formed at a 2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH4. We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH4 and moderate amounts of SO2, The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed.

  7. A Laboratory Investigation of Aerosol and Extinction Characteristics for SALTY DOG, NWC 29 and NWC 78 Pyrotechnics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Dispersion Extinction Pyrotechnics Salty Dog Smokes Deliquescent Growth i *0. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aide Iti nee.,ary and idently by block... deliquescent aerosol. Results from the laboratory investigation of individual particle growth indicate that the aerosol generated by NVC 78 has the...due to liquid water (i.e., the deliquesced aerosol) absorption at those IR wavelengths. To compare the extinction effectiveness of Salty Dog to that of

  8. Repellency of aerosol and cream products containing fennel oil to mosquitoes under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon-Il; Chang, Kyu-Sik; Yang, Young-Cheol; Kim, Byung-Seok; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2004-11-01

    The repellency of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Miller)-containing products (5% aerosol and 8% cream) against mosquitoes was compared with those of citronella oil, geranium oil and deet, as well as three commercial repellents, Baby Keeper cream containing IR3535, MeiMei cream containing citronella and geranium oils, and Repellan S aerosol containing 19% N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (deet) under laboratory and field conditions. In a laboratory study with female Aedes aegypti (L), fennel oil exhibited good repellency in a release-in-cage test and repellency in skin and patch tests of the oil was comparable with those of citronella and geranium oils. In paddy field tests with five human volunteers, 5% and 8% fennel oil-containing aerosol and cream produced 84% and 70% repellency, respectively, at 90 min after exposure, whereas Baby Keeper cream and MeiMei cream gave 71% and 57% repellency at 90 min after exposure, respectively, and Repellan S aerosol gave 89% repellency at 210 min. The species and ratio of mosquitoes collected were the genera Culex (44.1%), Anopheles (42.2%), Aedes (7.8%) and Armigeres (5.9%). Fennel oil-containing products could be useful for protection from humans and domestic animals from vector-borne diseases and nuisance caused by mosquitoes.

  9. Development of Particulates and Aerosols Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Rivera, Monica

    2005-01-01

    shared her understanding of the aerosol technology with them. She also provided input for their end of the summer presentations. And attended the Aviation and Particle Emissions workshop. This workshop brought together experts in the aircraft particulate emissions field. As a result Ms. Rivera made two significant contacts with academia (UMR) and government (WPAFB) which could lead to future collaboration. She also attended the Aerosol and Particle Measurement Class held at the University of Minnesota. This class refreshed her particulate knowledge and introduced her to new aerosol applications and technology. Furthermore at the class contacts were made with private industry (TSI) and government (WPAFB). Ms. Rivera also enhanced her education by taking an in-house class on aircraft design and operation.

  10. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, ...

  11. Research Laboratories and Centers Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Research and Development is the research arm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has three national laboratories and four national centers located in 14 facilities across the country.

  12. Stanford Aerospace Research Laboratory research overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be, addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modelling and control of extremely flexible space structures. The ARL has designed and built several semi-autonomous free-flying robots that perform numerous tasks in a zero-gravity, drag-free, two-dimensional environment. It is envisioned that future generations of these robots will be part of a human-robot team, in which the robots will operate under the task-level commands of astronauts. To make this possible, the ARL has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) with an intuitive object-level motion-direction capability. Using this interface, the ARL has demonstrated autonomous navigation, intercept and capture of moving and spinning objects, object transport, multiple-robot cooperative manipulation, and simple assemblies from both free-flying and fixed bases. The ARL has also built a number of experimental test beds on which the modelling and control of flexible manipulators has been studied. Early ARL experiments in this arena demonstrated for the first time the capability to control the end-point position of both single-link and multi-link flexible manipulators using end-point sensing. Building on these accomplishments, the ARL has been able to control payloads with unknown dynamics at the end of a flexible manipulator, and to achieve high-performance control of a multi-link flexible manipulator.

  13. (PORTUGAL)THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) represents an intensive examination of personal, residential and community-based particulate matter and related co-pollutant measurements in Detroit, Michigan. Data from the DEARS will be used as inputs into air quality, la...

  14. Influence of vapor wall loss in laboratory chambers on yields of secondary organic aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Cappa, Christopher D.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; McVay, Renee C.; Ensberg, Joseph J.; Kleeman, Michael J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a major fraction of submicrometer atmospheric particulate matter. Quantitative simulation of SOA within air-quality and climate models—and its resulting impacts—depends on the translation of SOA formation observed in laboratory chambers into robust parameterizations. Worldwide data have been accumulating indicating that model predictions of SOA are substantially lower than ambient observations. Although possible explanations for this mismatch have been advanced, none has addressed the laboratory chamber data themselves. Losses of particles to the walls of chambers are routinely accounted for, but there has been little evaluation of the effects on SOA formation of losses of semivolatile vapors to chamber walls. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that such vapor losses can lead to substantially underestimated SOA formation, by factors as much as 4. Accounting for such losses has the clear potential to bring model predictions and observations of organic aerosol levels into much closer agreement. PMID:24711404

  15. Constraining Carbonaceous Aerosol Climate Forcing by Bridging Laboratory, Field and Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M. K.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Saleh, R.; Cappa, C. D.; Williams, L. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Gorkowski, K.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Yokelson, R. J.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass and fossil fuel combustion emits black (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) aerosols that absorb sunlight to warm climate and organic carbon (OC) aerosols that scatter sunlight to cool climate. The net forcing depends strongly on the composition, mixing state and transformations of these carbonaceous aerosols. Complexities from large variability of fuel types, combustion conditions and aging processes have confounded their treatment in models. We analyse recent laboratory and field measurements to uncover fundamental mechanism that control the chemical, optical and microphysical properties of carbonaceous aerosols that are elaborated below: Wavelength dependence of absorption and the single scattering albedo (ω) of fresh biomass burning aerosols produced from many fuels during FLAME-4 was analysed to determine the factors that control the variability in ω. Results show that ω varies strongly with fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCEFI)—higher MCEFI results in lower ω values and greater spectral dependence of ω (Liu et al GRL 2014). A parameterization of ω as a function of MCEFI for fresh BB aerosols is derived from the laboratory data and is evaluated by field data, including BBOP. Our laboratory studies also demonstrate that BrC production correlates with BC indicating that that they are produced by a common mechanism that is driven by MCEFI (Saleh et al NGeo 2014). We show that BrC absorption is concentrated in the extremely low volatility component that favours long-range transport. We observe substantial absorption enhancement for internally mixed BC from diesel and wood combustion near London during ClearFlo. While the absorption enhancement is due to BC particles coated by co-emitted OC in urban regions, it increases with photochemical age in rural areas and is simulated by core-shell models. We measure BrC absorption that is concentrated in the extremely low volatility components and attribute it to wood burning. Our results support

  16. Virtual Instruction: A Qualitative Research Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadtlander, Lee M.; Giles, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Online graduate programs in psychology are becoming common; however, a concern has been whether instructors in the programs provide adequate research mentoring. One issue surrounding research mentoring is the absence of research laboratories in the virtual university. Students attending online universities often do research without peer or lab…

  17. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  18. Research support for the Laboratory for Lightwave Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, T. F.

    1992-12-01

    The Laboratory for Lightwave Technology at Brown University is one of the few university laboratories at which it is possible to design, fabricate, and characterize optical fibers of not only traditional, but of unusual design. These fibers have an increasingly important role in a host of applications of significance to the defense requirements of the United States. Among these are the following: fiber lasers for the measurement of clear air turbulence (in an important eye-safe region of the spectrum); and fiber sensors for the measurement of temperature and strain, not only in high temperature composite materials, but in structural concrete, which is important for roads, runways, and buildings. We are also engaged in research, an outgrowth of our work in optical fibers, on novel techniques for the formation of nanophase oxide particles, both ceramic and amorphous. The work on amorphous oxides is associated with our MCVD and OVD laboratories. In these labs, we have proposed and studied a new technique for the formation of multi-component oxides to be used in the doping of optical fiber preforms. In this synthesis, an aerosol of organometallic precursors is convectively transported into a reaction zone where it is pyrolized. The liquid aerosol is homogeneous at the molecular level, so that subsequent reactions produce glasses that are not phase separated. This has also been used to study the synthesis of high temperature ceramic nanophase single crystal oxides that may be produced at a high rate. The synthesis of both glasses and ceramics using novel techniques has meshed with our research in novel optical fibers and fiber sensors. In this report, we discuss the general activities of our laboratory.

  19. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  20. Naval Research Laboratory Arctic Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Initiatives • Naval Arctic Environmental Research – Improved Physical Understanding – Integrated Arctic Modeling and Prediction – Developing New ...of the Arctic environment and important coupled processes operating in the Arctic region • Development of a new , dynamic, fully-integrated Arctic...longer lead times, including the use of satellite SAR data for assimilation into integrated models • Generation of new technologies (platforms

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory catalog of research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is briefly presented. Topics include: (1) Applied Science; (2) Chemical Sciences; (3) Earth Sciences; (4) Materials Sciences; (5) Accelerator and Fusion Research; (6) Nuclear Science; (7) Physics; (8) Cell and Molecular Biology; (9) Chemical Biodynamics; (10) Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics; (11) Engineering; (12) Environmental Protection, Health and Safety; and (13) Information and Computing Sciences. (WET)

  2. AMALi - the Airborne Mobile Aerosol Lidar for Arctic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachlewska, I. S.; Neuber, R.; Lampert, A.; Ritter, C.; Wehrle, G.

    2010-03-01

    The Airborne Mobile Aerosol Lidar (AMALi) is an instrument developed at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research for reliable operation under the challenging weather conditions at the Earth's polar regions. Since 2003 the AMALi has been successfully deployed for measurements in ground-based installation and zenith- or nadir-pointing airborne configurations during several scientific campaigns in the Arctic. The lidar provides backscatter profiles at two wavelengths (355/532 nm or 1064/532 nm) together with the linear depolarization at 532 nm, from which aerosol and cloud properties can be derived. This paper presents the characteristics and capabilities of the AMALi system and gives examples of its usage for airborne and ground-based operations in the Arctic. As this backscatter lidar normally does not operate in aerosol-free layers special evaluation schemes are discussed, the nadir-pointing iterative inversion for the case of an unknown boundary condition and the two-stream approach for the extinction profile calculation if a second lidar system probes the same air mass. Also an intercomparison of the AMALi system with an established ground-based Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) is given.

  3. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri W. Hunt31Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT2AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow hosted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Research3U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental ResearchA number of studies in the past decade have transformed the way we think about atmospheric aerosols. The advances include, but are not limited to, source apportionment of organics using aerosol mass spectrometer data, the volatility basis set approach, quantifying isoprene oxidation, and understanding the role of aqueous oxidation of organics on SOA formation. A series of grants funded by EPA just under ten years ago supported many of these advances. These projects make up the body of work awarded under two solicitations released by the EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program: “Measurement, Modeling, and Analysis Methods for Airborne Carbonaceous Fine Particulate Matter” (2003) and “Source Apportionment of Particulate Matter” (2004). Our goal is to present the impact of the STAR solicitations and to show how they have pushed the field forward and led to new questions.In particular

  4. Naval Research Laboratory 1986 Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Lanzano, P., Earth , Moon, and Planets 25:27- 2763 34:283-304 Temperature Measurements of Shocked Water Using a Fluorescence Probe, by Jus- INSTRUMENTATION...51 Steep and Breaking Deep Water Waves 53 ,. Rapid Three-Dimensional Ocean Acoustic Computations 56 " Inertial Wave Dynamics 58 * Nonlinear Salt...itability, lubricants, shipbuilding materials, fire use in microsurgery. On Earth . NRL researchers figihting. along with the study of sound in the sea. helped

  5. Naval Research Laboratory 1984 Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-16

    M.E. . A Method for Measuring the Frequency Haran and B.D. Cool [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Dispersion for Broadband Pulses 73, 774-779 (1983)], by Trivett...Sound, pioneered in the fields of transferred to this office, NRL thus became the high - frequency radio and underwater sound prop- corporate research...and a scanning/transmission tion facility, and facilities for high frequency electron microscope; an ion implantation facility; (HF) and signal analysis

  6. 1980 Naval Research Laboratory Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    the highest sensitivity and drive level possi- 10000 psi and at temperatures from 0 to 35C. ble, consistent with omnidirectional characteris...height swell separately, but not both simultaneously. measurements from nadir-looking radars. Efforts have been made to remove the effects of An airborne ...efficiently is a dynamic process that requires con- tinual attention from managers at all levels . One pioneered naval research into space, from atmos

  7. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  8. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  9. Stirling Laboratory Research Engine: Preprototype configuration report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a simple Stirling research engine that could be used by industrial, university, and government laboratories was studied. The conceptual and final designs, hardware fabrication and the experimental validation of a preprototype stirling laboratory research engine (SLRE) were completed. Also completed was a task to identify the potential markets for research engines of this type. An analytical effort was conducted to provide a stirling cycle computer model. The versatile engine is a horizontally opposed, two piston, single acting stirling engine with a split crankshaft drive mechanism; special instrumentation is installed at all component interfaces. Results of a thermodynamic energy balance for the system are reported. Also included are the engine performance results obtained over a range of speeds, working pressures, phase angles and gas temperatures. The potential for a stirling research engine to support the laboratory requirements of educators and researchers was demonstrated.

  10. Artist's Concept of NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  11. Absorbing aerosols over Asia: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-11-01

    Forcing by absorbing atmospheric black carbon (BC) tends to heat the atmosphere, cool the surface, and reduce the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates and the hydrologic cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the increases in (1) the total amount of all aerosol species and (2) the amount of aerosol absorption that may have occurred over the 1950-1990 period. Focusing on south and east Asia, the sensitivity of a general circulation model's climate response (with prescribed sea surface temperatures and aerosol distributions) to such changes is investigated by considering a range of both aerosol absorption and aerosol extinction optical depth increases. We include direct and semidirect aerosol effects only. Precipitation changes are less sensitive to changes in aerosol absorption optical depth at lower aerosol loadings. At higher-extinction optical depths, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of absorbing aerosols and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation in northwestern India. In contrast, the presence of increases in only scattering aerosols weakens the monsoonal circulation and inhibits precipitation here. Cloud amount changes can enhance or counteract surface solar flux reduction depending on the aerosol loading and absorption, with the changes also influencing the surface temperature and the surface energy balance. The results have implications for aerosol reduction strategies in the future that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone has a reduced effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in BC aerosols should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosols.

  12. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Laboratory Investigation of Contact Freezing and the Aerosol to Ice Crystal Transformation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-10-28

    This project has been focused on the following objectives: 1. Investigations of the physical processes governing immersion versus contact nucleation, specifically surface-induced crystallization; 2. Development of a quadrupole particle trap with full thermodynamic control over the temperature range 0 to –40 °C and precisely controlled water vapor saturation ratios for continuous, single-particle measurement of the aerosol to ice crystal transformation process for realistic ice nuclei; 3. Understanding the role of ice nucleation in determining the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds, within a framework that allows bridging between laboratory and field measurements.

  14. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  15. The influence of marine microbial activities on aerosol production: A laboratory mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Bothe, Dylan W.; Radway, JoAnn C.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    The oceans cover most of the Earth's surface, contain nearly half the total global primary biomass productivity, and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. Here we experimentally investigate links between biological activity in seawater and sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, a relationship of potential significance for organic aerosol loading and cloud formation over the oceans and thus for climate globally. Bubbles were generated in laboratory mesocosm experiments either by recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Experiments were conducted with Atlantic Ocean seawater collected off the eastern end of Long Island, NY, and with artificial seawater containing cultures of bacteria and phytoplankton Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Changes in SSA size distributions occurred during all phases of bacterial and phytoplankton growth, as characterized by cell concentrations, dissolved organic carbon, total particulate carbon, and transparent exopolymer particles (gel-forming polysaccharides representing a major component of biogenic exudate material). Over a 2 week growth period, SSA particle concentrations increased by a factor of less than 2 when only bacteria were present and by a factor of about 3 when bacteria and phytoplankton were present. Production of jet-generated SSA particles of diameter less than 200 nm increased with time, while production of all particle diameters increased with time when frits were used. The implications of a marine biological activity dependent SSA flux are discussed.

  16. Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Deane, Grant B.; Stokes, M. Dale; DeMott, Paul J.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Palenik, Brian P.; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Molina, Mario J.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Geiger, Franz M.; Roberts, Gregory C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.; Ebben, Carlena J.; Forestieri, Sara D.; Guasco, Timothy L.; Hersey, Scott P.; Kim, Michelle J.; Lambert, William F.; Modini, Robin L.; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Schoepp, Nathan G.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Zhao, Defeng

    2013-01-01

    The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60–180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

  17. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  18. US Naval Research Laboratory focus issue: introduction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Rather than concentrate on a single topic, this feature issue presents the wide variety of research in optics that takes place at a single institution, the United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and is analogous to an NRL feature issue published in Applied Optics in 1967. NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps. It conducts a broadly based multidisciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development in the physical, engineering, space, and environmental sciences related to maritime, atmospheric, and space domains. NRL's research is directed toward new and improved materials, techniques, equipment, and systems in response to identified and anticipated Navy needs. A number of articles in this issue review progress in broader research areas while other articles present the latest results on specific topics.

  19. Emissions and Characteristics of Ice Nucleating Particles Associated with Laboratory Generated Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, C. S.; Hill, T. C. J.; Beall, C.; Sultana, C. M.; Moore, K.; Cornwell, G.; Lee, C.; Al-Mashat, H.; Laskina, O.; Trueblood, J.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate emission rates and activity spectra of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) are required for proper representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in atmospheric modeling studies. However, few investigations have quantified or characterized oceanic INP emissions. In conjunction with the Center for Aerosol Impacts on the Climate and the Environment, we have directly measured changes in INP emissions and properties of INPs from nascent sea spray aerosol (SSA) through the evolution of phytoplankton blooms. Multiple offline and online instruments were used to monitor aerosol chemistry and size, and bulk water characteristics during two phytoplankton bloom experiments. Two methods were utilized to monitor the number concentrations of INPs from 0 to -34 °C: The online CSU continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and collections processed offline using the CSU ice spectrometer. Single particle analyses were performed on ice crystal residuals downstream of the CFDC, presumed to be INPs, via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman microspectroscopy. Preliminary results indicate that laboratory-generated nascent SSA corresponds to number concentrations of INPs that are generally consistent with open ocean regions, based on current knowledge. STEM analyses revealed that the sizes of ice crystal residuals that were associated with nascent SSA ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 μm. Raman microspectroscopy analysis of 1 μm sized residuals found a variety of INP identities, including long chain organics, diatom fragments and polysaccharides. Our data suggest that biological processes play a significant role in ocean INP emissions by generating the species and compounds that were identified during these studies.

  20. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Researchers perform tests at Kennedy Space Center. New facilities for such research will be provided at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  1. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratory’s engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nation’s nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INL’s Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nation’s premier applied science laboratories.

  3. Optics at the naval research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, J A

    1967-12-01

    Edward O. Hulburt initiated optical research at The Naval Research Laboratory in June 1924, choosing, fields of investigation such as the upper atmosphere of the earth, especially the ionosphere, gas discharges, the optical properties of the atmosphere and of the sea, visibility, ultraviolet and infrared physics, photoelasticity, and similar subjects. Ultraviolet and x-ray experiments from rockets were an outgrowth from continuing interest in the upper atmosphere, ultimately leading to the establishment of the E. O. Hulburt Center for Space Research in February 1963. Several divisions of the NRL conduct optical research in chemical spectroscopy, the properties of solids, and plasma physics, in addition to broad programs in the Optical Physics Division.

  4. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Earpiece System, or ACCES®, under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Westone Laboratories, Inc. The innovative technology improves...trained in creating impressions for the custom-molded earpieces . Often this meant contacting researchers at AFRL. With hundreds of sets of this product...the flyers’ ears. By integrating specialized electronics into custom-molded earpieces , ACCES allows wearers to experience clear audio communications

  5. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  6. Perspectives from Former Executives of the DOD Corporate Research Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC; and the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) in Dayton, Ohio respectively. These individuals are: John Lyons...13 Vincent Russo and the Air Force Research Laboratory The Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) was activated in 1997. Prior to the creation of... AFRL , the Air Force conducted its research at four major

  7. Constraining Aerosol Properties Using H2O Retrievals from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Sander, S. P.; Wennberg, P. O.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    H2O has absorption features across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the ultraviolet to the infrared. The California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on the top of Mt Wilson, California, offers continuous high-resolution spectral measurements from 4000 to 8000 cm-1. We retrieve H2O slant column densities (SCDs) at different wavelengths using CLARS data. In particular, we compare retrievals from the spectralon, which is above the planetary boundary layer and relatively immune to aerosol scattering, with those from West Pasadena, a location in the Los Angeles basin that is influenced by aerosol scattering. SCD retrievals for West Pasadena show significantly larger variance across different wavelengths. The retrieval error in West Pasadena is much larger than can be attributed to spectroscopic uncertainties, and reflects the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering. Using a two-stream enhanced single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model, we simulated the effect of aerosol scattering on H2O SCD retrievals at different wavelengths. We found the effects are sensitive to the surface albedo, aerosol phase function and single scattering albedo. Using an empirical relationship derived from the radiative transfer model simulations, we relate the H2O retrieval variance to the aerosol optical depth Angstrom coefficient and compare the results with AERONET observations. The additional information gained from H2O retrieval variance within a large range of wavelengths could be used to improve OCO-2 type CO2 retrievals in the presence of aerosols.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  9. Development of Research Projects in Advanced Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ping; Guha, Suchi

    2008-04-01

    Advanced laboratory serves as a bridge spanning primary physics laboratory and scientific research or industrial activities for undergraduate students. Students not only study modern physics experiments and techniques but also acquire the knowledge of advanced instrumentation. It is of interest to encourage students using the knowledge into research projects at a later stage of the course. We have designed several scientific projects for advanced laboratory to promote student's abilities of independent research. Students work as a team to select the project and search literatures, to perform experiments, and to give presentations. During the research project, instructor only provides necessary equipment for the project without any pre-knowledge of results, giving students a real flavor of scientific research. Our initial attempt has shown some interesting results. We found that students showed a very strong motivation in these projects, and student performances exceeded our expectation. Almost all the students in our first batch of the course have now joined graduate school in Physics and Materials Science. In the future we will also arrange graduate students working with undergraduate students to build a collaborative environment. In addition, a more comprehensive method will be used to evaluate student achievements.

  10. Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.; Daley, J.G.; Roach, P.D.

    1986-06-01

    Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused at (1) development of mathematical models and analytical tools for predicting component and engine performance, and (2) experimental research into fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena occurring in Stirling cycle devices. A result of the analytical effort has been the formation of a computer library specifically for Stirling engine researchers and developers. The library contains properties of structural materials commonly used, thermophysical properties of several working fluids, correlations for heat transfer calculations and general specifications of mechanical arrangements (including various drive mechanisms) that can be utilized to model a particular engine. The library also contains alternative modules to perform analysis at different levels of sophistication, including design optimization. A reversing flow heat transfer facility is operating at Argonne to provide data at prototypic Stirling engine operating conditions under controlled laboratory conditions. This information is needed to validate analytical models.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  12. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  13. Optical properties of salt particles of a sea aerosol (laboratory experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubareva, T. V.

    2002-02-01

    The scientific clause is devoted to complex examinations of optical properties of micro crystals of alkali-halides simulative an atmospheric salt aerosol. In laboratory requirements the interactions in system 'micro crystals of salts - gas phase' were explored at superimposition of high- energy fields. Thus the scale of radiation and cold air plasma was utilized ultraviolet, X-ray. Is shown, that the presence of high-energy fields gives in interaction of micro crystals and gas phase. At interaction the chemical composition, structure and optical properties of salt particles changes. The scientific clause is devoted to study of optical properties of salt particles mainly in infrared range of a spectrum. The purpose of operation is the study of transformation of salt micro crystals and its communications with optical parameters.

  14. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2005 Research Review

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.; Gwinner, D.; Miller, M.; Pitchford, P.

    2006-06-01

    Science and technology are at the heart of everything we do at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as we pursue innovative, robust, and sustainable ways to produce energy--and as we seek to understand and illuminate the physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering behind alternative energy technologies. This year's Research Review highlights the Lab's work in the areas of alternatives fuels and vehicles, high-performing commercial buildings, and high-efficiency inverted, semi-mismatched solar cells.

  15. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, (3) laboratory assessments of cookstove systems, (4) journal publications, and (5) cookstove events. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) cookstove laboratory research program was first developed to assist the EPA-led Partnership for Clean Indoor Air and is now part of the U.S. Government’s commitment to the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (the Alliance). Goals of the program are to: (1) support the development of testing protocols and standards for cookstoves through ISO (International Organization for Standardization) TC (Technical Committee) 285: Clean Cookstoves and Clean Cooking Solutions, (2) support the development of international Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers (many sponsored by the Alliance) for scientifically evaluating and certifying cookstoves to international standards, and (3) provide an independent source of data to Alliance partners. This work supports EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. Household air pollution, mainly from solid-fuel cookstoves in the developing world, is estimated to cause approximately 4 million premature deaths per year, and emissions of black carbon and other pollutants from cookstoves aff

  16. MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports of research funded through the Michigan State University/Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall biosynthesis and proteins, gene expression, stress responses, plant hormone biosynthesis, interactions between the nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria, and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 320 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs. (MHB)

  17. Application of laser light scattering for determination of the border aerosol-air in a specialized physical laboratory setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damov, K. S.; Iliev, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    The current article examines the application of laser light scattering in a specialized laboratory setup. It is used for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume (High Concentration Aerosols) by the method of free flow out. The measurement chamber is first filled with the investigated aerosol. After a predetermined delay time the aerosol is allowed to flow out through a calibrated pipe with fixed size located few centimetres above the chamber's bottom. The lowering of the upper border aerosol-air is continuously scanned using a laser beam directed along the axis of the cylindrical chamber. The kinematic viscosity and mass density of the investigated aerosol phase are calculated by formulas obtained by the authors. The suggested application of laser light scattering led to higher accuracy of the determination the position of aerosol-air border, thence the certainty of this method. This improvement allowed the use of computer controlled optoelectronic setting. The use of laser light scattering significantly improves the method for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume.

  18. Definition of experiments and instruments for a communication/navigation research laboratory. Volume 3: Laboratory descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The following study objectives are covered: (1) identification of major laboratory equipment; (2) systems and operations analysis in support of the laboratory design; and (3) conceptual design of the comm/nav research laboratory.

  19. Air Force Research Laboratory Preparation for Year 2000.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Air Force Research Laboratory , Phillips Research Site , Kirkland Air Force Base, New...Pentagon, Washington, D.C. 20301-1900. The identity of each writer and caller is fully protected. Acronym AFRL Air Force Research Laboratory INSPECTOR...completion of the implementation phase was May 31, 1999. Air Force Research Laboratory . The Air Force Research

  20. Organic aerosol emission ratios from the laboratory combustion of biomass fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, Matthew D.; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Lee, Taehyoung; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Sullivan, Amy P.

    2014-11-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ER) have been characterized for 67 burns during the second Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment. These fires involved 19 different species representing 6 major fuels, each of which forms an important contribution to the U.S. biomass burning inventory. Average normalized ΔOA/ΔCO ratios show a high degree of variability, both between and within different fuel types and species, typically exceeding differen-ces between separate plumes in ambient measurements. This variability is strongly influenced by highly contrasting ΔOA levels between burns and the increased partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to the particle phase at high ΔOA concentrations. No correlation across all fires was observed between ΔOA/ΔCO and modified combustion efficiency (MCE), which acts as an indicator of the proportional contributions of flaming and smoldering combustion phases throughout each burn. However, a negative correlation exists with MCE for some coniferous species, most notably Douglas fir, for which there is also an influence from fuel moisture content. Changes in fire efficiency were also shown to dramatically alter emissions for fires with very similar initial conditions. Although the relationship with MCE is variable between species, there is greater consistency with the level of oxygenation in OA. The ratio of the m/z 44 fragment to total OA mass concentration (f44) as measured by aerosol mass spectrometer provides an indication of oxygenation as influenced by combustion processes at source, with ΔOA/ΔCO decreasing with increasing f44 for all fuel types. Inconsistencies in the magnitude of the effects associated with each potential influence on ΔOA/ΔCO emphasize the lack of a single dominant control on fire emissions, and a dependency on both fuel properties and combustion conditions.

  1. Modeling of Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.R.; Chase, R.J.; Luu, B.B. ); Williams, J.W.; Viverito, V.J. )

    1993-12-01

    Models are required that permit the estimation of emitted field signatures from EMP simulators to design the simulator antenna structure, to establish the usable test volumes, and to estimate human exposure risk. This paper presents the capabilities and limitations of a variety of EMP simulator models useful to the Army's EMP survivability programs. Comparisons among frequency and time-domain models are provided for two powerful US Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators: AESOP (Army EMP Simulator Operations) and VEMPS II (Vertical EMP Simulator II).

  2. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  3. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Lisa Ruffe and Neil Yorio prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  4. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  5. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated June 22, 1988: 'A dwarf wheat variety known as Yecoro Rojo flourishes in KSC's Biomass Production Chamber. Researchers are gathering information on the crop's ability to produce food, water and oxygen, and then remove carbon dioxide. The confined quarters associated with space travel require researchers to focus on smaller plants that yield proportionately large amounts of biomass. This wheat crop takes about 85 days to grow before harvest.' Plant experiments such as this are the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  6. Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study by Nora M Eldredge ARL-SR-0311 February 2015...Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study Nora M Eldredge Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  7. Air Force Research Laboratory’s Focused Long Term Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) mission is to provide support to the Air Force (AF) and the warfighters with... Air Force Research Laboratory’s Focused Long Term Challenges Leo J Rose Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory , 101 W Eglin Blvd...This technology vision, which was born in our Air Force Research Laboratory , builds on the Air Force’s traditional kill

  8. Aerosol Profile Measurements from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John W.; Roers, Raymond R.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Since achieving first light in December of 2005, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been involved in seven field campaigns, accumulating over 450 hours of science data across more than 120 flights. Data from the instrument have been used in a variety of studies including validation and comparison with the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite mission, aerosol property retrievals combining passive and active instrument measurements, aerosol type identification, aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud top and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height determinations. Measurements and lessons learned from the HSRL are leading towards next-generation HSRL instrument designs that will enable even further studies of aerosol intensive and extensive parameters and the effects of aerosols on the climate system. This paper will highlight several of the areas in which the NASA Airborne HSRL is making contributions to climate science.

  9. Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMeeking, Gavin R.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Baker, Stephen; Carrico, Christian M.; Chow, Judith C.; Collett, Jr., Jeffrey L.; Hao, Wei Min; Holden, Amanda S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Malm, William C.; Moosmuller, Hans; Sullivan, Amy P.; Wold, Cyle E.

    2009-05-15

    We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly-burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern US (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2-4} hydrocarbons, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3} and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed EF for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements often spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates for individual fuels of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions.

  10. Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, Gavin R.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Baker, Stephen; Carrico, Christian M.; Chow, Judith C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Hao, Wei Min; Holden, Amanda S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Malm, William C.; Moosmüller, Hans; Sullivan, Amy P.; Wold, Cyle E.

    2009-10-01

    We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern United States (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO2, CO, CH4, C2-4 hydrocarbons, NH3, SO2, NO, NO2, HNO3, and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, Na+, K+, and NH4+ generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed emission factors for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions for individual fuels.

  11. Bringing ayahuasca to the clinical research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2005-06-01

    Since the winter of 1999, the authors and their research team have been conducting clinical studies involving the administration of ayahuasca to healthy volunteers. The rationale for conducting this kind of research is twofold. First, the growing interest of many individuals for traditional indigenous practices involving the ingestion of natural psychotropic drugs such as ayahuasca demands the systematic study of their pharmacological profiles in the target species, i.e., human beings. The complex nature of ayahuasca brews combining a large number of pharmacologically active compounds requires that research be carried out to establish the safety and overall pharmacological profile of these products. Second, the authors believe that the study of psychedelics in general calls for renewed attention. Although the molecular and electrophysiological level effects of these drugs are relatively well characterized, current knowledge of the mechanisms by which these compounds modify the higher order cognitive processes in the way they do is still incomplete, to say the least. The present article describes the development of the research effort carried out at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, commenting on several methodological aspects and reviewing the basic clinical findings. It also describes the research currently underway in our laboratory, and briefly comments on two new studies we plan to undertake in order to further our knowledge of the pharmacology of ayahuasca.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  13. Model analysis of secondary organic aerosol formation by glyoxal in laboratory studies: the case for photoenhanced chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Andrew J; Woo, Joseph L; McNeill, V Faye

    2014-10-21

    The reactive uptake of glyoxal by atmospheric aerosols is believed to be a significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Several recent laboratory studies have been performed with the goal of characterizing this process, but questions remain regarding the effects of photochemistry on SOA growth. We applied GAMMA (McNeill et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 8075-8081), a photochemical box model with coupled gas-phase and detailed aqueous aerosol-phase chemistry, to simulate aerosol chamber studies of SOA formation by the uptake of glyoxal by wet aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions (Kroll et al. J. Geophys. Res. 2005, 110 (D23), 1-10; Volkamer et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 1907-1928; Galloway et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 3331- 306 3345 and Geophys. Res. Lett. 2011, 38, L17811). We find close agreement between simulated SOA growth and the results of experiments conducted under dark conditions using values of the effective Henry's Law constant of 1.3-5.5 × 10(7) M atm(-1). While irradiated conditions led to the production of some organic acids, organosulfates, and other oxidation products via well-established photochemical mechanisms, these additional product species contribute negligible aerosol mass compared to the dark uptake of glyoxal. Simulated results for irradiated experiments therefore fell short of the reported SOA mass yield by up to 92%. This suggests a significant light-dependent SOA formation mechanism that is not currently accounted for by known bulk photochemistry, consistent with recent laboratory observations of SOA production via photosensitizer chemistry.

  14. Career research opportunities for the medical laboratory scientist.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, David L

    2011-01-01

    Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) typically practice in hospital laboratories; however there are multiple alternatives in research. This article details the advantages of working in a variety of research laboratory settings. These include public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings. A view of the different research laboratory settings such as public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings will be provided. An assessment on how MLS professionals can prepare for a career in research is outlined and the report concludes with a brief summary of the various aspects of the research setting.

  15. Laboratory analogues simulating Titan's atmospheric aerosols: Compared chemical compositions of grains and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Jomard, François; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere. The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The main parameter probed is the CH4/N2 ratio to explore various possible chemical regimes. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions could be explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes. The higher nitrogen content in the grains possibly involves a higher optical absorption than the one measured on the films, with a possible impact on Titan's radiative models.

  16. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  17. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  18. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  19. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  20. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  1. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  2. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  3. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  4. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  5. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  6. Laboratory Simulation of Haze/Aerosol formation in warm and hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Lyons, James R.; Wright, David P.

    2016-10-01

    During the transit of an exoplanet across its host star, transmitted starlight through exoplanet atmosphere is absorbed and scattered, and the recorded transit spectra reveal important chemical information. There are many detected exoplanets in which hazes/aerosols obscure the incident photons, and consequently, fewer photons are transmitted through the atmosphere, contributing to a flat/nearly flat transit spectrum. Here, we have carried out two complementary approaches to address haze formation. First, laboratory simulations of haze condensation in exoplanet atmospheres are carried out using an electric discharge tube. A mixture of likely gas species (i.e. H2, He, H2O, CH4, N2 and H2S) is inserted into a glass manifold on a vacuum line, at a pressure ~100-10 mbar, and depending on the exoplanet category (e.g., warm or hot Jupiters), the temperature is set. Applying a few kilovolts produces plasma in the discharge tube, and as a result, particles are formed. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the optical constants (complex refractive index) of the collected laboratory hazes. Then, chemical characterization is made using RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy) and XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Second, we developed a transit modeling code by which the transit spectra are generated using observational and laboratory data as an input. The model accounts for Mie scattering from haze particles in the vis-NIR spectral region, and Rayleigh scattering which comes from gases and particles (effective in UV-vis). The measured refractive indexes (real and imaginary part) describe the absorption and scattering in the vis-NIR transmission region, and, by generating transit spectra close to the observed ones from exoplanets, constraints on atmospheric chemical characterization can be revealed. Our laboratory results show that haze particles formed in the presence of water and with the solar C/O ratio = 0.5. The other outcome of our experiment is that

  7. ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF LOW VOLUME RESIDENTIAL SAMPLES FOR SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results for organic speciation analysis for Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on Se...

  8. Evaporation kinetics and phase of laboratory and ambient secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Timothy D; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find significantly higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense effort focused on finding additional SOA sources but leaving the fundamental assumptions used by models unchallenged. Current air-quality models use absorptive partitioning theory assuming SOA particles are liquid droplets, forming instantaneous reversible equilibrium with gas phase. Further, they ignore the effects of adsorption of spectator organic species during SOA formation on SOA properties and fate. Using accurate and highly sensitive experimental approach for studying evaporation kinetics of size-selected single SOA particles, we characterized room-temperature evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated α-pinene SOA and ambient atmospheric SOA. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic models. Adsorption of "spectator" organic vapors during SOA formation, and aging of these coated SOA particles, dramatically reduced the evaporation rate, and in some cases nearly stopped it. Ambient SOA was found to exhibit evaporation behavior very similar to that of laboratory-generated coated and aged SOA. For all cases studied in this work, SOA evaporation behavior is nearly size-independent and does not follow the evaporation kinetics of liquid droplets, in sharp contrast with model assumptions. The findings about SOA phase, evaporation rates, and the importance of spectator gases and aging all indicate that there is need to reformulate the way SOA formation and evaporation are treated by models.

  9. Evaporation kinetics and phase of laboratory and ambient secondary organic aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find significantly higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense effort focused on finding additional SOA sources but leaving the fundamental assumptions used by models unchallenged. Current air-quality models use absorptive partitioning theory assuming SOA particles are liquid droplets, forming instantaneous reversible equilibrium with gas phase. Further, they ignore the effects of adsorption of spectator organic species during SOA formation on SOA properties and fate. Using accurate and highly sensitive experimental approach for studying evaporation kinetics of size-selected single SOA particles, we characterized room-temperature evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated α-pinene SOA and ambient atmospheric SOA. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic models. Adsorption of “spectator” organic vapors during SOA formation, and aging of these coated SOA particles, dramatically reduced the evaporation rate, and in some cases nearly stopped it. Ambient SOA was found to exhibit evaporation behavior very similar to that of laboratory-generated coated and aged SOA. For all cases studied in this work, SOA evaporation behavior is nearly size-independent and does not follow the evaporation kinetics of liquid droplets, in sharp contrast with model assumptions. The findings about SOA phase, evaporation rates, and the importance of spectator gases and aging all indicate that there is need to reformulate the way SOA formation and evaporation are treated by models. PMID:21262848

  10. Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics Research with Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Kato, Tsunehiko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Sakawa, Yuichi

    2008-12-01

    Large scale laser facilities mainly constructed for fusion research can be used to produce high-energy-density plasmas like the interior of stars and planets. They can be also used to reproduce the extreme phenomena of explosion and high Mach number flow in mimic scale in laboratory. With advanced diagnostic technique, we can study the physics of plasma phenomena expected to control a variety of phenomena in Universe. The subjects studied so far are reviewed, for example, in [1], [2]. The project to promote the laboratory astrophysics with Gekko XII laser facility has been initiated from April 1st this year as a project of our institute. It consists of four sub-projects. They are 1. Physics of collisionless shock and particle acceleration, 2. Physics of Non LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) photo-ionized plasma, 3. Physics of planets and meteor impact, 4. Development of superconducting Terahertz device. I will briefly explain what the laser astrophysics means and introduce what are the targets of our project. Regarding the first sub-project, we have carried out hydrodynamic and PIC simulation to design the experiments with intense laser. We clarified the physical mechanism of generation of the magnetic field in non-magnetized plasma and the collsionless shock formation caused by the ion orbit modifications by the magnetic fields generated as the result of plasma instability. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  11. Battery research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, M.M.

    1997-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has, for many years, been engaged in battery-related R and D programs for DOE and the transportation industry. In particular, from 1973 to 1995, ANL played a pioneering role in the technological development of the high-temperature (400 C) lithium-iron disulfide battery. With the emphasis of battery research moving away from high temperature systems toward ambient temperature lithium-based systems for the longer term, ANL has redirected its efforts toward the development of a lithium-polymer battery (60--80 C operation) and room temperature systems based on lithium-ion technologies. ANL`s lithium-polymer battery program is supported by the US Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), 3M and Hydro-Quebec, and the lithium-ion battery R and D efforts by US industry and by DOE.

  12. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; March, Paul; Williams, Nehemiah; ONeill, William

    2011-01-01

    NASA/JSC is implementing an advanced propulsion physics laboratory, informally known as "Eagleworks", to pursue propulsion technologies necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system over the next 50 years, and enabling interstellar spaceflight by the end of the century. This work directly supports the "Breakthrough Propulsion" objectives detailed in the NASA OCT TA02 In-space Propulsion Roadmap, and aligns with the #10 Top Technical Challenge identified in the report. Since the work being pursued by this laboratory is applied scientific research in the areas of the quantum vacuum, gravitation, nature of space-time, and other fundamental physical phenomenon, high fidelity testing facilities are needed. The lab will first implement a low-thrust torsion pendulum (<1 uN), and commission the facility with an existing Quantum Vacuum Plasma Thruster. To date, the QVPT line of research has produced data suggesting very high specific impulse coupled with high specific force. If the physics and engineering models can be explored and understood in the lab to allow scaling to power levels pertinent for human spaceflight, 400kW SEP human missions to Mars may become a possibility, and at power levels of 2MW, 1-year transit to Neptune may also be possible. Additionally, the lab is implementing a warp field interferometer that will be able to measure spacetime disturbances down to 150nm. Recent work published by White [1] [2] [3] suggests that it may be possible to engineer spacetime creating conditions similar to what drives the expansion of the cosmos. Although the expected magnitude of the effect would be tiny, it may be a "Chicago pile" moment for this area of physics.

  13. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  14. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  15. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to...

  16. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  17. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The...

  18. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  19. Collaborative research. Study of aerosol sources and processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Doug; Volkamer, Rainer

    2012-08-13

    during TCAP, and conducted laboratory experiments to quantify for the first time the Setschenow salting constant, KS, of glyoxal in sulfate aerosols. Knowledge about KS is prerequisite to predict how increasing sulfate concentrations since pre-industrial times have modified the formation of SOA from biogenic gases in atmospheric models.

  20. THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY (DEARS): BRIEFING TO THE MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) has completed its first monitoring season (summer 2005) and is progressing toward initiation of its second season (February 2005). The assistance obtained from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has been instr...

  1. PRELIMINARY FINDINGS FROM THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) has completed its first monitoring season (summer 2005) and is progressing toward initiation of its second season (February 2005). The assistance obtained from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has been instr...

  2. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  3. The Importance of Aromatic Reaction Pathways in Titan Aerosol Formation: Evidence from Laboratory Analogs and Comparisons to Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, J.; Trainer, M. G.; Li, X.; Pinnick, V. T.; Getty, S.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn has led to the discovery of benzene (C6H6) at ppm levels, as well as large positive ions evocative of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Titan's atmosphere (Waite et al., Science 316: 870, 2007.) The recent assignment of the band at 3.28 μm as observed by the Visual-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) to gas-phase PAHs provides further evidence that these molecules are prevalent on Titan (Lopez-Puertas et al., ApJ 770: 132, 2013). Taken together these observations suggest that aromatic reaction pathways play an important role in the photochemistry of Titan's atmosphere, in particular in the formation of large organic species. Even at low concentrations, aromatic molecules are sufficiently active in the ultraviolet to substantially contribute to the formation of aerosol particles in Titan's haze (Trainer et al., ApJL 766: L4, 2013). We will present results from a laboratory study of the UV irradiation of ppm-level aromatic precursors, both with and without nitrogen heteroatoms, to understand their influence on the observable characteristics of the resultant aerosol. Spectroscopic measurements of our analog aerosols compare favorably to observations of Titan's haze by VIMS and by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) in the far-infrared. In particular, we will present our best fits to the broad aerosol emission feature centered at approximately 145 cm-1 (Anderson et al. Icarus 212 762, 2011). This is the first time laboratory-produced Titan aerosol analogs have been shown to absorb in this region of the far-IR. From the broadness of this feature, we speculate that the emission is a blended composite of low-energy vibrations of large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their nitrogen containing counterparts polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs). Our results indicate the aerosols formed from PANHs provide the best match in this low frequency region. Using

  4. Modeling Elemental Composition of Organic Aerosol: Exploiting Laboratory and Ambient Measurement and the Implications of the Gap Between Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Heald, C. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Zhang, Q.; He, L. Y.; Huang, X. F.; Campuzano Jost, P.

    2014-12-01

    Global chemical transport models have been unable to capture the magnitude and variability of the mass concentrations of organic aerosol (OA). Uncertainty remains in the simulations, including the identification of primary sources and secondary tracers, the understanding of the formation mechanisms, and the representation of the atmospheric evolution of OA. There have been limited ambient measurements available to test simulations that use elemental composition to constrain the sources and aging of OA. In this study, a large dataset including both surface, aircraft, and laboratory observations of the atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios of OA is synthesized and corrected for the bias of general Aerosol Mass Spectrometer elemental analysis. Mean observed O:C and H:C ratios range from 0.3 to 0.9 and 1.3 to 1.9, respectively, for the ground sites. Aircraft measurements show more oxidized OA with a vertical-level mean O:C of 1.2 and H:C of 1.4. We developed a global model simulation for the elemental composition of OA based on laboratory measurements. The standard GEOS-Chem simulation underestimates the O:C ratios, with the largest model bias in remote regions. Model performance is greatly improved by the addition of a laboratory-based oxidative-aging scheme. The revised simulations are best able to capture the observed variability of O:C in remote regions when the heterogeneous aging of secondary organic aerosol is introduced. The simulations underestimate the H:C ratios due to the gap between ambient and laboratory data. This suggests that that we may be missing sources and pathways which increase H:C, or alternatively, that laboratory experiments do not adequately mimic the ambient environment, and thus that their application in models may not reproduce field observations.

  5. Nanoscience and Technology at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY ( AFRL ) Dr. Richard A. Vaia Dr. Daniel Miracle Dr. Thomas Cruse Air Force Research ...Technology At The Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 AFRL NST Overview 2 AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY VISION We defend

  6. Nanoscience and Technology at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY ( AFRL ) Dr. Richard A. Vaia Dr. Daniel Miracle Dr. Thomas Cruse Air Force Research ...Technology At The Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 AFRL NST Overview 2 AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY VISION We defend

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  8. 8. EXTERIOR DETAIL, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EXTERIOR DETAIL, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 18, Power Plant Laboratory Complex, Northeast corner of C & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  9. 7. EXTERIOR NORTHWEST VIEW, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. EXTERIOR NORTHWEST VIEW, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 18, Power Plant Laboratory Complex, Northeast corner of C & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  10. Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, K. M.; Ibison, M. G.; Holder, D. J.; Muratori, B. D.; Wolski, A.; Kourkafas, G.; Shepherd, B. J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory has focussed on the development of normalised phase space techniques-starting with the idea of sampling tomographic projections at equal phase advances. This idea has influenced the design and operation of the tomography sections at the Photo Injector Test Facility at Zeuthen (PITZ) and at the Accelerator and Lasers in Combined Experiments (ALICE) at Daresbury. We have studied the feasibility of using normalised phase space to measure the effect of space charge. Quadrupole scan measurements are carried out at two different parts of a beamline. Reconstructions at the same location give results that are clearly rotated with respect to each other in normalised phase space. We are able to show that a significant part of this rotation can be attributed to the effect of space charge. We show how the normalised phase space technique can be used to increase the reliability of the Maximum Entropy Technique (MENT). While MENT is known for its ability to work with just a few projections, the accuracy of its reconstructions has seldom been questioned. We show that for typical phase space distributions, MENT could produce results that look quite different from the original. We demonstrate that a normalised phase space technique could give results that are closer to the actual distribution. We also present simpler ways of deriving the phase space tomography formalism and the Maximum Entropy Technique.

  11. Hyperspectral imager development at Army Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam

    2008-04-01

    Development of robust compact optical imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents as well as targets and backgrounds. Spectral features arise due to the material properties of objects as a result of the emission, reflection, and absorption of light. Using hyperspectral imaging one can acquire images with narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene in detection of objects. Traditional hyperspectral imaging systems use gratings and prisms that acquire one-dimensional spectral images and require relative motion of sensor and scene in addition to data processing to form a two-dimensional image cube. There is much interest in developing hyperspectral imagers using tunable filters that acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up an image cube as a function of time. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers using a number of novel tunable filter technologies. These include acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the UV to the long wave infrared, diffractive optics technology that can provide image cubes either in a single spectral region or simultaneously in different spectral regions using a single moving lens or by using a lenslet array, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Fabry-Perot (FP) tunable etalons to develop miniature sensors that take advantage of the advances in microfabrication and packaging technologies. New materials are being developed to design AOTFs and a full Stokes polarization imager has been developed, diffractive optics lenslet arrays are being explored, and novel FP tunable filters are under fabrication for the development of novel miniature hyperspectral imagers. Here we will brief on all the technologies being developed and present

  12. Research of transport and deposition of aerosol in human airway replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Elcner, Jakub; Durdina, Lukas; Halasova, Tereza; Mravec, Filip; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Growing concern about knowledge of aerosol transport in human lungs is caused by great potential of use of inhaled pharmaceuticals. Second substantial motive for the research is an effort to minimize adverse effects of particular matter emitted by traffic and industry on human health. We created model geometry of human lungs to 7th generation of branching. This model geometry was used for fabrication of two physical models. The first one is made from thin walled transparent silicone and it allows a measurement of velocity and size of aerosol particles by Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). The second one is fabricated by stereolithographic method and it is designed for aerosol deposition measurements. We provided a series of measurements of aerosol transport in the transparent model and we ascertained remarkable phenomena linked with lung flow. The results are presented in brief. To gather how this phenomena affects aerosol deposition in human lungs we used the second model and we developed a technique for deposition fraction and deposition efficiency assessment. The results confirmed that non-symmetric and complicated shape of human airways essentially affects transport and deposition of aerosol. The research will now focus on deeper insight in aerosol deposition.

  13. CLOUDS, AEROSOLS, RADIATION AND THE AIR-SEA INTERFACE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN: ESTABLISHING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Bretherton, Chris; McFarquhar, Greg; Protat, Alain; Quinn, Patricia; Siems, Steven; Jakob, Christian; Alexander, Simon; Weller, Bob

    2014-09-29

    A workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy was convened at the University of Washington to discuss the state of knowledge of clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction over the Southern Ocean and to identify strategies for reducing uncertainties in their representation in global and regional models. The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system and is a unique pristine environment, yet other than from satellite, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, radiation and the air-sea interface in this region. Consequently, much is unknown about atmospheric and oceanographic processes and their linkage in this region. Approximately 60 scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and senior researchers working in atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.S. and foreign universities and government laboratories, attended the Southern Ocean Workshop. It began with a day of scientific talks, partly in plenary and partly in two parallel sessions, discussing the current state of the science for clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction in the Southern Ocean. After the talks, attendees broke into two working groups; one focused on clouds and meteorology, and one focused on aerosols and their interactions with clouds. This was followed by more plenary discussion to synthesize the two working group discussions and to consider possible plans for organized activities to study clouds, aerosols and the air-sea interface in the Southern Ocean. The agenda and talk slides, including short summaries of the highlights of the parallel session talks developed by the session chars, are available at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/socrates/presentations/SouthernOceanPresentations/.

  14. Significant light induced ozone loss on biomass burning aerosol: Evidence from chemistry-transport modeling based on new laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, I. B.; Beekmann, M.; D'Anna, B.; George, C.

    2012-09-01

    Recent laboratory studies indicated that a photo-induced heterogeneous reaction of ozone on the surface of aerosol containing humic like substances (HULIS) has the potential to affect the ozone budget in biomass burning plumes. To evaluate atmospheric significance of such heterogeneous light induced ozone loss, this process has been taken into account in the simulation of the extreme air pollution episode in the Moscow region during the 2010 mega fire event in western Russia. Results of the numerical experiments performed with the CHIMERE chemistry transport model indicate that photo induced removal of ozone could lead to significant (reaching several tens of percent) episodic decrease of the ozone concentration. The simulations also show that while wildfires provide reactive surface for the considered reaction, they strongly inhibit the photo-induced heterogeneous ozone loss by attenuating actinic fluxes through the “shielding” aerosol effect. The present results are calling for additional experimental and modelling studies.

  15. Frontiers for Laboratory Research of Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Hantao; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Magnetic reconnection occcurs throughout heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas as well as in laboratory fusion plasmas. Two broad categories of reconnection models exist: collisional MHD and collisionless kinetic. Eight major questions with respect to magnetic connection are set down, and past and future devices for studying them in the laboratory are described. Results of some computerized simulations are compared with experiments.

  16. Stirling engine research at national and university laboratories in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) reviewed research projects that are related to the development of Stirling engines and that are under way at Japanese national laboratories and universities. The research and development focused on component rather than on whole engine development. PNL obtained the information from a literature review and interviews conducted at the laboratories and universities. The universities have less equipment available and operate with smaller staffs for research than do the laboratories. In particular, the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory and the Aerospace Laboratory conduct high-quality component and fundamental work. Despite having less equipment, some of the researchers at the universities conduct high-quality fundamental research. As is typical in Japan, several of the university professors are very active in consulting and advisory capacities to companies engaged in Stirling engine development, and also with government and association advisory and technical committees. Contacts with these professors and selective examination of their research are good ways to keep abreast of Japanese Stirling developments.

  17. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte (right) and Cheryl Mackowiak harvest potatoes grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled Enviornment Life Support System (CELSS in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  18. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte harvests a potato grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled environment Life Support system (CELSS) in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' His work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  19. 24. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, Natick, Mass, Climatic Building, First Floor Plan, Architectural. Drawing No. 35-07-01, Sheet 2 of 72, 1952, updated to 1985. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  20. 25. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, Natick, Mass. Climatic Building, First Floor Plan, Refrigeration and Engineering. Drawing No. 35-07-01, Sheet 52 of 72, 1952. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  1. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  2. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Initial Results from the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J.; Sheridan, P. J.; Perry, L. B.; Neufeld, H.; Emanuel, R. E.; Tashakkori, R.; Bowman, D.; Long, C.

    2009-12-01

    AppalAIR (Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research, http://appalair.appstate.edu/) is a new interdisciplinary, atmospheric research facility located on the campus of Appalachian State University (1076 m; 36.2° N, 81.7° W) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The facility was designed to investigate air pollution formation and transport, the relationships among biogenic and anthropogenic inputs to a changing climate, and the effects of these factors on regional ecosystems. AppalAIR is a collaborating member of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division (NOAA/ESRL GMD) Collaborative Global Aerosol Network (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aero/net/app/index.html). Measurements are made from a 34 m tower and include aerosol light scattering (3-λ nephelometer) and absorption (3-λ PSAP, 7-λ aethalometer, 6-λ UV aethalometer), particle number concentration (CPC), and aerosol chemistry, size, and morphology using SPME/GC-MS and SEM analyses on 24 h filter samples. Initial results indicate alternating periods of small, highly absorptive (ssa < 0.90) fractal agglomerates and large, highly scattering (ssa > 0.95) spherical particles that are strongly dependent upon the highly variably meteorological patterns that have occurred over the summertime (JJA) in the southeastern U.S. By quantifying the aerosol direct radiative forcing during discrete meteorological patterns as defined by statistical cluster analysis as well as from specific aerosol chemical sources, we are able to extrapolate the results beyond the immediate region.

  3. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  4. A laboratory study of N2O5 heterogeneous interaction with tropospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Abbatt, J.P.D.

    1995-12-31

    The reaction probability for N{sub 2}O{sub 5} loss onto several types of aerosols (NaCl, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O) is being measured using a laminar flow reactor coupled to an ultrasonic aerosol generator and a chemical ionization mass spectrometer under conditions closely simulating those in the atmosphere. The aerosol particles are sized and counted using a right-angle-scattering optical particle counter. the typical aerosol size and number density in these experiments are a few microns and 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The use of chemical ionization mass spectrometer allows us to selectively monitor the N{sub 2}O{sub 5} gas density in the presence of HNO{sub 3}. Experiments are performed at a wide range of relative humidities, which allows the determination of the dependence of the heterogeneous interaction on the physical phase of the aerosol especially around the deliquescent point.

  5. Sandia, California Tritium Research Laboratory transition and reutilization project

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes a project within Sandia National Laboratory to convert the shut down Tritium Research Laboratory into a facility which could be reused within the laboratory complex. In the process of decommissioning and decontaminating the facility, the laboratory was able to save substantial financial resources by transferring much existing equipment to other DOE facilities, and then expeditiously implementing a decontamination program which has resulted in the building being converted into laboratory space for new lab programs. This project of facility reuse has been a significant financial benefit to the laboratory.

  6. Laboratory observation of oligomers in the aerosol from isoprene/NOx photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommen, J.; Metzger, A.; Duplissy, J.; Kalberer, M.; Alfarra, M. R.; Gascho, A.; Weingartner, E.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Verheggen, B.; Baltensperger, U.

    2006-07-01

    Compounds assigned to be oxidation products of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) have recently been observed in ambient aerosols, suggesting that isoprene might play an important role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation due to its large global source strength. SOA yields from photooxidation of isoprene and NOx in a chamber agree fairly well with previous data. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry showed the formation of high molecular weight compounds over the course of 15-hour experiments. Concurrently, the volatility of the SOA decreased markedly as observed by a tandem differential mobility analyzer. The volume fraction remaining of SOA at 150°C increased steadily from 5 to 25% during the same experiments. These observations are attributed to oligomerization reactions occurring in the aerosol phase. Under dry conditions a lower volatility was observed.

  7. Maritime security laboratory for maritime security research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, Barry J.; Sutin, Alexander; Bruno, Michael S.

    2007-04-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology has established a new Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) to facilitate advances in methods and technologies relevant to maritime security. MSL is designed to enable system-level experiments and data-driven modeling in the complex environment of an urban tidal estuary. The initial focus of the laboratory is on the threats posed by divers and small craft with hostile intent. The laboratory is, however, evolvable to future threats as yet unidentified. Initially, the laboratory utilizes acoustic, environmental, and video sensors deployed in and around the Hudson River estuary. Experimental data associated with boats and SCUBA divers are collected on a computer deployed on board a boat specifically designed and equipped for these experiments and are remotely transferred to a Visualization Center on campus. Early experiments utilizing this laboratory have gathered data to characterize the relevant parameters of the estuary, acoustic signals produced by divers, and water and air traffic. Hydrophones were deployed to collect data to enable the development of passive acoustic methodologies for maximizing SCUBA diver detection distance. Initial results involving characteristics of the estuary, acoustic signatures of divers, ambient acoustic noise in an urban estuary, and transmission loss of acoustic signals in a wide frequency band are presented. These results can also be used for the characterization of abnormal traffic and improvement of underwater communication in a shallow water estuary.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  9. Discontinuities in hygroscopic growth below and above water saturation for laboratory surrogates of oligomers in organic atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Natasha; Zuend, Andreas; Schilling, Katherine; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Discontinuities in apparent hygroscopicity below and above water saturation have been observed for organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles in both laboratory studies and in the ambient atmosphere. However, uncertainty remains regarding the factors that contribute to observations of low hygroscopic growth below water saturation but enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a given aerosol population. Utilizing laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosols, we explore the extent to which such discontinuities are influenced by organic component molecular mass and viscosity, non-ideal thermodynamic interactions between aerosol components, and the combination of these factors. Measurements of hygroscopic growth under subsaturated conditions and the CCN activity of aerosols comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with average molecular masses ranging from 200 to 10 000 g mol-1 and mixtures of PEG with ammonium sulfate (AS) were conducted. Experimental results are compared to calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium conducted with the Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model, and the potential influence of kinetic limitations on observed water uptake was further explored through estimations of water diffusivity in the PEG oligomers. Particle-phase behavior, including the prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), was also modeled with AIOMFAC. Under subsaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions, we observed little variability in hygroscopic growth across PEG systems with different molecular masses; however, an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular mass was observed. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures, and, in fact, an enhancement in CCN activity was observed for the PEG10000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 15 % reduction in critical activation diameter at a supersaturation of 0.8 %. We also

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  11. Hygroscopic growth of water soluble organic carbon isolated from atmospheric aerosol collected at US national parks and Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathan F.; Collins, Don R.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Samburova, Vera; Zielinska, Barbara; Kumar, Naresh; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-02-01

    Due to the atmospheric abundance and chemical complexity of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), its contribution to the hydration behavior of atmospheric aerosol is both significant and difficult to assess. For the present study, the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of isolated atmospheric WSOC particulate matter was measured without the compounding effects of common, soluble inorganic aerosol constituents. WSOC was extracted with high purity water from daily high-volume PM2.5 filter samples and separated from water soluble inorganic constituents using solid-phase extraction. The WSOC filter extracts were concentrated and combined to provide sufficient mass for continuous generation of the WSOC-only aerosol over the combined measurement time of the tandem differential mobility analyzer and coupled scanning mobility particle sizer-CCN counter used for the analysis. Aerosol samples were taken at Great Smoky Mountains National Park during the summer of 2006 and fall-winter of 2007-2008; Mount Rainier National Park during the summer of 2009; Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, during the summer of 2010; and Acadia National Park during the summer of 2011. Across all sampling locations and seasons, the hygroscopic growth of WSOC samples at 90 % RH, expressed in terms of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ranged from 0.05 to 0.15. Comparisons between the hygroscopicity of WSOC and that of samples containing all soluble materials extracted from the filters implied a significant modification of the hydration behavior of inorganic components, including decreased hysteresis separating efflorescence and deliquescence and enhanced water uptake between 30 and 70 % RH.

  12. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Group at the Phillips Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base...for Summer Graduate Student Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC...2390 S. York Street Denver, CO 80208-0177 Final Report for: Summer Faculty Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force

  13. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Outcomes of EPA’s STAR Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri ...

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  15. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  16. Mass spectral analysis of organic aerosol formed downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: field studies and laboratory confirmations.

    PubMed

    Bahreini, R; Middlebrook, A M; Brock, C A; de Gouw, J A; McKeen, S A; Williams, L R; Daumit, K E; Lambe, A T; Massoli, P; Canagaratna, M R; Ahmadov, R; Carrasquillo, A J; Cross, E S; Ervens, B; Holloway, J S; Hunter, J F; Onasch, T B; Pollack, I B; Roberts, J M; Ryerson, T B; Warneke, C; Davidovits, P; Worsnop, D R; Kroll, J H

    2012-08-07

    In June 2010, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft conducted two survey flights around the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. The Gulf oil spill resulted in an isolated source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors in a relatively clean environment. Measurements of aerosol composition and volatile organic species (VOCs) indicated formation of SOA from intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) downwind of the oil spill (Science2011, 331, doi 10.1126/science.1200320). In an effort to better understand formation of SOA in this environment, we present mass spectral characteristics of SOA in the Gulf and of SOA formed in the laboratory from evaporated light crude oil. Compared to urban primary organic aerosol, high-mass-resolution analysis of the background-subtracted SOA spectra in the Gulf (for short, "Gulf SOA") showed higher contribution of C(x)H(y)O(+) relative to C(x)H(y)(+) fragments at the same nominal mass. In each transect downwind of the DWH spill site, a gradient in the degree of oxidation of the Gulf SOA was observed: more oxidized SOA (oxygen/carbon = O/C ∼0.4) was observed in the area impacted by fresher oil; less oxidized SOA (O/C ∼0.3), with contribution from fragments with a hydrocarbon backbone, was found in a broader region of more-aged surface oil. Furthermore, in the plumes originating from the more-aged oil, contribution of oxygenated fragments to SOA decreased with downwind distance. Despite differences between experimental conditions in the laboratory and the ambient environment, mass spectra of SOA formed from gas-phase oxidation of crude oil by OH radicals in a smog chamber and a flow tube reactor strongly resembled the mass spectra of Gulf SOA (r(2) > 0.94). Processes that led to the observed Gulf SOA characteristics are also likely to occur in polluted regions where VOCs and IVOCs are coemitted.

  17. From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Keevil, C. William; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial. Background: There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission. Methods: In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components. Results: Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials. Conclusions: Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs. PMID:26163568

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2002-06-20

    Established by Congress in 1991, the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program provides the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL or the Laboratory), with the flexibility to invest up to 6% of their budget in long-term, high-risk, and potentially high payoff research and development (R&D) activities to support the DOE/NNSA's national security missions. By funding innovative R&D, the LDRD Program at LLNL develops and extends the Laboratory's intellectual foundations and maintains its vitality as a premier research institution. As proof of the Program's success, many of the research thrusts that started many years ago under LDRD sponsorship are at the core of today's programs. The LDRD Program, which serves as a proving ground for innovative ideas, is the Laboratory's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. Basic and applied research activities funded by LDRD enhance the Laboratory's core strengths, driving its technical vitality to create new capabilities that enable LLNL to meet DOE/NNSA's national security missions. The Program also plays a key role in building a world-class multidisciplinary workforce by engaging the Laboratory's best researchers, recruiting its future scientists and engineers, and promoting collaborations with all sectors of the larger scientific community.

  20. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  1. Aerosol Microphysics and Radiation Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    for dust storm forecasting and analysis, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA. Dec. 11-15, 2002 [Published]. Reid, J.S., J.R. Cook, D.L. Westphal...Persian Gulf/Arabian Sea, East Asia, and some parts of the Mediterranean Sea. Along coastal regions, dust , pollution and smoke can be present and...transitioned from the combined Marine Aerosol and Dust Aerosol programs from SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego (SSC-SD) to the Naval Research Laboratory

  2. Uncertainty Analysis And Synergy Of Aerosol Products From Multiple Satellite Sensors For Advanced Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air, and can be made up of wind-blown dust, smoke from fires, and particulate emissions from automobiles, industries, and other natural and man-made sources. Aerosols can have significant impacts on the air quality, and can interact with clouds and solar radiation in such a way as to affect the water cycle and climate. However, the extent and scale of these impacts are still poorly understood, and this represents one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research to date. To fill this gap in our knowledge, the global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols are being extensively observed and measured, especially during the last decade, using both satellite and ground-based instruments, including such spaceborne sensors as MODIS on the Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR on Terra, OMI on Aura, POLDER on PARASOL, CALIOP on CALIPSO, SeaWiFS on SeaStar, and the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sunphotometers. The aerosol measurements collected by these instruments over the last decade contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. Still, to be able to utilize these measurements synergistically, they have to be carefully and uniformly analyzed and inter-compared, in order to understand the uncertainties and limitations of the products - a process that is greatly complicated by the diversity of differences that exist among them. In this presentation, we will show results of a coherent comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from the above-named satellite sensors relative to AERONET. We use these results to demonstrate how these sensors perform in different parts of the world over different landcover types as well as their performance relative to one another, thereby facilitating product selection and integration for specific research and applications needs.

  3. Laboratory studies on secondary organic aerosol formation from crude oil vapors.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Palm, B B; Borbon, A; Graus, M; Warneke, C; Ortega, A M; Day, D A; Brune, W H; Jimenez, J L; de Gouw, J A

    2013-01-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol composition and gas phase compounds over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in June 2010 indicated the presence of high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from organic compounds of intermediate volatility. In this work, we investigated SOA formation from South Louisiana crude oil vapors reacting with OH in a Potential Aerosol Mass flow reactor. We use the dependence of evaporation time on the saturation concentration (C*) of the SOA precursors to separate the contribution of species of different C* to total SOA formation. This study shows consistent results with those at the DWH oil spill: (1) organic compounds of intermediate volatility with C* = 10(5)-10(6) μg m(-3) contribute the large majority of SOA mass formed, and have much larger SOA yields (0.37 for C* = 10(5) and 0.21 for C* = 10(6) μg m(-3)) than more volatile compounds with C*≥10(7) μg m(-3), (2) the mass spectral signature of SOA formed from oxidation of the less volatile compounds in the reactor shows good agreement with that of SOA formed at DWH oil spill. These results also support the use of flow reactors simulating atmospheric SOA formation and aging.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Mark J.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Turpin, Barbara J.

    Organic particulate matter (PM) formed in the atmosphere (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) is a substantial yet poorly understood contributor to atmospheric PM. Aqueous photooxidation in clouds, fogs and aerosols is a newly recognized SOA formation pathway. This study investigates the potential for aqueous glycolaldehyde oxidation to produce low volatility products that contribute SOA mass. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmation that aqueous oxidation of glycolaldehyde via the hydroxyl radical forms glyoxal and glycolic acid, as previously assumed. Subsequent reactions form formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and oxalic acid as expected. Unexpected products include malonic acid, succinic acid, and higher molecular weight compounds, including oligomers. Due to (1) the large source strength of glycolaldehyde from precursors such as isoprene and ethene, (2) its water solubility, and (3) the aqueous formation of low volatility products (organic acids and oligomers), we predict that aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde and other aldehydes in cloud, fog, and aerosol water is an important source of SOA and that incorporation of this SOA formation pathway in chemical transport models will help explain the current under-prediction of organic PM concentrations.

  5. Helical Explosive Flux Compression Generator Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) explosive pulsed power program. These include circuit codes such as Microcap and

  6. Summer Research Program (1992). Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) Reports. Volume 8. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Research Program Starfire Optical Range, Phillips Laboratory /LITE Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM 87117 Sponsored by: Air ... Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico September, 1992 18-1 PROGRESS...Report for: Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air

  7. Lifting the lid on toilet plume aerosol: A literature review with suggestions for future research

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David L.; Mead, Kenneth R.; Lynch, Robert A.; Hirst, Deborah V.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential risks associated with “toilet plume” aerosols produced by flush toilets is a subject of continuing study. This review examines the evidence regarding toilet plume bioaerosol generation and infectious disease transmission. Methods The peer-reviewed scientific literature was searched to identify articles related to aerosol production during toilet flushing, as well as epidemiologic studies examining the potential role of toilets in infectious disease outbreaks. Results The studies demonstrate that potentially infectious aerosols may be produced in substantial quantities during flushing. Aerosolization can continue through multiple flushes to expose subsequent toilet users. Some of the aerosols desiccate to become droplet nuclei and remain adrift in the air currents. However, no studies have yet clearly demonstrated or refuted toilet plume-related disease transmission, and the significance of the risk remains largely uncharacterized. Conclusion Research suggests that toilet plume could play a contributory role in the transmission of infectious diseases. Additional research in multiple areas is warranted to assess the risks posed by toilet plume, especially within health care facilities. PMID:23040490

  8. Introducing Undergraduates to a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student project which is intended to teach undergraduates concepts and techniques of nuclear physics, experimental methods used in particle detection, and provide experience in a functioning research environment. Included are detailed procedures for carrying out the project. (CC)

  9. Production, Organic Characterization, and Phase Transformations of Marine Particles Aerosolized from a Laboratory Mesocosm Phytoplankton Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particles emitted from bubble bursting and wave breaking of ocean waters with high biological activity can contain sea salts associated with organic material, with smaller particles containing a larger mass fraction of organics than larger particles. This likely indicates a link between phytoplankton productivity in oceans and particulate organic material in marine air. Once aerosolized, particles with significant amount of organic material can affect cloud activation and formation of ice crystals, among other atmospheric processes, thus influencing climate. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, in which concentrations of biological organisms can reach up to 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms. Here we present results of bubble bursting aerosol production from a seawater mesocosm containing artificial seawater, natural seawater and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species. These phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emilianaia huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus), possessed siliceous frustules, calcareous frustules and no frustules, respectively. Bubbles were generated employing recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions and bulk aerosol organic composition were measured as a function of phytoplankton growth, and chlorophyll composition and particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the water were determined. Finally, particles were collected on substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, their elemental compositions were determined using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEMEDAX), and their carbon speciation was determined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle size distributions exposed to dry and humidified air employing

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  11. COMMIT in 7-SEAS/BASELInE: Operation of and Observations from a Novel, Mobile Laboratory for Measuring In-Situ Properties of Aerosols and Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantina, Peter; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Loftus, Adrian M.; Kuo, Ferret; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Sayer, Andrew M.; Wang, Shen-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Hsu, N. Christina; Janjai, Serm; Chantara, Somporn; Nguyen, Anh X.

    2016-01-01

    Trace gases and aerosols (particularly biomass-burning aerosols) have important implications for air quality and climate studies in Southeast Asia (SEA). This paper describes the purpose, operation, and datasets collected from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) laboratory, a mobile platform designed to measure trace gases and optical/microphysical properties of naturally occurring and anthropogenic aerosols. More importantly, the laboratory houses a specialized humidification system to characterize hygroscopic growth/enhancement, a behavior that affects aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions and is generally underrepresented in the current literature. A summary of the trace gas and optical/microphysical measurements is provided, along with additional detail and analysis of data collected from the hygroscopic system during the 2015 Seven South-East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) field campaign. The results suggest that data from the platform are reliable and will complement future studies of aerosols and air quality in SEA and other regions of interest.

  12. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, D.

    2014-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report fulfills that requirement.

  14. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  15. Dental Laboratory Technology. Project Report Phase I with Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappe', Hoyt; Smith, Debra S.

    This report provides results of Phase I of a project that researched the occupational area of dental laboratory technology, established appropriate committees, and conducted task verification. These results are intended to guide development of a program designed to train dental laboratory technicians. Section 1 contains general information:…

  16. 75 FR 23847 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and ] Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 9, 2010 *VA Central Office. Oncology June 10-11, 2010....... L'Enfant...

  17. 77 FR 64598 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services..., behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately...

  18. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit..., behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately...

  19. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  20. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at...

  1. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  2. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program Final Reports, Volume 5B, Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Laboratory Technical Directorates and Air Force Air Logistics Centers. Each participant provided a report of their research , and these...reports are consolidated into this annual report. 14. SUBJECT TERMS AIR FORCE RESEARCH , AIR FORCE , ENGINEERING, LABORATORIES , REPORTS, SUMMER...216-6940 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - 1994 SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS

  3. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Albuquerque, New Mexico Sponsored by: Air ...Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico...UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM -- 1993 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS VOLUME 8

  4. A New Investigative Sophomore Organic Laboratory Involving Individual Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharas, Gregory B.

    1997-07-01

    The problem-solving approach calls for a laboratory curriculum that provides a greater intellectual challenge and the resemblance to a research experience. A curriculum was designed which involves individual research projects for the nine laboratories of the spring quarter of a three-quarter introductory organic chemistry course. These projects integrate the instructor's research and learning experiences for the students via interdisciplinary approaches of classical organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. The foundations for the individual research projects are laid out during the first and second quarters of laboratory instruction when students are introduced to classic synthetic, separation and purification techniques. In the third quarter of lab sequence, in carrying out the individual research projects, the emphasis is shifted towards obtaining and interpreting data for compounds that are not described in the laboratory manual rather than making representative compounds. The research is an open end laboratory project that includes an on-line and printed Chemical Abstracts literature search, molecular computer modeling, a microscale monomer synthesis and characterization, scale-up synthesis, polymer synthesis and characterization. By changing functional groups on the vinyl monomer molecule, the class can explore reactivity of one "family" of compounds and consequently polymers. This approach is based on the integration of genuine research experience with laboratory instruction in accessible but non-trivial manner.

  5. Research Review: Laboratory Student Magazine Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Explores research on student-produced magazines at journalism schools, including the nature of various programs and curricular structures, ethical considerations, and the role of faculty advisors. Addresses collateral sources that provide practical and philosophical foundations for the establishment and conduct of magazine production programs.…

  6. Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories balloon operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danaher, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The establishment and functions of the AFCRL balloon operations facility are discussed. The types of research work conducted by the facility are defined. The facilities which support the balloon programs are described. The free balloon and tethered balloon capabilities are analyzed.

  7. QUALITY ASSURANCE IN RESEARCH LABORATORIES: RULES AND REASON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality Assurance in Research Laboratories: Rules and Reason

    Ron Rogers, Quality Assurance and Records Manager, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL/ORD/US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709

    To anyone who has actively participated in research, as I have...

  8. Consultation and Decision Processes in a Research and Development Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clagett G.

    1970-01-01

    Study of relationship between consultation and decision processes in an industrial research laboratory showed the efficacy of multidirectional consultation coupled with a pattern of shared, decentralized decision making. (Author/KJ)

  9. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  10. Xerox' Canadian Research Facility: The Multinational and the "Offshore" Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchessault, R. H.; Myers, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    The history, logistics, and strategy behind the Xerox Corporation's Canadian research laboratory, a subsidiary firm located outside the United States for reasons of manpower, tax incentives, and quality of life, are described. (MSE)

  11. Research and Laboratory Instruction--An Experiment in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramm, Kenneth R.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an attempt to incorporate research into laboratory work in an introductory ecology class and a senior seminar. The investigation involves the examination of rhythms of food consumption and circadian activities in humans. (GS)

  12. A review of research on human activity induced climate change I. Greenhouse gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingxing; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Xin

    2004-06-01

    Extensive research on the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, carbon cycle modeling, and the characterization of atmospheric aerosols has been carried out in China during the last 10 years or so. This paper presents the major achievements in the fields of emissions of greenhouse gases from agricultural lands, carbon cycle modeling, the characterization of Asian mineral dust, source identification of the precursors of the tropospheric ozone, and observations of the concentrations of atmospheric organic compounds. Special, more detailed information on the emissions of methane from rice fields and the physical and chemical characteristics of mineral aerosols are presented.

  13. Atmospheric lidar research applying to H2O, O2 and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental research on a near infrared tunable dye laser was reported, and theoretical simulations were presented for various lidar configurations. The visible and nearinfrared wavelengths considered were suitable for observations of aerosols, water vapor, molecular oxygen pressure and temperature in the troposphere and above. The first phase of development work was described on a ruby pumped, tunable dye laser for the wavelength region 715 to 740 nanometers. Lidar simulations were summarized for measurements of H2O and for two color lidar observations of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  14. Fluorescent biological aerosol particles measured with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor WIBS-4: laboratory tests combined with a one year field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, E.; Schnaiter, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper bioaerosol measurements conducted with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor mark 4 (WIBS-4) are presented. The measurements comprise aerosol chamber characterization experiments and a one-year ambient measurement period at a semi-rural site in South Western Germany. This study aims to investigate the sensitivity of WIBS-4 to biological and non-biological aerosols and detection of biological particles in the ambient aerosol. Several types of biological and non-biological aerosol samples, including fungal spores, bacteria, mineral dust, ammonium sulphate, combustion soot, and fluorescent polystyrene spheres, were analyzed by WIBS-4 in the laboratory. The results confirm the sensitivity of the ultraviolet light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) method to biological fluorophores and show the good discrimination capabilities of the two excitation wavelengths/detection wavebands method applied in WIBS-4. However, a weak cross-sensitivity to non-biological fluorescent interferers remains and is discussed in this paper. All the laboratory studies have been undertaken in order to prepare WIBS-4 for ambient aerosol measurements. According to the one-year ambient aerosol study, number concentration of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) show strong seasonal and diurnal variability. The highest number concentration of FBAP was measured during the summer term and decreased towards the winter period when colder and drier conditions prevail. Diurnal FBAP concentrations start to increase after sunset and reach maximum values during the late night and early morning hours. On the other hand, the total aerosol number concentration was almost always higher during daytime than during nighttime and a sharp decrease after sunset was observed. There was no correlation observed between the FBAP concentration and the meteorological parameters temperature, precipitation, wind direction and wind speed. However, a clear correlation was identified between the FBAP

  15. Development of the Ensemble Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) and its application of the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) in support of aerosol forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, J. I.; Reid, J. S.; Hansen, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Collins, N.; Hoar, T. J.; Hogan, T.; Lynch, P.; McLay, J.; Reynolds, C. A.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-01

    An ensemble-based forecast and data assimilation system has been developed for use in Navy aerosol forecasting. The system makes use of an ensemble of the Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) at 1° × 1°, combined with an Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter from NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The base ENAAPS-DART system discussed in this work utilizes the Navy Operational Global Analysis Prediction System (NOGAPS) meteorological ensemble to drive offline NAAPS simulations coupled with the DART Ensemble Kalman Filter architecture to assimilate bias-corrected MODIS Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrievals. This work outlines the optimization of the 20-member ensemble system, including consideration of meteorology and source-perturbed ensemble members as well as covariance inflation. Additional tests with 80 meteorological and source members were also performed. An important finding of this work is that an adaptive covariance inflation method, which has not been previously tested for aerosol applications, was found to perform better than a temporally and spatially constant covariance inflation. Problems were identified with the constant inflation in regions with limited observational coverage. The second major finding of this work is that combined meteorology and aerosol source ensembles are superior to either in isolation and that both are necessary to produce a robust system with sufficient spread in the ensemble members as well as realistic correlation fields for spreading observational information. The inclusion of aerosol source ensembles improves correlation fields for large aerosol source regions such as smoke and dust in Africa, by statistically separating freshly emitted from transported aerosol species. However, the source ensembles have limited efficacy during long range transport. Conversely, the meteorological ensemble produces sufficient spread at the synoptic scale to enable observational impact through the ensemble data

  16. Development of the Ensemble Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) and its application of the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) in support of aerosol forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Juli I.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Hansen, James A.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Hogan, Timothy; Lynch, Peng; McLay, Justin; Reynolds, Carolyn A.; Sessions, Walter R.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong

    2016-03-01

    An ensemble-based forecast and data assimilation system has been developed for use in Navy aerosol forecasting. The system makes use of an ensemble of the Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) at 1 × 1°, combined with an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter from NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The base ENAAPS-DART system discussed in this work utilizes the Navy Operational Global Analysis Prediction System (NOGAPS) meteorological ensemble to drive offline NAAPS simulations coupled with the DART ensemble Kalman filter architecture to assimilate bias-corrected MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals. This work outlines the optimization of the 20-member ensemble system, including consideration of meteorology and source-perturbed ensemble members as well as covariance inflation. Additional tests with 80 meteorological and source members were also performed. An important finding of this work is that an adaptive covariance inflation method, which has not been previously tested for aerosol applications, was found to perform better than a temporally and spatially constant covariance inflation. Problems were identified with the constant inflation in regions with limited observational coverage. The second major finding of this work is that combined meteorology and aerosol source ensembles are superior to either in isolation and that both are necessary to produce a robust system with sufficient spread in the ensemble members as well as realistic correlation fields for spreading observational information. The inclusion of aerosol source ensembles improves correlation fields for large aerosol source regions, such as smoke and dust in Africa, by statistically separating freshly emitted from transported aerosol species. However, the source ensembles have limited efficacy during long-range transport. Conversely, the meteorological ensemble generates sufficient spread at the synoptic scale to enable observational impact through the ensemble data

  17. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  18. Army Research Laboratory. 1999 Annual Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    and by 1990 they had developed new methods to synthesis nanoparticles. The surface areas of aerogel MgO particles are 350 to 500 m2; those...deformation. Researchers have obtained detailed information on the frag- mentation process by analytical and computational methods and by experi...coordinated through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and VAMAS, to study and compare various testing methods . The round robin results

  19. Naval Research Laboratory Major Facilities 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    optical fiber fusion splicers, annealing facilities for magnetic materials, and facilities for degassing adhesives for potting purposes. The...characterizing the surface emissive and reflective properties of IR paints and materials. Measurements are made on transmittance, specular reflectance...systematic studies of material treatments and paint pigment, for example. This lab has been essential for NRL’s efforts, including in-house research and

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Research Highlights 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The research and development highlights are summarized. The world's brightest source of X-rays could revolutionize materials research. Test of a prototype insertion device, a key in achieving brilliant X-ray beams, have given the first glimpse of the machine's power. Superconductivity research focuses on the new materials' structure, economics and applications. Other physical science programs advance knowledge of material structures and properties, nuclear physics, molecular structure, and the chemistry and structure of coal. New programming approaches make advanced computers more useful. Innovative approaches to fighting cancer are being developed. More experiments confirm the passive safety of Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor concept. Device simplifies nuclear-waste processing. Advanced fuel cell could provide better mileage, more power than internal combustion engine. New instruments find leaks in underground pipe, measure sodium impurities in molten liquids, detect flaws in ceramics. New antibody findings may explain ability to fight many diseases. Cadmium in cigarettes linked to bone loss in women. Programs fight deforestation in Nepal. New technology could reduce acid rain, mitigate greenhouse effect, enhance oil recovery. Innovative approaches transfer Argonne-developed technology to private industry. Each year Argonne educational programs reach some 1200 students.

  1. NASA/WVU Software Research Laboratory, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabolish, George J.; Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    In our second year, the NASA/WVU Software Research Lab has made significant strides toward analysis and solution of major software problems related to V&V activities. We have established working relationships with many ongoing efforts within NASA and continue to provide valuable input into policy and decision-making processes. Through our publications, technical reports, lecture series, newsletters, and resources on the World-Wide-Web, we provide information to many NASA and external parties daily. This report is a summary and overview of some of our activities for the past year. This report is divided into 6 chapters: Introduction, People, Support Activities, Process, Metrics, and Testing. The Introduction chapter (this chapter) gives an overview of our project beginnings and targets. The People chapter focuses on new people who have joined the Lab this year. The Support chapter briefly lists activities like our WWW pages, Technical Report Series, Technical Lecture Series, and Research Quarterly newsletter. Finally, the remaining four chapters discuss the major research areas that we have made significant progress towards producing meaningful task reports. These chapters can be regarded as portions of drafts of our task reports.

  2. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  3. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  4. Adaptive optics research at Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Darryl P.; Primmerman, Charles A.

    A development history is presented for adaptive-optics methods of optical aberration measurement and correction in real time, which are applicable to the thermal blooming of high-energy laser beams, the compensation of a laser beam propagating from ground to space, and compensation by means of a synthetic beacon. Attention is given to schematics of the various adaptive optics system types, which cover the cases of cooperative and uncooperative targets. Representative research projects encompassed by the high-energy propagation range in West Palm Beach are the 'Everlaser' instrumented target vehicle, the OCULAR multidither system installation, and the Atmospheric Compensation Experiment Adaptive Optics System.

  5. Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jacqueline; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semisolid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on α-pinene SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at <5%, 50 and 90% RH, and on limonene SOA particles at <5% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30-70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 h, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at <5% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses; with aging at elevated RH leading to a more significant effect. In all cases, the observed SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent.

  6. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  7. Evaporation Kinetics of Laboratory Generated Secondary Organic Aerosols at Elevated Relative Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semi-solid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at 0%, 50% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30% to 70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 hours, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at 0% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses, with aging at elevated RH leading to more significant effect. In all cases, SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent, providing direct evidence that oligomers play a crucial role in determining the evaporation kinetics.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, J P; Fox, K J

    2008-03-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps BNL to respond new scientific opportunities within

  9. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 3. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base NM 87117-6008 Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base...Zindel, D.: 1963, Z. Astrophys. 57, 82. 29-13 FINAL REPORT SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM AT PHILLIPS LABORATORY KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific

  10. A novel single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer for atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Claudia; Ibrahim, Inas; Schleicher, Nina; Hitzenberger, Regina; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Leisner, Thomas; Schnaiter, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The spectral light-absorbing behavior of carbonaceous aerosols varies depending on the chemical composition and structure of the particles. A new single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer was developed and characterized for measuring absorption coefficients at three wavelengths across the visible spectral range. In laboratory studies, several types of soot with different organic content were generated by a diffusion flame burner and were investigated for changes in mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) values, absorption and scattering Ångström exponents (αabs and αsca), and single scattering albedo (ω). By increasing the organic carbonaceous (OC) content of the aerosol from 50 to 90 % of the total carbonaceous mass, for 660 nm nearly no change of MAC was found with increasing OC content. In contrast, for 532 nm a significant increase, and for 445 nm a strong increase of MAC was found with increasing OC content of the aerosol. Depending on the OC content, the Ångström exponents of absorption and scattering as well as the single scattering albedo increased. These laboratory results were compared to a field study at a traffic-dominated urban site, which was also influenced by residential wood combustion. For this site a daily average value of αabs(445-660) of 1.9 was found.

  11. Life extension research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; DuCharme, A.R. Jr.; DeBey, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) plant life extension (PLEX) effort, the DOE Technology Management Center at Sandia is actively participating in life extension research efforts. In the areas of reliability and surveillance, systems modelling techniques are being explored to identify those components which, if their reliability changes, could most impact safety. Results of an application of these techniques to the Surry nuclear plant were compared to an industry life extension categorization also performed at Surry. For selected types of components identified during this study, the degradation and failure mechanisms are being explored and state-of-the-art monitoring techniques are being evaluated. Initial results are presented. In the area of cable life extension, a definition study is under way to define utility-specific as well as collective industry actions that would facilitate extending cable life. Some recommendations of this study are also provided.

  12. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one hour at...

  13. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 2, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Research Extension Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. and Arkansas Tech University...Summer Research Extension Program (SREP) Phillips

  14. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  18. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,5 the Naval Research Sabbatical Leave Program6 for faculty, and the College Qualified...http://www.onr.navy.mil/Education-Outreach/Summer-Faculty- Research-Sabbatical.aspx. 7 See U. S. Army website, “CQL Program – College Qualified... tuition assistance for researchers who are completing advanced degrees and opportunities for graduate students to work temporarily in a laboratory. These

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Schrempf, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  20. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  2. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining

  4. Evaporation Kinetics and Phase of Laboratory and Ambient Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan G.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense efforts to find additional SOA sources but leaving the assumption of rapid SOA evaporation unchallenged. We characterized room-temperature evaporation of pure SOA and SOA formed in the presence of spectator organic vapors with and without aging. We find that it takes ~24 hrs for pure SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ~10 minutes timescales predicted by models. The presence of spectator organic vapors and aging dramatically reduces the evaporation, and in some cases nearly stops it. For all cases, SOA evaporation behavior is size independent and does not follow the liquid droplet evaporation kinetics assumed by models.

  5. Laboratory and field studies of stratospheric aerosols: Phase changes under high supersaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallet, John

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that water in the form of isolated small droplets supercool as much as 40 C below their equilibrium melting point. Solutions similarly supercool (with respect to water) and supersaturate (with respect of the solute). Experiments are described in which bulk solutions typical of atmospheric aerosols (nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrates; ammonium sulfate; ammonium bisulfate; sodium chloride) are supercooled and/or supersaturated and nucleated to initiate crystal growth. Supersaturation of 300 percent is readily attainable, with linear growth of crystals increasing roughly as (supercooling/supersaturation)sup 2. The implication of the experiments is that the situation of metastability in polar stratosphere clouds is very likely, with nucleation only occuring under a high degree of supercooling or supersaturation.

  6. Laboratory and field studies of stratospheric aerosols: Phase changes under high supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallet, John

    1991-02-01

    It is well known that water in the form of isolated small droplets supercool as much as 40 C below their equilibrium melting point. Solutions similarly supercool (with respect to water) and supersaturate (with respect of the solute). Experiments are described in which bulk solutions typical of atmospheric aerosols (nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrates; ammonium sulfate; ammonium bisulfate; sodium chloride) are supercooled and/or supersaturated and nucleated to initiate crystal growth. Supersaturation of 300 percent is readily attainable, with linear growth of crystals increasing roughly as (supercooling/supersaturation)sup 2. The implication of the experiments is that the situation of metastability in polar stratosphere clouds is very likely, with nucleation only occuring under a high degree of supercooling or supersaturation.

  7. The 48-inch lidar aerosol measurements taken at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, David C.; Osborn, M. T.; Winker, D. M.; Decoursey, R. J.; Youngbluth, Otto, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents lidar data taken between July 1991 and December 1992 using a ground-based 48-inch lidar instrument at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Seventy lidar profiles (approximately one per week) were obtained during this period, which began less than 1 month after the eruption of the Mount Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines. Plots of backscattering ratio as a function of altitude are presented for each data set along with tables containing numerical values of the backscattering ratio and backscattering coefficient versus altitude. The enhanced aerosol backscattering seen in the profiles highlights the influence of the Mount Pinatubo eruption on the stratospheric aerosol loading over Hampton. The long-term record of the profiles gives a picture of the evolution of the aerosol cloud, which reached maximum loading approximately 8 months after the eruption and then started to decrease gradually. NASA RP-1209 discusses 48-inch lidar aerosol measurements taken at the Langley Research Center from May 1974 to December 1987.

  8. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  9. Enabling UAS Research at the NASA EAV Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey A.

    2015-01-01

    The Exploration Aerial Vehicles (EAV) Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center leads research into intelligent autonomy and advanced control systems, bridging the gap between simulation and full-scale technology through flight test experimentation on unmanned sub-scale test vehicles.

  10. Strategic Plan for the ORD National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has a valued reputation for supporting the Agency’s mission of protecting human health and the environment with multidisciplinary expertise that brings cutting-edge research and technology to address critical exposure questions and...

  11. Integrating Interdisciplinary Research-Based Experiences in Biotechnology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Rupa S.; Wales, Melinda E.

    2012-01-01

    The increasingly interdisciplinary nature of today's scientific research is leading to the transformation of undergraduate education. In addressing these needs, the University of Houston's College of Technology has developed a new interdisciplinary research-based biotechnology laboratory curriculum. Using the pesticide degrading bacterium,…

  12. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  13. The Development of Research as a Role in Laboratory Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Fred M., Jr.; Page, Jane A.

    A 20-item questionnaire was mailed to 123 laboratory schools to investigate their involvement with educational research. The findings on the 57 schools that responded were organized into two categories: (1) background information on all respondents; and (2) information on research activities based on responses of the 39 schools identified as…

  14. Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory Bibliography, 1981-1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    n Ltd.. 6 pp., 1981. Olsen, R.G., Microwave-induced Developmental Defects in the Common Mealworm Tenerio mlit-ýr_--A Decade o’ Re-seaFch-, NAMRL-1283...Tri-service Aeromedical Research Panel Fall Technical Meeting , NAMRL Monograph 33, Naval Aerospace A Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola, FL

  15. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  16. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), is responsible for conducting research to improve the risk assessment of chemicals for potential effects ...

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Schrempf, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE's long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE's program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE's contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  18. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  19. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Location for the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This diagram shows the planned locations of the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL) and the Space Station Commerce Park at Kennedy Space Center. The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for the planned 400- acre commerce park.

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  2. Tree Topping Ceremony at NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications. This photo depicts construction workers taking part in a tree topping ceremony as the the final height of the laboratory is framed. The ceremony is an old German custom of paying homage to the trees that gave their lives in preparation of the building site.

  3. A Research-Based Laboratory Course Designed to Strengthen the Research-Teaching Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra, Karlett J.; Osgood, Marcy P.; Pappas, Donald L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 10-week laboratory course of guided research experiments thematically linked by topic, which had an ultimate goal of strengthening the undergraduate research-teaching nexus. This undergraduate laboratory course is a direct extension of faculty research interests. From DNA isolation, characterization, and mutagenesis, to protein…

  4. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  5. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology areas that have been identified as critical for the present and future work of the Laboratory, and are

  6. Research project on nanospace laboratory and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Isao

    1996-04-01

    The research project on Nano-Space Laboratory and related topics are reviewed. This project has been funded by the Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology since 1994. The project is classified into three major topics: (1) materials development by atom lab, (2) materials development by molecular lab and (3) development of theory and basic technology for nano-space research. The paper describes progress of the research with emphasis placed especially on new process technologies.

  7. Laboratory investigations of the impact of mineral dust aerosol on cold cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, K. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Möhler, O.

    2010-12-01

    Dust particles represent a dominant source of particulate matter (by mass) to the atmosphere, and their emission from some source regions has been shown to be transported on regional and hemispherical scales. Dust particles' potential to interact with water vapor in the atmosphere can lead to important radiative impacts on the climate system, both direct and indirect. We have investigated this interaction for several types of dust aerosol, collected from the Southwestern United States and the Saharan region. A continuous flow diffusion chamber was operated to measure the ice nucleation ability of the dust particles in the temperature range of relevance to cirrus and mixed-phase clouds (-65aerosol (SOA) species, higher relative humidity was required for ice nucleation below -40 °C, similar to that required for homogeneous nucleation of sulfates. However, ice nucleation was still

  8. A Minimal Fragmentation Approach to Real Time Aerosol Mass Spectrometry: A New Tool for Detailed Laboratory Studies of Organic Aerosol Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hanna, S.; Simpson, E.; Robb, D.; Blades, M. W.; Hepburn, J. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    The study of the atmospheric distribution and chemical processing of both biogenic and anthropogenic organics is one of the oldest and still most enduring challenges in atmospheric chemistry. The large number and structural complexity of many of the compounds as well as the high reactivity of many intermediates makes it hard to design analytical tools that are at the same time sensitive enough as well as being reasonably broad in scope. Despite big advances in techniques to characterize the gaseous phase component, there is still a dearth of instruments capable of doing the same for the organic aerosol component. This is due in part to the type of the compounds present in the aerosol phase, which in general lend themselves less to classical analytical methods such as GC/MS, as well as the inherent problems of any aerosol analysis, namely to transfer the aerosol to a suitable phase for analysis without altering it and while keeping track, at the same time, of the physical properties of the aerosol. Although impaction methods coupled to conventional analysis techniques have some specific advantages, the most widely used approach is the aerosol mass spectrometer. Unlike their predecessors, current aerosol mass spectrometer designs do a reasonably good job of delivering a representative sample of the aerosol phase to the detector while keeping track of the physical properties of the aerosol. However, the ionization step (either multitphoton absorption or electron impact in most cases) still leads to massive fragmentation of all but the most stable organics, making it very difficult to characterize individual compounds beyond establishing their functional groups(Allan et al. 2003; Su et al. 2004). Single photon near threshold ionization has been proposed and used recently (Oktem et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2005), but the challenges of producing coherent VUV radiation has led to a high detection threshold and a still significant amount of fragmentation, since these studies

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  10. Proceedings: EPRI Cancer Workshop II on laboratory research

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.

    1993-09-01

    A workshop on Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) and Cancer was held in Washington, DC, on September 6, 1991, organized by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) EMF Health Studies Program. The primary objective of the EPRI Cancer Research Workshop II was to review the status and future of the Institute`s laboratory research program on EMF and cancer; program direction had been determined based on recommendations from EPRI`s first cancer workshop in July 1988. Research that addressed these recommendations in the intervening three years, either within the EPRI program or in other programs around the world, was reviewed. To identify laboratory research that would be responsive to current needs, workshop participants discussed four experimental systems, key results, and areas for further research. These systems include the mouse skin tumor model, use of C3H/l0T1/2 cells and their derivatives, the nude mouse model, and pineal research. In the final phase of the workshop participants developed recommendations for future research that could help resolve what role, if any, EMF exposure plays in carcinogenesis. EPRI`s EMF Health Studies Program is considering these recommendations within the process of evaluating existing projects and developing new laboratory research.

  11. Design, demonstration and performance of a versatile electrospray aerosol generator for nanomaterial research and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjohn, Nancy; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Prikhodko, Sergey; Fung, David C.; Hirakawa, Karen S.; Zavala-Mendez, Jose D.; Hinds, William; Kennedy, Nola J.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are difficult to aerosolize in a controlled manner. We present a method for generating aerosols not only of carbon nanotubes, but also of many reference and proprietary materials including quantum dots, diesel particulate matter, urban dust, and their mixtures, using electrospraying. This method can be used as a teaching tool, or as the starting point for advanced research, or to deliver nanomaterials in animal exposure studies. This electrospray system generates 180 µg of nanotubes per m3 of carrier gas, and thus aerosolizes an occupationally relevant mass concentration of nanotubes. The efficiency achievable for single-walled carbon nanotubes is 9.4%. This system is simple and quick to construct using ordinary lab techniques and affordable materials. Since it is easy to replace soiled parts with clean ones, experiments on different types of nanomaterial can be performed back to back without contamination from previous experiments. In this paper, the design, fabrication, operation and characterization of our versatile electrospray method are presented. Also, the morphological changes that carbon nanotubes undergo as they make the transition from dry powders to aerosol particles are presented.

  12. Nano-G research laboratory for a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, Friedrich O. (Inventor); Garriott, Owen K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An acceleration free research laboratory is provided that is confined within a satellite but free of any physical engagement with the walls of the satellite, wherein the laboratory has adequate power, heating, cooling, and communications services to conduct basic research and development. An inner part containing the laboratory is positioned at the center-of-mass of a satellite within the satellite's outer shell. The satellite is then positioned such that its main axes are in a position parallel to its flight velocity vector or in the direction of the residual acceleration vector. When the satellite is in its desired orbit, the inner part is set free so as to follow that orbit without contacting the inside walls of the outer shell. Sensing means detect the position of the inner part with respect to the outer shell, and activate control rockets to move the outer shell; thereby, the inner part is repositioned such that it is correctly positioned at the center-of-mass of the satellite. As a consequence, all disturbing forces, such as drag forces, act on the outer shell, and the inner part containing the laboratory is shielded and is affected only by gravitational forces. Power is supplied to the inner part and to the laboratory by a balanced microwave/laser link which creates the kind of environment necessary for basic research to study critical phenomena such as the Lambda transition in helium and crystal growth, and to perform special metals and alloys research, etc.

  13. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  14. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  15. Laboratory Research: A Question of When, Not If.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    RD-A±53 298 LABORATORY RESEARCH: A QUESTION OF WHEN NOT IF(U) 1/1 MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY D R ILGEN MAR 85 TR-85-i N68814...Daniel R. Ilgen Michigan State University To Appear in E. A. Locke (Ed.) (1985) Generalizing from laboratory to field settings: Research findings from...D T IC NR170-961 ELECTE Technical Report 85-1 MAY 3 Department of Psychology and Department of Management Michigan State University B UNCLASSIFIED

  16. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  17. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  18. Final Report for LDRD Project ''A New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL''

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Bergman, D J; Dignon, J E; Connell, P S

    2002-01-31

    of aerosol/cloud interactions on climate forcing [Chuang and Penner, 1995]. Our research has been recognized as one of a few studies attempting to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate in the IPCC Third Assessment Report [IPCC, 2001]. Our previous assessments of aerosol climate effects were based on a general circulation model (NCAR CCM1) fully coupled to a global tropospheric chemistry model (GRANTOUR). Both models, however, were developed more than a decade ago. The lack of advanced physics representation and techniques in our current models limits us from further exploring the interrelationship between aerosol, cloud, and climate variation. Our objective is to move to a new era of aerosol/cloud/climate modeling at LLNL by coupling the most advanced chemistry and climate models and by incorporating an aerosol microphysics module. This modeling capability will enable us to identify and analyze the responsible processes in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions and therefore, to improve the level of scientific understanding for aerosol climate effects. This state-of-the-art coupled models will also be used to address the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural emissions in the spatial pattern of aerosol climate forcing in order to assess the potential of human induced climate change.

  19. The changing role of the National Laboratories in materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Fluss, M.

    1995-06-02

    The role of the National Laboratories is summarized from the era of post World War II to the present time. The U.S. federal government policy for the National Laboratories and its influence on their materials science infrastructure is reviewed with respect to: determining overall research strategies, various initiatives to interact with industry (especially in recent years), building facilities that serve the nation, and developing leading edge research in the materials sciences. Despite reductions in support for research in the U.S. in recent years, and uncertainties regarding the specific policies for R&D in the U.S., there are strong roles for materials research at the National Laboratories. These roles will be centered on the abilities of the National Laboratories to field multidisciplinary teams, the use of unique cutting edge facilities, a focus on areas of strength within each of the labs, increased teaming and partnerships, and the selection of motivated research areas. It is hoped that such teaming opportunities will include new alliances with China, in a manner similar, perhaps, to those recently achieved between the U.S. and other countries.

  20. DESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT RESEARCH AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Rigali, Mark J.; Miller, James E.; Altman, Susan J.; Biedermann, Laura; Brady, Patrick Vane.; Kuzio, Stephanie P.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rempe, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Water is the backbone of our economy - safe and adequate supplies of water are vital for agriculture, industry, recreation, and human consumption. While our supply of water today is largely safe and adequate, we as a nation face increasing water supply challenges in the form of extended droughts, demand growth due to population increase, more stringent health-based regulation, and competing demands from a variety of users. To meet these challenges in the coming decades, water treatment technologies, including desalination, will contribute substantially to ensuring a safe, sustainable, affordable, and adequate water supply for the United States. This overview documents Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL, or Sandia) Water Treatment Program which focused on the development and demonstration of advanced water purification technologies as part of the larger Sandia Water Initiative. Projects under the Water Treatment Program include: (1) the development of desalination research roadmaps (2) our efforts to accelerate the commercialization of new desalination and water treatment technologies (known as the 'Jump-Start Program),' (3) long range (high risk, early stage) desalination research (known as the 'Long Range Research Program'), (4) treatment research projects under the Joint Water Reuse & Desalination Task Force, (5) the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership Program, (6) water treatment projects funded under the New Mexico Small Business Administration, (7) water treatment projects for the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), (8) Sandia- developed contaminant-selective treatment technologies, and finally (9) current Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funded desalination projects.

  1. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  2. Smart Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for the NIST Research Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Richard S.; McLean, Mark J.; Osborn, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory notebooks have been a staple of scientific research for centuries for organizing and documenting ideas and experiments. Modern laboratories are increasingly reliant on electronic data collection and analysis, so it seems inevitable that the digital revolution should come to the ordinary laboratory notebook. The most important aspect of this transition is to make the shift as comfortable and intuitive as possible, so that the creative process that is the hallmark of scientific investigation and engineering achievement is maintained, and ideally enhanced. The smart electronic laboratory notebooks described in this paper represent a paradigm shift from the old pen and paper style notebooks and provide a host of powerful operational and documentation capabilities in an intuitive format that is available anywhere at any time. PMID:26958447

  3. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W.

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  4. Smart Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for the NIST Research Environment.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; McLean, Mark J; Osborn, William A

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory notebooks have been a staple of scientific research for centuries for organizing and documenting ideas and experiments. Modern laboratories are increasingly reliant on electronic data collection and analysis, so it seems inevitable that the digital revolution should come to the ordinary laboratory notebook. The most important aspect of this transition is to make the shift as comfortable and intuitive as possible, so that the creative process that is the hallmark of scientific investigation and engineering achievement is maintained, and ideally enhanced. The smart electronic laboratory notebooks described in this paper represent a paradigm shift from the old pen and paper style notebooks and provide a host of powerful operational and documentation capabilities in an intuitive format that is available anywhere at any time.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  8. Fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) measured with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor WIBS-4: laboratory tests combined with a one year field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, E.; Schnaiter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper bioaerosol measurements conducted with the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor mark 4 (WIBS-4) are presented. The measurements comprise aerosol chamber characterization experiments and a one-year ambient measurement period at a semi-rural site in South Western Germany. This study aims to investigate the sensitivity of WIBS-4 to biological and non-biological aerosols, performance of WIBS-4 for discrimination of several types of aerosols, and the detection and identification of biological particles in the ambient aerosol. Several types of biological and non-biological aerosol samples including spores, bacteria, pollen, mineral dust, ammonium sulphate, combustion soot, and fluorescent polystyrene spheres were analysed by WIBS-4 in the laboratory. The results confirm the sensitivity of the Ultra Violet Light Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) method to biological fluorophores and show the good discrimination capabilities of the two wavelengths excitation/two wavebands detection method applied in WIBS-4. However, a weak cross-sensitivity to non-biological fluorescent interferers remains and is discussed in this paper. All the laboratory studies have been undertaken in order to prepare WIBS-4 for ambient aerosol measurements. According to the one year ambient aerosol study, number concentration of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) show strong seasonal and diurnal variability. The highest number concentration of FBAP was measured during the summer term and it decreases towards the winter period when colder and drier conditions are prevailing. Diurnal FBAP concentrations start to increase after sunset and reach maximum values during the late night and early morning hours. On the other hand the total aerosol number concentration was always higher during day time than during night time and a sharp decrease after sunset was observed. There was no correlation observed between the FBAP concentration and the meteorological parameters temperature

  9. Laboratory light-scattering measurements with Titan's aerosols analogues produced by a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Alcouffe, G.; Cernogora, G.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Szopa, C.

    2009-11-01

    The chemistry leading to the formation of solid aerosols (tholins) in Titan's atmosphere is simulated by a capacitively coupled plasma in a N 2-CH 4 gas mixture. The solid grains are produced in volume directly in the gas phase and studied ex-situ by SEM imaging and by light scattering on clouds of particles. The scattered light properties depend on the physical properties of the particles (morphologies, size distribution), as well as on the phase angle and the wavelength of the light. The particles may be aggregated or agglomerated grains. The grains size distribution is studied as a function of plasma parameters such as initial methane concentration introduced into the discharge, gas flow, absorbed RF power and plasma duration. The average grain size increases when the amount of CH 4 increases, when the gas flow decreases, and when the plasma duration increases up to a limit for each production condition. For all the samples, the absorption decreases with increasing wavelength in the visible domain. As usually found for irregular particles, the polarization phase curves have a bell-shaped positive branch and a shallow negative branch. The maximum of polarization ( Pmax) increases when the average grain size decreases (sub-μm-sized grains). To obtain Pmax values within the range of those measured in Titan's atmosphere; the average grains diameter has to be smaller than 100 nm, in agreement with the space observations results. In the light-scattering experiment, the size of the agglomerates in the clouds is in the 40-80 μm range in equivalent diameter. As a consequence Pmax increases with decreasing wavelength due to the increasing absorption, in agreement with observations of Titan from outside the atmosphere.

  10. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-05-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  12. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  13. Aerosol Observability and Predictability: From Research to Operations for Chemical Weather Forecasting. Lagrangian Displacement Ensembles for Aerosol Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    A challenge common to many constituent data assimilation applications is the fact that one observes a much smaller fraction of the phase space that one wishes to estimate. For example, remotely sensed estimates of the column average concentrations are available, while one is faced with the problem of estimating 3D concentrations for initializing a prognostic model. This problem is exacerbated in the case of aerosols because the observable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not only a column integrated quantity, but it also sums over a large number of species (dust, sea-salt, carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. An aerosol transport model when driven by high-resolution, state-of-the-art analysis of meteorological fields and realistic emissions can produce skillful forecasts even when no aerosol data is assimilated. The main task of aerosol data assimilation is to address the bias arising from inaccurate emissions, and Lagrangian misplacement of plumes induced by errors in the driving meteorological fields. As long as one decouples the meteorological and aerosol assimilation as we do here, the classic baroclinic growth of error is no longer the main order of business. We will describe an aerosol data assimilation scheme in which the analysis update step is conducted in observation space, using an adaptive maximum-likelihood scheme for estimating background errors in AOD space. This scheme includes e explicit sequential bias estimation as in Dee and da Silva. Unlikely existing aerosol data assimilation schemes we do not obtain analysis increments of the 3D concentrations by scaling the background profiles. Instead we explore the Lagrangian characteristics of the problem for generating local displacement ensembles. These high-resolution state-dependent ensembles are then used to parameterize the background errors and generate 3D aerosol increments. The algorithm has computational complexity running at a resolution of 1/4 degree, globally. We will present the result of

  14. Titan's organic aerosols: Molecular composition and structure of laboratory analogues inferred from pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Carrasco, Nathalie; Buch, Arnaud; Gautier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Analogues of Titan's aerosols are of primary interest in the understanding of Titan's atmospheric chemistry and climate, and in the development of in situ instrumentation for future space missions. Numerous studies have been carried out to characterize laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), but their molecular composition and structure are still poorly known. If pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about their chemical composition, highly disparate results were obtained with this technique. They can be attributed to the variety of analytical conditions used for pyr-GCMS analyses, and/or to differences in the nature of the analogues analyzed, that were produced with different laboratory set-ups under various operating conditions. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholin's molecular composition by pyr-GCMS, we carried out a systematic study with two major objectives: (i) exploring the pyr-GCMS analytical parameters to find the optimal ones for the detection of a wide range of chemical products allowing a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio in the gaseous reactive medium on the tholin's molecular structure. We used a radio-frequency plasma discharge to synthetize tholins with different concentrations of CH4 diluted in N2. The samples were pyrolyzed at temperatures covering the 200-700°C range. The extracted gases were then analyzed by GCMS for their molecular identification. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for characterizing the molecular composition of our tholins by GCMS analysis is found to be 600°C. This temperature choice results from the best compromise between the number of compounds released, the quality of the signal and the appearance of pyrolysis artifacts. About a hundred molecules are identified as pyrolysates. A common major chromatographic pattern appears clearly for all the

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  16. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  18. Integrating teaching and research in the field and laboratory settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kaseke, K. F.; Daryanto, S.; Ravi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Field observations and laboratory measurements are great ways to engage students and spark students' interests in science. Typically these observations are separated from rigorous classroom teaching. Here we assessed the potential of integrating teaching and research in the field and laboratory setting in both US and abroad and worked with students without strong science background to utilize simple laboratory equipment and various environmental sensors to conduct innovative projects. We worked with students in Namibia and two local high school students in Indianapolis to conduct leaf potential measurements, soil nutrient extraction, soil infiltration measurements and isotope measurements. The experience showed us the potential of integrating teaching and research in the field setting and working with people with minimum exposure to modern scientific instrumentation to carry out creative projects.

  19. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Norris E.; Meade, Roger Allen

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  20. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  1. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2009-03-24

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with universities

  4. Chemical Structure and Accidental Explosion Risk in the Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Tips that laboratory researchers and beginning graduate students can use to safeguard against explosion hazard with emphasis on clear illustrations of molecular structure are discussed. Those working with hazardous materials must proceed cautiously and may want to consider alternative and synthetic routes.

  5. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  6. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from 12 U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the Internet. The data system is called the Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), and it is ...

  7. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  8. First international conference on laboratory research for planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Allen, J.E. Jr.; Stief, L.J.; Quillen, D.T.

    1990-05-01

    Proceedings of the First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres are presented. The covered areas of research include: photon spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and charged particle interactions. This report contains the 12 invited papers, 27 contributed poster papers, and 5 plenary review papers presented at the conference. A list of attendees and a reprint of the Report of the Subgroup on Strategies for Planetary Atmospheres Exploration (SPASE) are provided in two appendices.

  9. First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth (Editor); Allen, John E., Jr. (Editor); Stief, Louis J. (Editor); Quillen, Diana T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Proceedings of the First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres are presented. The covered areas of research include: photon spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and charged particle interactions. This report contains the 12 invited papers, 27 contributed poster papers, and 5 plenary review papers presented at the conference. A list of attendees and a reprint of the Report of the Subgroup on Strategies for Planetary Atmospheres Exploration (SPASE) are provided in two appendices.

  10. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  11. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report compiles the annual reports of Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects supported by the Berkeley Lab. Projects are arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Accelerator and fusion research division; (2) Chemical sciences division; (3) Computing Sciences; (4) Earth sciences division; (5) Environmental energy technologies division; (6) life sciences division; (7) Materials sciences division; (8) Nuclear science division; (9) Physics division; (10) Structural biology division; and (11) Cross-divisional. A total of 66 projects are summarized.

  12. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to...

  13. EPA Research and Development: National Exposure Research Laboratory

    EPA Science Inventory

    This course is for Biology majors, primarily those in the completed Freshman Biology. Students enrolled in the course are expected to have completed Freshman Biology. With some background in biology as a strt, students begin to think about doing some research as part of their u...

  14. Radiological characterization plan for the Tritium Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories/California

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.

    1995-05-01

    In this Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), the Health Protection Department, 8641 of Sandia National Laboratories/California provides specific information for an assessment of the radiological conditions of Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL), and the TRL Complex area. This RCP provides historical background information on each laboratory within the TRL Complex as related to both radiological conditions and hazardous materials. Since this plan chronicles past and present activities and outlines future actions, a final complex status report will follow the completion of this document. The Health Protection Department, 8641 anticipates that the TRL Complex will ultimately undergo a termination survey; however, this RCP does not include environmental surveys such as soil, vegetation, or ground water. The RCP does provide the basis for a final termination survey plan, when appropriate.

  15. Improved Arctic Cloud and Aerosol Research and Model Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Sassen

    2007-03-01

    In this report are summarized our contributions to the Atmospheric Measurement (ARM) program supported by the Department of Energy. Our involvement commenced in 1990 during the planning stages of the design of the ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites. We have worked continuously (up to 2006) on our ARM research objectives, building on our earlier findings to advance our knowledge in several areas. Below we summarize our research over this period, with an emphasis on the most recent work. We have participated in several aircraft-supported deployments at the SGP and NSA sites. In addition to deploying the Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) system (Sassen 1994; Noel and Sassen 2005) designed and constructed under ARM funding, we have operated other sophisticated instruments W-band polarimetric Doppler radar, and midinfrared radiometer for intercalibration and student training purposes. We have worked closely with University of North Dakota scientists, twice co-directing the Citation operations through ground-to-air communications, and serving as the CART ground-based mission coordinator with NASA aircraft during the 1996 SUCCESS/IOP campaign. We have also taken a leading role in initiating case study research involving a number of ARM coinvestigators. Analyses of several case studies from these IOPs have been reported in journal articles, as we show in Table 1. The PDL has also participated in other major field projects, including FIRE II and CRYSTAL-FACE. In general, the published results of our IOP research can be divided into two categories: comprehensive cloud case study analyses to shed light on fundamental cloud processes using the unique CART IOP measurement capabilities, and the analysis of in situ data for the testing of remote sensing cloud retrieval algorithms. One of the goals of the case study approach is to provide sufficiently detailed descriptions of cloud systems from the data-rich CART environment to make them suitable for application to

  16. Laboratory directed research and development fy1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R A

    2000-04-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was founded in 1952 and has been managed since its inception by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of this long association with UC, the Laboratory has been able to recruit a world-class workforce, establish an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and innovation, and achieve recognition in relevant fields of knowledge as a scientific and technological leader. This environment and reputation are essential for sustained scientific and technical excellence. As a DOE national laboratory with about 7,000 employees, LLNL has an essential and compelling primary mission to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. The Laboratory receives funding from the DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, whose focus is stewardship of our nuclear weapons stockpile. Funding is also provided by the Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, many Department of Defense sponsors, other federal agencies, and the private sector. As a multidisciplinary laboratory, LLNL has applied its considerable skills in high-performance computing, advanced engineering, and the management of large research and development projects to become the science and technology leader in those areas of its mission responsibility. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1984. The Program allows the Director of each DOE laboratory to fund advanced, creative, and innovative research and development (R&D) activities that will ensure scientific and technical vitality in the continually evolving mission areas at DOE and the Laboratory. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies, which attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The LDRD Program also

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of fiscal year 1993. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. The program advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Reports are given from the following divisions: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment -- Health and Safety, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics, and Structural Biology. (GHH)

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.; Chartock, M.

    1999-02-05

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  20. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  1. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen , Todd

    2007-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

  4. Spectral characterisation of mineralogical components of dust, HULIS and winter time aerosol using multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer. A laboratory and a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Utry, Noémi; Filep, Ágnes; Tátrai, Dávid; Bozóki, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-04-01

    changes in the relative strength between the traffic and residential heating emission. Finally, we demonstrated correlations between the AAE measured in different wavelength region and concurrently measured other aerosol variables such as size distribution, gas and trace element concentrations. These researches were funded by Hungarian Scientific Research Foundation (OTKA, Grant no. K101905) is gratefully acknowledged. The European Union and the European Social Fund have provided financial support to the project under the grant no. TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0047 and TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0060.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE office of energy research: Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1987. Research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of processes controlling the long-term fate and biological effects of fugitive chemicals and other stressors resulting from energy development. The research, focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, forms the basis for defining and quantifying processes that affect humans and the environment at the regional and global levels. Research is multidisciplinary and multitiered, providing integrated system-level insights into critical environmental processes. Research initiatives in subsurface microbiology and transport, global change, radon, and molecular sciences are building on PNL technical strengths in biogeochemistry, hydrodynamics, molecular biology, and theoretical ecology. Unique PNL facilities are used to probe multiple phenomena complex relationships at increasing levels of complexity. Intermediate-scale experimental systems are used to examine arid land watershed dynamics, aerosol behavior and effects, and multidimensional subsurface transport. In addition, field laboratories (the National Environmental Research Park and Marine Research Laboratory) are used in conjunction with advanced measurement techniques to validate concepts and models, and to extrapolate the results to the system and global levels. Strong university liaisons now in existence are being markedly expanded so that PNL resources and the specialized technical capabilities in the university community can be more efficiently integrated.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to

  7. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  8. Manned earth orbital laboratories to perform communications/navigation research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltz, D. M.; Quantock, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the feasibility of manned earth orbiting laboratories in the 1980s for solving problems identified with operational communication and navigation systems. A program of experiments recommended for implementation in the 1980 to 1990 period is presented. Equipment for conducting experiments is listed. Conceptual designs of laboratories which could be carried to orbit by the forthcoming NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter and then operated on orbit by an experimenter crew are discussed. Studies of the expected benefits, together with investigations of the configurations, mission considerations, and equipment selection result in the conclusion that manned communication/navigation research laboratories in earth orbit would be practical and effective, and that the experiments performed could derive meaningful information having application to future unmanned operational systems.

  9. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2005-03-22

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions

  11. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  12. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2005-11-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmosphere general circulation model, with its new cloud scheme, is employed to study the indirect radiative effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol during the industrial period. The preindustrial and present-day monthly mean aerosol climatologies are generated from running the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemistry-transport model. The respective global annual mean sulfate burdens are 0.22 and 0.81 Tg S. Cloud droplet number concentrations are related to sulfate mass concentrations using an empirical relationship (Boucher and Lohmann, 1995). A distinction is made between "forcing" and flux change at the top of the atmosphere in this study. The simulations, performed with prescribed sea surface temperature, show that the first indirect "forcing" ("Twomey" effect) amounts to an annual mean of -1.5 W m-2, concentrated largely over the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The annual mean flux change owing to the response of the model to the first indirect effect is -1.4 W m-2, similar to the annual mean forcing. However, the model's response causes a rearrangement of cloud distribution as well as changes in longwave flux (smaller than solar flux changes). There is thus a differing geographical nature of the radiation field than for the forcing even though the global means are similar. The second indirect effect, which is necessarily an estimate made in terms of the model's response, amounts to -0.9 W m-2, but the statistical significance of the simulated geographical distribution of this effect is relatively low owing to the model's natural variability. Both the first and second effects are approximately linearly additive, giving rise to a combined annual mean flux change of -2.3 W m-2, with the NH responsible for 77% of the total flux change. Statistically significant model responses are obtained for the zonal mean total indirect effect in the entire NH and in the Southern Hemisphere low

  13. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at...

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

    2012-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High-Energy-Density Science; (11) Laser Inertial

  15. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2000-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2002-03-15

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

  17. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2004, and exemplifies Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program and the LDRD program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply technologies to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2004, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the long-term science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technologies that have been identified as critical for the present and future work of the Laboratory, and are chartered to develop their respective

  18. A laboratory exposure system to study the effects of aging on super-micron aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Santarpia, Joshua; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hubbard, Joshua Allen

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory system was constructed that allows the super-micron particles to be aged for long periods of time under conditions that can simulate a range of natural environments and conditions, including relative humidity, oxidizing chemicals, organics and simulated solar radiation. Two proof-of-concept experiments using a non-biological simulant for biological particles and a biological simulant demonstrate the utility of these types of aging experiments. Green Visolite®, which is often used as a tracer material for model validation experiments, does not degrade with exposure to simulated solar radiation, the actual biological material does. This would indicate that Visolite® should be a good tracer compound for mapping the extent of a biological release using fluorescence as an indicator, but that it should not be used to simulate the decay of a biological particle when exposed to sunlight. The decay in the fluorescence measured for B. thurengiensis is similar to what has been previously observed in outdoor environments.

  19. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: laboratory experimental demonstration of the transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Shu, Xin; Dugas, Victoria; Woodson, Isaiah; Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga; Zhang, Zenghui; Hung, Francisco R; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills in the deep-sea environment such as the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico release vast quantities of crude oil into the sea-surface environment. Various investigators have discussed the marine transport and fate of the oil into different environmental compartments (air, water, sediment, and biota). The transport of the oil into the atmosphere in these previous investigations has been limited to only evaporation, a volatility dependent pathway. In this work, we studied the aerosolization of oil spill matter via bursting bubbles as they occur during whitecaps in a laboratory aerosolization reactor. By evaluating the alkane content in oil mousse, crude oil, the gas phase, and particulate matter we clearly demonstrate that aerosolization via bursting bubbles is a solubility and volatility independent transport pathway for alkanes. The signature of alkane fractions in the native oil and aerosolized matter matched well especially for the less volatile alkanes (C20-C29). Scanning electron microscope interfaced with energy dispersive X-ray images identified the carbon fractions associated with salt particles of aerosols. Theoretical molecular dynamics simulations in the accompanying paper lend support to the observed propensity for alkanes at air-salt water interfaces of breaking bubbles and the produced droplets. The presence of a dispersant in the aqueous phase increased the oil ejection rate at the surface especially for the C20-C29 alkanes. The information presented here emphasizes the need to further study sea-spray aerosols as a possible transport vector for spilled oil in the sea surface environment.

  20. Passive Detection of Biological Aerosols in the Atmosphere with a Fourier Transform Instrument (FTIR)—the Results of the Measurements in the Laboratory and in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błęcka, M. I.; Rataj, M.; Szymański, G.

    2012-06-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Radiation (FTIR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful methods for the detection of gaseous constituents, aerosols, and dust in planetary atmospheres. Infrared spectroscopy plays an important role in searching for biomarkers, organics and biological substances in the Universe. The possibility of detection and identifications with FTIR spectrometer of bio-aerosol spores ( Bacillus atrophaeus var. globigii=BG) in the atmosphere is discussed in this paper. We describe the results of initial spectral measurements performed in the laboratory and in the field. The purpose of these experiments was to detect and to identify bio-aerosol spores in two conditions: 1) In a closed chamber where the thermal contrast between the background and aerosols was large, and 2) In open air where the thermal contrast between the background and aerosols was small. The extinction spectrum of BG spores was deduced by comparing our measurements with models, and other measurements known from the literature. Our theoretical and experimental studies indicate that, during passive remote sensing measurements, it is difficult—but possible to detect and to identify bio-aerosol clouds by their spectral signatures. The simple spectral analysis described in the paper can be useful for the detection of various kinds of trace aerosols—not only in the Earth's atmosphere, but also during planetary missions in the environments of other astronomical objects such as planets, comets etc. We expect that the interpretation of data from spectrometric sounding of Venus and Mars during the current missions Mars and Venus Express, and later during the Rosetta mission will benefit from our experimental work and numerical modelling.

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Joel A.; Worsnop, Douglas

    2016-09-22

    This project was part of a collaborative campaign, including the participation of scientists from seven research groups as part of the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London to study wintertime sources of urban particulate matter. The UW contribution by PI Thornton’s group was to make the first deployment of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer instrument (MOVI-CI-ToFMS) to measure both particle and gas phase organic acids. The new instrument ran nearly continuously during the ClearfLo WINTER IOP at the Detling site, producing a first-ever data set of molecular composition information that can be used for source apportionment and process studies. The UW group published a paper in Environmental Science and Technology and contributed to another (Bohnenstengel et al BAMS 2015) detailing a direct molecular connection between biomass/biofuel burning particles and aerosol light absorption. The ES&T paper (Mohr, et al ES&T 2013) has received 42 citations in just 3 years indicative of its significant impact on the field. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal.

  2. Research in the Mont Terri Rock laboratory: Quo vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossart, Paul; Thury, Marc

    During the past 10 years, the 12 Mont Terri partner organisations ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, FOWG (now SWISSTOPO), GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI and SCK-CEN have jointly carried out and financed a research programme in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. An important strategic question for the Mont Terri project is what type of new experiments should be carried out in the future. This question has been discussed among partner delegates, authorities, scientists, principal investigators and experiment delegates. All experiments at Mont Terri - past, ongoing and future - can be assigned to the following three categories: (1) process and mechanism understanding in undisturbed argillaceous formations, (2) experiments related to excavation- and repository-induced perturbations and (3) experiments related to repository performance during the operational and post-closure phases. In each of these three areas, there are still open questions and hence potential experiments to be carried out in the future. A selection of key issues and questions which have not, or have only partly been addressed so far and in which the project partners, but also the safety authorities and other research organisations may be interested, are presented in the following. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is positioned as a generic rock laboratory, where research and development is key: mainly developing methods for site characterisation of argillaceous formations, process understanding and demonstration of safety. Due to geological constraints, there will never be a site specific rock laboratory at Mont Terri. The added value for the 12 partners in terms of future experiments is threefold: (1) the Mont Terri project provides an international scientific platform of high reputation for research on radioactive waste disposal (= state-of-the-art research in argillaceous materials); (2) errors are explicitly allowed (= rock laboratory as a “playground” where experience is often gained through

  3. Research activities on robotics at the Electrotechnical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakikura, M.

    Various robotics research activities carried out at the Electrotechnical Laboratory in Japan are discussed. The history of robotics research, which has been going on since the late 1960s as a part of artificial-intelligence research is described. Consideration is given to the full-scale robot system called ETL-ROBOT Mk. 1, to the carpenter robot, to the intelligent locomotive-handling robot, to the flexible finger, and to the hand-eye robot. The present aspect of the research in relation to past results is examined and includes the development of new robot systems such as a vision system based on a three-dimensional model, an interactive modeling system, a direct-drive manipulator, a robot vision language, and a language-aided robotic teleoperation system. Research themes planned for the near future include manipulation techniques, sensor techniques, autonomous robot control techniques, advanced teleoperation techniques, and system totalizing techniques.

  4. Impacts: NIST Building and Fire Research Laboratory (technical and societal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, N. J.

    1993-08-01

    The Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is dedicated to the life cycle quality of constructed facilities. The report describes major effects of BFRL's program on building and fire research. Contents of the document include: structural reliability; nondestructive testing of concrete; structural failure investigations; seismic design and construction standards; rehabilitation codes and standards; alternative refrigerants research; HVAC simulation models; thermal insulation; residential equipment energy efficiency; residential plumbing standards; computer image evaluation of building materials; corrosion-protection for reinforcing steel; prediction of the service lives of building materials; quality of construction materials laboratory testing; roofing standards; simulating fires with computers; fire safety evaluation system; fire investigations; soot formation and evolution; cone calorimeter development; smoke detector standards; standard for the flammability of children's sleepwear; smoldering insulation fires; wood heating safety research; in-place testing of concrete; communication protocols for building automation and control systems; computer simulation of the properties of concrete and other porous materials; cigarette-induced furniture fires; carbon monoxide formation in enclosure fires; halon alternative fire extinguishing agents; turbulent mixing research; materials fire research; furniture flammability testing; standard for the cigarette ignition resistance of mattresses; support of navy firefighter trainer program; and using fire to clean up oil spills.

  5. Internal-control weaknesses at Department of Energy research laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-15

    Two requests were made by Chairman, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, that GAO review the vulnerability of selected Department of Energy (DOE) research facilities to fraud, waste, and abuse. The review examined internal controls over payroll, procurement, and property management at six government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) research laboratories (Sandia, Hanford, Argonne, Oak Ridge, Fermi, and Brookhaven) and four government-owned, government-operated energy technology centers (Bartlesville, Laramie, Morgantown, and Pittsburgh). In fiscal 1982, DOE budgeted over $3 billion for its GOCO facilities and over $230 million for its energy technology centers. GAO noted specific problems at a number of the laboratories in each of the areas covered. In many instances, DOE has acknowledged the problems and corrective action is underway or is planned.

  6. US Naval Research Laboratory's Current Space Photovoltaic Experiemtns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Walters, Robert; Messenger, Scott; Krasowski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has a rich history conducting space photovoltaic (PV) experiments starting with Vanguard I, the first solar powered satellite in 1958. Today, NRL in collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center, is engaged in three flight experiments demonstrating a wide range of PV technologies in both LEO and HEO orbits. The Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE)[1], part of the 5th Materials on the International Space Station Experiment (MISSE-5), flew for 13 months on the International Space Station in 2005-2006. The FTSCE provided in-situ I-V monitoring of advanced III-V multi-junction cells and laboratory prototypes of thin film and other next generation technologies. Two experiments under development will provide more opportunities to demonstrate advanced solar cells and characterization electronics that are easily integrated on a wide variety of spacecraft bus architectures.

  7. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  8. 2016 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wester

    2016-05-25

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab. LDRD is able to fund employee-initiated proposals that address the current strategic objectives and better position Fermilab for future mission needs. The request for such funds is made in consideration of the investment needs, affordability, and directives from DOE and Congress. Review procedures of the proposals will insure that those proposals which most address the strategic goals of the DOE and the Laboratory or which best position Fermilab for the future will be recommended to the Laboratory Director who has responsibility for approval. The execution of each approved project will be the responsibility of the Principal Investigator, PI, who will follow existing Laboratory guidelines to ensure compliance with safety, environmental, and quality assurance practices. A Laboratory Director-appointed LDRD Coordinator will work with Committees, Laboratory Management, other Fermilab Staff, and the PI’s to oversee the implementation of policies and procedures of LDRD and provide the management and execution of this Annual Program Plan. FY16 represents third fiscal year in which LDRD has existed at Fermilab. The number of preliminary proposals (117) submitted in response to the LDRD Call for Proposals indicates very strong interest of the program within the Fermilab community. The first two Calls have resulted in thirteen active LDRD projects – and it is expected that between five and seven new

  9. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  10. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    titanium sapphire (Ti:sapph) laser was used that was pumped with a frequency doubled Spectra-Physics neodymium -doped yttrium vanadate laser. The 8...efficiency of several neodymium (Nd):yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) samples of different concentrations and therefore, the technique will continue to be...Nd neodymium NPs nanoparticles NRL US Naval Research Laboratory O oxygen PMT photomultiplier tube SBS stimulated Brillouin scattering SD

  11. Laser simulation at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosek, Jacob; Naderi, Shadi; Oliker, Benjamin; Lane, Ryan; Dajani, Iyad; Madden, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The physics of high brightness, high-power lasers present a variety of challenges with respect to simulation. The Air Force Research Laboratory is developing high-fidelity models for Yb-doped, Tm-doped, and Raman fiber amplifiers, hollow-core optical fiber gas lasers, and diode pumped alkali lasers. The approach to simulation and the physics specific to each laser technology are described, along with highlights of results, and relevant modeling considerations and limitations.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  13. CNR LARA project, Italy: Airborne laboratory for environmental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R. M.; Fiumi, L.; Marino, C. M.; Pignatti, S.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest for the environmental problems and the study of the impact on the environment due to antropic activity produced an enhancement of remote sensing applications. The Italian National Research Council (CNR) established a new laboratory for airborne hyperspectral imaging, the LARA Project (Laboratorio Aero per Ricerche Ambientali - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Research), equipping its airborne laboratory, a CASA-212, mainly with the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) instrument. MIVIS's channels, spectral bandwidths, and locations are chosen to meet the needs of scientific research for advanced applications of remote sensing data. MIVIS can make significant contributions to solving problems in many diverse areas such as geologic exploration, land use studies, mineralogy, agricultural crop studies, energy loss analysis, pollution assessment, volcanology, forest fire management and others. The broad spectral range and the many discrete narrow channels of MIVIS provide a fine quantization of spectral information that permits accurate definition of absorption features from a variety of materials, allowing the extraction of chemical and physical information of our environment. The availability of such a hyperspectral imager, that will operate mainly in the Mediterranean area, at the present represents a unique opportunity for those who are involved in environmental studies and land-management to collect systematically large-scale and high spectral-spatial resolution data of this part of the world. Nevertheless, MIVIS deployments will touch other parts of the world, where a major interest from the international scientific community is present.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  15. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  16. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  17. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  18. Reservoir technology research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, S.G.; Renner, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting geothermal reservoir research and testing sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1983. The INEL research program is primarily aimed at the development of reservoir engineering techniques for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Numerical methods have been developed which allow the simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex fractured reservoirs. Sensitivity studies have illustrated the importance of incorporating the influence of fractures in reservoir simulations. Related efforts include fracture characterization, geochemical reaction kinetics and field testing.

  19. Environmental Research Laboratories annual report for 1979 and 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory (ATDL) research program is organized around the following subject areas: transport and diffusion over complex terrain, atmospheric turbulence and plume diffusion, and forest meteorology and climatological studies. Current research efforts involve experimental and numerical modeling studies of flow over rugged terrain, studies of transport of airborne material in and above a forest canopy, basic studies of atmospheric diffusion parameters for applications to environmental impact evaluation, plume rise studies, and scientific collaboration with personnel in DOE-funded installations, universities, and government agencies on meteorological studies in our area of expertise. Abstracts of fifty-two papers that have been published or are awaiting publication are included.

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the 1992 fiscal year. It describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Divisions that report include: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment and Safety and Health, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics and Structural Biology.

  1. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directoed Research & Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wester

    2016-05-26

    After initiation by the Fermilab Laboratory Director, a team from the senior Laboratory leadership and a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Advisory Committee developed an implementation plan for LDRD at Fermilab for the first time. This implementation was captured in the approved Fermilab 2014 LDRD Program Plan and followed directions and guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 413.2B, a “Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines, …” document, and examples of best practices at other DOE Office of Science Laboratories. At Fermilab, a FY14 midyear Call for Proposals was issued. A LDRD Selection Committee evaluated those proposals that were received and provided a recommendation to the Laboratory Director who approved seven LDRD projects. This Annual Report focuses on the status of those seven projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab. The seven FY14 LDRD approved projects had a date of initiation late in FY14 such that this report reflects approximately six months of effort approximately through January 2015. The progress of these seven projects, the subsequent award of six additional new projects beginning in FY15, and preparations for the issuance of the FY16 Call for Proposals indicates that LDRD is now integrated into the overall annual program at Fermilab. All indications are that LDRD is improving the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory and providing new, novel, or cutting edge projects carried out at the forefront of science and technology and aligned with the mission and strategic visions of Fermilab and the Department of Energy.

  2. Research and development of network virtual instrument laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongmei; Pei, Xichun; Ma, Hongyue; Ma, Shuoshi

    2006-11-01

    A software platform of the network virtual instrument test laboratory has been developed to realize the network function of the test and signal analysis as well as the share of the hardware based on the data transmission theory and the study of the present technologies of the network virtual instrument. The whole design procedure was also presented in this paper. The main work of the research is as follows. 1. A suitable scheme of the test system with B/S mode and the virtual instrument laboratory with BSDA (Browser/Server/Database/Application) mode was determined. 2. The functions were classified and integrated by adopting the multilayer structure. The application for the virtual instruments running in the client terminal and the network management server managing the multiuser in the test laboratory according to the "Concurrent receival, sequential implementation" strategy in Java as well as the code of the test server application responding the client's requests of test and signal analysis in LabWindows/CVI were developed. As the extending part of network function of the original virtual test and analysis instruments, a software platform of network virtual instrument test laboratory was built as well. 3. The communication of the network data between Java and the LabWindows/CVI was realized. 4. The database was imported to store the data as well as the correlative information acquired by the server and help the network management server to manage the multiuser in the test laboratory. 5. A website embedding Java Applet of virtual instrument laboratory with the on-line help files was designed.

  3. Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Sato, Kei; Imamura, Takashi; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro

    2010-12-01

    It has recently been suggested that some organic aerosols can absorb solar radiation, especially at the shorter visible and UV wavelengths. Although quantitative characterization of the optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is required in order to confirm the effect of SOAs on the atmospheric radiation balance, the light absorption of SOAs has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we conducted laboratory experiments to measure the optical properties of SOAs generated during the photooxidation of toluene in the presence of NOx and the ozonolysis of α-pinene. Extinction and scattering coefficients of the SOAs were measured by a cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively. Refractive indices of the SOAs were determined so that the measured particle size dependence of the extinction and scattering efficiencies could be reproduced by calculations using Mie scattering theory. As a result, significant light absorption was found at 355 nm for the toluene SOAs. In contrast, no significant absorption was found either at 355 or 532 nm for the α-pinene SOAs. Using the obtained refractive index, mass absorption cross-section values of the toluene SOAs were calculated to be 0.3-3 m2 g-1 at 355 nm. The results indicate that light absorption by the SOAs formed from the photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons have a potential to influence the total aerosol light absorption, especially at UV wavelengths.

  4. The need for econometric research in laboratory animal operations.

    PubMed

    Baker, David G; Kearney, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    The scarcity of research funding can affect animal facilities in various ways. These effects can be evaluated by examining the allocation of financial resources in animal facilities, which can be facilitated by the use of mathematical and statistical methods to analyze economic problems, a discipline known as econometrics. The authors applied econometrics to study whether increasing per diem charges had a negative effect on the number of days of animal care purchased by animal users. They surveyed animal numbers and per diem charges at 20 research institutions and found that demand for large animals decreased as per diem charges increased. The authors discuss some of the challenges involved in their study and encourage research institutions to carry out more robust econometric studies of this and other economic questions facing laboratory animal research.

  5. Geoengineering with stratospheric aerosols: What do we not know after a decade of research?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Kravitz, Ben; Long, Jane C. S.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-11-01

    Any well-informed future decision on whether and how to deploy solar geoengineering requires balancing the impacts (both intended and unintended) of intervening in the climate against the impacts of not doing so. Despite tremendous progress in the last decade, the current state of knowledge remains insufficient to support an assessment of this balance, even for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering (SAG), arguably the best understood (practical) geoengineering method. We articulate key unknowns associated with SAG, including both climate-science and design questions, as an essential step toward developing a future strategic research program that could address outstanding uncertainties.

  6. Customized laboratory information management system for a clinical and research leukemia cytogenetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Sonal R; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M

    2009-01-01

    We developed a Microsoft Access-based laboratory management system to facilitate database management of leukemia patients referred for cytogenetic tests in regards to karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The database is custom-made for entry of patient data, clinical details, sample details, cytogenetics test results, and data mining for various ongoing research areas. A number of clinical research laboratoryrelated tasks are carried out faster using specific "queries." The tasks include tracking clinical progression of a particular patient for multiple visits, treatment response, morphological and cytogenetics response, survival time, automatic grouping of patient inclusion criteria in a research project, tracking various processing steps of samples, turn-around time, and revenue generated. Since 2005 we have collected of over 5,000 samples. The database is easily updated and is being adapted for various data maintenance and mining needs.

  7. FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK & RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-AGRICULTRAL RESEARCH SERVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Article describes Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory to an audience of scientific researchers (i.e. ecologists) interested in the interactions among organisms and their environment. Article outlines the facilities, environment, history, and ongoing types of research. Emphasis is on...

  8. Governing solar geoengineering research as it leaves the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andy

    2014-12-28

    One of the greatest controversies in geoengineering policy concerns the next stages of solar radiation management research, and when and how it leaves the laboratory. Citing numerous risks and concerns, a range of prominent commentators have called for field experiments to be delayed until there is formalized research governance, such as an international agreement. As a piece of pragmatic policy analysis, this paper explores the practicalities and implications of demands for 'governance before research'. It concludes that 'governance before research' is a desirable goal, but that a delay in experimentation-a moratorium-would probably be an ineffective and counterproductive way to achieve it. Firstly, it is very unlikely that a moratorium could be imposed. Secondly, even if it were practicable it seems that a temporary ban on field experiments would have at best a mixed effect addressing the main risks and concerns, while blocking and stigmatizing safe research and delaying the development of good governance practices from learning by doing. The paper suggests a number of steps to ensure 'governance before research' that can be taken in the absence of an international agreement or national legislation, emphasizing the roles of researchers and research funders in developing and implementing good practices.

  9. Zoonoses of occupational health importance in contemporary laboratory animal research.

    PubMed

    Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Nancy A; Weigler, Benjamin J; Di Giacomo, Ronald F

    2003-12-01

    In contemporary laboratory animal facilities, workplace exposure to zoonotic pathogens, agents transmitted to humans from vertebrate animals or their tissues, is an occupational hazard. The primary (e.g., macaques, pigs, dogs, rabbits, mice, and rats) and secondary species (e.g., sheep, goats, cats, ferrets, and pigeons) of animals commonly used in biomedical research, as classified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, are established or potential hosts for a large number of zoonotic agents. Diseases included in this review are principally those wherein a risk to biomedical facility personnel has been documented by published reports of human cases in laboratory animal research settings, or under reasonably similar circumstances. Diseases are listed alphabetically, and each section includes information about clinical disease, transmission, occurrence, and prevention in animal reservoir species and humans. Our goal is to provide a resource for veterinarians, health-care professionals, technical staff, and administrators that will assist in the design and on-going evaluation of institutional occupational health and safety programs.

  10. A 13-week research-based biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lefurgy, Scott T; Mundorff, Emily C

    2017-03-02

    Here, we present a 13-week research-based biochemistry laboratory curriculum designed to provide the students with the experience of engaging in original research while introducing foundational biochemistry laboratory techniques. The laboratory experience has been developed around the directed evolution of an enzyme chosen by the instructor, with mutations designed by the students. Ideal enzymes for this curriculum are able to be structurally modeled, solubly expressed, and monitored for activity by UV/Vis spectroscopy, and an example curriculum for haloalkane dehalogenase is given. Unique to this curriculum is a successful implementation of saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput screening of enzyme function, along with bioinformatics analysis, homology modeling, structural analysis, protein expression and purification, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and enzyme kinetics. Each of these techniques is carried out using a novel student-designed mutant library or enzyme variant unique to the lab team and, importantly, not described previously in the literature. Use of a well-established set of protocols promotes student data quality. Publication may result from the original student-generated hypotheses and data, either from the class as a whole or individual students that continue their independent projects upon course completion. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  11. The Lincoln Laboratory-Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory digital speech test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J.; Schecter, H.

    1984-05-01

    A narrowband digital speech communication test facility has been established and operates between Lincoln Laboratory and the Wright-Patterson Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. Noise fields simulating the acoustic environments of E3A and F-15 aircraft are established and Air Force personnel use the link operating at 2400 bps with a vocoder designed at Lincoln Laboratory, and a commercial telephone line modem. The facility includes a digital signal processing computer which can introduce bit errors and delay into the transmit and receive data. Communication scenarios are used to exercise the vocoder-modem channel with the dynamics and vocabulary of typical operational exchanges. Answers to a standard questionnaire provide acceptability data for the 2400 bps JTIDS class 2 voice channel. For the tests run so far, the 2400 bps voice is acceptable in the sense of positive user response to the questionnaire. Further testing using error and delay simulations will follow. An F-15 to F-15 link will be simulated at AMRL using a pair of vocoders operating back-to-back and in separate noise chambers.

  12. The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - Article in National Ambient Air Quality Status and Trends through 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research study that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted in Detroit, Michigan, named the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS), will help develop data that improves our understanding of human exposure to various air pollutants in our environment.

  13. 76 FR 60530 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Plastic Aerosol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Plastic...''), Plastic Aerosol Research Group, L.L.C. (``PARG'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the... are: Aerofil Technology Inc, Sullivan, MO; Aptar Beauty & Home, Cary, IL; Berry Plastics...

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the

  15. The ABC-Pyramid Atmospheric Research Observatory in Himalaya for aerosol, ozone and halocarbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Bonasoni, P; Laj, P; Angelini, F; Arduini, J; Bonafè, U; Calzolari, F; Cristofanelli, P; Decesari, S; Facchini, M C; Fuzzi, S; Gobbi, G P; Maione, M; Marinoni, A; Petzold, A; Roccato, F; Roger, J C; Sellegri, K; Sprenger, M; Venzac, H; Verza, G P; Villani, P; Vuillermoz, E

    2008-03-01

    In this work we present the new ABC-Pyramid Atmospheric Research Observatory (Nepal, 27.95 N, 86.82 E) located in the Himalayas, specifically in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. This measurement station has been set-up with the aim of investigating natural and human-induced environmental changes at different scales (local, regional and global). After an accurate instrumental set-up at ISAC-CNR in Bologna (Italy) in autumn 2005, the ABC-Pyramid Observatory for aerosol (physical, chemical and optical properties) and trace gas measurements (ozone and climate altering halocarbons) was installed in the high Khumbu valley in February 2006. Since March 2006, continuous measurements of aerosol particles (optical and physical properties), ozone (O3) and meteorological parameters as well as weekly samplings of particulate matter (for chemical analyses) and grab air samples for the determination of 27 halocarbons, have been carried out. These measurements provide data on the typical atmospheric composition of the Himalayan area between India and China and make investigations of the principal differences and similarities between the monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons possible. The study is carried out within the framework of the Ev-K2-CNR "SHARE-Asia" (Stations at High Altitude for Research on the Environment in Asia) and UNEP-"ABC" (Atmospheric Brown Clouds) projects. With the name of "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" the station is now part of the Observatory program of the ABC project.

  16. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, C.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included.

  18. PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

  19. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  20. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

  1. An overview of the Ice Nuclei Research Unit Jungfraujoch/Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment 2013 (INUIT-JFJ/CLACE-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Ice formation in mixed phase tropospheric clouds is an essential prerequisite for the formation of precipitation at mid-latitudes. Ice formation at temperatures warmer than -35°C is only possible via heterogeneous ice nucleation, but up to now the exact pathways of heterogeneous ice formation are not sufficiently well understood. The research unit INUIT (Ice NUcleation research unIT), funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG FOR 1525) has been established in 2012 with the objective to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation by combination of laboratory studies, model calculation and field experiments. The main field campaign of the INUIT project (INUIT-JFJ) was conducted at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 3580 m asl) during January and February 2013, in collaboration with several international partners in the framework of CLACE2013. The instrumentation included a large set of aerosol chemical and physical analysis instruments (particle counters, particle sizers, particle mass spectrometers, cloud condensation nuclei counters, ice nucleus counters etc.), that were operated inside the Sphinx laboratory and sampled in mixed phase clouds through two ice selective inlets (Ice-CVI, ISI) as well as through a total aerosol inlet that was used for out-of-cloud aerosol measurements. Besides the on-line measurements, also samples for off-line analysis (ESEM, STXM) have been taken in and out of clouds. Furthermore, several cloud microphysics instruments were operated outside the Sphinx laboratory. First results indicate that a large fraction of ice residues sampled from mixed phase clouds contain organic material, but also mineral dust. Soot and lead were not found to be enriched in ice residues. The concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei was found to be variable (ranging between < 1 and > 100 per liter) and to be strongly dependent on the operating conditions of the respective IN counter. The number size distribution of ice residues

  2. A design guide for energy-efficient research laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Wishner, N.; Chen, A.; Cook, L.; Bell, G.C.; Mills, E.; Sartor, D.; Avery, D.; Siminovitch, M.; Piette, M.A.

    1996-09-24

    This document--A Design Guide for Energy-Efficient Research Laboratories--provides a detailed and holistic framework to assist designers and energy managers in identifying and applying advanced energy-efficiency features in laboratory-type environments. The Guide fills an important void in the general literature and compliments existing in-depth technical manuals. Considerable information is available pertaining to overall laboratory design issues, but no single document focuses comprehensively on energy issues in these highly specialized environments. Furthermore, practitioners may utilize many antiquated rules of thumb, which often inadvertently cause energy inefficiency. The Guide helps its user to: introduce energy decision-making into the earliest phases of the design process, access the literature of pertinent issues, and become aware of debates and issues on related topics. The Guide does focus on individual technologies, as well as control systems, and important operational factors such as building commissioning. However, most importantly, the Guide is intended to foster a systems perspective (e.g. right sizing) and to present current leading-edge, energy-efficient design practices and principles.

  3. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 8. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Albuquerque. New Mexico Sponsored by...Best Available Copy UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM -- 1993 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS VOLUME 8 PHILLIPS LABORATORY ...Alabama Box 870344 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0344 Final Report for: Graduate Student Research Program Phillips Laboratory , Hanscom AFB Sponsored by: Air

  4. Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate Leadership Legacy, 1960-2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    AFRL -RY-WP-TM-2011-1017 AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY SENSORS DIRECTORATE LEADERSHIP LEGACY, 1960-2011 Compiled by Raymond C. Rang...Structures Divi- sion, Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory , Kirtland AFB, N.M. 7. March 1998 - July 1999, Chief, Integration and... Research Laboratory ( AFRL ), and Deputy Director of the Sensors Direc- torate, Air Force Research

  5. Laboratory Measurement of the Optical Properties of Hematite and Desert Dust Aerosols to Assess Their Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosmuller, H.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Frey, G.; Garro, B.; Engelbrecht, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Globally, aerosol mass emissions and optical depths are dominated by entrained mineral dust. While most minerals occurring in dust aerosols do not absorb solar radiation, some minerals cause significant absorption, thereby lowering the single scatter albedo (SSA) significantly below one, potentially contributing to a warmer and drier atmosphere. Therefore, the optical properties of globally relevant dust aerosols need to be characterized to reduce uncertainties in their radiative forcings. A well-known absorbing component found in dust aerosols is hematite, Fe2O3, which absorbs strongly in the blue-green spectral region, giving some soils, rocks, and dust aerosols their characteristic red color. We discuss measurements of the optical properties of ~30 dust aerosols, including a pure hematite standard, hematite-containing mineral dust standards ranging from 9-34% hematite by mass, and various dust samples collected from around the world. Samples are suspended from aqueous solution and/or from dry atomization with a cyclone re-suspension chamber yielding the fine fraction relevant for long-range transport. Size distributions were characterized with an optical aerosol spectrometer; absorption and scattering coefficients were measured with a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm and with an ultraviolet photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-UV) at 375 nm yielding wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MAC's), SSA's, and wavelength dependent Angstrom exponents. Hematite MAC's are an order of magnitude smaller than those of black carbon (BC) at 405 nm and 532 nm and are largely non-absorbing at 781 nm with SSA's of 0.49 0.68 and 0.98, respectively.

  6. Research Update: The USDA-ARS-Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation/manuscript provide a brief summary of beef cattle feeding-related research conducted at the USDA-ARS-Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, over the past four years. It summarizes data that has been published in scientific journals, in symposia and confer...

  7. Guidance for Human Subjects Research in the National Exposure Research Laboratory

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides guidance to investigators and managers associated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD)’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) on the ethical conduct, regulatory review, and approval of all huma...

  8. ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION RESEARCH THROUGH THE NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY (NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecosystem Restoration Research Program underway through ORD's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) has the long-term goal of providing watershed managers with "..state-of-the-science field-evaluated tools, technical guidance, and decision-support systems for s...

  9. A Virtual Laboratory for Aviation and Airspace Prognostics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Gorospe, George; Teubert, Christ; Quach, Cuong C.; Hogge, Edward; Darafsheh, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    Integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), autonomy, spacecraft, and other aviation technologies, in the airspace is becoming more and more complicated, and will continue to do so in the future. Inclusion of new technology and complexity into the airspace increases the importance and difficulty of safety assurance. Additionally, testing new technologies on complex aviation systems and systems of systems can be challenging, expensive, and at times unsafe when implementing real life scenarios. The application of prognostics to aviation and airspace management may produce new tools and insight into these problems. Prognostic methodology provides an estimate of the health and risks of a component, vehicle, or airspace and knowledge of how that will change over time. That measure is especially useful in safety determination, mission planning, and maintenance scheduling. In our research, we develop a live, distributed, hardware- in-the-loop Prognostics Virtual Laboratory testbed for aviation and airspace prognostics. The developed testbed will be used to validate prediction algorithms for the real-time safety monitoring of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the prediction of unsafe events. In our earlier work1 we discussed the initial Prognostics Virtual Laboratory testbed development work and related results for milestones 1 & 2. This paper describes the design, development, and testing of the integrated tested which are part of milestone 3, along with our next steps for validation of this work. Through a framework consisting of software/hardware modules and associated interface clients, the distributed testbed enables safe, accurate, and inexpensive experimentation and research into airspace and vehicle prognosis that would not have been possible otherwise. The testbed modules can be used cohesively to construct complex and relevant airspace scenarios for research. Four modules are key to this research: the virtual aircraft module which uses the X

  10. Ethical boundary-work in the animal research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hobson-West, Pru

    2012-08-01

    The use of animals in scientific experiments continues to attract significant controversy, particularly in the UK. This article draws on in-depth interviews with senior laboratory scientists who use animals in their research. A key claim is that animal research is necessary for medical advance. However, this promissory discourse relies on the construction of three boundaries. The first is between humans and non-human animals. The second is between the positive and less positive impacts of Home Office regulation. The third is between the use of animals in medicine versus other domains such as farming. The article analyses these discourses and evaluates the applicability of 'ethical boundary-work' (Wainwright et al., 2006a). I conclude that the concept is a potentially useful device for foregrounding ethics but argue that it carries several dangers for sociologists interested in claim-making in areas of controversy.

  11. Multi-modal virtual environment research at Armstrong Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    One mission of the Paul M. Fitts Human Engineering Division of Armstrong Laboratory is to improve the user interface for complex systems through user-centered exploratory development and research activities. In support of this goal, many current projects attempt to advance and exploit user-interface concepts made possible by virtual reality (VR) technologies. Virtual environments may be used as a general purpose interface medium, an alternative display/control method, a data visualization and analysis tool, or a graphically based performance assessment tool. An overview is given of research projects within the division on prototype interface hardware/software development, integrated interface concept development, interface design and evaluation tool development, and user and mission performance evaluation tool development.

  12. Ethical boundary-work in the animal research laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hobson-West, Pru

    2016-01-01

    The use of animals in scientific experiments continues to attract significant controversy, particularly in the UK. This article draws on in-depth interviews with senior laboratory scientists who use animals in their research. A key claim is that animal research is necessary for medical advance. However, this promissory discourse relies on the construction of three boundaries. The first is between humans and non-human animals. The second is between the positive and less positive impacts of Home Office regulation. The third is between the use of animals in medicine versus other domains such as farming. The article analyses these discourses and evaluates the applicability of ‘ethical boundary-work’ (Wainwright et al., 2006a). I conclude that the concept is a potentially useful device for foregrounding ethics but argue that it carries several dangers for sociologists interested in claim-making in areas of controversy. PMID:27708461

  13. User guide to the Burner Engineering Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fornaciari, N.; Schefer, R.; Paul, P.; Lubeck, C.; Sanford, R.; Claytor, L.

    1994-11-01

    The Burner Engineering Research Laboratory (BERL) was established with the purpose of providing a facility where manufacturers and researchers can study industrial natural gas burners using conventional and laser-based diagnostics. To achieve this goal, an octagonal furnace enclosure with variable boundary conditions and optical access that can accommodate burners with firing rates up to 2.5 MMBtu per hour was built. In addition to conventional diagnostic capabilities like input/output measurements, exhaust gas monitoring, suction pyrometry and in-furnace gas sampling, laser-based diagnostics available at BERL include planar Mie scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence. This paper gives an overview of the operation of BERL and a description of the diagnostic capabilities and an estimate of the time required to complete each diagnostic for the potential user who is considering submitting a proposal.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011

    SciTech Connect

    none, none

    2012-04-27

    Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). Going forward in FY 2012, the LDRD program also supports the Goals codified in the new DOE Strategic Plan of May, 2011. The LDRD program also supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Brief summares of projects and accomplishments for the period for each division are included.

  15. Ford Research Laboratory high school science and technology program (HSSTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Since 1984, the Ford Motor Company Research Laboratory has offered a series of Saturday morning enrichment experiences and summer work opportunities for high school students and teachers. The goal is to increase awareness of technical careers and the importance of science and mathematics in industry. The Saturday sessions are run entirely by volunteers and are organized around current topics ranging from fundamental science (e.g., atmospheric chemistry) to advanced engineering and manufacturing (e.g., glass production). A typical session includes a lecture, laboratory tours and demonstrations, a refreshment/social break and a hands-on activity whenever possible. Over 500 students and teachers participate annually from over 120 area high schools. Nearly one third of the students are minorities from the city of Detroit. Session quality is monitored through feedback from participants and volunteers. Juniors and seniors who attend at least three sessions are eligible to compete for four-week summer internships. Typically, about twenty-five to thirty interns (out of forty to fifty applicants) are selected on the basis of a transcript, teacher recommendation and a 2500-word report on a technical topic. Ford also generally hosts about eight summer teacher fellows through a statewide program that began as an HSSTP initiative. The HSSTP was recently recognized by the industrial Research Institute as one of eleven {open_quotes}Winning [Pre-College Education] Programs{close_quotes} nationwide. Keys to success include strong grassroots and managerial support and extensive networking in the community.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

    1999-07-14

    The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

  17. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also

  18. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs.

  19. Laboratory Measurements of the Effect of Sulfuric and Organic Acid Coatings on the Optical Properties of Carbon Soot Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H.; Khalizov, A.; Zhang, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol particles perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiative balance through scattering and absorption of the solar energy. Soot or black carbon, produced during combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels, is the major component responsible for light absorption by aerosol particles. The variation in the reported mass-specific absorption cross-sections (MAC) of fresh soot and increased light absorption by aged soot aerosols internally mixed with non-absorbing materials are the major factors leading to large uncertainties in the evaluation of the aerosol optical effects. We have investigated the optical properties of submicron carbon soot aerosols during simulated atmospheric processing with sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic organic acids. Internally mixed soot particles with known size, morphology, and the mixing state were produced by exposing the size-classified, flame-generated soot to sulfuric acid and organic acid vapor. Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot were measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively; light absorption was derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. Mass-specific absorption cross-sections for fresh and internally mixed soot aggregates were calculated using the measured effective densities of soot cores. The optical properties of fresh soot were independent of the relative humidity (RH). Internally mixed soot exhibited significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of the coating material and RH. Sulfuric acid was found to cause greater enhancement in soot optical properties than organic acids. The higher absorption and scattering resulted in the increased single scattering albedo of coated soot aerosol. The measurements indicate that the irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules is a major contributor to the enhanced optical properties of internally mixed soot.

  20. Toward a New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C,; Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Connell, P.; Bergman, D.; Rotman, D.; Wright, D.; McGraw, R.; Schwartz, S.

    2000-09-27

    One of the largest uncertainties in simulations of climate change over the industrial period is the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on the Earth's radiation budget. Much of this uncertainty arises from the limited capability for either precisely linking precursor gases to the formation and size distribution of the aerosols or quantitatively describing the existing levels of global aerosol loading. This project builds on our aerosol and chemistry expertise to address each of these uncertainties in a more quantitative fashion than is currently possible. With the current LDRD support, we are in the process to implement an aerosol microphysics module into our global chemistry model to more fundamentally and completely describe the processes that determine the distribution of atmospheric aerosols. Using this new modeling capability, in conjunction with the most current version of NCAR climate model, we will examine the influence of these processes on aerosol direct and indirect climate forcing.

  1. A laboratory study of the performance of the handheld diffusion size classifier (DiSCmini) for various aerosols in the 15-400 nm range.

    PubMed

    Bau, S; Zimmermann, B; Payet, R; Witschger, O

    2015-02-01

    In addition to chemical composition, particle concentration and size are among the main parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne ultrafine or nanoparticles. To assess occupational inhalation exposure, real-time instruments are recommended in recent strategies published. Among portable devices for personal exposure assessment in the workplace, DiSCmini (Matter Aerosol AG, Switzerland) has been identified as a potential candidate with its capacity to measure the airborne nanoparticle concentration and average particle size with good time-resolution. Monodisperse and polydisperse test nanoaerosols of varying compositions and morphologies were produced in the laboratory using the CAIMAN facility. These aerosols covered a range of particle sizes between 15 and 400 nm and number concentrations from 700 to 840,000 cm(-3). The aerosols were used to investigate the behavior of DiSCmini, comparing experimental data to reference data. In spite of a slight tendency to underestimate particle size, all particle diameters, number concentrations and surface area concentrations measured were in the same order of magnitude as reference data. Furthermore, no significant effect due to particle composition or morphology was noted.

  2. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.; Turner, R.S.

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  3. Progress of applied superconductivity research at Materials Research Laboratories, ITRI (Taiwan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R. S.; Wang, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    A status report based on the applied high temperature superconductivity (HTS) research at Materials Research Laboratories (MRL), Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is given. The aim is to develop fabrication technologies for the high-TC materials appropriate to the industrial application requirements. To date, the majorities of works have been undertaken in the areas of new materials, wires/tapes with long length, prototypes of magnets, large-area thin films, SQUID's and microwave applications.

  4. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd

    2004-03-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

  5. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  6. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-03-01

    Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are appropriately

  8. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 13. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM August 1993 14-1 My Summer Apprenticeship At Kirtland Air Force Base, Phillips Laboratory Andrea Garcia...AFOSR Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored By: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM... Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air

  9. A new laboratory facility to study the interactions of aerosols, cloud droplets/ice crystals, and trace gases in a turbulent environment: The Π Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, W. H., II; Chang, K.; Ciochetto, D.; Niedermeier, D.; Bench, J.; Shaw, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A detailed understanding of gas-aerosol-cloud interaction within the turbulent atmosphere is of prime importance for an accurate understanding of Earth's climate system. As one example: While every cloud droplet began as an aerosol particle, not every aerosol particle becomes a cloud droplet. The particle to droplet transformation requires that the particle be exposed to some critical concentration of water vapor, which differs for different combinations of particle size and chemical composition. Similarly, the formation of ice particles in mixed phase clouds is also catalyzed by aerosol particles. Even in the simplest scenarios it is challenging to gain a full understanding of the aerosol activation and ice nucleation processes. At least two other factors contribute significantly to the complexity observed in the atmosphere. First, aerosols and cloud particles are not static entities, but are continuously interacting with their chemical environment, and therefore changing in their properties. Second, clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, so thermodynamic and compositional variables, such as water vapor or other trace gas concentrations, fluctuate in space and time. Indeed, the coupling between turbulence and microphysical processes is one of the major research challenges in cloud physics. We have developed a multiphase, turbulent reaction chamber, (dubbed the Π Chamber, after the internal volume of 3.14 cubic meters) designed to address the problems outlined above. It is capable of pressures ranging from sea level to ~ 100 mbar, and can sustain temperatures of +40 to -55 ºC. We can independently control the temperatures on the surfaces of three heat transfer zones. This allows us to establish a temperature gradient between the floor and ceiling inducing Rayleigh-Benard convection and inducing a turbulent environment. Interior surfaces are electropolished stainless steel to facilitate cleaning before and after chemistry experiments. At present, supporting

  10. Retrieval of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from AERONET Photo-Polarimetric Measurements. 2: A New Research Algorithm and Case Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Dubovik, Oleg; Li, Li; Li, Zhengqiang; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Siniuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent N.

    2015-01-01

    A new research algorithm is presented here as the second part of a two-part study to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties from the multispectral and multiangular photopolarimetric measurements taken by Aerosol Robotic Network's (AERONET's) new-generation Sun photometer. The algorithm uses an advanced UNified and Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model and incorporates a statistical optimization approach.While the new algorithmhas heritage from AERONET operational inversion algorithm in constraining a priori and retrieval smoothness, it has two new features. First, the new algorithmretrieves the effective radius, effective variance, and total volume of aerosols associated with a continuous bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) function, while the AERONET operational algorithm retrieves aerosol volume over 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves complex refractive indices for both fine and coarsemodes,while the AERONET operational algorithm assumes a size-independent aerosol refractive index. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of the single-scattering albedo (SSA) for each aerosol mode and thus facilitate the validation of satellite products and chemistry transport models. We applied the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site and found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET operational inversions but can offer mode-resolved refractive index and SSA with acceptable accuracy for the aerosol composed by spherical particles. Along with the retrieval using both radiance and polarization, we also performed radiance-only retrieval to demonstrate the improvements by adding polarization in the inversion. Contrast analysis indicates that with polarization, retrieval error can be reduced by over 50% in PSD parameters, 10-30% in the refractive index, and 10-40% in SSA, which is consistent with theoretical analysis presented in the companion paper of this two-part study.

  11. COMPARISON OF MONODISPERSE AND POLYDISPERSE AEROSOL DEPOSITION IN A PACKED BED

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARISON OF MONODISPERSE AND POLYDISPERSE AEROSOL DEPOSITION IN A PACKED BED. Jacky A. Rosati, Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; Chong S. Kim, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory...

  12. Offshore wind measurements using Doppler aerosol wind lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  13. Offshore Wind Measurements Using Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  14. Severe Weather Research at the European Severe Storms Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenemeijer, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The European Severe Storms Laboratory's (ESSL) aim is to increase understanding of high-impact weather, with a particular focus on phenomena with small spatial and temporal dimensions, such as large hail, convectively-driven severe wind gusts, tornadoes and extreme precipitation.The ESSL performs and supports research activities and contributes to enhancing forecasting and warning capabilities in several ways. First, ESSL supports research by providing quality-controlled point data on severe weather events in the European Severe Weather Database. These data are collected through collaborations with networks of voluntary observers, and National HydroMeteorological Institutes throughout Europe. Second, research carried out at ESSL includes modelling the present and future occurrence of severe weather phenomena. This is done by developing proxies for severe weather events for use with reanalysis and climate model data. Third, at the ESSL Testbed, new products to support forecasting and warning operations are tested and demonstrated. Among these tools are visualizations of NWP ensemble data as well as radar, satellite and lightning detection data. Testbed participants provide feedback to the products and receive training in forecasting severe convective weather. Last, every second year ESSL organizes or co-organizes the European Conferences on Severe Storms.

  15. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome through detailed knowledge of its specific traits or with certain techniques. The rat has been used in many experimental protocols leading to bone loss, including hormonal interventions (ovariectomy, orchidectomy, hypophysectomy, parathyroidectomy), immobilization, and dietary manipulations. The aim of the current review is not only to present the ovariectomized rat and its advantages as an appropriate model for the research of osteoporosis, but also to provide information about the most relevant age and bone site selection according to the goals of each experimental protocol. In addition, several methods of bone mass evaluation are assessed, such as biochemical markers, densitometry, histomorphometry, and bone mechanical testing, that are used for monitoring and evaluation of this animal model in preventive or therapeutic strategies for osteoporosis. PMID:19004367

  16. Performance calculations for battery power supplies as laboratory research tools

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, J.J.; Rolader, G.E.; Jamison, K.A. ); Petresky, H. )

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) research at the Air Force Armament Laboratory, Hypervelocity Launcher Branch (AFATL/SAH), Eglin AFB, has focused on developing the technologies required for repetitively launching several kilogram payloads to high velocities. Previous AFATL/SAH experiments have been limited by the available power supply resulting in small muzzle energies on the order of 100's of kJ. In an effort to advance the development of EML's, AFATL/SAH has designed and constructed a battery power supply (BPS) capable of providing several mega-Amperes of current for several seconds. This system consists of six modules each containing 2288 automotive batteries which may be connected in two different series - parallel arrangements. In this paper the authors define the electrical characteristics of the AFATL Battery Power supply at the component level.

  17. Review of subsidence prediction research conducted at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Schuler, K.W.

    1982-04-01

    This paper reviews the results of the subsidence research program at Sandia National Laboratories. The manuscript highlights the following: the application of empirical methods (profile functions) to the subsidence above longwall panels in the US; the use of the rubble model to describe the behavior of broken strata as it distends when it falls to the mine floor (or top of the rubble pile) and then is subsequently compacted as it is loaded by overlying elements of strata; and, the application of physical modeling techniques (centrifuge simulations) and numerical techniques to study the failure mechanisms in highly structured stratigraphy. The capabilities of the latter two are illustrated by comparing their predictions to the results of a field case that has complicated stratigraphy.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m/s to 8 km/s. Instrumentation available at the facility includes optical and microwave interferometry, time-resolved holography, fast x-radiography, framing and streak photography, fast multi-wavelength pyrometry, piezoelectric and piezoresistive gauges and computer data reduction. This report discusses the guns and instrumentation available at the facility and selected recent applications.

  19. Cable condition monitoring research activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.; Zigler, G.L.; Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant cables. The objectives of the program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond 40 year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring techniques for predicting remaining cable life. The cables are being aged for long times at relatively mild exposure conditions with various condition monitoring techniques to be employed during the aging process. Following the aging process, the cables will be exposed to a sequential accident profile consisting of high dose rate irradiation followed by a simulated design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) steam exposure. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007...

  1. Associations between Personal Exposures to VOCs and Alterations in Cardiovascular Physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007 (5 seas...

  2. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF MOBILE SOURCE AIR TOXICS IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from the first two years of the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) were evaluated to determine spatial and temporal characteristics in concentrations of mobile source air toxics (MSATs). Outdoor concentrations of MSATs were significantly higher in samples co...

  3. DAILY VARIATION IN ORGANIC COMPOSITION OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic composition of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was investigated as a part of the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS). A high volume (113 liters/minute) sampler was used at the Allen Park community air monitoring station to collect PM2.5 for analysis by ga...

  4. Recruitment and Retention Strategies for Environmental Exposure Studies: Lessons from the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency’s Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) was a complex 3-year personal exposure study. The six geographically defined areas in the Detroit (Wayne County), Michigan, area used as study locations are ethnically diverse; the majority ...

  5. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic aerosols (BA), for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8) that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  6. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic (BA) aerosols, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2), malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols, whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8), which showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids controls their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  7. Forty-eight-inch lidar aerosol measurements taken at the Langley Research Center, May 1974 to December 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, W. H., Jr.; Osborn, M. T.; Hunt, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    A ground based lidar system located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., was used to obtain high resolution vertical profiles of the stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosol since 1974. More than 200 measurements obtained at a wavelength of 0.6943 microns during 1974 to 1987 are summarized. Plots of peak backscatter mixing ratio and integrated backscatter vs time are presented for the entire measurement sequence. The plots highlight the influence of several major volcanic eruptions on the long term stratospheric aerosol layer. In particular, the eruptions of El Chichon in late Mar. to early Apr. 1982, produced a massive aerosol layer. Aerosol enhancement from El Chichon reached Hampton, Va. by May 1982, with a scattering ratio of approx. 50 detected on Jul. 1, 1982. In addition, scattering ratio profiles for June 1982 to December 1987, along with tables containing numerical values of the backscatter ratio and backscattering function versus altitude, are included to further describe the upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosol layer. A 14 year summary is presented, in a ready to use format, of lidar observations at a fixed midlatitude location to be used for further study.

  8. Laboratory studies of interaction between trace gases and sulphuric acid or sulphate aerosols using flow-tube reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    Stratospheric ozone provides a protective shield for humanity and the global biosphere from harmful ultraviolet solar radiation. In past decades, theoretical models for the calculation of ozone balance frequently used gas-phase reactions alone in their studies. Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, however, it has been demonstrated that knowledge of heterogeneous reactions is needed to understand this significant natural event owing to the anthropogenic emission of chlorofluorocarbons. In this review I will briefly discuss the experimental techniques for the research of heterogeneous chemistry carried out in our laboratory. These experimental instruments include flow-tube reactors, an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer, a chemical ionization mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle spectrometer. Numerous measurements of uptake coefficient (or reaction probability) and solubility of trace gases in liquid sulphuric acid have been performed under the ambient conditions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, mainly 190-250 K and 40-80 wt% of H

  9. Laboratory studies of oxidation of primary emissions: Oxidation of organic molecular markers and secondary organic aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Emily A.

    Particulate matter (PM) is solid particles and liquid droplets of complex composition suspended in the atmosphere. In 1997, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for PM was modified to include new standards for fine particulate (particles smaller than 2.5mum, PM2.5) because of their association with adverse health effects, mortality and visibility reduction. Fine PM may also have large impacts on the global climate. Chemically, fine particulate is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic material, from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large fraction of PM2.5 is organic. The first objective was to investigate heterogeneous oxidation of condensed-phase molecular markers for two major organic source categories, meat-cooking emissions and motor vehicle exhaust. Effective reaction rate constants of key molecular markers were measured over a range of atmospherically relevant experimental conditions, including a range of concentrations and relative humidities, and with SOA condensed on the particles. Aerosolized meat grease was reacted with ozone to investigate the oxidation of molecular markers for meat-cooking emissions. Aerosolized motor oil, which is chemically similar to vehicle exhaust aerosol and contains the molecular markers used in source apportionment, was reacted with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to investigate oxidation of motor vehicle molecular markers. All molecular markers of interest - oleic acid, palmitoleic acid, and cholesterol for meat-cooking emissions, and hopanes and steranes for vehicle exhaust - reacted at rates that are significant for time scales on the order of days assuming typical summertime oxidant concentrations. Experimental conditions influenced the reaction rate constants. For both systems, experiments conducted at high relative humidity (RH) had smaller reaction rate constants than those at low RH. SOA coating slowed the reaction rate constants for meat-cooking markers, but had no effect on the oxidation of

  10. The latest progress in sugarcane molecular genetics research at the USDA-ARS, Sugarcane Research Laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, two sugar molecular genetics tools were developed in the USDA-ARS, Southeast Area, Sugarcane Research Laboratory at Houma, LA. One is the high throughput fluorescence- and capillary electrophoregrams (CE)-based SSR genotyping tool and the other is single pollen collection and SSR genotyping...

  11. Brain Cancer in Workers Employed at a Laboratory Research Facility

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Bender, Thomas John; Bonner, Eileen M.; Bodner, Kenneth M.; Kreft, Alisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background An earlier study of research facility workers found more brain cancer deaths than expected, but no workplace exposures were implicated. Methods Adding four additional years of vital-status follow-up, we reassessed the risk of death from brain cancer in the same workforce, including 5,284 workers employed between 1963, when the facility opened, and 2007. We compared the work histories of the brain cancer decedents in relationship to when they died and their ages at death. Results As in most other studies of laboratory and research workers, we found low rates of total mortality, total cancers, accidents, suicides, and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. We found no new brain cancer deaths in the four years of additional follow-up. Our best estimate of the brain cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.32 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.66–2.37), but the SMR might have been as high as 1.69. Deaths from benign brain tumors and other non-malignant diseases of the nervous system were at or below expected levels. Conclusion With the addition of four more years of follow-up and in the absence of any new brain cancers, the updated estimate of the risk of brain cancer death is smaller than in the original study. There was no consistent pattern among the work histories of decedents that indicated a common causative exposure. PMID:25493437

  12. The Mammalian Microbiome and Its Importance in Laboratory Animal Research.

    PubMed

    Bleich, André; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    In this issue are assembled 10 fascinating, well-researched papers that describe the emerging field centered on the microbiome of vertebrate animals and how these complex microbial populations play a fundamental role in shaping homeostasis of the host. The content of the papers will deal with bacteria and, because of relative paucity of information on these organisms, will not include discussions on viruses, fungus, protozoa, and parasites that colonize various animals. Dissecting the number and interactions of the 500-1000 bacterial species that can inhabit the intestines of animals is made possible by advanced DNA sequencing methods, which do not depend on whether the organism can be cultured or not. Laboratory animals, particularly rodents, have proven to be an indispensable component in not only understanding how the microbiome aids in digestion and protects the host against pathogens, but also in understanding the relationship of various species of bacteria to development of the immune system. Importantly, this research elucidates purported mechanisms for how the microbiome can profoundly affect initiation and progression of diseases such as type 1 diabetes, metabolic syndromes, obesity, autoimmune arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The strengths and limitations of the use of germfree mice colonized with single species of bacteria, a restricted flora, or most recently the use of human-derived microbiota are also discussed.

  13. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  14. U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB) is a centralized collection of sensor data of various modalities that are co-located and co-registered. The signatures include ground and air vehicles, personnel, mortar, artillery, small arms gunfire from potential sniper weapons, explosives, and many other high value targets. This data is made available to Department of Defense (DoD) and DoD contractors, Intel agencies, other government agencies (OGA), and academia for use in developing target detection, tracking, and classification algorithms and systems to protect our Soldiers. A platform independent Web interface disseminates the signatures to researchers and engineers within the scientific community. Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) signature models provide an excellent solution for the sharing of complex multimodal signature data for algorithmic development and database requirements. Many open source tools for viewing and plotting HDF5 signatures are available over the Web. Seamless integration of HDF5 signatures is possible in both proprietary computational environments, such as MATLAB, and Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) computational environments, such as Octave and Python, for performing signal processing, analysis, and algorithm development. Future developments include extending the Web interface into a portal system for accessing ARL algorithms and signatures, High Performance Computing (HPC) resources, and integrating existing database and signature architectures into sensor networking environments.

  15. The Laboratory Notebook as a Research and Development Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Martha J.

    1972-01-01

    The literature concerning laboratory notebooks is reviewed. A procedure is described for administering laboratory notebooks. Outlined is an indexing system which provides a method for retrieving information by laboratory notebook number, by name, and by general subjects. The indexing scheme is estimated to be adequate for collections up to 5,000…

  16. Deuterated glycoaldehyde: laboratory measurements, analysis and proposed astrophysical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, A.; Bouchez, A.; Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Guillemin, J. C.; Bottinelli, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.

    2011-05-01

    We have measured in the laboratory the spectra of all the monosubstituted isotopologues of glycoaldehyde (CH_2OD-CHO, CHDOH-CHO, CH_2OH-CDO) and one doubly substituted one (CHDOH-CDO). The spectra were measured, between 150 and 630 GHz, with the new Lille submillimetre-wave spectrometer based on harmonic generation of solid-state sources. The samples were provided by Rennes. Apart from the first listed isotopologue all species were observed simultaneously in the presence of an intense spectral impurity (pyridine), which complicated assignment. This work is part of the FORCOMS project, funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) that concerns the Formation of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in Space. The goal of the project is to better understand the formation of these COMs during the earliest phases of star formation. Glycoaldehyde, a sugar-related interstellar prebiotic molecule has been detected in two star-forming regions, Sgr B2(N) (1,2) and G31.41+0.31(3). A significant overabundance of deuterated species has been observed in protostellar environments. Formation of glycoaldehyde is suspected to involve photodissociation driven ice chemistry. One of the objectives of FORCOMS is to test if a comparison of the abundance of deuterated and non-deuterated COMs can be used to trace complex organic chemistry in interstellar environments. Previous laboratory work on the D-isotopologues was restricted to less than 26 GHz (4). We hence carried out new measurements and analysis to obtain a complete set of predictions for radioastronomy. The previous measurements greatly helped in assigning the spectra. Simulations with CASSIS software have been made to select the best candidates for detection and a telescope proposal is under way.

  17. GPS Monitor Station Upgrade Program at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galysh, Ivan J.; Craig, Dwin M.

    1996-01-01

    One of the measurements made by the Global Positioning System (GPS) monitor stations is to measure the continuous pseudo-range of all the passing GPS satellites. The pseudo-range contains GPS and monitor station clock errors as well as GPS satellite navigation errors. Currently the time at the GPS monitor station is obtained from the GPS constellation and has an inherent inaccuracy as a result. Improved timing accuracy at the GPS monitoring stations will improve GPS performance. The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing hardware and software for the GPS monitor station upgrade program to improve the monitor station clock accuracy. This upgrade will allow a method independent of the GPS satellite constellation of measuring and correcting monitor station time to US Naval Observatory (USNO) time. THe hardware consists of a high performance atomic cesium frequency standard (CFS) and a computer which is used to ensemble the CFS with the two CFS's currently located at the monitor station by use of a dual-mixer system. The dual-mixer system achieves phase measurements between the high-performance CFS and the existing monitor station CFS's to within 400 femtoseconds. Time transfer between USNO and a given monitor station is achieved via a two way satellite time transfer modem. The computer at the monitor station disciplines the CFS based on a comparison of one pulse per second sent from the master site at USNO. The monitor station computer is also used to perform housekeeping functions, as well as recording the health status of all three CFS's. This information is sent to the USNO through the time transfer modem. Laboratory time synchronization results in the sub nanosecond range have been observed and the ability to maintain the monitor station CFS frequency to within 3.0 x 10 (sup minus 14) of the master site at USNO.

  18. Enabling laboratory EUV research with a compact exposure tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brose, Sascha; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Tempeler, Jenny; Kim, Hyun-su; Loosen, Peter; Juschkin, Larissa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the capabilities of the designed and realized extreme ultraviolet laboratory exposure tool (EUVLET) which has been developed at the RWTH-Aachen, Chair for the Technology of Optical Systems (TOS), in cooperation with the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT) and Bruker ASC GmbH. Main purpose of this laboratory setup is the direct application in research facilities and companies with small batch production, where the fabrication of high resolution periodic arrays over large areas is required. The setup can also be utilized for resist characterization and evaluation of its pre- and post-exposure processing. The tool utilizes a partially coherent discharge produced plasma (DPP) source and minimizes the number of other critical components to a transmission grating, the photoresist coated wafer and the positioning system for wafer and grating and utilizes the Talbot lithography approach. To identify the limits of this approach first each component is analyzed and optimized separately and relations between these components are identified. The EUV source has been optimized to achieve the best values for spatial and temporal coherence. Phase-shifting and amplitude transmission gratings have been fabricated and exposed. Several commercially available electron beam resists and one EUV resist have been characterized by open frame exposures to determine their contrast under EUV radiation. Cold development procedure has been performed to further increase the resist contrast. By analyzing the exposure results it can be demonstrated that only a 1:1 copy of the mask structure can be fully resolved by the utilization of amplitude masks. The utilized phase-shift masks offer higher 1st order diffraction efficiency and allow a demagnification of the mask structure in the achromatic Talbot plane.

  19. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2014-07-28

    This project funded the participation of scientists from seven research groups, running more than thirty instruments, in the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London. The primary science questions for the ClearfLo Winter IOP were, 1) what is the urban increment of particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants in the greater London area, and, 2) what is the contribution of solid fuel use for home heating to wintertime PM? An additional motivation for the Detling measurements was the question of whether coatings on black carbon particles enhance absorption. The following four key accomplishments have been identified so far: 1) Chemical, physical and optical characterization of PM from local and regional sources (Figures 2, 4, 5 and 6). 2) Measurement of urban increment in particulate matter and gases in London (Figure 3). 3) Measurement of optical properties and chemical composition of coatings on black carbon containing particles indicates absorption enhancement. 4) First deployment of chemical ionization instrument (MOVI-CI-TOFMS) to measure both particle-phase and gas-phase organic acids. (See final report from Joel Thornton, University of Washington, for details.) Analysis of the large dataset acquired in Detling is ongoing and will yield further key accomplishments. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal. The measurement of absorption enhancement by coatings on black carbon will contribute to improved modeling of the direct radiative properties of PM.

  20. Current and planned cochlear implant research at New York University Laboratory for Translational Auditory Research.

    PubMed

    Svirsky, Mario A; Fitzgerald, Matthew B; Neuman, Arlene; Sagi, Elad; Tan, Chin-Tuan; Ketten, Darlene; Martin, Brett

    2012-06-01

    The Laboratory of Translational Auditory Research (LTAR/NYUSM) is part of the Department of Otolaryngology at the New York University School of Medicine and has close ties to the New York University Cochlear Implant Center. LTAR investigators have expertise in multiple related disciplines including speech and hearing science, audiology, engineering, and physiology. The lines of research in the laboratory deal mostly with speech perception by hearing impaired listeners, and particularly those who use cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). Although the laboratory's research interests are diverse, there are common threads that permeate and tie all of its work. In particular, a strong interest in translational research underlies even the most basic studies carried out in the laboratory. Another important element is the development of engineering and computational tools, which range from mathematical models of speech perception to software and hardware that bypass clinical speech processors and stimulate cochlear implants directly, to novel ways of analyzing clinical outcomes data. If the appropriate tool to conduct an important experiment does not exist, we may work to develop it, either in house or in collaboration with academic or industrial partners. Another notable characteristic of the laboratory is its interdisciplinary nature where, for example, an audiologist and an engineer might work closely to develop an approach that would not have been feasible if each had worked singly on the project. Similarly, investigators with expertise in hearing aids and cochlear implants might join forces to study how human listeners integrate information provided by a CI and a HA. The following pages provide a flavor of the diversity and the commonalities of our research interests.

  1. Progress and Understanding Spatial and Temporal Variability of PM2.5 and its Components in the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) measured personal exposures, ambient, residential indoor and residential outdoor concentrations of select PM2.5 aerosol components (SO4, NO3, Fe, Si, Ca, K, Mn, Pb, Zn, EC and OC) over a thr...

  2. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

  3. Merging of Research and Teaching in Developmental Biology: Adaptation of Current Scientific Research Papers for Use in Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, H. H.; and others

    1970-01-01

    Describes two laboratory exercises adopted from current research papers for use in an undergraduate developmental biology course. Gives methods, summary of student results, and student comments. Lists lecture topics, text and reprint assignments, and laboratory exercises for course. (EB)

  4. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Basques, Eric O.

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  5. Aerosol Interdisciplinary Research Program Workshop October 30 - November 1, 1995 Columbia, MD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. J.; Chou, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    The Aerosol Interdisciplinary Program (AIP) was established by NASA in 1992 to address the suggestion that the direct and indirect radiative effects of sulfate and other aerosols in the troposphere, including those from biomass burning, may be sufficient, on a global basis to offset the radiative effects of increases in greenhouse gases.

  6. Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is executing a program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. This paper summarizes the activities of this ongoing program through October 1980. Characterization of electrically initiated fires revealed a margin of safety in the separation criteria of Regulatory Guide 1.75 for such fires in IEEE-383 qualified cable. However, tests confirmed that these guidelines and standards are not sufficient, in themselves, to protect against exposure fires. This paper describes both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness. It also describes full scale tests to determine the effects of walls and ceilings on fire propagation between cable trays. Some small-scale scoping tests have been conducted to investigate the effects of varying the furnace pressure on cable penetration performance in the ASTM-E-119 Fire Test. The Sandia Fire Research Facility has been completed and a series of tests have been run to assess the effectiveness of Halon-1301 as a suppression system in extinguishing deep-seated cable-tray fires. It was found that given sufficient soak times Halon systems are effective in extinguishing such fires.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.

    2005-09-01

    In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL aggressively supports the vision of a low-noise on-orbit environment, which facilitates mission success as well as crew health, safety, and comfort. In concert with these goals, the ATL also produces and distributes free educational resources and low-noise advocacy tools for hearing conservation education and awareness. Among these are two compact discs of auditory demonstrations (of phenomena in acoustics, hearing conservation, and communication), and presentations, software packages, and other educational materials for use by engineers, audiologists, and other hearing conservation stakeholders. This presentation will highlight ATL's construction, history, technical capabilities, and current projects and will feature demonstrations of some of the unique educational resource materials that are distributed by the ATL.

  8. Audit of management of the laboratory directed research and development program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-14

    The Department`s national laboratories, since their establishment, have been permitted to conduct a limited amount of discretionary research activities. The Department`s Defense Program laboratories, such as the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, generate funding for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) programs by charging their total laboratory operating and capital equipment budgets a flat surcharge of up to 6 percent. The ceiling was mandated by the Congress in authorization legislation. This audit was performed to determine whether the LDRD program at Lawrence Livermore was managed in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. Audit work was conducted at the Department`s Headquarters and at Lawrence Livermore. Discussions were also held with representatives of the Oakland Operations Office. Department and Lawrence Livermore systems to select and manage LDRD projects were in general compliance with requirements specified in Departmental Orders. However, actions taken in Fiscal Years 1996 and 1997 by the Department and the management and operating contractor had the effect of increasing the $50 million annual level of discretionary research work conducted at Lawrence Livermore by an equivalent of $19 million. This increased level of discretionary research was primarily obtained at the expense of Department directed research.

  9. NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY: PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This small, two-fold flyer contains general information introducing EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory and its research program. The key overarching areas of research described are: Protection of drinking water; control of air pollution; pollution prevention and e...

  10. 75 FR 15675 - Professional Research Experience Program in Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Professional Research Experience Program in Chemical Science...) Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (CSTL) announces that the Professional Research Experience... Research and Standards--11.609. Program Description: The National Institute of Standards and...

  11. NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - AN ANNUAL REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Annual Report showcases some of the research activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. The report is an indicator of the examples of progress and accomplishments that ...

  12. NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FY 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Annual Report showcases some of the scientific activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. Where appropriate, the contributions of other collaborating research organizat...

  13. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  14. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  15. Outcomes of a Research-Driven Laboratory and Literature Course Designed to Enhance Undergraduate Contributions to Original Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes outcomes of a research-driven advanced microbiology laboratory and literature research course intended to enhance undergraduate preparation for and contributions to original research. The laboratory section was designed to teach fundamental biochemistry and molecular biology techniques in the context of an original research…

  16. Transitions from functionalization to fragmentation reactions of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Andrew T; Onasch, Timothy B; Croasdale, David R; Wright, Justin P; Martin, Alexander T; Franklin, Jonathan P; Massoli, Paola; Kroll, Jesse H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Brune, William H; Worsnop, Douglas R; Davidovits, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) reactions governing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors were studied in a flow reactor in the absence of NO(x). SOA precursors were n-decane (n-C10), n-pentadecane (n-C15), n-heptadecane (n-C17), tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane (JP-10), and vapors of diesel fuel and Southern Louisiana crude oil. Aerosol mass spectra were measured with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, from which normalized SOA yields, hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios, and C(x)H(y)+, C(x)H(y)O+, and C(x)H(y)O(2)+ ion abundances were extracted as a function of OH exposure. Normalized SOA yield curves exhibited an increase followed by a decrease as a function of OH exposure, with maximum yields at O/C ratios ranging from 0.29 to 0.74. The decrease in SOA yield correlates with an increase in oxygen content and decrease in carbon content, consistent with transitions from functionalization to fragmentation. For a subset of alkane precursors (n-C10, n-C15, and JP-10), maximum SOA yields were estimated to be 0.39, 0.69, and 1.1. In addition, maximum SOA yields correspond with a maximum in the C(x)H(y)O+ relative abundance. Measured correlations between OH exposure, O/C ratio, and H/C ratio may enable identification of alkane precursor contributions to ambient SOA.

  17. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  18. The NOAA climate monitoring and diagnostics laboratory (CMDL) research program

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, E.

    1993-12-31

    The CMDL atmospheric measurement program (knows as GMCC--Global Monitoring for Climate Change, prior to 1990) involves monitoring a variety of environmentally important trace gases at four permanent observations. Mauna Loa, Hawaii, Samoa, South Pole and Barrow, Alaska, as well as numerous other global sites. Shipboard and stratospheric aircraft platforms are also utilized. The greenhouse gases CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO are measured and analyzed in order to better understand the global carbon cycle. CFCs, HCFC`s and N{sub 2}O are measured, both because of their greenhouse roles as well as their role in the control of stratospheric ozone. Regular balloon borne measurements of ozone, water vapor and aerosols in the stratosphere, particularly over the South Pole, are contributing to the understanding of stratospheric ozone loss. Lidar and solar transmission measurements are being used to study volcanic aerosols. Some of the most recent results of this program will be described along with the implications related to future climate change.

  19. Catalyzing Graduate Teaching Assistants' Laboratory Teaching through Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond-Robinson, Janet; Rodriques, Romola A. Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We report on a study of a laboratory teaching apprenticeship program designed to improve graduate teaching assistant (GTA) performance. To catalyze GTAs as laboratory teachers we constructed learning goals, synthesized previous literature into a design model and a developmental path, and built two instruments to measure 12 strategic pedagogical…

  20. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general.

  1. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    classification. The harmonization of the aerosol typing procedures is a fundamental need in aerosol studies for long-term perspectives, satellite validation, and accuracy. However, the possibilities and limits in defining a common set of aerosol types for satellite missions and ground-based measurements depends on different information content among measurement techniques and for different retrieval conditions (e.g. for low aerosol content there is smaller satellite aerosol type retrieval sensitivity), as well as different historical choices. The concept of aReference database for aerosol typing (REDAT) is developed with the specific purpose of providing a dataset suitable for the comparison of typing procedures (from ground-based, and satellite measurements) and to be used as reference dataset for the modelling community. It will also allow the definition of translating rules between the different aerosol typing nomenclature, information strongly needed for the more and more increased audience of scientific data with no scientific background, as well as policy and decision makers. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results is partially funded by ACTRIS2 Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the grant agreement n. 654169.

  2. FY08 In-House Laboratory Independent Research (ILIR) and Independent Applied Research (IAR) Annual Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Navy and industry. In recent research, the principal investigator has developed multiple anti-swing feedback control algorithms for a gantry crane , and...ILIR PROJECT SUMMARIES Ortiz, A. , F Ferrese, Q Dong, S Biswas, Output feedback & trajectory tracking control of a gantry crane : theory...successfully implemented it to a laboratory scale crane . Experimental results confirmed excellent performance of the anti-swing control algorithm

  3. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program, Final Reports, Volume 5A, Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    made out of some Aluminum alloy have a minimum thickness that has to be maintained for fabrication and structural integrity. What other material can...We should then assume a design with a base thickness made of an Aluminum alloy , and compute the cost differential in achieving a different...Properties Research Laboratory, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN. 30-17 10. Aerospace Structural Metals Handbook, Vol. I (Ferrous Alloys ), 1968, AFML-TR-68

  4. The NASA-AMES Research Center Stratospheric Aerosol Model. 1. Physical Processes and Computational Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Kiang, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional model of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is presented. In constructing the model, a wide range of basic physical and chemical processes are incorporated in order to avoid predetermining or biasing the model predictions. The simulation, which extends from the surface to an altitude of 58 km, includes the troposphere as a source of gases and condensation nuclei and as a sink for aerosol droplets. The size distribution of aerosol particles is resolved into 25 categories with particle radii increasing geometrically from 0.01 to 2.56 microns such that particle volume doubles between categories.

  5. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called direct effect , aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called indirect effects, whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will discuss

  6. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  7. NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY - PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) conducts research into ways to prevent and reduce pollution risks that threaten human health and the environment. The laboratory inve...

  8. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  9. Seismic anisotropy in granite at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, G.M.; Crampin, S.; Young, R.P.

    2000-05-01

    The Shear-Wave Experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory was probably the first controlled-source shear-wave survey in a mine environment. Taking place in conjunction with the excavation of the Mine-by test tunnel at 420 m depth, the shear-wave experiment was designed to measure the in situ anisotropy of the rockmass and to use shear waves to observe excavation effects using the greatest variety of raypath directions of any in situ shear-wave survey to date. Inversion of the shear-wave polarizations shows that the anisotropy of the in situ rockmass is consistent with hexagonal symmetry with an approximate fabric orientation of strike 023{degree} and dip 35{degree}. The in situ anisotropy is probably due to microcracks with orientations governed by the in situ stress field and to mineral alignment within the weak gneissic layering. However, there is no unique interpretation as to the cause of the in situ anisotropy as the fabric orientation agrees approximately with both the orientation expected from extensive-dilatancy anisotropy and that of the gneissic layering. Eight raypaths with shear waves propagating wholly or almost wholly through granodiorite, rather than granite, do not show the expected shear-wave splitting and indicate a lower in situ anisotropy, which may be due to the finer grain size and/or the absence of gneissic layering within the granodiorite. These results suggest that shear waves may be used to determine crack and mineral orientations and for remote monitoring of a rockmass. This has potential applications in mining and waste monitoring.

  10. New Atomic Ion SIMS Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, K. S.; Fazel, K. C.; Fahey, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry of particulates and few micrometer regions of samples by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a very useful analytical tool. However, there are limitations caused by interferences from molecular species, such as hydrides, oxides, and carbides. Above mass 90 u, these interferences (> 104 M/ΔM) can exceed the resolving power of SIMS. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is capable of eliminating such molecular ion interferences, but lacks spatial information and generally requires use of negative ions. This requirement limits its sensitivity, since actinide and lanthanide elements preferentially generate positive atomic ions (~104 : 1). The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has installed a hybrid SIMS-AMS system, using a Single Stage AMS as a replacement for the normal Cameca IMS 4f SIMS electron multiplier detector. The NRL design enables analysis of either positive or negative ions. Thus, this system offers the potential to provide SIMS-like particle and micro-scale analysis without a forest of signals from molecular species, and is capable of measuring important positive atomic ions. This should improve measurement sensitivity and precision to determine isotopic distributions of actinides, lanthanides, and transition metals; and elemental abundances of trace species in particles or small features. Initial measurements show that molecule intensities can be reduced by seven orders of magnitude while atomic ion intensities are only diminished ~50%. We have chosen to call this instrument an atomic ion SIMS, or ai-SIMS, for short. The effect of basic operational parameters such as ion energy, charge state, molecule destruction gas and its pressure will be described, and examples of the benefits and capabilities of ai-SIMS will be presented.

  11. Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

  12. Survival of Escherichia coli with and without ColE1::Tn5 after aerosol dispersal in a laboratory and a farm environment.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, B; Flynn, P; Kamely, D; Levy, S B

    1988-01-01

    The survival of a laboratory strain and a naturally occurring fecal strain of Escherichia coli, with and without a Tn5-containing derivative of ColE1, was examined after aerosol dispersal in a laboratory office and a barn under ambient temperature and humidity conditions. Following the release of paired strains, air and diverse types of surfaces were assayed for the test organisms. In both environments, the number of airborne bacteria declined rapidly within the first 2 h. Longer survival was found on surfaces and varied with surface type: recovery was greatest from wood products. Organisms persisted for 1 day in the office and for up to 20 days in the barn. Survival of the fecal strain was better than that of the laboratory strain in both test environments. In general, plasmid-bearing strains fared similarly to their plasmidless parents, but in several comparisons the ColE1::Tn5-containing strain showed enhanced survival. These studies have implications for the present and proposed release of genetically engineered organisms with and without plasmid vectors. PMID:2843099

  13. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    SciTech Connect

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

    2003-02-27

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

  14. Low-gravity Orbiting Research Laboratory Environment Potential Impact on Space Biology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of any orbital space research platform is to provide a quiescent low gravity, preferably a zero gravity environment, to perform fundamental as well as applied research. However, small disturbances exist onboard any low earth orbital research platform. The impact of these disturbances must be taken into account by space research scientists during their research planning, design and data analysis in order to avoid confounding factors in their science results. The reduced gravity environment of an orbiting research platform in low earth orbit is a complex phenomenon. Many factors, among others, such as experiment operations, equipment operation, life support systems and crew activity (if it is a crewed platform), aerodynamic drag, gravity gradient, rotational effects as well as the vehicle structural resonance frequencies (structural modes) contribute to form the overall reduced gravity environment in which space research is performed. The contribution of these small disturbances or accelerations is precisely why the environment is NOT a zero gravity environment, but a reduced acceleration environment. This paper does not discuss other factors such as radiation, electromagnetic interference, thermal and pressure gradient changes, acoustic and CO2 build-up to name a few that affect the space research environment as well, but it focuses solely on the magnitude of the acceleration level found on orbiting research laboratory used by research scientists to conduct space research. For ease of analysis this paper divides the frequency spectrum relevant to most of the space research disciplines into three regimes: a) quasi-steady, b) vibratory and c) transient. The International Space Station is used as an example to illustrate the point. The paper discusses the impact of these three regimes on space biology research and results from space flown experiments are used to illustrate the potential negative impact of these disturbances (accelerations

  15. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  16. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  17. The Unstructured Student-Designed Research Type of Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macias-Machin, Agustin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of an individually designed experiment for a chemical engineering laboratory course. Lists main ideas of the method. Provides an example of the experiment including ways to answer the questions and extensions. (YP)

  18. Leading Antibacterial Laboratory Research by Integrating Conventional and Innovative Approaches: The Laboratory Center of the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Hill, Carol; Hujer, Andrea M; Patel, Robin; Evans, Scott R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2017-03-15

    The Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Laboratory Center (LC) leads the evaluation, development, and implementation of laboratory-based research by providing scientific leadership and supporting standard/specialized laboratory services. The LC has developed a physical biorepository and a virtual biorepository. The physical biorepository contains bacterial isolates from ARLG-funded studies located in a centralized laboratory and they are available to ARLG investigators. The Web-based virtual biorepository strain catalogue includes well-characterized gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains published by ARLG investigators. The LC, in collaboration with the ARLG Leadership and Operations Center, developed procedures for review and approval of strain requests, guidance during the selection process, and for shipping strains from the distributing laboratories to the requesting investigators. ARLG strains and scientific and/or technical guidance have been provided to basic research laboratories and diagnostic companies for research and development, facilitating collaboration between diagnostic companies and the ARLG Master Protocol for Evaluating Multiple Infection Diagnostics (MASTERMIND) initiative for evaluation of multiple diagnostic devices from a single patient sampling event. In addition, the LC has completed several laboratory-based studies designed to help evaluate new rapid molecular diagnostics by developing, testing, and applying a MASTERMIND approach using purified bacterial strains. In collaboration with the ARLG's Statistical and Data Management Center (SDMC), the LC has developed novel analytical strategies that integrate microbiologic and genetic data for improved and accurate identification of antimicrobial resistance. These novel approaches will aid in the design of future ARLG studies and help correlate pathogenic markers with clinical outcomes. The LC's accomplishments are the result of a successful collaboration with the ARLG

  19. Open- and closed-formula laboratory animal diets and their importance to research.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Dennis E; Lewis, Sherry M; Teter, Beverly B; Thigpen, Julius E

    2009-11-01

    Almost 40 y ago the scientific community was taking actions to control environmental factors that contribute to variation in the responses of laboratory animals to scientific manipulation. Laboratory animal diet was recognized as an important variable. During the 1970s, the American Institute of Nutrition, National Academy of Science, Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, and Laboratory Animals Centre Diets Advisory Committee supported the use of 'standard reference diets' in biomedical research as a means to improve the ability to replicate research. As a result the AIN76 purified diet was formulated. During this same time, the laboratory animal nutritionist at the NIH was formulating open-formula, natural-ingredient diets to meet the need for standardized laboratory animal diets. Since the development of open-formula diets, fixed-formula and constant-nutrient-concentration closed-formula laboratory animal natural ingredient diets have been introduced to help reduce the potential variation diet can cause in research.

  20. Guidelines for Biosafety Training Programs for Workers Assigned to BSL-3 Research Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Homer, Lesley C; Alderman, T Scott; Blair, Heather Ann; Brocard, Anne-Sophie; Broussard, Elaine E; Ellis, Robert P; Frerotte, Jay; Low, Eleanor W; McCarthy, Travis R; McCormick, Jessica M; Newton, JeT'Aime M; Rogers, Francine C; Schlimgen, Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer M; Stedman, Diann; Warfield, Cheryl; Ntiforo, Corrie A; Whetstone, Carol T; Zimmerman, Domenica; Barkley, Emmett

    2013-03-01

    The Guidelines for Biosafety Training Programs for Workers Assigned to BSL-3 Research Laboratories were developed by biosafety professionals who oversee training programs for the 2 national biocontainment laboratories (NBLs) and the 13 regional biocontainment laboratories (RBLs) that participate in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) NBL/RBL Network. These guidelines provide a general training framework for biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) high-containment laboratories, identify key training concepts, and outline training methodologies designed to standardize base knowledge, understanding, and technical competence of laboratory personnel working in high-containment laboratories. Emphasis is placed on building a culture of risk assessment-based safety through competency training designed to enhance understanding and recognition of potential biological hazards as well as methods for controlling these hazards. These guidelines may be of value to other institutions and academic research laboratories that are developing biosafety training programs for BSL-3 research.