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Sample records for aerosol scattering coefficients

  1. An analysis of the characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficients at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Eun, S.; Seo, W.; Park, J.; Ahn, J.; Moon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can scatter and absorb solar radiation and their spatial/temporal distributions are highly inhomogeneous due to short lifetimes (about a few weeks or less). Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, aerosols directly affect visibility and climate through the modification of the Earth's energy budget (Charlson et al., 1992; Yan, 2007; Wang, 2012). This study investigates long-term trends and characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficient at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo, 100 km upstream of Seoul, in Korea. Aerosol scattering coefficients were measured continuously with nephelometers. The analysis period is limited to one year of 2011. For the relationship analysis of extinction coefficients (σext) to visibility and aerosol optical depth, σsp observed at 3 p.m. have been used with help of aerosol absorption coefficients (σap) in order to remove its dependence upon relative humidity (RH), and also those of rainy period have been excluded. As expected, σext estimated are inversely proportional to visibility observation by eye. Aerosol extinction coefficients have been vertically integrated with an assumption of nearly well-mixed within an e-folding height to determine aerosol optical depth (τa), and compared with those retrieved from sunphotometer. The results show a reasonable agreement in spite of an inherent difference of each definition. We expect these findings would help to eventually understand aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on the regional climate change around Korea.

  2. Measurements of the absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosol particles in suburb of Nanjing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Weiwei; Yan, Jiade; Qian, Ling; Tong, Yaoqing; Lin, Zhenyi

    2008-08-01

    The absorption and scattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosols were continuously measured with a Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS, DMT Inc. USA) at a suburb site of Nanjing, one of the regions experiencing rapid industrialization in China. The measurements were carried out during autumn and winter 2007. A preliminary analysis of the data shows that, the scattering coefficient, Bscat, is two to ten times larger than the absorption coefficient, Babs, implying that the aerosols formed/emitted in this area are more scattering than previous assumed, and can be more important in cooling the Earth-atmosphere system. The results also indicate that the absolute values of both parameters are very much dependent on the meteorological conditions, such as wind speed and direction, fog, rain, etc. as well as the time of the day. Higher values often appear at nighttimes when wind is weak, especially when a temperature inverse layer is present near the surface. Higher values of Bscat and Babs were also observed under hazy and foggy weather conditions or when wind is blown from east, where a large industrial zone is located. Simultaneous measurements of the number concentrations, chemical compositions, and size distributions of aerosol particles are used to explain the characteristics of the changes in Bscat and Babs.

  3. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  4. Effect of hygroscopic growth on the aerosol light-scattering coefficient: A review of measurements, techniques and error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Zieger, P.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is important for an accurate description of direct aerosol radiative forcing. This factor is defined as the ratio between the scattering coefficient at enhanced relative humidity, RH, to a reference (dry) scattering coefficient. Here, we review the different experimental designs used to measure the scattering coefficient at dry and humidified conditions as well as the procedures followed to analyze the measurements. Several empirical parameterizations for the relationship between f(RH) and RH have been proposed in the literature. These parameterizations have been reviewed and tested using experimental data representative of different hygroscopic growth behavior and a new parameterization is presented. The potential sources of error in f(RH) are discussed. A Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the overall measurement uncertainty, which is found to be around 20-40% for moderately hygroscopic aerosols. The main factors contributing to this uncertainty are the uncertainty in RH measurement, the dry reference state and the nephelometer uncertainty. A literature survey of nephelometry-based f(RH) measurements is presented as a function of aerosol type. In general, the highest f(RH) values were measured in clean marine environments, with pollution having a major influence on f(RH). Dust aerosol tended to have the lowest reported hygroscopicity of any of the aerosol types studied. Major open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are outlined.

  5. Measurements of aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient using a charge-coupled device side-scatter lidar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qingze; Xie, Chenbo; Bo, Guangyu; Hu, Shunxing; Wang, Yingjian

    2014-01-13

    By using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as the detector, side-scatter lidar has great potential applications in the near range atmospheric detection. A new inversion method is proposed for CCD side-scatter lidar (Clidar) to retrieve aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient. Case studies show the retrieved results from Clidar are in good agreements with those obtained from other instruments. It indicates that the new proposed inversion method is reliable and feasible and that the Clidar is practicable.

  6. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  7. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each

  8. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  9. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  10. An alternative method estimating hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol light scattering coefficient: a case study in an urban area of Guangzhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. S.; Zhang, L.; Tao, J.; Zhang, R. J.; Cao, J. J.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed to estimate hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) of aerosol light scattering coefficient (bsp), making use of the measured size- and chemically-resolved aerosol samples. Regarding this method, chemical composition of the measured aerosol samples were first reconstructed using the equilibrium model ISOPPORIA II. The model reconstructed chemical composition varies with a varying relative humidity (RH) input, which was then employed to calculate bsp and f(RH) of bsp using Mie Model. Further, the RH dependence of f(RH) of bsp (denoted as f(RH) derived from model calculation was empirically fitted with a two-parameter formula. One of the two parameters was set to be a constant for practical applications. For validation, the developed formula of fsp(RH) was applied to correct the long-term records of measured bsp from the values under comparative dry conditions to the ones under ambient RH conditions. Compared with the original bsp data, the f(RH)-corrected bsp had a higher linear correlation with and a smaller discrepancy from the bsp data derived directly from visibility and absorption measurements. The method described in this paper provides an alternative approach to estimate fsp(RH) and has many potential applications.

  11. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to

  12. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  13. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  14. Estimating aerosol light-scattering enhancement from dry aerosol optical properties at different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, Gloria; Jefferson, Anne; Sheridan, Patrick; Andrews, Elisabeth; Lyamani, Hassan; Ogren, John; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-05-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on the relative humidity (RH). Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. The scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is defined as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at a high and reference RH. Predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we explore the relationship between aerosol light-scattering enhancement and dry aerosol optical properties such as the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) at multiple sites around the world. The measurements used in this study were conducted by the US Department of Energy at sites where different aerosol types predominate (pristine marine, polluted marine, dust dominated, agricultural and forest environments, among others). In all cases, the scattering enhancement decreases as the SSA decreases, that is, as the contribution of absorbing particles increases. On the other hand, for marine influenced environments the scattering enhancement clearly increases as the contribution of coarse particles increases (SAE decreases), evidence of the influence of hygroscopic coarse sea salt particles. For other aerosol types the relationship between f(RH) and SAE is not so straightforward. Combining all datasets, f(RH) was found to exponentially increase with SSA with a high correlation coefficient.

  15. Airborne Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Extinction and Scattering During the Aerosol IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Ricci, K.; Provencal, R.; Schmid, B.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Arnott, P.

    2003-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Min-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects.= We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those friom a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  16. Measurement of relative humidity dependent light scattering of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Zieger, P.; Wehrle, G.; Jefferson, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2009-09-01

    Relative humidity (RH) influences the water content of aerosol particles and therefore has an important impact on the particles' ability to scatter visible light. The RH dependence of the particle light scattering coefficient (σsp) is therefore an important measure for climate forcing calculations. We built a humidification system for a nephelometer which allows the measurement of σsp at a defined RH in the range of 40-90%. This RH conditioner consists of a humidifier followed by a dryer, which enables us to measure the hysteresis behavior of deliquescent aerosol particles. In this paper we present the set-up of a new humidified nephelometer, a detailed characterization with well defined laboratory generated aerosols, and a first application in the field by comparing our instrument to another humidified nephelometer. Monodisperse ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride particles were measured at four different dry particle sizes. Agreement between measurement and prediction based on Mie theory was found for both σsp and f(RH)=σsp(RH)/σsp(dry) within the range of uncertainty. The two humidified nephelometers measuring at a rural site in the Black Forest (Germany) often detected different f(RH), probably caused by the aerosol hysteresis behavior: when the aerosol was metastable, therefore was scattering more light, only one instrument detected the higher f(RH).

  17. Measurement of relative humidity dependent light scattering of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Zieger, P.; Wehrle, G.; Jefferson, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2010-01-01

    Relative humidity (RH) influences the water content of aerosol particles and therefore has an important impact on the particles' ability to scatter visible light. The RH dependence of the particle light scattering coefficient (σsp is therefore an important measure for climate forcing calculations. We built a humidification system for a nephelometer which allows the measurement of σsp at a defined RH in the range of 40-90%. This RH conditioner consists of a humidifier followed by a dryer, which enables us to measure the hysteresis behavior of deliquescent aerosol particles. In this paper we present the set-up of a new humidified nephelometer, a detailed characterization with well defined laboratory generated aerosols, and a first application in the field by comparing our instrument to another humidified nephelometer. Monodisperse ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride particles were measured at four different dry particle sizes. Agreement between measurement and prediction based on Mie theory was found for both σsp and f(RH)=σsp(RH)/σsp(dry) within the range of uncertainty. The two humidified nephelometers measuring at a rural site in the Black Forest (Germany) often detected different f(RH), probably caused by the aerosol hysteresis behavior: when the aerosol was metastable, therefore was scattering more light, only one instrument detected the higher f(RH).

  18. Atmospheric Aerosol Scattering Background Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-14

    condensation nuclei in the atmosphere, Nature 51:1259- 1267. 16. Whitby , K.T. (1975) Modeling of Atmospheric Aerosol Particle Size Distribution, Prog. Rep...Meteorol. 18:501-509. 33 15. Went, F.W. (1964) The nature of Aitkin condensation nuclei In the atmosphere, Nature 51:1259- 1267. 16. Whitby . K.T. (1975

  19. Investigation of multiple scattering effects in aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of investigations on the various aspects of multiple scattering effects on visible and infrared laser beams transversing dense fog oil aerosols contained in a chamber (4' x 4' x 9'). The report briefly describes: (1) the experimental details and measurements; (2) analytical representation of the aerosol size distribution data by two analytical models (the regularized power law distribution and the inverse modified gamma distribution); (3) retrieval of aerosol size distributions from multispectral optical depth measurements by two methods (the two and three parameter fast table search methods and the nonlinear least squares method); (4) modeling of the effects of aerosol microphysical (coagulation and evaporation) and dynamical processes (gravitational settling) on the temporal behavior of aerosol size distribution, and hence on the extinction of four laser beams with wavelengths 0.44, 0.6328, 1.15, and 3.39 micrometers; and (5) the exact and approximate formulations for four methods for computing the effects of multiple scattering on the transmittance of laser beams in dense aerosols, all of which are based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation under the small angle approximation.

  20. Scattering and absorption by thin flat aerosols.

    PubMed

    Weil, H; Chu, C M

    1980-06-15

    An integral equation method is used to study spectral and polarization effects for the scattering and absorption of electromagnetic radiation incident on arbitrarily oriented flat disk aerosols of major dimension comparable to the wavelength of the radiation. Numerical results for flat plate ice crystals are presented.

  1. Scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols over Lanzhou City and applications using an integrating nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhang; Bo, Hu; Changhe, Chen; Ping, Du; Lei, Zhang; Guanghong, Feng

    2004-12-01

    The data, measured by a three-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer over Lanzhou City during the winters of 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 respectively, have been analyzed for investigating the scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols and exploring their relationship and the status of air pollution. The aerosol particle volume distribution is inverted with the measured spectral scattering coefficients. The results show that the daily variation of the aerosol scattering coefficients is in a tri-peak shape. The average ratio of backscattering coefficient to total scattering coefficient at 550 nm is 0.158; there exists an excellent correlation between the scattering coefficients and the concentration of PM10. The average ratio of the concentration of PM10 to the scattering coefficients is 0.37 g m-2, which is contingent on the optical parameters of aerosol particles such as the size distribution, etc.; an algorithm is developed for inverting the volume distribution of aerosol particles by using the histogram and Monte-Carlo techniques, and the test results show that the inversion is reasonable.

  2. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  3. Multiwavelength multistatic optical scattering for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.

    The main focus of this research is the development of a technique to remotely characterize aerosol properties, such as particle size distribution, concentration, and refractive index as a function of wavelength, through the analysis of optical scattering measurements. The proposed technique is an extension of the multistatic polarization ratio technique that has been developed by prior students at the Penn State Lidar Lab to include multiple wavelengths. This approach uses the ratio of polarized components of the scattering phase functions at multiple wavelengths across the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum to extract the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols. The scattering intensities at each wavelength are vertically separated across the face of the imager using a transmission diffraction grating, so that scattering intensities for multiple wavelengths at many angles are available for analysis in a single image. The ratio of the scattering phase function intensities collected using parallel and perpendicular polarized light are formed for each wavelength and analysis of the ratio is used to determine the microphysical properties of the aerosols. One contribution of the present work is the development of an inversion technique based on a genetic algorithm that retrieves lognormal size distributions from scattering measurements by minimizing the squared error between measured polarization ratios and polarization ratios calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. The opportunities and limitations of using the polarization ratio are explored, and a genetic algorithm is developed to retrieve single mode and trimodal lognormal size distributions from multiwavelength, angular scattering data. The algorithm is designed to evaluate particles in the diameter size range of 2 nm to 60 im, and uses 1,000 linear spaced diameters within this range to compute the modeled polarization ratio. The algorithm returns geometric mean radii and

  4. Lidar measurements of cloud extinction coefficient distribution and its forward scattering phase function according to multiply scattered lidar returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Jinhuan; Huang, Qirong

    1992-01-01

    The study of the inversion algorithm for the single scatter lidar equation, for quantitative determination of cloud (or aerosol) optical properties, has received much attention over the last thirty years. Some of the difficulties associated with the solution of this equation are not yet solved. One problem is that a single scatter lidar equation has two unknowns. Because of this, the determination of the far-end boundary value, in the case of Klett's algorithm, is a problem if the atmosphere is optically inhomogeneous. Another difficulty concerns multiple scattering. There is a large error in the extinction distribution solution, in many cases, if only the single scattering component is considered, while neglecting the multiple scattering component. However, the use of multiple scattering in the remote sensing of aerosol or cloud optical properties is promising. In our early study, an inversion method for simultaneous determination of the cloud (or aerosol) Extinction Coefficient Distribution (ECD) and its Forward Scattering Phase Function (FSPF) was proposed according to multiply scattered lidar returns with two fields of view for the receiver. The method is based on a parameterized multiple scatter lidar equation. This paper is devoted to further numerical tests and an experimental study of lidar measurements of cloud ECD and FSPF using this method.

  5. Aerosol Scattering and Absorption Properties Over the Central Himalayan Location Nainital: Results from Gvax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M. M.; Babu, S.; Nair, V. S.; Satheesh, S.; Naja, M.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive characterization of aerosols over a central Himalayan location, Nainital (29.4° N, 79.5° E, 1958 m amsl) were carried out during June 2011 to March 2012 under the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). Owing to the highly turbid, persistent and increasing aerosol concentration over the Ganges Valley in northern India, their influence on surface dimming, mid-tropospheric warming and monsoon circulations, the experimental site Nainital is best suited for studying the regional distribution of complex aerosol sources, their transport and direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms. During the study period, aerosol scattering (absorption) coefficients showed values as high as > 500 Mm-1 (> 50 Mm-1) in local noon time during the onset of winter and early spring and as low as < 300 Mm-1 (< 40 Mm-1) during the summer months. Consequently, aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased in winter (< 0.9, for 45% of occurrences) with large day-to-day modulations and higher values (> 0.9, for 81% of occurrences) during summer. Based on the spectral distribution of scattering coefficients, fine mode aerosols dominate the summer compared to winter season. The strong absorption during the winter and early spring is associated with the prevalence of biomass burning aerosols and/or dust as reveal by the steep spectral dependence of absorption coefficients (αabs >2.0). These observed seasonal variations are attributed to the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer as well as the influence of long range transport over the Himalayan location.

  6. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  7. Applications of UV Scattering and Absorbing Aerosol Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols cause a substantial amount of radiative forcing, but quantifying this amount is difficult: determining aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere and, especially, characterizing their (optical) properties, has proved to be quite a challenge. A good way to monitor aerosol characteristics on a global scale is to perform satellite remote sensing. Most satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on fitting of aerosol-induced changes in earth reflectance, which are usually subtle and have a smooth wavelength dependence. In such algorithms certain aerosol models are assumed, where optical parameters such as single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and size parameter (or Angstrom exponent) are defined. Another, semi-quantitative technique for detecting aerosols is the calculation of UV Aerosol Indices (UVAI). The Absorbing and Scattering Aerosol Indices detect "UV-absorbing" aerosols (most notably mineral dust, black and brown carbon particles) and "scattering" aerosols (sulfate and secondary organic aerosol particles), respectively. UVAI are essentially a measure of the contrast between two wavelengths in the UV range. The advantages of UVAI are: they can be determined in the presence of clouds, they are rather insensitive to surface type, and they are very sensitive to aerosols. The Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) has been in use for over a decade, and the Scattering Aerosol Index (SAI) was recently introduced by our group. Whereas the AAI is mainly used to detect desert dust and biomass burning plumes, the SAI can be used to study regions with high concentrations of non-absorbing aerosols, either anthropogenic (e.g. sulfate aerosols in eastern China) or biogenic (e.g. secondary organic aerosols formed from VOCs emitted by plants). Here we will present our recent UVAI results from SCIAMACHY: we will discuss the seasonal trend of SAI, and correlate our UVAI data with other datasets such as trace gases (HCHO, NO2, CO) and fire counts from the (A

  8. Multi-Parameter Aerosol Scattering Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Fischer, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This work relates to the development of sensors that measure specific aerosol properties. These properties are in the form of integrated moment distributions, i.e., total surface area, total mass, etc., or mathematical combinations of these moment distributions. Specifically, the innovation involves two fundamental features: a computational tool to design and optimize such sensors and the embodiment of these sensors in actual practice. The measurement of aerosol properties is a problem of general interest. Applications include, but are not limited to, environmental monitoring, assessment of human respiratory health, fire detection, emission characterization and control, and pollutant monitoring. The objectives for sensor development include increased accuracy and/or dynamic range, the inclusion in a single sensor of the ability to measure multiple aerosol properties, and developing an overall physical package that is rugged, compact, and low in power consumption, so as to enable deployment in harsh or confined field applications, and as distributed sensor networks. Existing instruments for this purpose include scattering photometers, direct-reading mass instruments, Beta absorption devices, differential mobility analyzers, and gravitational samplers. The family of sensors reported here is predicated on the interaction of light and matter; specifically, the scattering of light from distributions of aerosol particles. The particular arrangement of the sensor, e.g. the wavelength(s) of incident radiation, the number and location of optical detectors, etc., can be derived so as to optimize the sensor response to aerosol properties of practical interest. A key feature of the design is the potential embodiment as an extremely compact, integrated microsensor package. This is of fundamental importance, as it enables numerous previously inaccessible applications. The embodiment of these sensors is inherently low maintenance and high reliability by design. The novel and

  9. Light Scattering Study of Titania Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Choonghoon; Sorensen, Chris

    1997-03-01

    We studied the fractal morphology of titania aerosols by light scattering. Titania aerosols were generated by the thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a silica tube furnace. TTIP was evaporated at temperatures up to 80^circC and its vapor was carried by dry nitrogen to a furnace with temperature in the range of 400 - 600^circC. A TEM analysis of the generated particles showed a typical DLCA structure with a monomer diameter about 50 nm. The particles were then made to flow through a narrow outlet as a laminar stream. The light scattering from these particles was measured using a He-Ne laser as a light source. The measured structure factor clearly showed the Rayleigh, Guinier, and fractal regimes. The fractal morphological parameters, such as the cluster radius of gyration, the fractal dimension, and the fractal prefactor were studied from the structure factor as a function of particle generation conditions. The cluster radius of gyration was about 1 μm and showed a modest dependency on the generation conditions. The fractal dimension was about 1.7 in all cases. These results are in good agreement with the TEM analysis.

  10. Lidar effective multiple-scattering coefficients in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, F O; Bissonnette, L R; Flamant, P H

    1997-05-20

    We delimit a regime, valid for most ground-based lidar probings of cirrus clouds, in which the field-of-view dependence of multiple scattering reaches a plateau. In this regime and assuming the phase function to be constant around pi, we formally demonstrate Platt's modification of the single-scattering lidar equation, with a parameter eta(P) accounting for the reduction of the effective scattering coefficient defined so that (1 - eta(P)) is the amount of energy scattered in the forward peak. Then, to cope with nonconstant backscattering functions, we discuss the introduction of an effective backscattering coefficient that is an average of the scattering probabilities around pi.

  11. Assessing the measurement of aerosol single scattering albedo by Cavity Attenuated Phase-Shift Single Scattering Monitor (CAPS PMssa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim de Faria, Julia; Bundke, Ulrich; Onasch, Timothy B.; Freedman, Andrew; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The necessity to quantify the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate forcing is already well known; assessing this impact requires continuous and systematic measurements of the aerosol optical properties. Two of the main parameters that need to be accurately measured are the aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo (SSA, defined as the ratio of particulate scattering to extinction). The measurement of single scattering albedo commonly involves the measurement of two optical parameters, the scattering and the absorption coefficients. Although there are well established technologies to measure both of these parameters, the use of two separate instruments with different principles and uncertainties represents potential sources of significant errors and biases. Based on the recently developed cavity attenuated phase shift particle extinction monitor (CAPS PM_{ex) instrument, the CAPS PM_{ssa instrument combines the CAPS technology to measure particle extinction with an integrating sphere capable of simultaneously measuring the scattering coefficient of the same sample. The scattering channel is calibrated to the extinction channel, such that the accuracy of the single scattering albedo measurement is only a function of the accuracy of the extinction measurement and the nephelometer truncation losses. This gives the instrument an accurate and direct measurement of the single scattering albedo. In this study, we assess the measurements of both the extinction and scattering channels of the CAPS PM_{ssa through intercomparisons with Mie theory, as a fundamental comparison, and with proven technologies, such as integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption monitors. For comparison, we use two nephelometers, a TSI 3563 and an Aurora 4000, and two measurements of the absorption coefficient, using a Particulate Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). We also assess the indirect absorption coefficient

  12. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  13. Scattering matrices and expansion coefficients of martian analogue palagonite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, E. C.; Volten, H.; Stam, D. M.; Muñoz, O.; Hovenier, J. W.; Roush, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of ratios of elements of the scattering matrix of martian analogue palagonite particles for scattering angles ranging from 3° to 174° and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. To facilitate the use of these measurements in radiative transfer calculations we have devised a method that enables us to obtain, from these measurements, a normalized synthetic scattering matrix covering the complete scattering angle range from 0° to 180°. Our method is based on employing the coefficients of the expansions of scattering matrix elements into generalized spherical functions. The synthetic scattering matrix elements and/or the expansion coefficients obtained in this way, can be used to include multiple scattering by these irregularly shaped particles in (polarized) radiative transfer calculations, such as calculations of sunlight that is scattered in the dusty martian atmosphere.

  14. Accommodation coefficient of HOBr on deliquescent sodium bromide aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmuth, M.; Gäggeler, H. W.; von Glasow, R.; Ammann, M.

    2002-06-01

    Uptake of HOBr on sea salt aerosol, sea salt brine or ice is believed to be a key process providing a source of photolabile bromine (Br2) and sustaining ozone depletion cycles in the Arctic troposphere. In the present study, uptake of HOBr on sodium bromide (NaBr) aerosol particles was investigated at an extremely low HOBr concentration of 300 cm-3 using the short-lived radioactive isotopes 83-86Br. Under these conditions, at maximum one HOBr molecule was taken up per particle. The rate of uptake was clearly limited by the mass accommodation coefficient, which was calculated to be 0.6 ± 0.2. This value is a factor of 10 larger than estimates used in earlier models. The atmospheric implications are discussed using the box model "MOCCA'', showing that the increase of the accommodation coefficient of HOBr by a factor of 10 only slightly affects net ozone loss, but significantly increases chlorine release.

  15. Estimates of aerosol species scattering characteristics as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.

    The absorption of water by ambient aerosols can significantly increase the light scattering coefficient and thereby affect issues such as visibility and climate forcing. Although water absorption by inorganic compounds and mixtures of inorganic compounds can often be modeled with adequate certainty for most applications, modeling water uptake by organic aerosols at present is speculative. In this paper, we present data in the form of f (RH)=b scat(RH)/b scat,dry , where bscat(RH) is the scattering coefficient measured at some relative humidity (RH)>20% and bscat,dry is the scattering coefficient measured at RH <20%. The f(RH) has been measured at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The f(RH) curves obtained from these two sites, which show distinctly different aerosol composition and average RH values, are compared. We also present comparisons between the measured water uptake by ambient aerosol with modeled water uptake by inorganic compounds to estimate the water uptake by organic aerosol.

  16. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  17. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  18. Aerosol hygroscopic growth parameterization based on a solute specific coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-09-01

    Water is a main component of atmospheric aerosols and its amount depends on the particle chemical composition. We introduce a new parameterization for the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), based on an empirical relation between water activity (aw) and solute molality (μs) through a single solute specific coefficient νi. Three main advantages are: (1) wide applicability, (2) simplicity and (3) analytical nature. (1) Our approach considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at large relative humidity (RH), including CCN activation, as well as concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD). (2) A single νi coefficient suffices to parameterize the HGF for a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. (3) In contrast to previous methods, our analytical aw parameterization depends not only on a linear correction factor for the solute molality, instead νi also appears in the exponent in form x · ax. According to our findings, νi can be assumed constant for the entire aw range (0-1). Thus, the νi based method is computationally efficient. In this work we focus on single solute solutions, where νi is pre-determined with the bisection method from our analytical equations using RHD measurements and the saturation molality μssat. The computed aerosol HGF and supersaturation (Köhler-theory) compare well with the results of the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. The equations introduced here provide the basis of our revised gas-liquid-solid partitioning model, i.e. version 4 of the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM4), described in a companion paper.

  19. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  20. Aerosol single scattering albedo affected by chemical composition: An investigation using CRDS combined with MARGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Lin; Melluki, Wahid; Zhou, Hourong

    2013-04-01

    This work describes a field measurement of the aerosol optical properties and water-soluble inorganic (WSI) ion concentrations in aerosols at 1 h resolution from 2 April to 5 May 2010 in urban Shanghai. The average scattering coefficient at 532 nm (αs,532) is 102 ± 75 Mm- 1, much lower than values of Beijng and Guangzhou although four pollution events occurred during this field campaign. The single scattering albedo (ω) is 0.70 at 532 nm, which is considerably low, indicating higher relative abundance of light absorbing soot in Shanghai. The similar patterns of diurnal cycles of αs,532 and NH4+ concentration suggested that formation of secondary inorganic aerosol is one of dominant elements to decide diurnal cycles of optical properties of aerosol in Shanghai. Both αs,532 and absorption coefficient at 532 nm (αa,532) have linear relationship with mass concentration of SO42 -, NO3-, Cl- and NH4+. The concentration of NH4+ presents best linear relationship with αs,532. The mass scattering cross section is 15.7 m2 g- 1 for SO42 -. There is obvious dependence between the aerosol optical properties and the wind directions. The aerosol loading from west is much higher than those from Northeast (NE) and Southeast (SE) due to pollution parcels from Zhejiang and Jiangsu province. The decreasing rate of ω following the increase of αa,532 is highest during NE wind period, followed by that during SE and then West, suggesting a higher mass fraction of soot in aerosol during NE wind.

  1. Reconstruction of Aerosol Properties from Forward-scattering Intensities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    image aerosol particles using digital holography in a flow- through, contact-free manner. Particles in an aerosol stream are illuminated by a...triggered, pulsed laser and the pattern produced by the interference of this light with that scattered by the particles is recorded by a digital camera...The recorded pattern constitutes a digital hologram from which an image of the particles is computationally reconstructed using a fast Fourier

  2. Source Strength and Scattering Properties of Organic Marine Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-20

    aerosol LONG-TERM GOAL My long term goal is to quantify the role played by sea salt in radiative scattering in the marine environment. This project studies...the number of aerosol particles produced from sea salt under different marine conditions. Studying the chemical composition of those particles...provides important information about their behavior in the atmosphere. OBJECTIVES I would like to see whether the number of sea salt particles observed in

  3. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; Tomlinson, Jason; Fast, Jerome

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by a suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.

  4. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; ...

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by amore » suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.« less

  5. Scattering Functions Near the Sun by Large Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-20

    Reprint S FLN ;NG N U M 1E q5 I Scattering Functions Near the Sun by Large Aerosols !E 61102F !PR 2310 TA G1 j6. AUTHCR(S) WU 18 iFrederic E. Volz 7...98 ’~ PL-TR-93-2129 a reprint from Applied Optics Scattering functions near the Sun by large aerosols 93-13947 Frederic E. Volz Ill 11111 hil; liill...Introduction no glare (ND = 0) 2°-4’ from the Sun , persistent Over most of the globe, the sky brightness close to the values of ND of - 2.0 (and

  6. Measurements of scattering and absorption properties of surface aerosols at a semi-arid site, Anantapur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Gopal, K.; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Arafath, S. Md.; Raja Obul Reddy, K.; Siva Kumar Reddy, N.; Pavan Kumari, S.; Raghavendra Kumar, K.; Chakradhar Rao, T.; Lokeswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Hussain, S.; Vasudeva Reddy, M.; Suresh Babu, S.; Mallikarjuna Reddy, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties are continuously measured at a semi-arid station, Anantapur from June 2012 to May 2013 which describes the impact of surface aerosols on climate change over the region. Scattering coefficient (σsct) and absorption coefficient (σabs) are obtained from integrating Nephelometer and Aethalometer, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo (ω0), Scattering/absorption Ångström exponents were examined during the period of study. Diurnal variations of σsct and σabs show a bi-peak pattern with two maxima and one minimum in a day. The largest values of σsct and σabs are obtained in winter while the lowest values are measured in monsoon. From the measurements σsct550 and σabs550 are found to be 110 ± 12.23 Mm- 1 and 33 ± 5.2 Mm- 1, respectively during the study period. An analysis of the ω0 suggests that there is a more absorbing fraction in the particle composition over the measurement site. The ω0 obtained in the surface boundary layer of Anantapur is below the critical value of 0.86 that determines the shift from cooling to warming. A relationship between scattering/absorption coefficients and scattering/absorption Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo is further examined. In order to understand the origins of the air masses in the study region, we performed seven-day back trajectory analyses based on the NOAA HYSPLIT model. These trajectories were computed at several altitudes (3000 m, 1500 m, and 500 m) for June 2012 and May 2013. These results put in evidence the need of efforts to reduce absorbing particles (black carbon) emissions to avoid the possible warming that would result from the reductions of the cooling aerosol only.

  7. Scattering properties of the atmospheric aerosol in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiujuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Pu, Weiwei; Meng, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2011-08-01

    Measurements of aerosol scattering coefficient (σ sp) and PM 2.5 concentration obtained during June 2008 to May 2009 at urban, suburban, and rural sites in Beijing area. The mean value of σ sp during measurement period was 301 ± 307, 263 ± 263, 182 ± 201 Mm - 1 at Baolian (BL: urban site), Changping (CP: suburban site) and Shangdianzi (SDZ: rural site), respectively. The seasonal and diurnal patterns of σ sp were analyzed with the measurement data. The σ sp showed different seasonal and diurnal patterns at these three sites. The seasonal fluctuations inσ sp in urban area were mostly influenced by seasonal variability in both emissions and meteorological conditions, while the seasonal wind patterns seemed to dominate the σ sp in the suburban and rural areas. The diurnal activity of σ sp generally showed a bimodal, trimodal and a unimodal pattern at BL, CP and SDZ sites, respectively. The diurnal variation of boundary layer height companying with source activity was mainly dominated the diurnal variation of σ sp at urban and suburban sites. The mountain-valley breeze and boundary layer growth in SDZ region mostly dominated the diurnal variation of σ sp. The mass scattering efficiency of PM 2.5 was estimated at BL and SDZ, which showed a decreasing trend from urban to rural site with different seasonal variation at two sites. During fog and haze episodes, the lower northeasterly winds could result in significant spatial difference in σ sp, while the σ sp was spatially uniform under the influence of stronger southerly winds.

  8. Flow tracing fidelity of scattering aerosol in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental method for determinating the flow tracing fidelity of a scattering aerosol used in laser Doppler velocimeters was developed with particular reference to the subsonic turbulence measurements. The method employs the measurement of the dynamic response of a flow seeding aerosol excited by acoustic waves. The amplitude and frequency of excitation were controlled to simulate the corresponding values of fluid turbulence components. Experimental results are presented on the dynamic response of aerosols over the size range from 0.1 to 2.0 microns in diameter and over the frequency range 100 Hz to 100 kHz. It was observed that unit density spherical scatterers with diameters of 0.2 microns followed subsonic air turbulence frequency components up to 100 kHz with 98 percent fidelity.

  9. Flow tracing fidelity of scattering aerosol in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental method for the determination of the flow-tracing fidelity of a scattering aerosol used in laser Doppler velocimeters was developed with particular reference to the subsonic turbulence measurements. The method employs the measurement of the dynamic response of a flow-seeding aerosol excited by acoustic waves. The amplitude and frequency of excitation were controlled in order to simulate the corresponding values of fluid turbulence components. Experimental results are presented on the dynamic response of aerosols over the size range from 0.1 to 2.0 microns in diam and over the frequency range 100 Hz to 100 kHz. It was observed that unit-density spherical scatterers with diameters of 0.2 micron followed subsonic air turbulence frequency components up to 100 kHz with 98% fidelity.

  10. A perturbative treatment of aerosol scattering of infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, W. R.; Chameides, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of long-wave atmospheric heating and cooling rates using the rate equations of Rodgers and Walshaw (1966) with the Malkmus (1967) random band model are presented. A perturbation scheme is developed for the inclusion of aerosol scattering effects in the numerical calculation. Unlike the flux differencing method for calculating long-wave heating and cooling rates, this scheme allows aerosol effects to be included in a simple manner with only a small additional use of computer time. The calculations indicate good agreement with those of previous investigators and demonstrate the expected equivalence of the flux-differencing method and the flux-divergence equation of Rodgers and Walshaw (1966), even at stratospheric altitudes. It is found that aerosols lead to a net heating in the lower troposphere due to infrared scattering and absorption.

  11. Toward a Combined SAGE II-HALOE Aerosol Climatology: An Evaluation of HALOE Version 19 Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 microns is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 microns is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 micron aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40micronaerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 micron channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived data sets.

  12. Determine scattering coefficient and anisotropy of scattering of murine tissues using reflectance-mode confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Jacques, Steven L.

    2013-02-01

    Different techniques have been developed to determine the optical properties of turbid media, which include collimated transmission, diffuse reflectance, adding-doubling and goniometry. While goniometry can be used to determine the anisotropy of scattering (g), other techniques are used to measure the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient (μs(1-g)). But separating scattering coefficient (μs) and anisotropy of scattering from reduced scattering coefficient has been tricky. We developed an algorithm to determine anisotropy of scattering from the depth dependent decay of reflectance-mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) data. This report presents the testing of the algorithm on tissue phantoms with different anisotropies (g = 0.127 to 0.868, at 488 nm wavelength). Tissue phantoms were made from polystyrene microspheres (6 sizes 0.1-0.5 μm dia.) dispersed in both aqueous solutions and agarose gels. Three dimensional images were captured. The rCSLM-signal followed an exponential decay as a function of depth of the focal volume, R(z)ρexp(-μz) where ρ (dimensionless, ρ = 1 for a mirror) is the local reflectivity and μ [cm-1] is the exponential decay constant. The theory was developed to uniquely map the experimentally determined μ and ρ into the optical scattering properties μs and g. The values of μs and g depend on the composition and microstructure of tissues, and allow characterization of a tissue.

  13. Assessment of Error in Aerosol Optical Depth Measured by AERONET Due to Aerosol Forward Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slustsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Michail

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, 99.53%. Only 0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  14. Assessment of error in aerosol optical depth measured by AERONET due to aerosol forward scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slutsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, ∼99.53%. Only ∼0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  15. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  16. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-21

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data-up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  17. Absorption, scattering and single scattering albedo of aerosols obtained from in situ measurements in the subarctic coastal region of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, E.; Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V.; Lopez, J.; de Frutos, A.

    2011-01-01

    In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties were made in summer 2008 at the ALOMAR station facility (69°16 N, 16°00 E), located at a rural site in the North of the island of Andøya (Vesterålen archipelago), about 300 km north of the Arctic Circle. The extended three months campaign was part of the POLAR-CAT Project of the International Polar Year (IPY-2007-2008), and its goal was to characterize the aerosols of this sub-Arctic area which frequently transporte to the Arctic region. The ambient light-scattering coefficient, σs(550 nm), at ALOMAR had a hourly mean value of 5.412 Mm-1 (StD = 3.545 Mm-1) and the light-absorption coefficient, σa(550 nm), had an hourly mean value of 0.400 Mm-1 (StD = 0.273 Mm-1). The scattering/absorption Ångström exponents, αs,a, are used for detailed analysis of the variations of the spectral shape of σs,a. The single scattering albedo, &omega0, ranges from 0.622 to 0.985 (mean = 0.913, StD = 0.052) and the relation of this property to the absorption/scattering coefficients and the Ångström exponents is presented. The relationships between all the parameters analyzed, mainly those related to the single scattering albedo, allow us to describe the local atmosphere as extremely clean.

  18. Inverse scattering for an AKNS problem with rational reflection coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudel, H.; Kaup, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    We study the AKNS (Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur) inverse scattering problem for rational reflection coefficients on a semi-infinite interval. We demonstrate that the Marchenko integral equations for the AKNS version on such an interval can be solved in a direct and straightforward way by algebraic methods for any set of rational reflection coefficients, vanishing at infinity. The general AKNS scattering problem for this case, as well as the usual symmetry reductions, are discussed. The connection to an alternative procedure by Rourke and Morris (1992 Phys. Rev. A 46 3631) is pointed out. Our procedure is built around a constant matrix, M, which can be constructed from the poles and residues of the rational reflection coefficients. Under certain conditions, which we define as minimal symmetry and which then suitably constrains the distribution of eigenvalues, we show that it is always possible to represent the resulting potentials as truncated N-soliton potentials. This procedure is of interest for solving initial-boundary value problems of integrable hyperbolic systems by the inverse scattering transform (IST) applied to a semi-infinite or finite interval.

  19. The sensitivity to polarization in stratospheric aerosol retrievals from limb scattered sunlight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Rieger, L. A.; Dueck, S. R.; Zawada, D. J.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite measurements of limb scattered sunlight at visible and near infrared wavelengths have been used successfully for several years to retrieve the vertical profile of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient. The existing satellite measurements are of the total radiance, with very little knowledge or impact of the polarization state of the limb radiance. Recently proposed instrument concepts for stratospheric aerosol profiling have been designed to measure the linearly polarized radiance. Yet, to date, the impact of the polarized measurement on the retrievals has not been systematically studied. Here we use a fully spherical, multiple scattering radiative transfer model to perform a sensitivity study on the effects of the polarized measurement on stratospheric aerosol extinction retrievals through specific investigations of the aerosol signal fraction in polarized measurements, potential retrieval bias, and achievable precision. In this study,we simulate both total and linearly polarized measurements, for a wide range of limb viewing geometries that are encountered in typical low earth orbits and for various aerosol loading scenarios. The orientation of the linear polarization with respect to the horizon is also studied. Taking into account instrument signal to noise levels it is found that in general, the linear polarization can be used as effectively as the total radiance measurement, with consideration of instrument signal to noise capabilities; however the horizontal polarization is more promising in terms of signal magnitude.

  20. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility in the framework of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a~one year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0-180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically-influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically-influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air-masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine

  1. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during the TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 1-year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0 to 180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine if

  2. Verification and application of the extended spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA+) methodology to estimate aerosol fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, K. C.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Eck, T. F.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA) and SDA+ (extended SDA) methodologies can be employed to separate the fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients from measured total aerosol extinction coefficients, but their common use is currently limited to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Here we provide the verification of the SDA+ methodology on a non-AERONET aerosol product, by applying it to fine and coarse mode nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) data sets collected in the marine boundary layer. Using data sets collected on research vessels by NOAA-PMEL(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory), we demonstrate that with accurate input, SDA+ is able to predict the fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficient partition in global data sets representing a range of aerosol regimes. However, in low-extinction regimes commonly found in the clean marine boundary layer, SDA+ output accuracy is sensitive to instrumental calibration errors. This work was extended to the calculation of coarse and fine mode scattering coefficients with similar success. This effort not only verifies the application of the SDA+ method to in situ data, but by inference verifies the method as a whole for a host of applications, including AERONET. Study results open the door to much more extensive use of nephelometers and PSAPs, with the ability to calculate fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficients in field campaigns that do not have the resources to explicitly measure these values.

  3. Broadband computation of the scattering coefficients of infinite arbitrary cylinders.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Cédric; Guizal, Brahim; Felbacq, Didier

    2012-07-01

    We employ a time-domain method to compute the near field on a contour enclosing infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary cross section and constitution. We therefore recover the cylindrical Hankel coefficients of the expansion of the field outside the circumscribed circle of the structure. The recovered coefficients enable the wideband analysis of complex systems, e.g., the determination of the radar cross section becomes straightforward. The prescription for constructing such a numerical tool is provided in great detail. The method is validated by computing the scattering coefficients for a homogeneous circular cylinder illuminated by a plane wave, a problem for which an analytical solution exists. Finally, some radiation properties of an optical antenna are examined by employing the proposed technique.

  4. Experimental validation of light scattering and absorption theories of fractal-like carbonaceous aerosol agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Arnott, W. P.; Garro, M.; Slowik, J.; Cross, E.; Han, J.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T.; Worsnop, D.

    2007-12-01

    The optical coefficients of size-selected carbonaceous aerosol agglomerates measured at a wavelength of 870 nm are compared with those predicted by three theories, namely Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) approximation, volume-equivalent Mie theory, and integral equation formulation for scattering (IEFS). Carbonaceous agglomerates, produced via flame synthesis, were size-selected using two differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) in series, and their scattering and absorption coefficients were measured with nephelometry and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy, along with image processing techniques, were used for the parameterization of the structural properties of the fractal-like agglomerates. The agglomerate structural parameters were used to evaluate the predictions of the optical coefficients based on the three light scattering and absorption theories. The results indicate that the RDG approximation agrees within 10% of the experimental results and the exact electromagnetic calculations of the IEFS theory. The experimental scattering coefficient is over predicted by the volume-equivalent Mie theory by a factor of ~3.2. Also, the RDG approximation-predicted optical coefficients showed pronounced sensitivity to changes in monomer mean diameter, the count median diameter of the agglomerates, and the geometric standard deviation of the agglomerate number size distribution.

  5. The Aerosol Coarse Mode: Its Importance for Light Scattering Enhancement and Columnar Optical Closure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient aerosol particles can take up water and thus change their optical properties depending on the hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. Knowledge of the hygroscopicity effect is of importance for radiative forcing calculations but is also needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing or model results with in situ measurements. Specifically, the particle light scattering depends on RH and can be described by the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value. Here, we will present insights from measurements of f(RH) across Europe (Zieger et al., 2013) and will demonstrate why the coarse mode is important when modeling or predicting f(RH) from auxiliary aerosol in-situ measurements. We will show the implications by presenting the results of a recently performed columnar optical closure study (Zieger et al., 2015). This study linked ground-based in-situ measurements (with the help of airborne aerosol size distribution measurements) to columnar aerosol optical properties derived by a co-located AERONET sun photometer. The in situ derived aerosol optical depths (AOD) were clearly correlated with the directly measured values of the AERONET sun photometer but were substantially lower compared to the directly measured values (factor of ˜ 2-3). Differences became greater for longer wavelengths. The disagreement between in situ derived and directly measured AOD was hypothesized to originate from losses of coarse and fine mode particles through dry deposition within the forest's canopy and losses in the in situ sampling lines. In addition, elevated aerosol layers from long-range transport were observed for parts of the campaign which could have explained some of the disagreement. Zieger, P., Fierz-Schmidhauser, R., Weingartner, E., and Baltensperger, U.: Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering: results from different

  6. Determination of reversible protein equilibrium association coefficients using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The characterization in solution of reversible protein associations as well as associations between proteins and small molecules is essential in many areas of science. Understanding cellular function or developing and formulating pharmaceuticals or other biologically active materials often requires quantitation of such associations. Most pharmaceuticals have functionality due solely to association with molecules within the body, and the discovery and accurate characterization of these associations is a key element for pharmaceutical development. Unfortunately, most methods used to measure associations of proteins require either immobilizing the protein on a surface (e.g. surface plasmon resonance), which potentially alters the protein characteristics, or require considerable time and effort and large quantities of sample (e.g. analytical ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry). Light scattering based measurements of reversible association coefficients require much less sample and may be performed much more rapidly than other free solution techniques. In this talk I describe how static and dynamic light scattering may each independently be used to measure equilibrium association coefficients between proteins in free solution, and may also be used to observe and quantitate the association of small molecules with them. I present background theory for both static and dynamic light scattering measurements of equilibrium associations, and examples of measurements made of both model systems and of systems with commercial relevance in the pharmaceutical industry.

  7. On deriving the accurate aerosol extinction profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere using the range dependent scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, M. V.; Radhakrishnan, S. R.; Mahadevanpillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2008-12-01

    Lidar has proven to be an effective instrument for obtaining high resolution profiles of atmospheric aerosols. Deriving the optical properties of aerosols from the experimentally obtained lidar data is one of the most interesting and challenging task for the atmospheric scientists. A few methods had been developed so far, to obtain the quantitative profiles of extinction and backscattering coefficient of aerosols from the pulsed backscattering lidar measurements. Most of the existing inversion methods assume a range independent value for the scattering ratio for inverting the lidar signal even though it is known that the scattering ratio depends on the nature of aerosols and as such range dependent. We used a modified Klett's method for the inversion of lidar signal that uses range dependent scattering ratio (s) for the characterization of atmospheric aerosols. This method provides the constants k and s for all the altitude regions of the atmosphere and leads to derive the aerosol extinction profile for the lidar data. In this paper we made a study on the errors involved in the extinction profiles derived using the range dependent scattering ratio and discuss the approach in this regard to obtain the accurate extinction profiles.

  8. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in solid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1988-08-01

    We estimate the differential scattering cross-section due to SBS in a glass bead which is much larger than the wavelength of a high energy laser beam which irradiates it. We consider three possible scenarios: neither the incident nor the Stokes wavelength is on a Mie resonance; only the Stokes wavelength is on resonance; and the incident wavelength and the Stokes wavelength are on a Mie resonance. For the first two cases, we find that the SBS scattering cross-section is extremely small compared to the geometric/Mie cross-section. It follows as a corollary that SBS in a glass bead will be insufficient to shatter it in these two cases. In the last case, it is quite possible that due to the buildup of high fields on-resonance within the spherical bead, the bead might be shattered. The chance of such an event occurring in a polydisperse distribution of spherical beads is generally not expected to be very high. 3 figs.

  9. Characterization of the aerosol type using simultaneous measurements of the lidar ratio and estimations of the single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, Vassilis; Balis, Dimitrios; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2011-07-01

    Lidar measurements of the vertical distribution of the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient and the corresponding extinction to backscatter ratio (so-called lidar ratio) at 355 nm have been performed at Thessaloniki, Greece using a Raman lidar system in the frame of the EARLINET for the period 2001-2005. Coincident spectral UV irradiance measurements, total ozone observations and aerosol optical depth estimates were available from a double Brewer spectroradiometer. The retrieval of single scattering albedo employed the Brewer global irradiance measurements and radiative transfer modeling. Vertically averaged values of the lidar ratio ranged from a minimum of 16 sr to a maximum value of 90 sr, while the effective single scattering albedo ranged from 0.78 to 1.00. The mean value of the lidar ratio for the dataset under study was 45.5 ± 21.0 sr while the average value of the single scattering albedo was 0.94 ± 0.05. For the majority of our measurements (80%) the single scattering albedo found to be greater than 0.90. Using additional information from backward trajectory calculations and lidar-derived free tropospheric contribution of aerosols in the columnar aerosol optical depth, it is shown that the combined use of the directly measured lidar ratio, and the indirectly estimated single scattering albedo, leads to a better characterization of the aerosol type probed.

  10. [Effect of weather condition on the aerosol scattering property at Shangdianzi].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Pu, Wei-Wei; Meng, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A study on the effect of weather condition on the aerosol scattering property has been carried out using one year measurement data sets of aerosol scattering coefficient (ASC) and meteorological parameters at Shangdianzi (SDZ). The results showed that the ASC was highest in haze-fog day with 608.4 Mm(-1) and higher in fog day with 500.6 Mm(-1) and haze day with 423.7 Mm (-1) those were 6.4-9.2 times higher than the ASC in normal day. The ASC was highest in summer in all kinds of weather conditions. The lower ASC in fog day and haze-fog day was observed in autumn and winter, respectively. There was no evident difference of the ASC between other three seasons in haze day and normal day. Pronounced seasonal variation of the mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was observed in fog day with the highest value in summer. Significant diurnal variations in ASC were observed in haze-fog day and normal day with a unimodal pattern and a bimodal pattern, respectively. The wind was the most important factor for the ASC at SDZ. The transport of aerosol particles by the strong southwest wind should be responsible for the higher level of ASC in SDZ area and regional scale in low visibility weather conditions. The northeast wind was favourable to the reduction of ASC, especially in normal day.

  11. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering Assessments and the Impact of City Size on Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe

    The general problem of urban pollution and its relation to the city population is examined in this dissertation. A simple model suggests that pollutant concentrations should scale approximately with the square root of city population. This model and its experimental evaluation presented here serve as important guidelines for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards including the limits that air pollution places on city population. The model was evaluated using measurements of air pollution. Optical properties of aerosol pollutants such as light absorption and scattering plus chemical species mass concentrations were measured with a photoacoustic spectrometer, a reciprocal nephelometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer in Mexico City in the context of the multinational project "Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO)" in March 2006. Aerosol light absorption and scattering measurements were also obtained for Reno and Las Vegas, NV USA in December 2008-March 2009 and January-February 2003, respectively. In all three cities, the morning scattering peak occurs a few hours later than the absorption peak due to the formation of secondary photochemically produced aerosols. In particular, for Mexico City we determined the fraction of photochemically generated secondary aerosols to be about 75% of total aerosol mass concentration at its peak near midday. The simple 2-d box model suggests that commonly emitted primary air pollutant (e.g., black carbon) mass concentrations scale approximately as the square root of the urban population. This argument extends to the absorption coefficient, as it is approximately proportional to the black carbon mass concentration. Since urban secondary pollutants form through photochemical reactions involving primary precursors, in linear approximation their mass concentration also should scale with the square root of population. Therefore, the scattering coefficient, a proxy for particulate matter

  12. Study the polarization and depolarization properties of atmospheric aerosol multiple scattering based on the successive order of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weizhen; Sun, Bin; Li, Zhengqiang; Sun, Xiaobing; Hong, Jin; Qie, Lili; Wang, Han

    2015-10-01

    With the polynomial fitting of source function in each order of scattering calculation and the effective process of aerosol forward scattering peak, a polarized radiative transfer (RT) model based on the improved successive order of scattering (SOS) method has been developed to solve the vector radiative transfer equation. By our RT model, not only the total Stokes parameters [I, Q, U] measured by the satellite (aircraft) and ground-based sensors with linear polarization could be approximately simulated, but also the results of parameters for each scattering order event could conveniently calculated, which are very helpful to study the polarization properties for the atmospheric aerosol multiple scattering. In this study, the synchronous measured aerosol results including aerosol optical depth, complex refractive index and particle size distribution from AERONET under different air conditions, are considered as the input parameters for the successive scattering simulations. With our polarized RT model and the Mie code combined, the Stokes parameters as well as the degree of polarization for each scattering order are simulated and presented; meanwhile, the polarization (depolarization) properties of multiply scattering are preliminary analyzed and compared with different air quality (clear and pollution). Those results could provide a significant support for the further research of polarized aerosol remote sensing and inversion. Polarization properties of aerosol, successive order of scattering, vector radiative transfer equation, polynomial fitting of source function , multiply scattering

  13. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  14. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  15. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  16. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  17. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  18. Multiwavelength In-Situ Aerosol Scattering and Absorption During the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification, Case Studies, and Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D.; Coffman, D.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T.

    2005-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption of the New York and Boston urban pollution outflow were carried out aboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 (New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Study) field campaign during July 2004 in the Gulf of Maine. Aerosol scattering, backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured using integrating nephelometers and multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at ~55-60% RH (nephelometers). Two data sets were collected, one for particles with diameters dp<10μm and one for particles <1μm. The purpose of the latter was to focus on the largely pollution related accumulation mode and to minimize the uncertainty due to highly variable near-surface sea salt aerosol. Combining the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients σsp and σap yields the derived, intensive parameters, single-scattering albedo, ω=σsp/(σsp+σap), Ångström exponents, å, for σsp, and σap, the hemispheric backscattering ratio, and the fine mode fraction of the aerosol, FMF =σsp(dp<1μm)/σsp(dp<10μm). These are key parameters in estimating aerosol direct radiative forcing and they provide constraints on model building and closure studies with physical and chemical aerosol properties. They are important for relating in-situ optical properties to those sensed remotely, e.g., optical depth from ground- or aircraft-based sun photometry or optical depth from satellite, and to the FMF retrieved from satellite data. The measured and derived data will be classified based on a trajectory analysis of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations and sources. Case studies describing the aging of pollution plumes are calculated and analyzed in context of other measurements and the prevailing meteorology and the upwind sources. The obtained relationship between in-situ Ångström and FMF will be compared

  19. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficients onto single component organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lakey, P S J; George, I J; Whalley, L K; Baeza-Romero, M T; Heard, D E

    2015-04-21

    Measurements of HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) were made onto a variety of organic aerosols derived from glutaric acid, glyoxal, malonic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, squalene, monoethanol amine sulfate, monomethyl amine sulfate, and two sources of humic acid, for an initial HO2 concentration of 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3), room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. Values in the range of γ < 0.004 to γ = 0.008 ± 0.004 were measured for all of the aerosols apart from the aerosols from the two sources of humic acid. For humic acid aerosols, uptake coefficients in the range of γ = 0.007 ± 0.002 to γ = 0.09 ± 0.03 were measured. Elevated concentrations of copper (16 ± 1 and 380 ± 20 ppb) and iron (600 ± 30 and 51 000 ± 3000 ppb) ions were measured in the humic acid atomizer solutions compared to the other organics that can explain the higher uptake values measured. A strong dependence upon relative humidity was also observed for uptake onto humic acid, with larger uptake coefficients seen at higher humidities. Possible hypotheses for the humidity dependence include the changing liquid water content of the aerosol, a change in the mass accommodation coefficient or in the Henry's law constant.

  20. Chemical Characterization and Single Scattering Albedo of Atmospheric Aerosols Measured at Amami-Oshima, Southwest Japan, During Spring Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Yabuki, M.; Takamura, T.; Sudo, S.; Yonemura, S.; Shirasuna, Y.; Hirano, K.; Sera, K.; Maeda, T.; Hayasaka, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2008-12-01

    An intensive field program was performed to measure atmospheric aerosols at Amami-Oshima, a small island located at southwest Japan, in the spring season of 2001, 2003, and 2005 under the ACE-Asia, APEX and ABC-EAREX2005 projects. Chemical analysis of the fine and coarse aerosols was made for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon, water soluble ions, and trace elements. Single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols was independently estimated by two methods. The one (SSAc) is by chemical compositions assuming a half internal mixture between EC and non sea-salt sulfate, and the other (SSAo) is by optical measurements of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The backward trajectory analysis showed that the aerosol concentrations in the air masses arrived at Amami, were much higher from the Asian Continent than from other regions, and two types of aerosol enhancement were observed. The one was caused by polluted air masses from the urban-industrial area of east-coast China, the other was by high mineral dusts due to large- scale dust storms in the desert regions of northwest China. The SSAc was in a range of 0.87-0.98, and in good agreement with the SSAo after some corrections for original scattering and absorption coefficients. The SSAc showed no significant difference between the air masses from the polluted area and the desert regions. The negative correlation between the SSAc and EC was divided into two groups depending on the concentration of non sea-salt sulfate, while the increase in mineral dusts did not show any correlation with the SSAc.

  1. Evaluating Nighttime CALIOP 0.532 micron Aerosol Optical Depth and Extinction Coefficient Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Curtis, C. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Welton, E. J.; Omar, A. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) Version 3.01 5-km nighttime 0.532 micron aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from 2007 are screened, averaged and evaluated at 1 deg X 1 deg resolution versus corresponding/co-incident 0.550 micron AOD derived using the US Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of quality-assured NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD. In the absence of sunlight, since passive radiometric AOD retrievals rely overwhelmingly on scattered radiances, the model represents one of the few practical global estimates available from which to attempt such a validation. Daytime comparisons, though, provide useful context. Regional-mean CALIOP vertical profiles of night/day 0.532 micron extinction coefficient are compared with 0.523/0.532 micron ground-based lidar measurements to investigate representativeness and diurnal variability. In this analysis, mean nighttime CALIOP AOD are mostly lower than daytime (0.121 vs. 0.126 for all aggregated data points, and 0.099 vs. 0.102 when averaged globally per normalised 1 deg. X 1 deg. bin), though the relationship is reversed over land and coastal regions when the data are averaged per normalised bin (0.134/0.108 vs. 0140/0.112, respectively). Offsets assessed within single bins alone approach +/- 20 %. CALIOP AOD, both day and night, are higher than NAAPS over land (0.137 vs. 0.124) and equal over water (0.082 vs. 0.083) when averaged globally per normalised bin. However, for all data points inclusive, NAAPS exceeds CALIOP over land, coast and ocean, both day and night. Again, differences assessed within single bins approach 50% in extreme cases. Correlation between CALIOP and NAAPS AOD is comparable during both day and night. Higher correlation is found nearest the equator, both as a function of sample size and relative signal magnitudes inherent at

  2. Low hygroscopic scattering enhancement of boreal aerosol and the implications for a columnar optical closure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P. P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Hong, J.; Komppula, M.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; Lampilahti, J.; de Leeuw, G.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Tunved, P.; Väänänen, R.; Petäjä, T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient aerosol particles can take up water and thus change their optical properties depending on the hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. Knowledge of the hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for radiative forcing calculations and is also needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing or model results with in situ measurements. Specifically, particle light scattering depends on RH and can be described by the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value (RH <30-40 %). Here, we present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä, Finland. Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground level by a humidified nephelometer is found to be generally lower (e.g. 1.63±0.22 at RH = 85 % and λ = 525 nm) than observed at other European sites. One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the aerosol encountered at Hyytiälä to which f(RH) is clearly anti-correlated (R2≈0.8). A simplified parametrization of f(RH) based on the measured chemical mass fraction can therefore be derived for this aerosol type. A trajectory analysis revealed that elevated values of f(RH) and the corresponding elevated inorganic mass fraction are partially caused by transported hygroscopic sea spray particles. An optical closure study shows the consistency of the ground-based in situ measurements. Our measurements allow to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient using the measured f(RH). By combining the ground-based measurements with intensive aircraft measurements of the particle number size distribution and ambient RH, columnar values of the particle extinction coefficient are determined and compared to columnar measurements of a co-located AERONET sun photometer. The water

  3. Measurement of the emission rate of an aerosol source--comparison of aerosol and gas transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Callé, S; Godinot, S; Régnier, R; Dessagne, J M

    2000-12-01

    A measuring method of the emission rate of an atmospheric pollutant source, based on the use of a tracer gas (helium) and developed in the case of a gaseous source, was tested for an aerosol source. The influence of both particle sedimentation and wall depositions was studied. The transport coefficients of the tracer gas and of alumina particles of various particle sizes (MMAD from 8 to 36 microns) were measured on a vertical axis close to the source, in a 71 m3 room swept by a piston flow. The measurements clearly demonstrated the predominant influence of sedimentation in the case of particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 microns. Particle wall deposition was determined by measuring the gas and particle concentration decay in the ventilated room. To do this, a new tracing method using a fluorescent aerosol was developed. The measured aerosol deposition rates are much higher than those calculated from the formula of Corner for a cubical volume. Aerosol sedimentation and wall deposition are two phenomena limiting the use of a tracer gas to measure the aerosol emission rate. The chemical substances and materials used in work premises are likely to be released into the atmosphere and lead to the formation of pollutants. These emissions stem from either physical or chemical processes (evaporation of a solvent) or from mechanical processes (dispersion of oil droplets at the source of mists).

  4. The generalized scattering coefficient method for plane wave scattering in layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Chao; Wang, Huai-Yu; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2017-02-01

    The generalized scattering coefficient (GSC) method is pedagogically derived and employed to study the scattering of plane waves in homogeneous and inhomogeneous layered structures. The numerical stabilities and accuracies of this method and other commonly used numerical methods are discussed and compared. For homogeneous layered structures, concise scattering formulas with clear physical interpretations and strong numerical stability are obtained by introducing the GSCs. For inhomogeneous layered structures, three numerical methods are employed: the staircase approximation method, the power series expansion method, and the differential equation based on the GSCs. We investigate the accuracies and convergence behaviors of these methods by comparing their predictions to the exact results. The conclusions are as follows. The staircase approximation method has a slow convergence in spite of its simple and intuitive implementation, and a fine stratification within the inhomogeneous layer is required for obtaining accurate results. The expansion method results are sensitive to the expansion order, and the treatment becomes very complicated for relatively complex configurations, which restricts its applicability. By contrast, the GSC-based differential equation possesses a simple implementation while providing fast and accurate results.

  5. Inference of the aerosol Angstrom coefficient from SAGE short-wavelength data. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Pruvost, P.

    1983-01-01

    SAGE four-channel transmission profiles are inverted to retrieve the extinction profiles from which the aerosol Angstrom coefficient alpha is obtained. The procedure allows one to check the influence of the NO2 absorption profile, which is small below 25 km. The results compare well with those obtained by a completely different procedure at NASA Langley Research Center, and the main features of the alpha profiles seem to be significant, even considering the rather large error bars. The relation between the retrieved Angstrom coefficient, the particle effective radius and the asymmetry factor is considered.

  6. Inter-Comparison of ILAS-II Version 1.4 Aerosol Extinction Coefficient at 780 nm with SAGE II, SAGE III, and POAM III Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saitoh, Naoko; Hayashida, S.; Sugita, T.; Nakajima, H.; Yokota, T.; Hayashi, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kanzawa, H.; Ejiri, M. K.; Irie, H.; Tanaka, T.; Terao, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Sasano, Y.; Bevilacqua, R.; Randall, C.; Thomason, L.; Taha, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) II on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) II observed stratospheric aerosol in visible/near-infrared/infrared spectra over high latitudes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Observations were taken intermittently from January to March, and continuously from April through October, 2003. We assessed the data quality of ILAS-II version 1.4 aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm from comparisons with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, SAGE III, and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III aerosol data. At heights below 20 km in the Northern Hemisphere, aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II agreed with those from SAGE II and SAGE III within 10%, and with those from POAM III within 15%. From 20 to 26 km, ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients were smaller than extinction coefficients from the other sensors; differences between ILAS-II and SAGE II ranged from 10% at 20 km to 34% at 26 km. ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients from 20 to 25 km in February over the Southern Hemisphere had a negative bias (12-66%) relative to SAGE II aerosol data. The bias increased with increasing altitude. Comparisons between ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol extinction coefficients from January to May in the Southern Hemisphere (defined as the non-Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) season ) yielded qualitatively similar results. From June to October (defined as the PSC season ), aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II were smaller than those from POAM III above 17 km, as in the case of the non-PSC season; however, ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol data were within 15% of each other from 12 to 17 km.

  7. Defect characterization using an ultrasonic array to measure the scattering coefficient matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Wilcox, Paul D

    2008-10-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is used for detection, characterization, and sizing of defects. The accurate sizing of defects that are of similar or less size than the ultrasonic wavelength is of particular importance in assessing structural integrity. In this paper, we demonstrate how measurement of the scattering coefficient matrix of a cracklike defect can be used to obtain its size, shape, and orientation. The scattering coefficient matrix describes the far field amplitude of scattered signals from a scatterer as a function of incident and scattering angles. A finite element (FE) modeling procedure is described that predicts the scattering coefficient matrix of various cracklike defects. Experimental results are presented using a commercial 64-element, 5 MHz array on 2 aluminum test samples that contain several machined slots and through thickness circular holes. To minimize the interference from the reflections of neighboring defects, a subarray approach is used to focus ultrasound on each target defect in turn and extract its scattering coefficient matrices. A circular hole and a fine slot can be clearly distinguished by their different scattering coefficient matrices over a specific range of incident angles and scattering angles. The orientation angles of slots directly below the array are deduced from the measured scattering coefficient matrix to an accuracy of a few degrees, and their lengths are determined with an error of 10%.

  8. [Development of a photoacoustic spectroscopy system for the measurement of absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Niu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    In the present paper, the authors focus on the effect of the resonance frequency shift due to the changes in temperature and humidity on the PA signal, present several methods to control the noise derived form gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Based on the efforts mentioned above, a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-8) W x cm(-1) x Hz(-1/2) was achieved for the measurement of atmospheric aerosols absorption coefficient. During the experiments, the PA cell was calibrated with the absorption of standard NO2 gas at 532 nm and the atmospheric aerosols were measured continuously. The measurement results show that the PAS is suitable for the real-time measurement of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols in their natural suspended state.

  9. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  10. Enhanced Light Scattering of Secondary Organic Aerosols by Multiphase Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Li, Junling; Liggio, John; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa; Liu, Qifan; Guo, Yucong; Tong, Shengrui; Li, Jiangjun; Peng, Chao; Jing, Bo; Wang, Dong; Fu, Pingqing

    2017-02-07

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a pivotal role in visibility and radiative forcing, both of which are intrinsically linked to the refractive index (RI). While previous studies have focused on the RI of SOA from traditional formation processes, the effect of multiphase reactions on the RI has not been considered. Here, we investigate the effects of multiphase processes on the RI and light-extinction of m-xylene-derived SOA, a common type of anthropogenic SOA. We find that multiphase reactions in the presence of liquid water lead to the formation of oligomers from intermediate products such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, resulting in a large enhancement in the RI and light-scattering of this SOA. These reactions will result in increases in light-scattering efficiency and direct radiative forcing of approximately 20%-90%. These findings improve our understanding of SOA optical properties and have significant implications for evaluating the impacts of SOA on the rapid formation of regional haze, global radiative balance, and climate change.

  11. Low hygroscopic scattering enhancement of boreal aerosol and the implications for a columnar optical closure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P. P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Hong, J.; Komppula, M.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; Lampilahti, J.; de Leeuw, G.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Tunved, P.; Väänänen, R.; Petäjä, T.

    2015-02-01

    Ambient aerosol particles can take up water and thus change their optical properties depending on the hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. Knowledge of the hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for radiative forcing calculations and is also needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing or model results with in-situ measurements. Specifically, particle light scattering depends on RH and can be described by the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value (RH <30-40%). Here, we present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä, Finland. Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground by a humidified nephelometer is found to be significantly lower (1.53±0.24 at RH = 85% and λ=450 nm) than observed at other European sites. One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the aerosol encountered at Hyytiälä to which f(RH) is clearly anti-correlated (R2≈0.8). A trajectory analysis revealed that elevated values of f(RH) and the corresponding elevated inorganic mass fraction are partially caused by transported hygroscopic sea spray particles. An optical closure study shows the consistency of the ground based in-situ measurements. Our measurements allow to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient using the measured f(RH). By combining the ground-based measurements with intensive aircraft measurements of the particle number size distribution and ambient RH, columnar values of the particle extinction coefficient are determined and compared to direct measurements of a co-located AERONET Sun photometer. The water uptake is found to be of minor importance for the column averaged properties due to the low particle hygroscopicity and the low RH during the

  12. Acoustic scattering in dispersions: improvements in the calculation of single particle scattering coefficients.

    PubMed

    Pinfield, Valerie J

    2007-07-01

    Measurements of ultrasound speed and attenuation can be related to the properties of dispersed systems by applying a scattering model. Rayleigh's method for scattering of sound by a spherical object, and its subsequent developments to include viscous, thermal, and other effects (known as the ECAH model) has been widely adopted. The ECAH method has difficulties, including numerical ill-conditioning, calculation of Bessel functions at large arguments, and inclusion of thermal effects in all cases. The present work develops techniques for improving the ECAH calculations to allow its use in instrumentation. It is shown that thermal terms can be neglected in some boundary equations up to approximately 100 GHz in water, and several simplified solutions result. An analytical solution for the zero-order coefficient is presented, with separate nonthermal and thermal parts, allowing estimation of the thermal contribution. Higher orders have been simplified by estimating the small shear contribution as the inertial limit is approached. The condition of the matrix solutions have been greatly improved by these techniques and by including appropriate scaling factors. A method is presented for calculating the required Bessel functions when the argument is large (high frequency or large particle size). The required number of partial wave orders is also considered.

  13. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  14. Impacts of aerosol scattering on the short-wave infrared satellite observations of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, M.; Chen, L.; Li, S.; Tao, J.; Su, L.; Zou, M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and carbon dioxide (CO2), as two key factors driving the global climate change, have earned enormous attention from scientist around the world. One challenge for the satellite measurements of CO2 using this SWIR wavelength range (~1.6μm) is the impact of multiple scattering by aerosols and cirrus. Since the rapid economic growth and associated increase in fossil fuel consumption have caused serious particulate pollution in many regions of China, remote sensing of CO2 using SWIR band in China needs to pay more attention to the scattering properties of aerosol particles and the multiple scattering. Considering the complexity of morphological and chemical properties, aerosol particles are grouped based on a large number of TEM/SEM images, and then their scattering properties at 1.6μm band are calculated by the T-matrix method and GMM method. In this study, the Monte Carlo method is used to solve the multiple scattering problem by simulating photons transport in the scattering media. We combined this multiple scattering model with the LBLRTM as a forward radiative transfer model for studying the impact of aerosol scattering on the satellite observations of CO2 using SWIR band. Finally, based on the GOCART aerosol component products, AERONET aerosol size distribution products, CALIPSO aerosol profile products, and MODIS aerosol optical depth and surface albedo products, the monthly variability of errors in CO2 concentrations over China were calculated and analyzed. The results indicate that CO2 concentrations are overestimated in western regions of China, especially in desert areas (a maximum of ~7.08%), and those are underestimated in eastern regions (a minimum of ~-6.9%).

  15. Intercomparison of Remote and Flight Level Measured Aerosol Backscatter Coefficient During GLOBE 2 Pacific Survey Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhime, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data are examined from two local flights undertaken during NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May - June, 1990. During each of these two flights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provides an ideal opportunity to allow flight level measured or modeled aerosol backscafter to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscafter data that were obtained at these same altitudes either earlier or later than the flight level measurements. Aerosol backscafter comparisons were made at 1.06-, 9.11- and 9.25-mm wavelengths, using data from three lidar systems and two aerosol optical counters. The best agreement between all sensor's was found in the altitude region below 7 km where backscafter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscafter data at 1.06- and 9.25-mm wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters. Possible reasons are offered to explain this discrepancy. During the Japan local flight, microphysics analysis revealed: (1) evidence of a strong advected seasalt aerosol plume from the marine boundary layer, and (2) where backscatter was low, the large lidar sampling volume included many large particles which were of different chemical composition to the small particle category sampled by the particle counters.

  16. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  17. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  18. The dependence of aerosol light-scattering on RH over the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Crahan, K.; Jonssen, H.

    2002-04-01

    Measurements of the relative humidity dependence of aerosol light scattering are reported from three experimental venues over the Pacific Ocean. The measurement platform utilized was the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Results are compared with previous measurements at other locales and with theoretical models. The relatively low values of hygroscopicity obtained in marine air are consistent with a substantial organic component to the aerosol.

  19. Aerosol scattering effects on water vapor retrievals over the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhao-Cheng; Zhang, Qiong; Natraj, Vijay; Margolis, Jack S.; Shia, Run-Lie; Newman, Sally; Fu, Dejian; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Wong, Kam W.; Sander, Stanley P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we propose a novel approach to describe the scattering effects of atmospheric aerosols in a complex urban environment using water vapor (H2O) slant column measurements in the near infrared. This approach is demonstrated using measurements from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the top of Mt. Wilson, California, and a two-stream-exact single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model. From the spectral measurements, we retrieve H2O slant column density (SCD) using 15 different absorption bands between 4000 and 8000 cm-1. Due to the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering, large variations in H2O SCD retrievals are observed as a function of wavelength. Moreover, the variations are found to be correlated with aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured at the AERONET-Caltech station. Simulation results from the RT model reproduce this correlation and show that the aerosol scattering effect is the primary contributor to the variations in the wavelength dependence of the H2O SCD retrievals. A significant linear correlation is also found between variations in H2O SCD retrievals from different bands and corresponding AOD data; this correlation is associated with the asymmetry parameter, which is a first-order measure of the aerosol scattering phase function. The evidence from both measurements and simulations suggests that wavelength-dependent aerosol scattering effects can be derived using H2O retrievals from multiple bands. This understanding of aerosol scattering effects on H2O retrievals suggests a promising way to quantify the effect of aerosol scattering on greenhouse gas retrievals and could potentially contribute towards reducing biases in greenhouse gas retrievals from space.

  20. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo Derived from MODIS Reflectances over a Bright Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Martins, J.; Remer, L. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Stephens, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate TOA reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol is similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from MODIS Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two AERONET stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the SBDART model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from GERB, ARM, and CERES data. Spectral SSA values retrieved at Banizoumbou result in TOA forcing estimates that agree with CERES measurements

  1. Interrelationships Between Aerosol Characteristics and Light Scattering During Late-winter in a Eastern Mediterranean Arid Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Schebeske, G.; Formenti, P.; Maenhaut, W.; Cafmeyer, J.; Ptasinski, J.; Karnieli, A.; Orlovsky, L.

    1999-01-01

    An intensive field campaign involving measurement of various aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative properties was conducted at Sde Boker in the Negev Desert of Israel, from 18 February to 15 March 1997. Nephelometer measurements gave average background scattering coefficient values of about 25 M/m at 550 nm wavelength, but strong dust events caused the value of this parameter to rise up to about 800 M/m Backscattering fractions did not depend on aerosol loading, and generally fell in the range of 0.1 to 0.25, comparable to values reported for marine and Arctic environments. Chemical analysis of the aerosol revealed that, in the coarse size range (2 - 10 micrometer equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD)), calcium (Ca) was by far the most abundant element followed by silicon (Si), both of which are indicators for mineral dust. In the fine size fraction (< 2 micrometers EAD), sulfur (S) generally was the dominant element, except during high dust episodes when Ca and Si were again the most abundant. Furthermore, fine black carbon (BC) correlates with S, suggesting that they may have originated from the same sources or source regions. An indication of the short-term effect of aerosol loading on radiative forcing was provided by measurements of global and diffuse solar radiation, which showed that during high turbidity periods (strong dust events) almost all of the solar radiation reaching the area is scattered or absorbed.

  2. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed.

  3. View From a Megacity: Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments, MIRAGE-Mex deployment to Mexico City in the period of 30 days, March 2006, a suite of photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) were installed to measure at ground level the light absorption and scattering by aerosols at four sites: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP), a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac, a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch, and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 40 and 250 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering and Aetholemeter absorption measurements at the T0 site will be presented. We will present a broad overview of the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site. Insight on the dynamical connections will be discussed.

  4. Evaluating model parameterizations of submicron aerosol scattering and absorption with in situ data from ARCTAS 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Macintyre, Helen L.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Ridley, David A.; Heald, Colette L.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Cubison, Michael J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K.; Dibb, Jack E.; Wang, Chien

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the scattering and absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation by aerosols is essential for accurate simulations of atmospheric chemistry and climate. Closure studies using in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption can be used to evaluate and improve models of aerosol optical properties without interference from model errors in aerosol emissions, transport, chemistry, or deposition rates. Here we evaluate the ability of four externally mixed, fixed size distribution parameterizations used in global models to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption at three wavelengths using in situ data gathered during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. The four models are the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Combo model, GEOS-Chem v9-02, the baseline configuration of a version of GEOS-Chem with online radiative transfer calculations (called GC-RT), and the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC v3.1) package. We also use the ARCTAS data to perform the first evaluation of the ability of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption when in situ data on the aerosol size distribution are used, and examine the impact of different mixing rules for black carbon (BC) on the results. We find that the GMI model tends to overestimate submicron scattering and absorption at shorter wavelengths by 10-23 %, and that GMI has smaller absolute mean biases for submicron absorption than OPAC v3.1, GEOS-Chem v9-02, or GC-RT. However, the changes to the density and refractive index of BC in GC-RT improve the simulation of submicron aerosol absorption at all wavelengths relative to GEOS-Chem v9-02. Adding a variable size distribution, as in ASP v2.1, improves model performance for scattering but not for absorption, likely due to the assumption in ASP v2.1 that BC is present at a constant mass fraction

  5. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  6. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  7. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  8. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  9. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  10. Light scattering of fractal aerosol aggregates using T-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kung-Hau

    1992-08-01

    The aerosols in atmosphere are often random cluster of small primary particles with disordered appearance. They are considered to be fractal aggregates with a noninteger dimensions and have the important property of invariance under scale transformation. The essential fractal morphology are included in this study of scattering properties for aggregated aerosol particles. The fractal aggregates are simulated by using the growth model of hierarchical cluster-cluster aggregation. The T-matrix approach together with the translation addition theorem for vector spherical waves is employed to solve the aggregate scattering problem. Numerical results for scattering cross sections are illustrated for fractal clusters.

  11. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  12. Nonequivalence of second virial coefficients from sedimentation equilibrium and static light scattering studies of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Deszczynski, Marcin; Harding, Stephen E; Wills, Peter R

    2007-06-01

    Experimental data for ovalbumin and lysozyme are presented to highlight the nonequivalence of second virial coefficients obtained for proteins by sedimentation equilibrium and light scattering. Theoretical considerations confirm that the quantity deduced from sedimentation equilibrium distributions is B(22), the osmotic second virial coefficient describing thermodynamic nonideality arising solely from protein self-interaction. On the other hand, the virial coefficient determined by light scattering is shown to reflect the combined contributions of protein-protein and protein-buffer interactions to thermodynamic nonideality of the protein solution. Misidentification of the light scattering parameter as B(22) accounts for published reports of negative osmotic second virial coefficients as indicators of conditions conducive to protein crystal growth. Finally, textbook assertions about the equivalence of second virial coefficients obtained by sedimentation equilibrium and light scattering reflect the restriction of consideration to single-solute systems. Although sedimentation equilibrium distributions for buffered protein solutions are, indeed, amenable to interpretation in such terms, the same situation does not apply to light scattering measurements because buffer constituents cannot be regarded as part of the solvent: instead they must be treated as non-scattering cosolutes.

  13. Measuring the scattering coefficient of turbid media from two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sevrain, David; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Leray, Aymeric; Odin, Christophe; Le Grand, Yann

    2013-10-21

    In this paper, we propose a new and simple method based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy to measure the scattering coefficient µ(s) of thick turbid media. We show, from Monte Carlo simulations, that µ(s) can be derived from the axial profile of the ratio of the TPEF signals epi-collected by the confocal and the non-descanned ports of a scanning microscope, independently of the anisotropy factor g and of the absorption coefficient µ(a) of the medium. The method is validated experimentally on tissue-mimicking optical phantoms, and is shown to have potential for imaging the scattering coefficient of heterogeneous media.

  14. Two-dimensional modeling of multiply scattered laser radiation in optically dense aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Embury, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The discrete ordinates finite element radiation transport code TWOTRAN is applied to describe the multiple scattering of a laser beam from a reflecting target. For a model scenario involving a 99% relative humidity rural aerosol, we compute the average intensity of the scattered radiation and correction factors to the Lambert-Beer law arising from multiple scattering. As our results indicate, two-dimensional x-y and r-z geometry modeling can reliably describe a realistic three-dimensional scenario. Specific results are presented for the two visual ranges of 1.52 and 0.76 km which show that for sufficiently high aerosol concentrations (e.g., equivalent to V = 0.76 km) the target signature in a distant detector becomes dominated by multiply scattered radiation from interactions of the laser light with the aerosol environment.

  15. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  16. Single scattering solution for radiative transfer through Rayleigh and aerosol atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is presented to the radiative transfer of the solar irradiation through a turbid atmosphere, based on the single-scattering approximation, i.e., an assumption that a photon that underwent scattering either leaves the top of the atmosphere or strikes the surface. The solution depends on a special idealization of the scattering phase function of the aerosols. The equations developed are subsequently applied to analyze quantitatively the enhancement of the surface irradiation and the enhancement of the scattered radiant emittance as seen from above the atmosphere, caused by the surface reflectance and atmospheric back scattering. An order of magnitude error analysis is presented.

  17. Using Single-Scattering Albedo Spectral Curvature to Characterize East Asian Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral dependence of aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) has been used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, by analyzing SSA measured at four wavelengths, 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm from the Aerosol Robotic Network data set, we find that the SSA spectra over East Asia are frequently peaked at 675 nm. In these cases, we suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Aerosol SSA spectral curvatures for East Asia during fall and winter are considerably larger than those found in places primarily dominated by biomass burning or dust aerosols. SSA curvature is found to increase as the SSA magnitude decreases. The curvature increases with coarse mode fraction (CMF) to a CMF value of about 0.4, then slightly decreases or remains constant at larger CMF. Mie calculations further verify that the strongest SSA curvature occurs at approx. 40% dust fraction, with 10% scattering aerosol fraction. The nonmonotonic SSA spectral dependence is likely associated with enhanced absorption in the shortwave by dust, absorption by black carbon at longer wavelengths, and also the flattened absorption optical depth spectral dependence due to the increased particle size.

  18. Hydration State of the Ambient Aerosol in the North Pacific Ocean from Controlled Relative Humidity Light Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, M. J.; Carrico, K.; Kus, P.; Quinn, T.; Bates, T.

    2002-12-01

    The hydration state of the ambient aerosol over the North Pacific was studied onboard the R/V Ronald Brown during ACE-Asia in spring 2001. Determination of whether ambient aerosols exist in a "dry" state, "hydrated" state, or a mixture of both states is important in determining the radiative effects of aerosols and their influence on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Three nephelometers measured aerosol light scattering coefficients as a function of controlled relative humidity (20% < RH < 85%), wavelength of light (450, 550, and 700 nm), and particle diameter (Dp) <10 um and 1 um. One nephelometer was at "dry" conditions (RH = 19 +/- 5%) while a second downstream nephelometer was operated with RH scanning between 35% and 85%, while alternating the scans so they start at the low RH "dry" condition or the high RH "hydrated" condition. A third nephelometer was operated at an intermediate RH of 50 +/- 8%. In the latter, the aerosol only experienced decreasing RH conditions from their ambient state. The intermediate RH light scattering measurement was made because it likely did not perturb the aerosol from its ambient hydration state as the aerosol generally would not have deliquesced or crystallized for such a change in RH conditions (i.e. changed phase from a solution drop to a dry crystal). Light scattering values vs. RH (f(RH)) provides humidograms that were classified and fit to functions according to whether the structure followed a smooth monotonic function or deliquescent behavior (step changes in f(RH) with a possible hysteresis loop). Deliquescent behavior was observed 40% of the time with Dp < 1 um and 56% of the time with Dp < 10 um, likely due to the influence of coarse mode seasalt aerosol. The deliquescence RH was 77 +/- 2% while the efflorescence RH was 41 +/- 2% for all humidograms demonstrating deliquescence. The intermediate RH nephelometer measured light scattering values on the lower "dry" branch of the hysteresis loop 9% of the time, in between

  19. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity: a comparison between measurements made at three different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.

    The water uptake by fine aerosol particles in the atmosphere has been investigated at three rural National Parks in the United States (Great Smoky Mountains, Grand Canyon and Big Bend National Parks). The relative humidity (RH) of sample aerosols was varied from less than 20% to greater than 90% using Perma Pure drying tubes as the scattering coefficient of the aerosol was measured with a Radiance Research M903 nephelometer. Data from these studies show that growth curves at all the three sites are similar in shape but the magnitude of growth can vary considerably from day to day. The growth curves from Great Smoky Mountains show smooth continuous growth over the entire range of RH, while the growth curves from the Grand Canyon and Big Bend show smooth and continuous growth on some days and deliquescence on other days. Comparing 12-h filter samples of chemical composition data with the aerosol growth curves, we find that higher fractions of soluble inorganic compounds (sulfate and nitrate) produce growth curves of greater magnitude than do higher concentrations of either organic carbon or soil material.

  20. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  1. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  2. Background Maritime Aerosol: Their Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of human induced change in the aerosol concentration and properties, or the aerosol response to climate change (e.g. droughts producing fires or dust) should be measured relative to a "background aerosol". How to define this background aerosol, so that it is both measurable and useful? Here we use 10 stations located in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to answer this question. Using a data set of the spectral optical thickness measured by the Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET), extending 1-3 years, we find the background conditions for these stations. The oceanic background aerosol is the result of ocean emission and spray, and some residual long lived continental aerosol. Its source is very broadly spread and is expected to vary little in time. Pollution or dust sources are from specific locations, emitted and transported to the measuring site in specific combination of meteorological conditions. Therefore they are expected to vary with time. It follows that the background aerosol can be identified as the median for conditions with small variations. To define the background we compute the median of N consequent measurements. We use N=50 that in average cloudy conditions corresponds to 2-3 days of measurements and N=100 (4-5 days). Most high polluted or dusty conditions correspond to data sequences with high standard deviation (greater than 0.02 in optical thickness) and are excluded. From the remaining N point running medians with low standard deviations we derive again the median. This excludes those rare cases of pollution or dust that is stable during the N measurements. The results show that the background aerosol over the Pacific Ocean is characterize by optical thickness of 0.055 at 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 0.74. Over the Atlantic Ocean the values are 0.070 and 1.1 respectively, with little influence of the assumed value of N (50 or 100). The derivation of the background uses 20,000 and 5000 medians respectively that passed the

  3. Measurements of the scattering coefficients of intralipid solutions by a femtosecond optical Kerr gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Junyi; Yang, Yi; Si, Jinhai; Tan, Wenjiang; Chen, Feng; Yi, Wenhui; Hou, Xun

    2011-04-01

    An ultrafast optical Kerr gate (OKG) in femtosecond time scale was used to determine the scattering coefficients of intralipids, in which the BI2O3-B2O3-SiO2 oxide glass was employed as the Kerr medium. Because of the joint action of the time gate and a transient spatial gate that was induced in the Kerr materials by the gating beam, more precise scattering coefficients could be obtained. Our experimental results show that, for low turbid media, the scattering coefficients measured using the OKG method are similar to those measured using the collimated transmittance (CT) approach, while for highly turbid media, the results obtained using the OKG method are bigger than those using the CT approach.

  4. [Characteristics and Parameterization for Atmospheric Extinction Coefficient in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-na; Zhao, Pu-sheng; He, Di; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the characteristics of atmospheric extinction coefficient in Beijing, systematic measurements had been carried out for atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 concentration, scattering coefficient, black carbon, reactive gases, and meteorological parameters from 2013 to 2014. Based on these data, we compared some published fitting schemes of aerosol light scattering enhancement factor [ f(RH)], and discussed the characteristics and the key influence factors for atmospheric extinction coefficient. Then a set of parameterization models of atmospheric extinction coefficient for different seasons and different polluted levels had been established. The results showed that aerosol scattering accounted for more than 94% of total light extinction. In the summer and autumn, the aerosol hygroscopic growth caused by high relative humidity had increased the aerosol scattering coefficient by 70 to 80 percent. The parameterization models could reflect the influencing mechanism of aerosol and relative humidity upon ambient light extinction, and describe the seasonal variations of aerosol light extinction ability.

  5. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City: Comparison with Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Miranda, G. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Four photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) for aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The four sites included: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP); a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac; a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch; and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. A similar campaign was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA in January-February, 2003. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering at the T0 site will be presented. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of

  6. Optical scattering coefficient estimated by optical coherence tomography correlates with collagen content in ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2011-09-01

    Optical scattering coefficient from ex vivo unfixed normal and malignant ovarian tissue was quantitatively extracted by fitting optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-line signals to a single scattering model. 1097 average A-line measurements at a wavelength of 1310 nm were performed at 108 sites obtained from 18 ovaries. The average scattering coefficient obtained from the normal tissue group consisted of 833 measurements from 88 sites was 2.41 mm-1 (+/-0.59), while the average coefficient obtained from the malignant tissue group consisted of 264 measurements from 20 sites was 1.55 mm-1 (+/-0.46). The malignant ovarian tissue showed significant lower scattering than the normal group (p < 0.001). The amount of collagen within OCT imaging depth was analyzed from the tissue histological section stained with Sirius Red. The average collagen area fraction (CAF) obtained from the normal tissue group was 48.4% (+/-12.3%), while the average CAF obtained from the malignant tissue group was 11.4% (+/-4.7%). A statistical significance of the collagen content was found between the two groups (p < 0.001). These results demonstrated that quantitative measurements of optical scattering coefficient from OCT images could be a potential powerful method for ovarian cancer detection.

  7. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for scattering anisotropy coefficient determination in dental-resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Carrasco, Irene M.; Ghinea, Razvan; Pérez, María M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and its applications. Among the key optical properties of biological media is the angular distribution of the scattered light, characterized by the average cosine of the scattering angle, called the scattering anisotropy coefficient (g). The value of g can be determined by experimentally irradiating the material with a laser beam and making angular-scattering measurements in a goniometer. In this work, an experimental technique was used to determine g by means of goniometric measurements of the laser light scattered off two different dental-resin composites (classified as nano and hybrid). To assess the accuracy of the experimental method, a Mie theory-based computational model was used. Independent measurements were used to determine some of the required input parameters for computation of the theoretical model. The g values estimated with the computational method (nano-filled: 0.9399; hybrid: 0.8975) and the values calculated with the experimental method presented (nano-filled: 0.98297 +/- 0.00021; hybrid: 0.95429 +/- 0.00014) agreed well for both dental resins, with slightly higher experimental values. The higher experimental values may indicate that the scattering particle causes more narrow-angle scattering than does a perfect sphere of equal volume, assuming that with more spherical scattering particles the scattering anisotropy coefficient increases. Since g represents the angular distribution of the scattered light, values provided by both the experimental and the computational methods show a strongly forward-directed scattering in the dental resins studied, more pronounced in the nano-filled composite than in the hybrid composite.

  8. Simultaneous forward- and backward-hemisphere elastic-light-scattering patterns of respirable-size aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Gustavo E.; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.; Aptowicz, Kevin; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2006-10-01

    Two-dimensional angular optical scattering (TAOS) patterns of aerosols are measured simultaneously from the forward hemisphere 15°<θ<90° as well as the backward hemisphere 90°<θ<165° (detecting 63% of the 4π sr of scattered light) by using an ellipsoidal reflector and an intensified CCD detector. TAOS patterns were obtained from polystyrene-latex spheres (individuals and aggregates) and from single Bacillus subtilis spores. These information-rich patterns, measured with a single laser pulse for individual particles on the fly, suggest that forward-TAOS and backward-TAOS measurements may be used for rapid classification of single aerosol particles.

  9. Adhesion of Mineral and Soot Aerosols can Strongly Affect their Scattering and Absorption Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Jana M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method to compute the optical cross sections and the Stokes scattering matrix for polydisperse mineral aerosols (modeled as homogeneous spheres) covered with a large number of much smaller soot particles. These results are compared with the Lorenz-Mie results for a uniform external mixture of mineral and soot aerosols. We show that the effect of soot particles adhering to large mineral particles can be to change the extinction and scattering cross sections and the asymmetry parameter quite substantially. The effect on the phase function and degree of linear polarization can be equally significant.

  10. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo and Asymmetry Parameter from MFRSR Observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Barnard, James C.

    2007-06-15

    Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94  << OLE Object: Picture (Metafile) >> ). The single-scattering albedo ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ). In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> and << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Science Program (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~ 5 << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) to those obtained from measurements.

  11. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficients for weakly scattering, agar spheres in agar phantoms

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Anderson, Janelle J.; Herd, Maria-Teresa; Ma, Darryl; Haak, Alexander; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Zagzebski, James A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Hall, Timothy J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Applicability of ultrasound phantoms to biological tissue has been limited because most phantoms have generally used strong scatterers. The objective was to develop very weakly scattering phantoms, whose acoustic scattering properties are likely closer to those of tissues and then compare theoretical simulations and experimental backscatter coefficient (BSC) results. The phantoms consisted of agar spheres of various diameters (nominally between 90 and 212 μm), containing ultrafiltered milk, suspended in an agar background. BSC estimates were performed at two institutions over the frequency range 1–13 MHz, and compared to three models. Excellent agreement was shown between the two laboratory results as well as with the three models. PMID:20707460

  12. Aerosol single-scattering albedo retrieval over North Africa using critical reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kelley C.

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol are similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as to measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from the

  13. Aerosol single scattering albedo retrieval with various techniques in the UV and visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, A.; Krotkov, N.; Blumthaler, M.; Bais, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Balis, D.; Schmidhauser, R.; Kouremeti, N.; Giannakaki, E.; Arola, A.

    2009-08-01

    The most important aerosol properties for determining aerosol effect in the solar radiation reaching the earth's surface are the aerosol extinction optical depth and the single scattering albedo (SSA). Most of the latest studies, dealing with aerosol direct or indirect effects, are based on the analysis of aerosol optical depth in a regional or global scale, while SSA is typically assumed based on theoretical assumptions and not direct measurements. Especially for the retrieval of SSA in the UV wavelengths only limited work has been available in the literature. In the frame of SCOUT-O3 project, the variability of the aerosol SSA in the UV and visible range was investigated during an experimental campaign. The campaign took place in July 2006 at Thessaloniki, Greece, an urban environment with high temporal aerosol variability. SSA values were calculated using measured aerosol optical depth, direct and diffuse irradiance as input to radiative transfer models. The measurements were performed by co-located UV-MFRSR and AERONET CIMEL filter radiometers, as well as by two spectroradiometers. In addition, vertical aerosol profile measurements with LIDAR and in-situ information about the aerosol optical properties at ground level with a nephelometer and an aethalometer were available. The ground-based measurements revealed a strong diurnal cycle in the SSA measured in-situ at ground level (from 0.75 to 0.87 at 450nm), which could be related to the variability of the wind speed, the boundary layer height and the local aerosol emissions. The reasons for SSA differences obtained by different techniques are analyzed for the first time to provide recommendations for more accurate column SSA measurements.

  14. Statistics of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and optical depth using lidar measurement over Lanzhou, China since 2005-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Wang, Z.; Tian, P.; Wang, J.; Zhang, L.; Quan, X.

    2013-06-01

    The aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and optical depth over Lanzhou in China were observed under no precipitation and dust free condition using the micropulse lidar CE370-2 from September 2005 to July 2008. The statistics of the variations of monthly average aerosol optical depth (AOD) and daily average AOD, frequency distribution of daily average AOD, and the seasonal variation of aerosol vertical distribution were analyzed based on the observation data. The results showed that the daily average AOD of Main Observatory and City Observatory was 87.8% and 78.2% ranged below 0.4 respectively with similar frequency distribution patterns. The AOD in autumn and winter were larger than that in spring and summer, and AOD in suburb was in certain extent smaller than that in city of Lanzhou. Aerosol existed in the layer below 4km, and its extinction coefficient decreased with increasing of height.

  15. Determination of Absorption and Scattering Coefficients for Nonhomogeneous Media: II. Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    prepared from a glass of known absorption coefficient variation. The new model produces an accuracy inprovement up to a factor of 2.5 over the Kubelka ... Munk theory. Off-axis scattering measurements were made with improved instrumentation between 0.33 and 2.7 micrometers. The model was then applied to

  16. A simple method for finding the scattering coefficients of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Seth S.

    2015-09-15

    Quantum walks are roughly analogous to classical random walks, and similar to classical walks they have been used to find new (quantum) algorithms. When studying the behavior of large graphs or combinations of graphs, it is useful to find the response of a subgraph to signals of different frequencies. In doing so, we can replace an entire subgraph with a single vertex with variable scattering coefficients. In this paper, a simple technique for quickly finding the scattering coefficients of any discrete-time quantum graph will be presented. These scattering coefficients can be expressed entirely in terms of the characteristic polynomial of the graph’s time step operator. This is a marked improvement over previous techniques which have traditionally required finding eigenstates for a given eigenvalue, which is far more computationally costly. With the scattering coefficients we can easily derive the “impulse response” which is the key to predicting the response of a graph to any signal. This gives us a powerful set of tools for rapidly understanding the behavior of graphs or for reducing a large graph into its constituent subgraphs regardless of how they are connected.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy and Mie scattering of acetylene aerosols formed in a low temperature diffusion cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming and spectroscopically characterizing cryogenic aerosols formed in a low temperature gas cell. By adjusting the cell pressure, gas composition and flow rate, the size distribution of aerosol particles can be varied over a wide range. The combination of pressure and flow rate determine the residence time of the aerosols in the cell and hence the time available for the particles to grow. FTIR spectroscopy, over the range from 600/cm to 6000/cm, is used to characterize the aerosols. The particle size distribution can be varied so that, at one extreme, the spectra show only absorption features associated with the infrared active vibrational bands and, at the other, they display both absorption and Mie scattering. In the latter case, Mie scattering theory is used to obtain semiquantitative aerosol size distributions, which can be understood in terms of the interplay between nucleation and condensation. In the case of acetylene aerosols, the infrared spectra suggest that the particles exist in the high temperature cubic phase of the solid.

  18. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  19. Aerosol chemical composition and light scattering during a winter season in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Gao, Jian; Wang, Han; Chai, Faihe; Wang, Shulan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate PM2.5 contributions to light scattering under different air pollution levels, PM2.5 and its major chemical components, PM10, size-segregated water-soluble ions, and aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) under dry conditions were measured at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013 when heavy pollution events frequently occurred. Measurements were categorized into three pollution levels including heavy-polluted (Air Quality Index (AQI) ≥ 200), light-polluted (200 > AQI ≥ 100) and clean periods (AQI < 100). The average PM2.5 mass concentration was 248 μg m-3 during the heavy-polluted period, which was 2.4 and 5.6 times of those during the light-polluted (104 μg m-3) and clean (44 μg m-3) periods, respectively. The concentrations of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ increased much more than those of OC and EC during the heavy-polluted period compared with those during the light-polluted and clean periods. Good correlations between PM2.5 and bsp were found (R2 > 0.95) during the different pollution levels. The mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was 4.9 m2 g-1 during the heavy-polluted period, which was higher than those during the light-polluted (4.3 m2 g-1) and clean periods (3.6 m2 g-1). To further evaluate the impact of individual chemical components of PM2.5 on light scattering, a multiple linear regression equation of measured bsp against the mass concentration of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, Organic Matter (OM), EC, Fine Soil (FS), Coarse Matter (CM) and Other chemical compounds were performed. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and OM were the dominant species contributing to bsp under both dry and ambient conditions. OM contributed more to bsp than the sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 did under the dry condition during all the pollution periods and this was also the case under the ambient condition during the light-polluted and clean periods. However, the total contributions of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 to bsp under the ambient condition was 55%, much more than the 29% contribution

  20. Simple aerosol correction technique based on the spectral relationships of the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectances for atmospheric correction over the oceans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyun; Park, Young-Je; Kim, Wonkook; Lee, Boram

    2016-12-26

    An estimation of the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectance is an important part of the atmospheric correction procedure in satellite ocean color data processing. Most commonly, the utilization of two near-infrared (NIR) bands to estimate the aerosol optical properties has been adopted for the estimation of the effects of aerosols. Previously, the operational Geostationary Color Ocean Imager (GOCI) atmospheric correction scheme relies on a single-scattering reflectance ratio (SSE), which was developed for the processing of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) data to determine the appropriate aerosol models and their aerosol optical thicknesses. The scheme computes reflectance contributions (weighting factor) of candidate aerosol models in a single scattering domain then spectrally extrapolates the single-scattering aerosol reflectance from NIR to visible (VIS) bands using the SSE. However, it directly applies the weight value to all wavelengths in a multiple-scattering domain although the multiple-scattering aerosol reflectance has a non-linear relationship with the single-scattering reflectance and inter-band relationship of multiple scattering aerosol reflectances is non-linear. To avoid these issues, we propose an alternative scheme for estimating the aerosol reflectance that uses the spectral relationships in the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectance between different wavelengths (called SRAMS). The process directly calculates the multiple-scattering reflectance contributions in NIR with no residual errors for selected aerosol models. Then it spectrally extrapolates the reflectance contribution from NIR to visible bands for each selected model using the SRAMS. To assess the performance of the algorithm regarding the errors in the water reflectance at the surface or remote-sensing reflectance retrieval, we compared the SRAMS atmospheric correction results with the SSE atmospheric correction using both simulations and in situ match-ups with the

  1. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  2. Quantifying organic aerosol single scattering albedo over the tropical biomass burning regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jung-Eun; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2016-12-01

    Despite growing evidence of light-absorbing organic aerosols (OAs), their contribution to the Earth's radiative budget is still poorly understood. In this study we derived a new empirical relationship that binds OA single scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of light scattering to extinction, with sulfate + nitrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) and applied this method to estimate OA SSA over the tropical biomass burning regions. This method includes division of the attribution of black carbon (BC) and OA absorption aerosol optical depths from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observation and determination of the fine-mode ratio of sea-salt and dust AODs from several atmospheric chemistry models. Our best estimate of OA SSA over the tropical biomass burning regions is 0.91 at 550 nm. Uncertainties associated with observations and models permit a value range of 0.82-0.93. Furthermore, by using the estimated OA SSA and comprehensive observations including AERONET, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), we examined the first global estimate of sulfate + nitrate AOD through a semi-observational approach. The global mean sulfate + nitrate AOD of 0.017 is in the lower range of the values obtained from 21 models participated in AeroCom phase II. The results imply that most aerosol models as well as climate models, which commonly use OA SSA of 0.96-1.0, have so far ignored light absorption by OAs and have overestimated light scattering by sulfate + nitrate aerosols. This indicates that the actual aerosol direct radiative forcing should be less negative than currently believed.

  3. T-matrix calculations of fractal black carbon atmospheric aerosol particle optical scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anna; Boness, David

    2008-05-01

    To better constrain global climate change computer models, and thereby to more fully understand the full extent of anthropogenic climate change, it is necessary to understand the physics of light scattering from those atmospheric aerosol particles that are caused by human activities. The IPCC AR4 report on the physical basis of climate change lists uncertainty in the effects of black carbon aerosol particles, caused by burning fossil fuels and organic matter, as one of the greatest uncertainties in current climate change understanding. This study hopes to increase the knowledge of how aerosols contribute to radiative forcing by using more realistic modeling of scattering properties. We use D. W. Mackowski's T- matrix code on fractal aggregates of uniform spherical monomers and compare this with fractal scattering predicted by the Raleigh-Debye-Gans approximation. The T-matrix code is checked for accuracy with one spherical particle as found with Mie theory. Scattering properties found using the T-matrix method are performed as a function of fractal dimension and number of monomers. Preliminary results will be presented. Future work will involve comparison with soot particle optical scattering measurements made at Seattle University.

  4. Calibration of an integrating sphere for determining the absorption coefficient of scattering suspensions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, N B; Prézelin, B B

    1993-11-20

    Measuring the absolute absorption of suspensions of absorbing particles with unknown scattering characteristics is not possible in conventional spectrophotometers or in integrating spheres that have the sample located outside the sphere. A method for the calibration and use of an integrating sphere with a centrally located sample to measure absolute absorption coefficients of scattering suspensions is presented. Under the tested conditions the integrating sphere used in this study was insensitive to changes in the scattering coefficient of the sample but had a nonlinear response to increasing absorption of the sample, which could be corrected with an empirically derived function. This response was analyzed by using a Monte Carlo simulation, and results indicated that amplification of the absorption signal was primarily due to photons reflected from the sphere surface and the baffle reentering the cuvette. The calibration procedure described here may be generally applicable to spheres of different configurati n. An example of the use of the sphere for determining the absorption and scattering coefficients of marine phytoplankton samples is presented.

  5. Scattering and Absorption of E&M radiation by small particles-applications to study impact of biomass aerosols on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bililign, Solomon; Singh, Sujeeta; Fiddler, Marc; Smith, Damon

    2015-03-01

    The phenomena of scattering, absorption, and emission of light and other electromagnetic radiation by small particles are central to many science and engineering disciplines. Absorption of solar radiation by black carbon aerosols has a significant impact on the atmospheric energy distribution and hydrologic processes. By intercepting incoming solar radiation before it reaches the surface, aerosols heat the atmosphere and, in turn, cool the surface. The magnitude of the atmospheric forcing induced by anthropogenic absorbing aerosols, mainly black carbon (BC) emitted from biomass burning and combustion processes has been suggested to be comparable to the atmospheric forcing by all greenhouse gases (GHGs). Despite the global abundance of biomass burning for cooking, forests clearing for agriculture and wild fires, the optical properties of these aerosols have not been characterized at wide range of wavelengths. Our laboratory uses a combination of Cavity ring down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry to measure optical properties of (extinction, absorption and scattering coefficients) of biomass aerosols. Preliminary results will be presented. Supported by the Department of Defense under Grant #W911NF-11-1-0188.

  6. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  7. Light-scattering method of determining the second virial coefficient for simple molecules and oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Einaga, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Fumiaki; Yamakawa, Hiromi

    1992-05-14

    A procedure of determining the molecular weight and second virial coefficient for simple molecules and oligomers from light-scattering measurements on a binary solution is presented on the basis of the well-established theory of fluctuations in multicomponent systems. It consists of determining first total isotropic scattering from the solution and then the composition scattering by subtracting from the former the density scattering (the Einstein-Smoluchowski term), where the values at finite concentrations should be used for the density scattering and also for the refractive index and its increment appearing in the optical constant. The required value of the density scattering is obtained by multiplying its observed value for the pure solvent by the concentration correction factor that is evaluated from a proper relationship between the refractive index and density of the solution. From experimental results obtained for a solution of toluene in cyclohexane at 25.0 {degrees}C as an example, the Lorentz-Lorenz equation is recommended as such a relationship. It is demonstrated that the multiple scattering theory by Bullough, which has often been used, is erroneous. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Absorption Coefficient, Molecular Composition, and Photodegradation of Different Types of Brown Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Aiona, P. K.; Nizkorodov, S.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols that absorb solar radiation have a direct effect on climate. Brown carbon (BrC) represents the type of carbonaceous aerosols characterized by large absorption coefficients in the near-UV range of the spectrum. BrC can be either directly emitted into the atmosphere from combustion sources, or be formed in the atmosphere through multi-phase reactions, such as aging of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mediated by ammonium sulfate (AS). Under the conditions of exposure to solar radiation, both primary and secondary BrC can potentially change their molecular composition and optical properties as a result of photodegradation of chromophoric compounds. This presentation will discuss the molecular level composition, the absorption and fluorescence spectra, and the mechanism of photodegradation among several representative types of BrC. The primary BrC samples include aerosol produced by smoldering wood combustion. The secondary BrC samples include AS aged products of chamber-generated SOA, products of reaction between methylglyoxal and AS, and SOA produced by the hogh-NOx photooxdiation of aromatic compounds, such as naphthalene. This presentation will also include preliminary data on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of photo-degraded bioaerosols. In all cases, absorption spectra of extracted bulk samples are measured during irradiation by a known flux of UV or visible light. The molecular level composition of the fresh and photobleached samples are characterized by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS). Photobleaching of BrC is found to occur over a range of atmospherically relevant time scales. In many cases, the molecular level composition of photobleached BrC exhibits only subtle changes suggesting that the optical and fluorescence properties of BrC are controlled by a few compounds present in low quantities. The observed fluorescence from non-biological BrC indicates potential issues in using fluorescence

  9. Determination of self-diffusion coefficients by quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of levitated Ni droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A.; Stüber, S.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Heinen, O.; Unruh, T.

    2008-03-01

    Conventional techniques to measure diffusion coefficients in liquid metals and alloys are hampered by buoyancy-driven convective fluid flow and chemical reactions of the liquids with container material. To overcome these obstacles we combined containerless processing via electromagnetic levitation with quasielastic neutron scattering. This combination allowed us to study the atomic self-motion in liquid nickel within a broad temperature range from 200K above to more than 200K below the melting point, in the metastable regime of an undercooled melt. Other than in liquid Sn the temperature dependence of the Ni self-diffusion coefficient is well described with an Arrhenius law.

  10. Extracting scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of tissue using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.

    2012-03-01

    Determination of tissue optical properties is important as it will lead to better design of optical diagnostic tools, improvement in laser therapy, photo dynamic therapy dosimetry, drug pharmacokinetics, etc. We have developed a theoretical model for OCT signal using Monte Carlo simulation that allows us to fit values extracted from the OCT signal, namely, reflectance, ρ, and the total optical attenuation coefficient, μt, to obtain optical properties of tissue (scattering coefficient, μs, and anisotropy factor, g). Using this method we have extracted optical properties of different tissue types, e.g., skin, muscle, liver, and brain of mouse.

  11. Cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice. I. Lattice virial coefficients and large scattering lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dean; Schaefer, Thomas

    2006-01-15

    We study cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice using an effective field theory. We work in the unitary limit in which the scattering length is much larger than the interparticle spacing. In this article we focus on the equation of state at temperatures above the Fermi temperature and compare lattice simulations to the virial expansion on the lattice and in the continuum. We find that in the unitary limit lattice discretization errors in the second virial coefficient are significantly enhanced. As a consequence the equation of state does not show the universal scaling behavior expected in the unitary limit. We suggest that scaling can be improved by tuning the second virial coefficient rather than the scattering length.

  12. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  13. The effect of scatter and attenuation on aerosol deposition as determined by gamma scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Berridge, M S; Nelson, A D; Heald, D L

    2001-01-01

    Gamma scintigraphy is often used to quantify deposition patterns from aerosol inhalers. The errors caused by scatter and tissue attenuation in planar Tc-99m gamma scintigraphy were investigated based on the data collected from four subjects in this study. Several error correction methods were tested. The results from two scatter correction methods, Jaszczak's method and factor analysis of dynamic sequences (FADS), were similar. Scatter accounted for 20% of raw data in the whole lung, 20% in the oropharynx, and 43% in the central airways and esophagus. Three attenuation correction methods were investigated and compared. These were: uniform attenuation correction (UAC), a known method used for inhalation drug imaging work; the broad-beam attenuation correction used for organ imaging in nuclear medicine; and a narrow-beam inhomogeneous tissue attenuation correction proposed in this study. The three methods differed significantly (p < 0.05), but all indicated that attenuation is a severe quantification problem. The narrow beam attenuation correction with scatter correction, showed that raw data underestimated tracer deposition by 44% in the lung, 137% in the oropharynx, and 153% in the trachea/esophageal region. To quantify aerosol lung deposition using planar scintigraphy even in relative terms, corrections are necessary. Much of the literature concerning quantified aerosol dose distributions measured by gamma scintigraphy needs to be interpreted carefully.

  14. Orbit Optimization and Scattering Coefficient Analysis for the Proposed GLORIA System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the optimization of an orbit for a Low-Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite for coastal coverage over Antarctic and United States shorelines as part of the Geostationary/Low-Earth Orbiting Radar Image Acquisition (GLORIA) System. Simulations over a range of orbital parameters are performed to determine the optimal orbit. Scattering coefficients are computed for the optimal orbit throughout the day and characterized to compare various scenarios for which link budget comparisons could then be made.

  15. Aerosol light absorption measurements during the Reno Aerosol Optics Experiment: Photoacoustic measurements and a multiple-scattering model for the aethalometer response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmueller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The filter used on the aethalometer is a multiple scattering substrate, yet the current parameterization of the instrument simply uses Beer's law for its analysis when obtaining black carbon concentration. Specific characterizations of the instrument response, where filter attenuation was obtained as a function of wavelength, gave the following impressions. 1. Filter attenuation generally increases inversely with wavelength for all aerosol types. 2. When subjected to a constant flow of low single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-constant response. The response is highest when the filter single scattering albdeo is highest, and it decreases as the filter blackens. 3. When subjected to a constant flow of essentially unity single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-zero response, even though it should do so. A few percent of scattering is converted to absorption, because the addition of purely scattering aerosol is analogous to a simple thickening of the filter. The effect is more pronounced at shorter wavelengths, and is related to item 1. The multiple scattering model reproduces these behaviors. The photoacoustic instrument light absorption calibration with nitrogen dioxide gas will be presented along with closure data from extinction minus scattering as evaluations of its measurement accuracy.

  16. Relationship between the Kubelka-Munk scattering and radiative transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Thennadil, Suresh N

    2008-07-01

    The relationship between the Kubelka-Munk (K-M) and the transport scattering coefficient is obtained through a semi-empirical approach. This approach gives the same result as that given by Gate [Appl. Opt.13, 236 (1974)] when the incident beam is diffuse. This result and those given by Star et al. [Phys. Med. Biol.33, 437 (1988)] and Brinkworth [Appl. Opt.11, 1434 (1972)] are compared with the exact solution of the radiative transfer equation over a large range of optical properties. It is found that the latter expressions, which include an absorption component, do not give accurate results over the range considered. Using the semi-empirical approach, the relationship between the K-M and the transport scattering coefficient is derived for the case where the incident light is collimated. It is shown that although the K-M equation is derived based on diffuse incident light, it can also represent very well the reflectance from a slab of infinite thickness when the incident light is collimated. However, in this case the relationship between the coefficients has to include a function that is dependent on the anisotropy factor. Analysis indicates that the K-M transform achieves the objective of obtaining a measure that gives the ratio of absorption to scattering effects for both diffuse and collimated incident beams over a large range of optical properties.

  17. Multi-angle Light Scattering Device for Aerosol Particle Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    SUBJECT TERMS b. ABSTRACT 2. REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Kansas State University 2 Fairchild Hall Manhattan , KS 66506 -1100 31-Jul-2014...currently measuring scattering from Arizona road dust, various sizes of abrasive grits and planning soot studies, some cloud processed. The project

  18. An investigation into particle shape effects on the light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, Brian Steven

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. The radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere can be affected by mineral dust through both direct and indirect means. Mineral dust can directly scatter or absorb incoming visible solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial IR radiation. Dust particles can also serve as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby increasing albedo, or provide sites for heterogeneous reactions with trace gas species, which are indirect effects. Unfortunately, many of these processes are poorly understood due to incomplete knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the particles including dust concentration and global distribution, as well as aerosol composition, mixing state, and size and shape distributions. Much of the information about mineral dust aerosol loading and spatial distribution is obtained from remote sensing measurements which often rely on measuring the scattering or absorption of light from these particles and are thus subject to errors arising from an incomplete understanding of the scattering processes. The light scattering properties of several key mineral components of atmospheric dust have been measured at three different wavelengths in the visible. In addition, measurements of the scattering were performed for several authentic mineral dust aerosols, including Saharan sand, diatomaceous earth, Iowa loess soil, and palagonite. These samples include particles that are highly irregular in shape. Using known optical constants along with measured size distributions, simulations of the light scattering process were performed using both Mie and T-Matrix theories. Particle shapes were approximated as a distribution of spheroids for the T-Matrix calculations. It was found that the theoretical model simulations differed markedly from experimental measurements of the light scattering, particularly near the mid-range and near backscattering angles. In

  19. A case study of dust aerosol radiative properties over Lanzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Bao, J.; Zhou, B.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2010-02-01

    The vertical distribution of dust aerosol and its radiative properties are analysed using the data measured by the micropulse lidar, profiling microwave radiometer, sunphotometer, particulate monitor, and nephelometer at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) during a dust storm from 27 March to 29 March 2007. The analysis shows that the dust aerosol mainly exists below 2 km in height, and the dust aerosol extinction coefficient decreases with height. The temporal evolution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the dust storm is characterized by a sub-maximum at 22:00 (Beijing Time) on 27 March and a maximum at 12:00 on 28 March. The AOD derived by lidar is compared with that obtained by sunphotometer, and shows a good consistency. The PM10 concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient share identical variation trends, and their maximums both appear at 22:00 on 27 March. The aerosol extinction coefficient and relative humidity have the same trends and their maximums appear at identical heights, showing a correlation between extinction coefficient and relative humidity known as aerosol hygroscopicity. Nevertheless, the correlation between aerosol extinction coefficient and temperature cannot be obviously seen. The aerosol extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and PM10 concentration present good linear correlations. The correlation coefficients of the aerosol scattering coefficient and PM10 concentration, of aerosol extinction coefficient and PM10 concentration, and of aerosol extinction and scattering coefficient are respectively 0.98, 0.94, and 0.96.

  20. Sizing aerosolized fractal nanoparticle aggregates through Bayesian analysis of wide-angle light scattering (WALS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Will, Stefan; Daun, Kyle J.

    2016-11-01

    Inferring the size distribution of aerosolized fractal aggregates from the angular distribution of elastically scattered light is a mathematically ill-posed problem. This paper presents a procedure for analyzing Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS) data using Bayesian inference. The outcome is probability densities for the recovered size distribution and aggregate morphology parameters. This technique is applied to both synthetic data and experimental data collected on soot-laden aerosols, using a measurement equation derived from Rayleigh-Debye-Gans fractal aggregate (RDG-FA) theory. In the case of experimental data, the recovered aggregate size distribution parameters are generally consistent with TEM-derived values, but the accuracy is impaired by the well-known limited accuracy of RDG-FA theory. Finally, we show how this bias could potentially be avoided using the approximation error technique.

  1. Primary and secondary contributions to aerosol light scattering and absorption in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2009-06-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer, a nephelometer, an aethalometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to measure at ground level real-time aerosol light absorption, scattering, and chemistry at an urban site located in North East Mexico City (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexican Petroleum Institute, denoted by IMP), as part of the Megacity Impact on Regional and Global Environments field experiment, MILAGRO, in March 2006. Photoacoustic and reciprocal nephelometer measurements at 532 nm accomplished with a single instrument compare favorably with conventional measurements made with an aethalometer and a TSI nephelometer. The diurnally averaged single scattering albedo at 532 nm was found to vary from 0.60 to 0.85 with the peak value at midday and the minimum value at 07:00 a.m. local time, indicating that the Mexico City plume is likely to have a net warming effect on local climate. The peak value is associated with strong photochemical generation of secondary aerosol. It is estimated that the photochemical production of secondary aerosol (inorganic and organic) is approximately 75% of the aerosol mass concentration and light scattering in association with the peak single scattering albedo. A strong correlation of aerosol scattering at 532 nm and total aerosol mass concentration was found, and an average mass scattering efficiency factor of 3.8 m2/g was determined. Comparisons of photoacoustic and aethalometer light absorption with oxygenated organic aerosol concentration (OOA) indicate a very small systematic bias of the filter based measurement associated with OOA and the peak aerosol single scattering albedo.

  2. Primary and secondary contributions to aerosol light scattering and absorption in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2008-09-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer, a nephelometer, an aetholemeter, and an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to measure at ground level real-time aerosol light absorption, scattering, and chemistry at an urban site located in north east Mexico City (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexican Petroleum Institute, denoted by IMP), as part of the Megacity Impact on Regional and Global Environments field experiment, MILAGRO, in March 2006. Photoacoustic and reciprocal nephelometer measurements at 532 nm accomplished with a single instrument compare favorably with conventional measurements made with an aethelometer and a TSI nephelometer. The diurnally averaged single scattering albedo at 532 nm was found to vary from 0.60 to 0.85 with the peak value at midday and the minimum value at 7 a.m. local time, indicating that the Mexico City plume is likely to have a net warming effect on local climate. The peak value is associated with strong photochemical generation of secondary aerosol. It is estimated that the same-day photochemical production of secondary aerosol (inorganic and organic) is approximately 40 percent of the aerosol mass concentration and light scattering in association with the peak single scattering albedo. A strong correlation of aerosol scattering at 532 nm and total aerosol mass concentration was found, and an average mass scattering efficiency factor of 3.8 m2/g was determined. Comparisons of photoacoustic and aethalometer light absorption with oxygenated organic aerosol concentration (OOA) indicate a very small systematic bias of the filter based measurement associated with OOA and the peak aerosol single scattering albedo.

  3. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  4. On the Inversion of Light Scattering Data into Information on Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A.; Westwater, E.; Cupp, R. E.; Derr, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    The Backus-Gilbert inversion technique was applied to scattering data and calculated examples were given to ascertain its ability to recover the aerosol properties with no a-priori assumptions. In order to cheque this inversion procedure as well as other techniques (such as Daves' and Herman's et al.), a controlled experiment was performed. The experiment dealt with spherical particles the Mie scattering curves of which was measured by use of a dye-laser. These curves were used to accurately determine the refractive index of the particles. Mixtures of three different known sizes were then prepared and the scattering intensity vs. wavelength was measured at 90 deg scattering angle. The mixtures contained also various known relative concentrations of the three sizes. The analysis of the measured results will be shown and discussed.

  5. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  6. Shapes of internally mixed hygroscopic aerosol particles after deliquescence, and their effect on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Freney, Evelyn J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2011-07-01

    Hygroscopic aerosol particles change the magnitude of light scattering through condensation and evaporation of water vapor. We collected aerosol particles from two megacities and observed the particle shapes at various values of relative humidity (RH) using an environmental cell within a transmission electron microscope. Many Mexico City samples had sulfate particles that were embedded within weakly hygroscopic organic aerosol, whereas the Los Angeles samples mainly consisted of externally mixed sulfate particles. For the Mexico City samples, when the RH was increased in the microscope, only the sulfate parts deliquesced, but the entire particle did not become spherical, i.e., particles containing deliquescent phases do not necessarily become spherical upon deliquescence. This result conflicts with the assumption used in many models, i.e., that deliquesced particles become spherical. Using a discrete-dipole approximation to calculate light scattering of simulated particles that resemble the observed ones, we show that, for particles >1.0 μm, the spherical-shape assumption used in Mie theory underestimates the light scattering by ˜50%, with the exact value depending on the sizes and relative volumes of the constituent phases.

  7. Estimation of columnar concentrations of absorbing and scattering fine mode aerosol components using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Ghim, Young Sung

    2016-11-01

    Columnar concentrations of absorbing and scattering components of fine mode aerosols were estimated using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for a site downwind of Seoul. The study period was between March 2012 and April 2013 including the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia campaign in March to May 2012. The Maxwell Garnett mixing rule was assumed for insoluble components embedded in a host solution, while the volume average mixing rule was assumed for the aqueous solution of soluble components. During the DRAGON-Asia campaign the surface concentrations of major components of fine particles were measured. The columnar mass fractions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), mineral dust (MD), and ammonium sulfate (AS) were 1.5, 5.9, 6.6, and 52%, respectively, which were comparable to the mass fractions measured at the surface for BC, OC, and secondary inorganic aerosols at 2.3, 18, and 55%. The vertical distributions of BC and AS were investigated by employing the concept of a column height. While the column height for BC was similar to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, that for AS was 4.4 times higher than the PBL height and increased with air temperature from March to May. The monthly variations of the columnar mass concentrations during the study period were generally well explained in term of meteorology and emission characteristics. However, certain variations of MD were different from those typically observed primarily because only fine mode aerosols were considered.

  8. Optical characterization of thin female breast biopsies based on the reduced scattering coefficient.

    PubMed

    Garofalakis, A; Zacharakis, G; Filippidis, G; Sanidas, E; Tsiftsis, D D; Stathopoulos, E; Kafousi, M; Ripoll, J; Papazoglou, T G

    2005-06-07

    One of the main goals in optical characterization of biopsies is to discern between tissue types. Usually, the theory used for deriving the optical properties of such highly scattering media is based on the diffusion approximation. However, biopsies are usually small in size compared to the transport mean free path and thus cannot be treated with standard diffusion theory. To account for this, an improved theory was developed, by the authors, that can correctly describe light propagation in small geometries (Garofalakis et al 2004 J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 6 725-35). The theory's limit was validated by both Monte Carlo simulations and experiments performed on tissue-like phantoms, and was found to be two transport mean free paths. With the aid of this theory, we have characterized 59 samples of breast tissue including cancerous samples by retrieving their reduced scattering coefficients from time-resolved transmission data. The mean values for the reduced scattering coefficients of the normal and the tumour tissue were measured to be 9.7 +/- 2.2 cm(-1) and 10.8 +/- 1.8 cm(-1), respectively. The correlation with age was also investigated.

  9. Measuring absorption coefficient of scattering liquids using a tube inside an integrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Yolanda; Veenstra, Colin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-04-10

    A method for measuring the absorption coefficient μa of absorbing and scattering liquid samples is presented. The sample is injected into a small transparent tube mounted through an integrating sphere. Two models for determining the absorption coefficient using the relative optical output signal are described and validated using aqueous ink absorbers of 0.5 vol.% (0.3  mm-1a<1.55  mm-1) and 1.0 vol.% (1.0  mm-1a<4.0  mm-1) concentrations with 1 vol.% (μs'≈1.4  mm-1) and 10 vol.% (μs'≈14  mm-1) Intralipid dilutions. The low concentrations give μa and μs values, which are comparable with those of biological tissues. One model assumes a uniform light distribution within the sample, which is valid for low absorption. Another model considers light attenuation that obeys Lambert-Beer's law, which may be used for relatively high absorption. Measurements with low and high scattering samples are done for the wavelength range of 400-900 nm. Measured spectra of purely absorbing samples are within 15% agreement with measurements using standard transmission spectrophotometry. For 0.5 vol.% ink absorbers and at wavelengths below 700 nm, measured μa values are higher for samples with low scattering and lower for those with high scattering. At wavelengths above 700 nm, measured μa values do not vary significantly with amount of scattering. For 1.0 vol.% ink absorbers, measured spectra do not change with low scattering. These results indicate that the method can be used for measuring absorption spectra of scattering liquid samples with optical properties similar to biological absorbers, particularly at wavelengths above 700 nm, which is difficult to accomplish with standard transmission spectrophotometry.

  10. Can we better use existing and emerging computing hardware to embed activity coefficient predictions in complex atmospheric aerosol models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Alibay, Irfan; Ruske, Simon; Hindriksen, Vincent; Noisternig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To predict the evolving concentration, chemical composition and ability of aerosol particles to act as cloud droplets, we rely on numerical modeling. Mechanistic models attempt to account for the movement of compounds between the gaseous and condensed phases at a molecular level. This 'bottom up' approach is designed to increase our fundamental understanding. However, such models rely on predicting the properties of molecules and subsequent mixtures. For partitioning between the gaseous and condensed phases this includes: saturation vapour pressures; Henrys law coefficients; activity coefficients; diffusion coefficients and reaction rates. Current gas phase chemical mechanisms predict the existence of potentially millions of individual species. Within a dynamic ensemble model, this can often be used as justification for neglecting computationally expensive process descriptions. Indeed, on whether we can quantify the true sensitivity to uncertainties in molecular properties, even at the single aerosol particle level it has been impossible to embed fully coupled representations of process level knowledge with all possible compounds, typically relying on heavily parameterised descriptions. Relying on emerging numerical frameworks, and designed for the changing landscape of high-performance computing (HPC), in this study we show that comprehensive microphysical models from single particle to larger scales can be developed to encompass a complete state-of-the-art knowledge of aerosol chemical and process diversity. We focus specifically on the ability to capture activity coefficients in liquid solutions using the UNIFAC method, profiling traditional coding strategies and those that exploit emerging hardware.

  11. Light Absorption in the Stratosphere: Trend, Soot Aerosol Concentration and Contribution by...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Verma, S.; Strwwa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Hamill, P.; Vay, S.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The light absorption coefficient, Beta(a) of the stratospheric aerosol is an important quantity that determines its radiative effects. When combined with the aerosol scattering coefficient, Beta(a) it becomes possible to evaluate the aerosol single scatter albedo, omega = Beta(s)/(Beta(s) + Beta(a)) which is essential for modeling the overall radiative effects of the stratospheric aerosol. Pollack1 determined that omega = 0.98 is a critical value that separates stratospheric cooling from warming.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients by a combined vibrational pure-rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balin, I.; Serikov, I.; Bobrovnikov, S.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; Arshinov, Y.; van den Bergh, H.

    2004-10-01

    Implementation of the pure-rotational Raman (PRR) lidar method for simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients is reported. The isolation of two wavelength domains of the PRR spectrum and the suppression of the elastically scattered light is carried out by a double-grating polychromator. Experiments involving elastic backscatter from dense clouds and a solid target confirm the high level of suppression of the elastic light in the corresponding acquisition channels of the two selected PRR domains. Calibration of the temperature channel was done both by comparison with an experimentally verified atmospheric temperature model profile and by inter-comparison with radiosondes. Night-time temperature profiles with high vertical resolution were obtained up to the lower stratosphere. The PRR temperature profile combined with the water vapor mixing ratio obtained from the ro-vibrational Raman channel is used to estimate the relative humidity.

  13. Discrimination and classification of bio-aerosol particles using optical spectroscopy and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversole, Jay D.

    2011-03-01

    For more than a decade now, there has been significant emphasis for development of sensors of agent aerosols, especially for biological warfare (BW) agents. During this period, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other labs have explored the application of optical and spectroscopic methods relevant to biological composition discrimination to aerosol particle characterization. I will first briefly attempt to establish the connection between sensor performance metrics which are statistically determined, and aerosol particle measurements through the use of computational models, and also describe the challenge of ambient background characterization that would be needed to establish more reliable and deterministic sensor performance predictions. Greater attention will then be devoted to a discussion of basic particle properties and their measurement. The NRL effort has adopted an approach based on direct measurements on individual particles, principally of elastic scatter and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), rather than populations of particles. The development of a LIF instrument using two sequential excitation wavelengths to detect fluorescence in discrete spectral bands will be described. Using this instrument, spectral characteristics of particles from a variety of biological materials including BW agent surrogates, as well as other ``calibration'' particles and some known ambient air constituents will be discussed in terms of the dependence of optical signatures on aerosol particle composition, size and incident laser fluence. Comparison of scattering and emission measurements from particles composed of widely different taxa, as well as from similar species under different growth conditions highlight the difficulties of establishing ground truth for complex biological material compositions. One aspect that is anticipated to provide greater insight to this type of particle classification capability is the development of a fundamental computational model of

  14. Seasonal Trend of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo at Biomass Burning Sites in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Ward, D.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S.; Hyer, E. J.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2011-12-01

    A database of the optical properties of primarily biomass burning aerosols in Mongu, Zambia from multi-year monitoring at an AERONET sun-sky radiometer site was examined. For the biomass burning season months (July-November), we investigate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals utilizing the algorithm of Dubovik and King (2000). The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from ~0.84 in July to ~0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom Exponent (440-870 nm; r2=0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r2=0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, seasonal SSA retrievals for both the Etosha Pan, Namibia and Skukuza, South Africa AERONET sites also show increasing single scattering albedo values through the burning season. We show maps of satellite detected fire counts, which indicate that the regions of primary biomass burning in southern Africa shift significantly from July to October. Possible reasons for the seasonal changes in observed SSA include differences in biomass fuel types in different regions and seasons (fraction of woody biomass versus grasses), agricultural practices (Chitemene: in which woody fuels are burned at the end of the dry season), differences in fuel moisture content (as mid-October is the typical beginning of the rainy season) and differences in aging due to transport speed and distance from varying source regions. We also analyze the seasonality of SSA for sites in biomass burning regions of southern Amazonia, where no significant seasonal trend in SSA was detected.

  15. Derivation of the chemical-equilibrium rate coefficient using scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering theory is applied to derive the equilibrium rate coefficient for a general homogeneous chemical reaction involving ideal gases. The reaction rate is expressed in terms of the product of a number of normalized momentum distribution functions, the product of the number of molecules with a given internal energy state, and the spin-averaged T-matrix elements. An expression for momentum distribution at equilibrium for an arbitrary molecule is presented, and the number of molecules with a given internal-energy state is represented by an expression which includes the partition function.

  16. Assessing blood vessel abnormality via extracting scattering coefficients from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Andersen, Claus B.; Frosz, Michael H.; Thrane, Lars; Hansen, Peter R.; Jorgensen, Thomas M.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2003-10-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the industrialized world. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution intravascular imaging technology with a potential for in vivo plaque characterization. Although structural remodeling of the arterial vessel wall during plaque development can change tissue optical scattering properties, very limited evidence is available on the exact optical scattering properties of plaques. The scattering coefficient, μs, and the anisotropy factor, g, can be derived from OCT images by fitting a theoretical model to individual depth-scans. The aim of the current study was to use this method to examine by OCT the scattering properties of human arteries with different stages of atherosclerotic lesion development. Methods: Normal (n=4), lipid-rich (n=4), and fibrous (n=3) aortic blocks as classified by parallel histopathologic examination were obtained within 24 hours of death and imaged by OCT. The intima was located in the OCT images, and then further split into 115 blocks (41 normal, 40 lipid-rich, and 34 fibrous) of adjacent OCT depth-scans transversely spanning ~200-300 μm. Scattering signals from each block were averaged and fit to the theoretical model. From these fittings, μs and g were extracted. Results and Discussion: The optical scattering properties of normal aortic intima were quite different from lipid-rich and fibrous lesions, respectively. We discovered that the normal intima was generally highly forward scattering, i.e., with 0.917

  17. Ground-level spectral distribution of solar direct-normal irradiance and marine aerosol attenuation coefficients at Reunion Island

    SciTech Connect

    Vaxelaire, P.; Leveau, J.; Baldy, S. ); Menguy, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The ground-level spectral distribution of direct solar irradiance at Reunion Island was measured for six bands covering the spectrum of solar radiation. The measurements, distributed over one year, were made under clear sky conditions with a pyrheliometer (Eppley, NIP) and six large pass-band flat filters. Good stability of spectral irradiances as a function of solar height allows us to propose approximate relationships which significantly characterize the irradiance into each spectral band. Measurements at Reunion vary significantly from data obtained with the same apparatus in a northern hemisphere continental area (Lyon). The determination of aerosol attenuation coefficients, for different spectral bands, allows the establish of a mean curve, for these coefficients as a function of wavelength, characteristic for marine aerosols.

  18. Organic aerosol molecular composition and gas-particle partitioning coefficients at a Mediterranean site (Corsica).

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Couvidat, Florian; Rio, Caroline; Fable, Sébastien; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli; Pailly, Olivier; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Chiappini, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Molecular speciation of atmospheric organic matter was investigated during a short summer field campaign performed in a citrus fruit field in northern Corsica (June 2011). Aimed at assessing the performance on the field of newly developed analytical protocols, this work focuses on the molecular composition of both gas and particulate phases and provides an insight into partitioning behavior of the semi-volatile oxygenated fraction. Limonene ozonolysis tracers were specifically searched for, according to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data previously recorded for smog chamber experiments. A screening of other oxygenated species present in the field atmosphere was also performed. About sixty polar molecules were positively or tentatively identified in gas and/or particle phases. These molecules comprise a wide range of branched and linear, mono and di-carbonyls (C3-C7), mono and di-carboxylic acids (C3-C18), and compounds bearing up to three functionalities. Among these compounds, some can be specifically attributed to limonene oxidation and others can be related to α- or β-pinene oxidation. This provides an original snapshot of the organic matter composition at a Mediterranean site in summer. Furthermore, for compounds identified and quantified in both gaseous and particulate phases, an experimental gas/particle partitioning coefficient was determined. Several volatile products, which are not expected in the particulate phase assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, were nonetheless present in significant concentrations. Hypotheses are proposed to explain these observations, such as the possible aerosol viscosity that could hinder the theoretical equilibrium to be rapidly reached.

  19. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol mixtures—whether dominated by dust, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, sea salt, or mixtures of them—complicate the retrieval of remotely sensed aerosol properties from satellites and possibly increase the uncertainty of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Major aerosol source regions in South Asia include the Thar Desert as well as agricultural lands, Himalayan foothills, and large urban centers in and near the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Over India and Pakistan, seasonal changes in meteorology, including the monsoon (June-September), significantly affect the transport, lifetime, and type of aerosols. Strong monsoonal winds can promote long range transport of dust resulting in mixtures of dust and carbonaceous aerosols, while more stagnant synoptic conditions (e.g., November-January) can prolong the occurrence of urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, or mixtures of them over the IGP. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer data are analyzed to show the aerosol optical depth (AOD) seasonality and aerosol dominant mixing states. The Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) relationship has been shown to provide sound clustering of dominant aerosol types using long term AERONET site data near known source regions [Giles et al., 2012]. In this study, aerosol type partitioning using the SSA (440 nm) and EAE (440-870 nm) relationship is further developed to quantify the occurrence of Dust, Mixed (e.g., dust and carbonaceous aerosols), Urban/Industrial (U/I) pollution, and Biomass Burning (BB) smoke. Based on EAE thresholds derived from the cluster analysis (for AOD440nm>0.4), preliminary results (2001-2010) for Kanpur, India, show the overall contributions of each dominant particle type (rounded to the nearest 10%): 10% for Dust (EAE≤0.25), 60% for Mixed (0.251.25). In the IGP, BB aerosols may have varying sizes (e.g., corresponding to 1.2

  20. A Convolution Algorithm of Differential Coefficients of liquid water Based on Vibrational Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Su, Lin; Li, Shenshen; Yu, Chao; Yan, Huanhuan

    Inelastic Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS) by liquid water is one significant limitation to the accuracy of the retrieval of trace gas constituents in atmosphere over waters, particularly over clear ocean waters, while using satellite data with Differential Optical Absorption Spec-troscopy technique (DOAS).The effect which is similar to the Ring effect in atmosphere results in the filling in of Fraunhofer lines, which is known as solar absorption lines. The inelastic component of the liquid water scattering causes a net increase of radiance in the line because more radiation is shifted to the wavelength of an absorption line than shifted from this wave-length to other wavelengths. The spectrum at the top of the atmosphere over land measured by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument)/AURA is convolved with Vibrational Raman Scat-tering coefficients of liquid water, divided by the original measured spectrum, with a cubic polynomial subtracted off, to create differential water Ring spectrum. The OMI spectrum over land is chosen to avoid the effect of VRS by liquid water. This method has been suggested in order to obtain an effective differential water Ring coeffients for the DOAS fitting process.The differential water Ring spectrum could be used to improve the accuracy of the retrieval of the trace gases concentration. The method is not relying on RTM, which would be time-consuming and depending on lot of parameters. Therefore, it is very fast and convenient.

  1. Influence of the scattering and absorption coefficients on homogeneous room simulations that use a diffusion equation model.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Juan M; Escolano, José; Cobos, Maximo; López, José J

    2013-03-01

    The diffusion equation model was used for room acoustic simulations to predict the sound pressure level and the reverberation time. The technical literature states that the diffusion equation method accurately models the late portion of the room impulse response if the energy is sufficiently scattered. This work provides conclusions on the validity of the diffusion equation model for rooms with homogeneous dimensions in relation to the scattering coefficients of the boundaries. A systematic evaluation was conducted out to determine the ranges of the absorption and scattering coefficient values that result in low noticeable differences between the predictions from a geometrical acoustic model and those from the diffusion equation model.

  2. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  3. A survey of light-scattering techniques used in the remote monitoring of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deirmendjian, D.

    1980-01-01

    A critical survey of the literature on the use of light-scattering mechanisms in the remote monitoring of atmospheric aerosols, their geographical and spatial distribution, and temporal variations was undertaken to aid in the choice of future operational systems, both ground based and air or space borne. An evaluation, mainly qualitative and subjective, of various techniques and systems is carried out. No single system is found to be adequate for operational purposes. A combination of earth surface and space-borne systems based mainly on passive techniques involving solar radiation with active (lidar) systems to provide auxiliary or backup information is tentatively recommended.

  4. Investigation of scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues using Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    The scattering coefficient, μs, the anisotropy factor, g, the scattering phase function, p(θ), and the angular dependence of scattering intensity distributions of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues were systematically investigated as a function of wavelength, scattering angle and scattering particle size using Mie theory and experimental parameters. The Matlab-based codes using Mie theory for both spherical and cylindrical models were developed and applied for studying the light propagation and the key scattering properties of the prostate tissues. The optical and structural parameters of tissue such as the index of refraction of cytoplasm, size of nuclei, and the diameter of the nucleoli for cancerous and normal human prostate tissues obtained from the previous biological, biomedical and bio-optic studies were used for Mie theory simulation and calculation. The wavelength dependence of scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor were investigated in the wide spectral range from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The scattering particle size dependence of μs, g, and scattering angular distributions were studied for cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The results show that cancerous prostate tissue containing larger size scattering particles has more contribution to the forward scattering in comparison with the normal prostate tissue. In addition to the conventional simulation model that approximately considers the scattering particle as sphere, the cylinder model which is more suitable for fiber-like tissue frame components such as collagen and elastin was used for developing a computation code to study angular dependence of scattering in prostate tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to deal with both spherical and cylindrical scattering particles in prostate tissues.

  5. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  6. Simulation model of absorption and scattering properties of laser light applied to urban aerosols over the city of Popayan, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, Alvaro E.; Rodriguez, Edith; Jaramillo, Mauricio; Solarte, Efrain

    2004-11-01

    Aerosols are among the most spatially variable components of the atmosphere, and thus their study requires their monitoring over a broad geographic range. The backscattering of light from suspended solid and liquid particles in the atmosphere obeys Mie scattering theory. Light attenuation in the spectral region from 300 to 4000 nm due to Mie scattering exceeds that due to molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and ozone absorption combined. This occurs despite the fact that aerosol particle concentrations in the atmosphere are many orders of magnitude smaller than molecular concentrations. Starting from the characteristics of urban aerosols measured over the city of Popayan, Colombia), 2° 27" N; 76° 37' W, with a PM10 particle selector, we present the results of a study of light attenuation properties generated using Matlab computer code, to simulate and predict measurements with a Lidar system operating at 514.5 nm.

  7. Retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from Imaging Polar Nephelometer scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed Espinosa, W.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg; Ziemba, Luke; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Orozco, Daniel; Schuster, Gregory; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Fuertes, David; Vanderlei Martins, J.

    2017-03-01

    A method for the retrieval of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from in situ light-scattering measurements is presented and the results are compared with existing measurement techniques. The Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) is applied to airborne and laboratory measurements made by a novel polar nephelometer. This instrument, the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph), is capable of making high-accuracy field measurements of phase function and degree of linear polarization, at three visible wavelengths, over a wide angular range of 3 to 177°. The resulting retrieval produces particle size distributions (PSDs) that agree, within experimental error, with measurements made by commercial optical particle counters (OPCs). Additionally, the retrieved real part of the refractive index is generally found to be within the predicted error of 0.02 from the expected values for three species of humidified salt particles, with a refractive index that is well established. The airborne measurements used in this work were made aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field campaign, and the inversion of this data represents the first aerosol retrievals of airborne polar nephelometer data. The results provide confidence in the real refractive index product, as well as in the retrieval's ability to accurately determine PSD, without assumptions about refractive index that are required by the majority of OPCs.

  8. Effects of suspended sediment concentration on the absorption and scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrie, Gregory E.; Ladner, Sherwin; Gould, Richard A., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The scattering coefficient (b) for the nearshore waters off the coast of North Carolina near Camp Lejeune is strongly influenced by suspended sediment concentration and total particulate cross-sectional area (xg). In-situ measurements of a and b were made using a WET Labs AC9 meter. Estimates of suspended sediment concentration and total particulate cross-sectional area were determined from laser particle size analyses of surface water samples. The SeaWiFS bio-optical algorithm was modified for Case II waters and used to estimate a and bb from remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). After conversion from backscattering (bb) to total scattering (b), modeled a and b values from the modified SeaWiFS algorithm were compared to the measured values. The differences between the measured and estimated values appear to be directly related to increases in suspended sediment concentration and xg. Correlations of about 0.90 were obtained for b vs xg and bb vs xg.

  9. Effects of combined scattering and absorption coefficients on laser speckle contrast imaging values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2015-03-01

    Laser Speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive or minimally invasive method for visualizing blood flow and perfusion in biological tissues. In LSCI the motion of scattering particles results in a reduction in global and regional speckle contrast. A variety of parameters can affect the calculated contrast values in LSCI techniques, including the optical properties of the fluid and surrounding tissue. In typical LSCI where the motion of blood is of interests, optical properties are influenced by hematocrit levels. In this work we considered the combined effects of both the scattering and absorption coefficients on LSCI measurements on a flow phantom. Fluid phantoms consisting of various concentrations of neutrally buoyant ~10 micron microspheres and India ink mixed with DI water were formulated to mimic the optical properties of whole blood with various levels of hematocrit. In these flow studies, it was found that an increase in μa and/or μs led to a decrease in contrast values when all other experimental parameters were held constant. The observed reduction in contrast due to optical property changes could easily be confused with a contrast reduction due to increased flow velocity. These results suggest that optical properties need to be considered when using LSCI to make flow estimates.

  10. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  11. Application of laser light scattering for determination of the border aerosol-air in a specialized physical laboratory setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damov, K. S.; Iliev, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    The current article examines the application of laser light scattering in a specialized laboratory setup. It is used for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume (High Concentration Aerosols) by the method of free flow out. The measurement chamber is first filled with the investigated aerosol. After a predetermined delay time the aerosol is allowed to flow out through a calibrated pipe with fixed size located few centimetres above the chamber's bottom. The lowering of the upper border aerosol-air is continuously scanned using a laser beam directed along the axis of the cylindrical chamber. The kinematic viscosity and mass density of the investigated aerosol phase are calculated by formulas obtained by the authors. The suggested application of laser light scattering led to higher accuracy of the determination the position of aerosol-air border, thence the certainty of this method. This improvement allowed the use of computer controlled optoelectronic setting. The use of laser light scattering significantly improves the method for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume.

  12. Optical inhomogeneity of dust-like aerosols and its effects on scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Dlugach, Z.; Liu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The use of the very concept of effective refractive index has been implicit in virtually all computations of electromagnetic scattering by dust-like aerosols since the nanometer-scale heterogeneity of such particles has been essentially ignored. Therefore, the failure of this concept in application to dust-like aerosols would create a highly problematic situation. It is thus imperative to perform a comprehensive analysis of the actual physical origin of the heuristic effective-medium approximations (EMAs) and the range and conditions of their practical applicability. In this talk, we will identify the true place of the EMAs in the framework of statistical electrodynamics. We will validate the outcome of this analysis by superposition T-matrix computer calculations and will perform a detailed quantitative assessment of the actual accuracy of the EMAs when they are applied to less-than-ideal types of heterogeneity encountered in nature. It is expected that the accuracy of an EMA will depend on many factors: on type of mixing; on refractive indices and size parameters of the host and the inclusions; on number, spatial distribution, and packing density of the inclusions; on whether one computes monodisperse or polydisperse optical characteristics; on whether one computes only integral radiometric characteristics or also the elements of the scattering matrix; etc. If so, the actual practical suitability of an EMA will vary widely depending on the specific type of application, e.g., lidar remote sensing, polarimetric remote sensing, radiometric remote sensing, or integral radiation-budget computations.

  13. Spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance measurements for noninvasive determination of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, Alwin; Lilge, Lothar; Patterson, Michael S.; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Wilson, Brian C.

    1996-05-01

    The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of biological tissues determine the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance that is due to a point source. A system is described for making remote measurements of spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance and hence noninvasive, noncontact estimates of the tissue optical properties. The system incorporated a laser source and a CCD camera. Deflection of the incident beam into the camera allowed characterization of the source for absolute reflectance measurements. It is shown that an often used solution of the diffusion equation cannot be applied for these measurements. Instead, a neural network, trained on the results of Monte Carlo simulations, was used to estimate the absorption and scattering coefficients from the reflectance data. Tests on tissue-simulating phantoms with transport scattering coefficients between 0.5 and 2.0 mm-1 and absorption coefficients between 0.002 and 0.1 mm -1 showed the rms errors of this technique to be 2.6% for the transport scattering coefficient and 14% for the absorption coefficients. The optical properties of bovine muscle, adipose, and liver tissue, as well as chicken muscle (breast), were also measured ex vivo at 633 and 751 nm. For muscle tissue it was found that the Monte Carlo simulation did not agree with experimental measurements of reflectance at distances less than 2 mm from the incident beam. Carlo, neural network.

  14. Effect of relative humidity on light scattering by mineral dust aerosol as measured in the marine boundary layer over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Jones, X.; Maring, H. B.; Prospero, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Using an integrating nephelometer, we measured aerosol light scattering during a month-long experiment conducted in April 1994 on Barbados, West Indies (13.17°N, 59.43°W). Concurrent measurements of aerosol composition showed that the trade wind aerosol mass was alternatively dominated by sea salt and by mineral dust transported from North Africa. Dust concentrations ranged from 0.9 to 257 μg m-3, and sea salt ranged from 9.4 to 29 μg m-3. Nonsea-salt sulfate (nss SO4=) was generally a minor component with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 4.2 μg m-3. We obtained hygroscopic growth factors (HGF) by calculating the ratio of the aerosol scattering coefficient (ASC) measured at ambient relative humidity (RH), which ranged from 67% to 83%, to the ASC measured with the sample air stream heated so as to reduce the RH to under 40%. Over the course of the experiment, HGF ranged from 1.13 to 1.69, with lower values corresponding to high dust concentration periods. By a variety of procedures, including the chemical apportioning of ASC, we derived the HGF for mineral dust; depending on the technique used, values ranged from 1.0 to 1.1. In contrast, we obtain for sea salt an HGF of 1.8±0.2, a value consistent with previously reported measurements. The low HGF values obtained for dusty periods suggest that only minor amounts of hygroscopic materials are associated with dust. Consequently, the radiative properties of North African dust in the atmosphere will be relatively insensitive to RH changes.

  15. Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO field campaign: a comparison of results from the T0 and T1 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Castro, T.; Salcido, A.; Frederick, J.

    2008-07-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering were obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign in March 2006. A comparison of aerosol absorption and scattering was obtained in Mexico City at site T0 located in the northern part of Mexico City at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo Laboratories and at site T1 located at the Universidad Tecnológica de Tecamac, 18 miles northwest of T0. Hourly averages of aerosol absorption were similar at both sites, ranging from 6 93 Mm-1 with an average of 31 Mm-1 at T0; and from 2 104 Mm-1 with an average of 19 Mm-1 at T1. Aerosol scattering at T0 ranged from 16 344 Mm-1 with an average of 105 Mm-1; while the scattering values at T1 were lower than T0 ranging from 2 136 with an average of 53 Mm-1. Aerosol single scattering albedos (SSAs) were determined at both sites using these data. SSAs at T1 ranged from 0.44 0.90 with an average 0.75 as compared to hose at T0, range 0.51 0.93 with an average of 0.77. Broadband UV-B intensity was found to be higher at site T0, with an average of 64 μW/cm2 at solar noon, than at site T1, which had an average of 54 μW/cm2 at solar noon. Comparisons of clear-sky modeled UV-B intensities with the simultaneous UV-B measurements obtained at site T0 and at site T1 for cloudless days indicate a larger diffuse radiation field at site T0 than at site T1. The determination of aerosol scattering Ångstrom coefficient at T0 suggests the larger diffuse radiation is due to the predominance of submicron aerosols at T0 with aerosol scattering of UV-B radiation peaked in the forward direction, leading to the enhancement observed at ground level.

  16. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  17. A method based on iterative morphological filtering and multiple scattering for detecting layer boundaries and extinction coefficients with LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Jiang, Li-Hui; Xiong, Xing-Long; Ma, Yu-Zhao; Liu, Jie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Layer boundaries detection with LIDAR is of great significance for the meteorological and environmental research. Apart from the background noise, multiple scattering can also seriously affect the detection results in LIDAR signal processing. To alleviate these issues, a novel approach was proposed based upon morphological filtering and multiple scattering correction with multiple iterations, which essentially acts as a weighted algorithm with multiple scattering factors in different filtering scales, and applies integral extinction coefficients as media to perform correction. Simulations on artificial signals and real LIDAR signals support this approach.

  18. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  19. Retrieval of the columnar aerosol phase function and single-scattering albedo from sky radiance over the ocean - Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Menghua; Gordon, Howard R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the fact that the part of downward radiance that depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere can be extracted from the measured sky radiance, a new scheme for retrieval of the aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo over the ocean is developed. This retrieval algorithm is tested with simulations for several cases. It is found that the retrieved aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo are virtually error-free if the vertical structure of the atmosphere is known and if the sky radiance and the aerosol optical thickness can be measured accurately. The robustness of the algorithm in realistic situations, in which the measurements are contaminated by calibration errors or noise, is examined. It is found that the retrieved value of omega(0) is usually in error by less than about 10 percent, and the phase function is accurately retrieved for theta less than about 90 deg. However, as the aerosol optical thickness becomes small, e.g., less than about 0.1, errors in the sky radiance measurement can lead to serious problems with the retrieval algorithm, especially in the blue. The use of the retrieval scheme should be limited to the red and near IR when the aerosol optical thickness is small.

  20. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  1. Effects of variation in cloudiness and stratospheric aerosol scattering upon tropospheric UV flux, photolysis rates, and the ozone urban plume.

    PubMed

    Matloff, G L

    1981-11-15

    Using a radiative transfer model, the sensitivity of tropospheric UV flux and photolysis rates for NO(2) and HNO(2) to variations in cloudiness and stratospheric aerosol scattering are evaluated. A lumped parameter ozone plume model combining photochemistry and diffusion is then utilized to investigate variations in downwind ozone concentrations caused by variations in cloudiness.

  2. A numerical procedure for recovering true scattering coefficients from measurements with wide-beam antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qinglin; Gogineni, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical procedure for estimating the true scattering coefficient, sigma(sup 0), from measurements made using wide-beam antennas. The use of wide-beam antennas results in an inaccurate estimate of sigma(sup 0) if the narrow-beam approximation is used in the retrieval process for sigma(sup 0). To reduce this error, a correction procedure was proposed that estimates the error resulting from the narrow-beam approximation and uses the error to obtain a more accurate estimate of sigma(sup 0). An exponential model was assumed to take into account the variation of sigma(sup 0) with incidence angles, and the model parameters are estimated from measured data. Based on the model and knowledge of the antenna pattern, the procedure calculates the error due to the narrow-beam approximation. The procedure is shown to provide a significant improvement in estimation of sigma(sup 0) obtained with wide-beam antennas. The proposed procedure is also shown insensitive to the assumed sigma(sup 0) model.

  3. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  4. Simulation model of scattering properties and extinction of laser light applied to urban aerosols over the city of Cali, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Edith; Montilla, Elena; Jaramillo, Mauricio; Solarte, Efraín; Bastidas, Alvaro

    2005-10-01

    Aerosols are among the most spatially variable components of the atmosphere, and thus their study requires their monitoring over a broad geographic range. The backscattering of light from suspended solid and liquid particles in the atmosphere obeys Mie scattering theory. Light attenuation in the spectral region from 300 to 4000 nm due to Mie scattering exceeds that due to molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and ozone absorption combined. This occurs despite the fact that aerosol particle concentrations in the atmosphere are many orders of magnitude smaller than molecular concentrations. Starting from the characteristics of urban aerosols measured over the city of Cali (Colombia), 3° 30' N, 76° 30' W, with a PM10 particle selector, along with information on meteorological conditions typical of the region, we present the results of a study of light scattering properties generated using a model applied Mie scattering theory to size parameter between 0 and 50, with an increment of 0.01, and Matlab computer code, to simulate and predict measurements with a Lidar system operating at 532 nm.

  5. Parameterization of single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) with EC / OC for aerosol emissions from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Rudra P.; Wagner, Nick L.; Langridge, Justin M.; Lack, Daniel A.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Murphy, Shane M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are two critical parameters in determining the impact of absorbing aerosol on the Earth's radiative balance. Aerosol emitted by biomass burning represent a significant fraction of absorbing aerosol globally, but it remains difficult to accurately predict SSA and AAE for biomass burning aerosol. Black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and non-absorbing coatings all make substantial contributions to the absorption coefficient of biomass burning aerosol. SSA and AAE cannot be directly predicted based on fuel type because they depend strongly on burn conditions. It has been suggested that SSA can be effectively parameterized via the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of a biomass burning event and that this would be useful because emission factors for CO and CO2, from which MCE can be calculated, are available for a large number of fuels. Here we demonstrate, with data from the FLAME-4 experiment, that for a wide variety of globally relevant biomass fuels, over a range of combustion conditions, parameterizations of SSA and AAE based on the elemental carbon (EC) to organic carbon (OC) mass ratio are quantitatively superior to parameterizations based on MCE. We show that the EC / OC ratio and the ratio of EC / (EC + OC) both have significantly better correlations with SSA than MCE. Furthermore, the relationship of EC / (EC + OC) with SSA is linear. These improved parameterizations are significant because, similar to MCE, emission factors for EC (or black carbon) and OC are available for a wide range of biomass fuels. Fitting SSA with MCE yields correlation coefficients (Pearson's r) of ˜ 0.65 at the visible wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm while fitting SSA with EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) yields a Pearson's r of 0.94-0.97 at these same wavelengths. The strong correlation coefficient at 405 nm (r = 0.97) suggests that parameterizations based on EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) have good predictive

  6. Contribution of fine particle sulfates to light scattering in St. Louis summer aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vossler, T.L.; Macias, E.S.

    1986-12-01

    The contribution of fine particle (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to total light scattering was calculated from measured sulfur size distributions and estimates of water that might be associated with this deliquescent species. The most common type of sulfur size distribution observed had a major sulfur mass peak between 0.5 and 1.0 ..mu..m in diameter and was associated with the highest levels of b/sub scat/. A less common type with no peak above 0.5 ..mu..m was associated only with low values of b/sub scat/. On average, (NH/sub 4/)SO/sub 4/ plus associated water contributed 68% of the total light scattering due to particles during the summer of 1984. The measured light scattering coefficient, b/sub scat/, and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ plus associated water were extremely well correlated. b/sub scat/ and total fine particle mass were not as well correlated, because the correlation between b/sub scat/ and non-sulfate fine mass was poor. The average calculated light scattering efficiency of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ plus water was 4.2 m/sup 2//g. The higher values were associated with sulfur size distributions with a major peak above 0.5 ..mu..m.

  7. Extinction coefficient (1 micrometer) properties of high-altitude clouds from solar occultation measurements (1985-1990): Evidence of volcanic aerosol effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Minnis, Patrick; Yue, Glenn K.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of the 1-micrometer volume extinction coefficient of two geographically different high-altitude cloud systems have been examined for the posteruption period (1985-1990) of the April 1982 El Chichon volcanic event with emphasis on the effect of volcanic aerosols on clouds. These two high-altitude cloud systems are the tropical clouds in the tropopause region observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 and the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) sighted by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) 2. The results indicate that volcanic aerosols alter the frequency distributions of these high-altitude clouds in such a manner that the occurrence of clouds having high extinction coefficients (6 x 10(exp -3) - 2 x 10(exp -2)/km) is suppressed, while that of clouds having low extinction coefficients (2 x 10(exp -3) - 6 x 10(exp -2)/km) is enhanced. This influence of the volcanic aerosols appears to be opposite to the increase in the extinction coefficient of optically thick clouds observed by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) during the initial posteruption period of the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption. A plausible explanation of this difference, based on the Mie theory, is presented. As a consequence of the Mie theory, the effective radius of most, if not all, of the high-altitude clouds, measured by the SAGE series of satellite instruments must be less than about 0.8 micrometers. This mean cloud particle size implied by the satellite extinction-coefficient data at a single wavelength (1 micrometer) is further substantiated by the particle size analysis based on cloud extinction coefficient at two wavelengths (0.525 and 1.02 micrometers) obtained by the SAGE 2 observations. Most of the radiation measured by ERBE is reflected by cloud systems comprised of particles having effective radii much greater than 1 micrometer. A reduction in the effective radius of these clouds due to volcanic aerosols is expected to increase their

  8. Joint elastic side-scattering LIDAR and Raman LIDAR measurements of aerosol optical properties in south east Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiencke, L.; Rizi, V.; Will, M.; Allen, C.; Botts, A.; Calhoun, M.; Carande, B.; Claus, J.; Coco, M.; Emmert, L.; Esquibel, S.; Grillo, A. F.; Hamilton, L.; Heid, T. J.; Iarlori, M.; Klages, H.-O.; Kleifges, M.; Knoll, B.; Koop, J.; Mathes, H.-J.; Menshikov, A.; Morgan, S.; Patterson, L.; Petrera, S.; Robinson, S.; Runyan, C.; Sherman, J.; Starbuck, D.; Wakin, M.; Wolf, O.

    2017-03-01

    We describe an experiment, located in south-east Colorado, U.S.A., that measured aerosol optical depth profiles using two LIDAR techniques. Two independent detectors measured scattered light from a vertical UV laser beam. One detector, located at the laser site, measured light via the inelastic Raman backscattering process. This is a common method used in atmospheric science for measuring aerosol optical depth profiles. The other detector, located approximately 40 km distant, viewed the laser beam from the side. This detector featured a 3.5 m2 mirror and measured elastically scattered light in a bistatic LIDAR configuration following the method used at the Pierre Auger cosmic ray observatory. The goal of this experiment was to assess and improve methods to measure atmospheric clarity, specifically aerosol optical depth profiles, for cosmic ray UV fluorescence detectors that use the atmosphere as a giant calorimeter. The experiment collected data from September 2010 to July 2011 under varying conditions of aerosol loading. We describe the instruments and techniques and compare the aerosol optical depth profiles measured by the Raman and bistatic LIDAR detectors.

  9. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  10. Laboratory light-scattering measurements with Titan's aerosols analogues produced by a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Alcouffe, G.; Cernogora, G.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Szopa, C.

    2009-11-01

    The chemistry leading to the formation of solid aerosols (tholins) in Titan's atmosphere is simulated by a capacitively coupled plasma in a N 2-CH 4 gas mixture. The solid grains are produced in volume directly in the gas phase and studied ex-situ by SEM imaging and by light scattering on clouds of particles. The scattered light properties depend on the physical properties of the particles (morphologies, size distribution), as well as on the phase angle and the wavelength of the light. The particles may be aggregated or agglomerated grains. The grains size distribution is studied as a function of plasma parameters such as initial methane concentration introduced into the discharge, gas flow, absorbed RF power and plasma duration. The average grain size increases when the amount of CH 4 increases, when the gas flow decreases, and when the plasma duration increases up to a limit for each production condition. For all the samples, the absorption decreases with increasing wavelength in the visible domain. As usually found for irregular particles, the polarization phase curves have a bell-shaped positive branch and a shallow negative branch. The maximum of polarization ( Pmax) increases when the average grain size decreases (sub-μm-sized grains). To obtain Pmax values within the range of those measured in Titan's atmosphere; the average grains diameter has to be smaller than 100 nm, in agreement with the space observations results. In the light-scattering experiment, the size of the agglomerates in the clouds is in the 40-80 μm range in equivalent diameter. As a consequence Pmax increases with decreasing wavelength due to the increasing absorption, in agreement with observations of Titan from outside the atmosphere.

  11. Effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on ultrafine aerosol particles clogging in nanofiber based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Realistic SEM image based 3D filter model considering transition/free molecular flow regime, Brownian diffusion, aerodynamic slip, particle-fiber and particle-particle interactions together with a novel Euclidian distance map based methodology for the pressure drop calculation has been utilized for a polyurethane nanofiber based filter prepared via electrospinning process in order to more deeply understand the effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on filter clogging and basic filter characteristics. Based on the performed theoretical analysis, it has been revealed that the increase in the fiber-particle friction coefficient causes, firstly, more weaker particle penetration in the filter, creation of dense top layers and generation of higher pressure drop (surface filtration) in comparison with lower particle-fiber friction coefficient filter for which deeper particle penetration takes place (depth filtration), secondly, higher filtration efficiency, thirdly, higher quality factor and finally, higher quality factor sensitivity to the increased collected particle mass. Moreover, it has been revealed that even if the particle-fiber friction coefficient is different, the cake morphology is very similar.

  12. [Experimental determination of radiation scattering and absorption coefficients in a homogeneous layer of highly-dispersive biological medium].

    PubMed

    Danilov, A A; Masloboev, Iu P; Selishchev, S V; Tereshchenko, S A

    2006-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of optical characteristics of a highly-dispersive medium (radiation scattering and absorption coefficients) is described. The method is based on two mathematical models of ultrashort laser pulse propagation through a highly-dispersive medium (HDM), an axial model and a diffusion model. Milk dissolved in water was used as HDM. Dependences of optical characteristics of HDM on the concentration of milk in water are obtained. The limits of applicability of the axial and diffusion models to media with different scattering and absorption characteristics are determined.

  13. Elastic back-scattering patterns via particle surface roughness and orientation from single trapped airborne aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard; Wang, Chuji; Muñoz, Olga; Videen, Gorden; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for simultaneously measuring the back-scattering patterns and images of single laser-trapped airborne aerosol particles. This arrangement allows us to observe how the back-scattering patterns change with particle size, shape, surface roughness, orientation, etc. The recoded scattering patterns cover the angular ranges of θ=167.7-180° (including at 180° exactly) and ϕ=0-360° in spherical coordinates. The patterns show that the width of the average speckle intensity islands or rings is inversely proportional to particle size and how the shape of these intensity rings or islands also depends on the surface roughness. For an irregularly shaped particle with substantial roughness, the back-scattering patterns are formed with speckle intensity islands, the size and orientations of these islands depend more on the overall particle size and orientation, but have less relevance to the fine alteration of the surface structure and shapes. The back-scattering intensity at 180° is very sensitive to the particle parameters. It can change from a maximum to a minimum with a change of 0.1% in particle size or refractive index. The method has potential use in characterizing airborne aerosol particles, and may be used to provide back-scattering information for LIDAR applications.

  14. Use of dynamic light scattering to determine second virial coefficient in a semidilute concentration regime.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sandeep; Scherer, Thomas M; Shire, Steven J; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2011-04-15

    The present work discusses an alternative procedure to obtain static light scattering (SLS) parameters in a dilute and semidilute concentration regime from a dynamic light scattering (DLS) instrument that uses an avalanche photodiode (APD) for recording the scattered intensity signal. An APD enables one to perform both SLS and DLS measurements by photon counting and photon correlation, respectively. However, due to the associated recovery time, the APDs are susceptible to saturation (above 1000 kcps), which may limit the measurements in systems that scatter too much light. We propose an alternative way of obtaining the SLS parameters with instruments that use APD for recording signal intensities.

  15. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  16. The Accommodation Coefficient of Water Molecules on Ice: Results from Cirrus Cloud Experiments at the Aerosol Chamber AIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrotzki, J.; Connolly, P.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Moehler, O.; Ebert, V.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are pure ice clouds in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. One of the parameters governing the growth of ice crystals in these clouds is the accommodation coefficient of water molecules on ice. However, its magnitude is still uncertain to a large degree, since experimental results vary from below 0.01 up to unity depending on the design of the experiment and the examined ice growth process [1]. For the specific case of ice crystal growth in cirrus clouds, no previous experimental studies regarding the accommodation coefficient exist. Therefore, dedicated experiments were carried out at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA [2], examining the ice crystal growth for deposition nucleation in the temperature range from -75 °C to -40 °C. These experiments were evaluated with two different models, a simple one, which just incorporates kinetic and diffusive theory of ice crystal growth, and the more advanced and extended aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction model (ACPIM) [3]. The outcome of these two models is compared to absolute in-situ humidity data measured within AIDA using extractive as well as open path diode laser hygrometers (TDLAS) [4]. For every experiment, this is done by varying the value of the accommodation coefficient within each model, in order to get best agreement with experimental data. The values obtained for the accommodation coefficient at different temperatures are presented and the overall uncertainties as well as the consistency between the two different models are discussed. [1] D. R. Heynes, N. J. Tro, and S. M. George, J. Phys. Chem. 1992, 96, 8502-8509 (1992) [2] O. Möhler et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 3, 211-223 (2003) [3] P. J. Connolly et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 9, 2805-2824 (2009) [4] D. W. Fahey et al., AquaVIT White Paper, avail. at https://aquavit.icg.kfa-juelich.de/AquaVit/AquaVitWiki

  17. Condensation nuclei and aerosol-scattering extinction measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory: 1974-1985. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, D.M.; Quakenbush, T.K.; Bodhaine, B.A.

    1987-07-01

    The observatory at Mauna Loa, Hawaii measures the characteristics of surface aerosols under background conditions. The instruments provide data that are representative of the background-aerosol climatology at Mauna Loa. These data can also be used to identify potential local contamination periods. The nephelometer's light-scattering measurements show an annual cycle: a maximum in April and a minimum in November, with a variation of a factor of 5.5. The Condensation Nucleus (CN) counter shows a much smaller annual cycle: a maximum in September and a minimum in March, with a variation of a factor of 1.5. A local decrease in CN concentration occurs in August. The Angstrom exponent minimum occurs in May. This indicates larger aerosol particles within the month as compared with the remainder of the year.

  18. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  19. Measuring the reduced scattering coefficient and γ with SFR spectroscopy: studying the phase function dependence (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Anouk L.; Zhang, Xu; Bosschaart, Nienke; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-03-01

    Both Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Single Fiber Reflectance Spectroscopy (SFR) are used to determine various optical properties of tissue. We developed a method combining these two techniques to measure the scattering anisotropy (g1) and γ (=1-g2/1-g1), related to the 1st and 2nd order moments of the phase function. The phase function is intimately associated with the cellular organization and ultrastructure of tissue, physical parameters that may change during disease onset and progression. Quantification of these parameters may therefore allow for improved non-invasive, in vivo discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue. With SFR the reduced scattering coefficient and γ can be extracted from the reflectance spectrum (Kanick et al., Biomedical Optics Express 2(6), 2011). With OCT the scattering coefficient can be extracted from the signal as a function of depth (Faber et al., Optics Express 12(19), 2004). Consequently, by combining SFR and OCT measurements at the same wavelengths, the scattering anisotropy (g) can be resolved using µs'= µs*(1-g). We performed measurements on a suspension of silica spheres as a proof of principle. The SFR model for the reflectance as a function of the reduced scattering coefficient and γ is based on semi-empirical modelling. These models feature Monte-Carlo (MC) based model constants. The validity of these constants - and thus the accuracy of the estimated parameters - depends on the phase function employed in the MC simulations. Since the phase function is not known when measuring in tissue, we will investigate the influence of assuming an incorrect phase function on the accuracy of the derived parameters.

  20. Negative second virial coefficients as predictors of protein crystal growth: evidence from sedimentation equilibrium studies that refutes the designation of those light scattering parameters as osmotic virial coefficients.

    PubMed

    Deszczynski, Marcin; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J

    2006-03-20

    The effects of ammonium sulphate concentration on the osmotic second virial coefficient (BAA/MA) for equine serum albumin (pH 5.6, 20 degrees C) have been examined by sedimentation equilibrium. After an initial steep decrease with increasing ammonium sulphate concentration, BAA/MA assumes an essentially concentration-independent magnitude of 8-9 ml/g. Such behaviour conforms with the statistical-mechanical prediction that a sufficient increase in ionic strength should effectively eliminate the contributions of charge interactions to BAA/MA but have no effect on the covolume contribution (8.4 ml/g for serum albumin). A similar situation is shown to apply to published sedimentation equilibrium data for lysozyme (pH 4.5). Although termed osmotic second virial coefficients and designated as such (B22), the negative values obtained in published light scattering studies of both systems have been described incorrectly because of the concomitant inclusion of the protein-salt contribution to thermodynamic nonideality of the protein. Those negative values are still valid predictors of conditions conducive to crystal growth inasmuch as they do reflect situations in which there is net attraction between protein molecules. However, the source of attraction responsible for the negative virial coefficient stems from the protein-salt rather than the protein-protein contribution, which is necessarily positive.

  1. A potential for overestimating the absolute magnitudes of second virial coefficients by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J; Patel, Trushar R; Winzor, Donald J

    2013-04-15

    Theoretical consideration is given to the effect of cosolutes (including buffer and electrolyte components) on the determination of second virial coefficients for proteins by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)-a factor overlooked in current analyses in terms of expressions for a two-component system. A potential deficiency of existing practices is illustrated by reassessment of published results on the effect of polyethylene glycol concentration on the second virial coefficient for urate oxidase. This error reflects the substitution of I(0,c3,0), the scattering intensity in the limit of zero scattering angle and solute concentration, for I(0,0,0), the corresponding parameter in the limit of zero cosolute concentration (c3) as well. Published static light scattering results on the dependence of the apparent molecular weight of ovalbumin on buffer concentration are extrapolated to zero concentration to obtain the true value (M2) and thereby establish the feasibility of obtaining the analogous SAXS parameter, I(0,0,0), experimentally.

  2. Validation of quantitative attenuation and backscattering coefficient measurements by optical coherence tomography in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime.

    PubMed

    Almasian, Mitra; Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Faber, Dirk J

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to quantitatively measure optical properties of tissue such as the attenuation coefficient and backscattering coefficient. However, to obtain reliable values for strong scattering tissues, accurate consideration of the effects of multiple scattering and the nonlinear relation between the scattering coefficient and scatterer concentration (concentration-dependent scattering) is required. We present a comprehensive model for the OCT signal in which we quantitatively account for both effects, as well as our system parameters (confocal point spread function and sensitivity roll-off). We verify our model with experimental data from controlled phantoms of monodisperse silica beads (scattering coefficients between 1 and 30  mm(−1) and scattering anisotropy between 0.4 and 0.9). The optical properties of the phantoms are calculated using Mie theory combined with the Percus–Yevick structure factor to account for concentration-dependent scattering. We demonstrate excellent agreement between the OCT attenuation and backscattering coefficient predicted by our model and experimentally derived values. We conclude that this model enables us to accurately model OCT-derived parameters (i.e., attenuation and backscattering coefficients) in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime for spherical monodisperse samples.

  3. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  4. Electron Transport Coefficients and Scattering Cross Sections in CH4, HBr and in Mixtures of He and Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Sasic, Olivera M.

    2006-12-01

    We have applied a standard swarm procedure in order to obtain electron scattering cross sections and transport coefficients that provide a data base for plasma modeling. In case of CH4 the dissociative excitation cross sections from binary collision experiments were renormalized by fitting the measured excitation coefficients with our calculations. In case of HBr we have produced a complete set of cross sections based on available data from the literature, with some extrapolations. We have also tested the cross sections in He-Xe mixtures and the application of Blanc's law and common mean energy procedure in calculating drift velocities in by comparison with recent measurements. Finally, a well tested Monte Carlo code was used in wide range of both DC and RF electric and magnetic fields in order to calculate a number of transport coefficients in case of CH4 and HBr.

  5. Radiative properties of the background aerosol: absorption component of extinction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Charlson, R J

    1985-07-19

    The light-scattering and light-absorption coefficients of the global background aerosol define its single-scatter albedo. Continuous, simultaneous measurements of these optical coefficients were made on a daily basis for the remote marine mid-troposphere; such measurements are essential for assessment of the effects of aerosol on atmospheric radiative transfer. Measurements of light-absorption coefficients made at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii were higher than expected, and the single-scatter albedo was lower than the value often used in radiative transfer models. Soot appears to be the most likely primary absorber, and hemispheric dispersal of this combustion-derived material is suggested.

  6. A case study of dust aerosol radiative properties over Lanzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Bao, J.; Zhou, B.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2010-05-01

    The vertical distribution of dust aerosol and its radiative properties are analysed using the data measured by the micropulse lidar, profiling microwave radiometer, sunphotometer, particulate monitor, and nephelometer at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) during a dust storm from 27 March to 29 March 2007. The analysis shows that the dust aerosol mainly exists below 2 km in height, and the dust aerosol extinction coefficient decreases with height. The temporal evolution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the dust storm is characterized by a sub-maximum at 22:00 (Beijing Time), 27 March and a maximum at 12:00, 28 March. The AOD respectively derived by lidar and sunphotometer shows a good consistency. The PM10 concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient share similar variation trends, and their maximums both appear at 22:00, 27 March. The aerosol extinction coefficient and relative humidity have the similar trends and their maximums almost appear at the same heights, which presents a correlation between extinction coefficient and relative humidity known as aerosol hygroscopicity. The relative humidity is related with temperature, and then the temperature will affect the aerosol extinction properties by modifying the relative humidity condition. The aerosol extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and PM10 concentration present good linear correlations. The correlation coefficients of the aerosol scattering coefficients of 450, 520, and 700 nm and PM10 concentration, of aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved by lidar at 532 nm and PM10 concentration, and of aerosol extinction and scattering coefficient are respectively 0.98, 0.94, and 0.96.

  7. Osmotic virial coefficients for model protein and colloidal solutions: importance of ensemble constraints in the analysis of light scattering data.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Daniel W; Krekelberg, William P; Roberts, Christopher J; Shen, Vincent K

    2012-05-07

    Protein-protein interactions in solution may be quantified by the osmotic second virial coefficient (OSVC), which can be measured by various experimental techniques including light scattering. Analysis of Rayleigh light scattering measurements from such experiments requires identification of a scattering volume and the thermodynamic constraints imposed on that volume, i.e., the statistical mechanical ensemble in which light scattering occurs. Depending on the set of constraints imposed on the scattering volume, one can obtain either an apparent OSVC, A(2,app), or the true thermodynamic OSVC, B(22)(osm), that is rigorously defined in solution theory [M. A. Blanco, E. Sahin, Y. Li, and C. J. Roberts, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 225103 (2011)]. However, it is unclear to what extent A(2,app) and B(22)(osm) differ, which may have implications on the physical interpretation of OSVC measurements from light scattering experiments. In this paper, we use the multicomponent hard-sphere model and a well-known equation of state to directly compare A(2,app) and B(22)(osm). Our results from the hard-sphere equation of state indicate that A(2,app) underestimates B(22)(osm), but in a systematic manner that may be explained using fundamental thermodynamic expressions for the two OSVCs. The difference between A(2,app) and B(22)(osm) may be quantitatively significant, but may also be obscured in experimental application by statistical uncertainty or non-steric interactions. Consequently, the two OSVCs that arise in the analysis of light scattering measurements do formally differ, but in a manner that may not be detectable in actual application.

  8. Osmotic virial coefficients for model protein and colloidal solutions: Importance of ensemble constraints in the analysis of light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siderius, Daniel W.; Krekelberg, William P.; Roberts, Christopher J.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2012-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions in solution may be quantified by the osmotic second virial coefficient (OSVC), which can be measured by various experimental techniques including light scattering. Analysis of Rayleigh light scattering measurements from such experiments requires identification of a scattering volume and the thermodynamic constraints imposed on that volume, i.e., the statistical mechanical ensemble in which light scattering occurs. Depending on the set of constraints imposed on the scattering volume, one can obtain either an apparent OSVC, A2,app, or the true thermodynamic OSVC, {B_{22}^{osm}}, that is rigorously defined in solution theory [M. A. Blanco, E. Sahin, Y. Li, and C. J. Roberts, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 225103 (2011), 10.1063/1.3596726]. However, it is unclear to what extent A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} differ, which may have implications on the physical interpretation of OSVC measurements from light scattering experiments. In this paper, we use the multicomponent hard-sphere model and a well-known equation of state to directly compare A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}}. Our results from the hard-sphere equation of state indicate that A2,app underestimates {B_{22}^{osm}}, but in a systematic manner that may be explained using fundamental thermodynamic expressions for the two OSVCs. The difference between A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} may be quantitatively significant, but may also be obscured in experimental application by statistical uncertainty or non-steric interactions. Consequently, the two OSVCs that arise in the analysis of light scattering measurements do formally differ, but in a manner that may not be detectable in actual application.

  9. Generalized non-local surface susceptibility model and Fresnel coefficients for the characterization of periodic metafilms with bianisotropic scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitriadis, Alexandros I.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.; Tsiboukis, Theodoros D.; Hafner, Christian

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: •Formulas for E/M fields radiated by continuous surface polarization distributions. •Non-local effective surface susceptibility model for periodic metafilms. •Generalized reflection and transmission coefficients for an arbitrary metafilm. •Successful treatment of non-planar scatterer arrays and spatial dispersion effects. -- Abstract: A non-local surface susceptibility model for the consistent description of periodic metafilms formed by arbitrarily-shaped, electrically-small, bianisotropic scatterers is developed in this paper. The rigorous scheme is based on the point-dipole approximation technique and is valid for any polarization and propagation direction of an electromagnetic wave impinging upon the metafilm, unlike existing approaches whose applicability is practically confined to very specific cases of incidence. Next, the universal form of the resulting surface susceptibility matrix is employed for the derivation of the generalized Fresnel coefficients for such surfaces, which enable the comprehensive interpretation of several significant, yet relatively unexamined, physical interactions. Essentially, these coefficients include eight distinct terms, corresponding to the co-polarized and cross-polarized reflection and transmission coefficients for the two orthogonal eigenpolarizations of a linearly-polarized incident plane wave. The above formulas are, then, utilized for the prediction of the scattering properties of metafilms with different planar and non-planar resonators, which are characterized via the featured model and two previously reported local ones. Their comparison with numerical simulation outcomes substantiates the merits of the proposed method, reveals important aspects of the underlying physics, and highlights the differences between the various modeling procedures.

  10. On the scattering method for the \\overline{\\partial} -equation and reconstruction of convection coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamasan, Alexandru

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we reconstruct convection coefficients from boundary measurements. We reduce the Beals and Coifman formalism from a linear first order system to a formalism for the \\overline{\\partial} -equation.

  11. Simultaneous Maximum-Likelihood Reconstruction of Absorption Coefficient, Refractive Index and Dark-Field Scattering Coefficient in X-Ray Talbot-Lau Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography is presented. This technique allows the iterative simultaneous reconstruction of discrete distributions of absorption coefficient, refractive index and a dark-field scattering coefficient. This technique avoids prior phase retrieval in the tomographic projection images and thus in principle allows reconstruction from tomographic data with less than three phase steps per projection. A numerical phantom is defined which is used to evaluate convergence of the technique with regard to photon statistics and with regard to the number of projection angles and phase steps used. It is shown that the use of a random phase sampling pattern allows the reconstruction even for the extreme case of only one single phase step per projection. The technique is successfully applied to measured tomographic data of a mouse. In future, this reconstruction technique might also be used to implement enhanced imaging models for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. These enhancements might be suited to correct for example beam hardening and dispersion artifacts and improve overall image quality of X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. PMID:27695126

  12. Analysis of aerosol scattering properties measured by a nephelometer at a coastal-rural site in the Atlantic southwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan F.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol hemispherical scattering and the backscattering coefficients, σsp, σbsc, have been measured using a 3-wavelength (450, 550 and 700 nm) integrating nephelometer over two years (January 2006-May 2008) in the coastal area of the Gulf of Cádiz, in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula. These coefficients have been carefully analyzed starting with the impact of corrections on the measurements of σsp: i.e., drift calibration constants do not modify the mean value in our data series. However, the selection of dry data (with RH less than 50%) modifies substantially the number of data and the resulting mean value of σsp is now 14% lower, which is compensated when the angular truncation correction is applied. The characterization and features of σsp, σbsc, and the derived parameters αsp (alpha Ångström exponent) and b (the backscatter ratio) has been analyzed, as annual, seasonal and diurnal evolution. A general statistic based on hourly data gives mean values and standard deviation of σsp (500 nm)=48±38 Mm-1 with a median of 38 Mm-1, and σbsc (500 nm)=5.6±3.8 Mm-1 with a median of 4.6 Mm-1. Thus, these values show moderate-low values but with a large range of variation considering the existing measured values over the Iberian Peninsula. The median value of σsp (500 nm) is an indicator that events of high aerosol burden are frequent presenting a substantial influence on the daily averages. The alpha Ångström exponent, αsp, derived from the pairs 450/700 nm gives a mean value 1.35±0.54 with a median of 1.47 and with the most frequent value of 1.7, thus indicating the prevalence of medium size particles but with a significant influence of fine particles. The b ratio has the same value for mean and median, 0.12±0.02, showing a decrease with increasing values of σsp. Annual and daily cycles have been also analyzed showing the complex behaviour of the optical properties at this coastal site where cold and warn periods show very different

  13. Baseline Maritime Aerosol: Methodology to Derive the Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite Measurements of the global distribution of aerosol and their effect on climate should be viewed in respect to a baseline aerosol. In this concept, concentration of fine mode aerosol particles is elevated above the baseline by man-made activities (smoke or urban pollution), while coarse mode by natural processes (e.g. dust or sea-spray). Using 1-3 years of measurements in 10 stations of the Aerosol Robotic network (ACRONET we develop a methodology and derive the optical thickness and properties of this baseline aerosol for the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Defined as the median for periods of stable optical thickness (standard deviation < 0.02) during 2-6 days, the median baseline aerosol optical thickness over the Pacific Ocean is 0.052 at 500 am with Angstrom exponent of 0.77, and 0.071 and 1.1 respectively, over the Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Influence of surface roughness on the elastic-light scattering patterns of micron-sized aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, J.-C.; Fernandes, G. E.; Aptowicz, K. B.; Pan, Y.-L.; Chang, R. K.

    2010-04-01

    The relation between the surface roughness of aerosol particles and the appearance of island-like features in their angle-resolved elastic-light scattering patterns is investigated both experimentally and with numerical simulation. Elastic scattering patterns of polystyrene spheres, Bacillus subtilis spores and cells, and NaCl crystals are measured and statistical properties of the island-like intensity features in their patterns are presented. The island-like features for each class of particle are found to be similar; however, principal-component analysis applied to extracted features is able to differentiate between some of the particle classes. Numerically calculated scattering patterns of Chebyshev particles and aggregates of spheres are analyzed and show qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  15. Global Assessment of OMI Aerosol Single-scattering Albedo Using Ground-based AERONET and SKYNET Inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    We compare the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the near-UV two-channel algorithm (OMAERUV) applied to the Aura-Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements with an equivalent inversion made by the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This work is the first comprehensive effort to globally compare the OMI-retrieved SSA with that of AERONET using all available sites spanning the regions of biomass burning, dust, and urban pollution. An analysis of the co-located retrievals over 269 sites reveals that about 46 percent (69 percent) of OMI-AERONET matchups agree within the absolute difference of plus or minus 0.03 (plus or minus 0.05) for all aerosol types. The comparison improves to 52 percent (77 percent) when only 'smoke' and 'dust' aerosol types were identified by the OMAERUV algorithm. Regionally, the agreement between the two inversions was robust over the biomass burning sites of South America, Sahel, Indian subcontinent, and oceanic-coastal sites followed by a reasonable agreement over north-east Asia. Over the desert regions, OMI tends to retrieve higher SSA, particularly over the Arabian Peninsula. Globally, the OMI-AERONET matchups agree mostly within plus or minus 0.03 for the aerosol optical depth (440 nanometers) and UV-aerosol index larger than 0.4 and 1.0, respectively. We also compare the OMAERUV SSA against the inversion made by an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET with its operating sites in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The advantage of the SKYNET database over AERONET is that it performs retrieval at near-UV wavelengths which facilitate the direct comparison of OMI retrievals with the equivalent ground-based inversion. Comparison of OMI and SKYNET over currently available sites reveals a good agreement between the two where more than 70 percent of matchups agree within the absolute difference of 0.05.

  16. Transport coefficients of graphene: Interplay of impurity scattering, Coulomb interaction, and optical phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong-Yi; Foster, Matthew S.

    2016-05-01

    We study the electric and thermal transport of the Dirac carriers in monolayer graphene using the Boltzmann-equation approach. Motivated by recent thermopower measurements [F. Ghahari, H.-Y. Xie, T. Taniguchi, K. Watanabe, M. S. Foster, and P. Kim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 136802 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.136802], we consider the effects of quenched disorder, Coulomb interactions, and electron-optical-phonon scattering. Via an unbiased numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation we calculate the electrical conductivity, thermopower, and electronic component of the thermal conductivity, and discuss the validity of Mott's formula and of the Wiedemann-Franz law. An analytical solution for the disorder-only case shows that screened Coulomb impurity scattering, although elastic, violates the Wiedemann-Franz law even at low temperature. For the combination of carrier-carrier Coulomb and short-ranged impurity scattering, we observe the crossover from the interaction-limited (hydrodynamic) regime to the disorder-limited (Fermi-liquid) regime. In the former, the thermopower and the thermal conductivity follow the results anticipated by the relativistic hydrodynamic theory. On the other hand, we find that optical phonons become non-negligible at relatively low temperatures and that the induced electron thermopower violates Mott's formula. Combining all of these scattering mechanisms, we obtain the thermopower that quantitatively coincides with the experimental data.

  17. Aerosol measurements at 60 m during April 1994 remote cloud study intensive operating period (RCS/IOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Albert, B.; Lee, N.; Knuth, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Aerosol measurements were made at the Southern Great Plains Site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Many types of air masses pass over this area, and on the data acquisition day, extremly low aerosol scattering coefficients were seen. A major effort was placed on providing some characterization of the aerosol size distribution. Data is currently available from the experimental center.

  18. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  19. Comparative analysis of urban atmospheric aerosol by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS).

    PubMed

    Johnson, K S; Laskin, A; Jimenez, J L; Shutthanandan, V; Molina, L T; Salcedo, D; Dzepina, K; Molina, M J

    2008-09-01

    A multifaceted approach to atmospheric aerosol analysis is often desirable in field studies where an understanding of technical comparability among different measurement techniques is essential. Herein, we report quantitative intercomparisons of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), performed of fline under a vacuum, with analysis by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) carried out in real-time during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Good agreement was observed for mass concentrations of PIXE-measured sulfur (assuming it was dominated by SO4(2-)) and AMS-measured sulfate during most of the campaign. PESA-measured hydrogen mass was separated into sulfate H and organic H mass fractions, assuming the only major contributions were (NH4)2SO4 and organic compounds. Comparison of the organic H mass with AMS organic aerosol measurements indicates that about 75% of the mass of these species evaporated under a vacuum. However approximately 25% of the organics does remain under a vacuum, which is only possible with low-vapor-pressure compounds, and which supports the presence of high-molecular-weight or highly oxidized organics consistent with atmospheric aging. Approximately 10% of the chloride detected by AMS was measured by PIXE, possibly in the form of metal-chloride complexes, while the majority of Cl was likely present as more volatile species including NH4Cl. This is the first comparison of PIXE/PESA and AMS and, to our knowledge, also the first report of PESA hydrogen measurements for urban organic aerosols.

  20. A semianalytic model to extract differential linear scattering coefficients of breast tissue from energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Boileau, Michel M.; Wang Yinkun

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this work is to develop a technique to measure the x-ray diffraction signals of breast biopsy specimens. A biomedical x-ray diffraction technology capable of measuring such signals may prove to be of diagnostic use to the medical field. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements coupled with a semianalytical model were used to extract the differential linear scattering coefficients [{mu}{sub s}(x)] of breast tissues on absolute scales. The coefficients describe the probabilities of scatter events occurring per unit length of tissue per unit solid angle of detection. They are a function of the momentum transfer argument, x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}, where {theta}=scatter angle and {lambda}=incident wavelength. The technique was validated by using a 3 mm diameter 50 kV polychromatic x-ray beam incident on a 5 mm diameter 5 mm thick sample of water. Water was used because good x-ray diffraction data are available in the literature. The scatter profiles from 6 deg. to 15 deg. in increments of 1 deg. were measured with a 3 mmx3 mmx2 mm thick cadmium zinc telluride detector. A 2 mm diameter Pb aperture was placed on top of the detector. The target to detector distance was 29 cm and the duration of each measurement was 10 min. Ensemble averages of the results compare well with the gold standard data of A. H. Narten [''X-ray diffraction data on liquid water in the temperature range 4 deg. C-200 deg. C, ORNL Report No. 4578 (1970)]. An average 7.68% difference for which most of the discrepancies can be attributed to the background noise at low angles was obtained. The preliminary measurements of breast tissue are also encouraging.

  1. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  2. Influence of diffuse reflectance measurement accuracy on the scattering coefficient in determination of optical properties with integrating sphere optics (a secondary publication).

    PubMed

    Horibe, Takuro; Ishii, Katsunori; Fukutomi, Daichi; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-30

    An estimation error of the scattering coefficient of hemoglobin in the high absorption wavelength range has been observed in optical property calculations of blood-rich tissues. In this study, the relationship between the accuracy of diffuse reflectance measurement in the integrating sphere and calculated scattering coefficient was evaluated with a system to calculate optical properties combined with an integrating sphere setup and the inverse Monte Carlo simulation. Diffuse reflectance was measured with the integrating sphere using a small incident port diameter and optical properties were calculated. As a result, the estimation error of the scattering coefficient was improved by accurate measurement of diffuse reflectance. In the high absorption wavelength range, the accuracy of diffuse reflectance measurement has an effect on the calculated scattering coefficient.

  3. Influence of diffuse reflectance measurement accuracy on the scattering coefficient in determination of optical properties with integrating sphere optics (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Horibe, Takuro; Ishii, Katsunori; Fukutomi, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    An estimation error of the scattering coefficient of hemoglobin in the high absorption wavelength range has been observed in optical property calculations of blood-rich tissues. In this study, the relationship between the accuracy of diffuse reflectance measurement in the integrating sphere and calculated scattering coefficient was evaluated with a system to calculate optical properties combined with an integrating sphere setup and the inverse Monte Carlo simulation. Diffuse reflectance was measured with the integrating sphere using a small incident port diameter and optical properties were calculated. As a result, the estimation error of the scattering coefficient was improved by accurate measurement of diffuse reflectance. In the high absorption wavelength range, the accuracy of diffuse reflectance measurement has an effect on the calculated scattering coefficient. PMID:26877594

  4. A new approach to evaluating the effects of pharmacologic vitreolysis on vitreous diffusion coefficients using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Sebag, J.

    2006-02-01

    PURPOSE: Pharmacologic vitreolysis is a new approach to improve vitreo-retinal surgery. Ultimately, the development of drugs to liquefy and detach vitreous from retina should prevent disease by mitigating the contribution of vitreous to retinopathy and eliminate the need for surgery. However, the mechanism of action of pharmacologic vitreolysis remains unclear. The technique of Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to evaluate the effects of microplasmin by following the diffusion coefficients of spherical polystyrene nano-particles injected with microplasmin into the vitreous. METHODS: Diffusion coefficients in dissected (n=9) porcine eyes were measured in vitro. DLS was performed on all specimens at 37°C as often as every 10 minutes for up to 6 hours following injections of human recombinant microplasmin at doses ranging from 0.125 mg to 0.8 mg, with 20 nm diameter tracer nanospheres. RESULTS: DLS findings in untreated porcine vitreous were similar to the previously described findings in bovine and human vitreous, demonstrating a fast (early) component, resulting from the flexible hyaluronan molecules, and a slow (late) component, resulting form the stiff collagen molecules. Microplasmin increased porcine vitreous diffusion coefficients. A new approach was developed to use DLS measurements of vitreous diffusion coefficients to evaluate the effects of microplasmin in intact eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacologic vitreolysis with human recombinant microplasmin increases vitreous diffusion coefficients in vitro. The results of these studies indicate that this new approach using DLS to measure vitreous diffusion coefficients can be used to study the effects of pharmacologic vitreolysis using microplasmin and other agents in intact eyes and ultimately in vivo.

  5. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ˜ 0.19, and that over oceans is ˜ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations to show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3 < AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), -0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), -0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD - MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  6. Aerosol measurements at the Southern Great Plains Site: Design and surface installation

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Knuth, R.H.; Guggenheim, S.F.; Albert, B.

    1996-04-01

    To impropve the predictive capabilities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program radiation models, measurements of awserosol size distributions, condensation particle concentrations, aerosol scattering coefficients at a number of wavelenghts, and the aerosol absorption coefficients are needed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Alos, continuous measurements of ozone concnetrations are needed for model validation. The environmental Measuremenr Laboratory (EMK) has the responsibility to establish the surface aerosol measurements program at the SGP site. EML has designed a special sampling manifold.

  7. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  8. Absorbing and scattering aerosols over the source region of biomass burning emissions: Implications in the assessment of optical and radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Srivastava, Rohit; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, Darshan

    2016-02-01

    The current study focuses on the assessment of model simulated optical and radiative properties of aerosols incorporating the measured chemical composition of aerosol samples collected at Patiala during October, 2011-February, 2012. Monthly average mass concentration of PM2.5, elemental carbon (EC), primary organic carbon (POC), water-soluble (WS) and insoluble (INS) aerosols ranged from 120 to 192, 6.2 to 7.2, 20 to 39, 59 to 111 and 35 to 90 μg m-3, respectively. Mass concentration of different components of aerosols was further used for the assessment of optical properties derived from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) model simulations. Microtops based measured aerosol optical depth (AOD500) ranged from 0.47 to 0.62 showing maximum value during November and December, and minimum during February. Ångström exponent (α380-870) remained high (>0.90) throughout the study period except in February (0.74), suggesting predominance of fine mode particles over the study region. The observed ratio of scattering to absorbing aerosols was incorporated in OPAC model simulations and single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) so obtained ranged between 0.80 and 0.92 with relatively low values during the period of extensive biomass burning. In the present study, SBDART based estimated values of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface (SRF) and top of the atmosphere (TOA) ranged from -31 to -66 Wm-2 and -2 to -18 W m-2 respectively. The atmospheric ARF, ranged between + 18 and + 58 Wm-2 resulting in the atmospheric heating rate between 0.5 and 1.6 K day-1. These results signify the role of scattering and absorbing aerosols in affecting the magnitude of aerosol forcing.

  9. Brillouin-scattering measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in liquid CS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, R. W.; Detenbeck, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin spectra were recorded for light scattered at small angles from liquid CS2. The use of a single-mode He-Ne laser, locked in frequency to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, permitted measurements of line widths of the order of 10 MHz for frequencies in the range 300-1000 MHz. These measurements extend previous Brillouin line-width measurements at higher frequencies into the region where relaxation effects are dominant and connect the optical measurements with lower-frequency acoustical data.

  10. Multiple scattering technique lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissonnette, Luc R.

    1992-01-01

    The Bernouilli-Ricatti equation is based on the single scattering description of the lidar backscatter return. In practice, especially in low visibility conditions, the effects of multiple scattering can be significant. Instead of considering these multiple scattering effects as a nuisance, we propose here to use them to help resolve the problems of having to assume a backscatter-to-extinction relation and specifying a boundary value for a position far remote from the lidar station. To this end, we have built a four-field-of-view lidar receiver to measure the multiple scattering contributions. The system has been described in a number of publications that also discuss preliminary results illustrating the multiple scattering effects for various environmental conditions. Reported here are recent advances made in the development of a method of inverting the multiple scattering data for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient.

  11. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  12. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  13. Uptake Co-efficient Studies of HO2 Radicals with NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 Aerosols under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faloon, Kate H.; Bloss, William J.

    2010-05-01

    The atmospheric oxidising capacity determines the rate of removal of many atmospheric constituents, including pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane. For most compounds, tropospheric degradation is initiated through reaction with the hydroxyl radical. OH is rapidly interconverted with hydroperoxy radicals HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (e.g. CH3O2, referred to as RO2 in general) through reaction with volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides; consequently loss of peroxy species affects atmospheric oxidising capacity. Model analyses have shown that heterogeneous loss of hydro- and organic peroxy radicals may significantly affect OH levels and hence factors such as pollutant degradation, ozone production and SOA formation - however these processes are poorly understood. This work aims to increase our understanding of heterogeneous reactions between HO2 radicals and aerosol; specifically the rate at which HO2 is lost to aerosols particles. The rate and mechanism of this HO2 loss process is highly uncertain at present and reducing this uncertainty will allow improved simulation of this process within atmospheric models. We present new values of the mass accommodation co-efficient, αHO2, and the uptake co-efficient,γHO2, for NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aqueous aerosols. Sodium chloride is used as a substitute for marine aerosols and ammonium sulphate as a substitute for an urban aerosol. A laboratory flow-tube system, mimicking tropospheric conditions, is used for determination of these values. Hydroperoxy radicals are produced by the photolysis of water vapour and detected using a PEroxy Radical Chemical Amplification (PERCA) technique, while aerosols are generated using a constant output atomiser and detected using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The flow tube system allows variation of the radical aerosol contact distance, and hence time, allowing a rate of uptake, γ, to be determined. Mass accommodation, α, values are determined using aerosols

  14. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Bian, Huisheng; Curci, Gabriele; Myhre, Gunnar; van Noije, Twan; Schulz, Michael; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-27

    The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over the global oceans is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL satellite. The retrieved values for SSA and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) agree well with the ground-based measurements of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The global coverage provided by the PARASOL observations represents a unique opportunity to evaluate SSA and AOD simulated by atmospheric transport model runs, as performed in the AeroCom framework. The SSA estimate provided by the AeroCom models is generally higher than the SSA retrieved from both PARASOL and AERONET. On the other hand, the mean simulated AOD is about right or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the SSA by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and underestimate it at surface. This implies that aerosols have a potential stronger impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  15. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient and volatility of important BVOC oxidation products using the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G.; Hohaus, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schmitt, S. H.; Yu, Z.; Schlag, P.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can alter the Earth's radiative budget and global climate but can also affect human health. A dominant contributor to the submicrometer particulate matter (PM) is organic aerosol (OA). OA can be either directly emitted through e.g. combustion processes (primary OA) or formed through the oxidation of organic gases (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). A detailed understanding of SOA formation is of importance as it constitutes a major contribution to the total OA. The partitioning between the gas and particle phase as well as the volatility of individual components of SOA is yet poorly understood adding uncertainties and thus complicating climate modelling. In this work, a new experimental methodology was used for compound-specific analysis of organic aerosol. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) is a newly developed instrument that deploys an aerodynamic lens to separate the gas and particle phase of an aerosol. The particle phase is directed to a cooled sampling surface. After collection particles are thermally desorbed and transferred to a detector for further analysis. In the present work, the ACM was coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to detect and quantify organic compounds partitioning between the gas and particle phase. This experimental approach was used in a set of experiments at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR to investigate SOA formation. Ozone oxidation with subsequent photochemical aging of β-pinene, limonene and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were studied. Simultaneous measurement of the gas and particle phase using the ACM-PTR-ToF-MS allows to report partitioning coefficients of important BVOC oxidation products. Additionally, volatility trends and changes of the SOA with photochemical aging are investigated and compared for all systems studied.

  16. A wavelength-dispersive instrument for characterizing fluorescence and scattering spectra of individual aerosol particles on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Donald R.; Swanson, Benjamin E.; Huffman, J. Alex

    2016-08-01

    We describe a novel, low-cost instrument to acquire both elastic and inelastic (fluorescent) scattering spectra from individual supermicron-size particles in a multi-particle collection on a microscope slide. The principle of the device is based on a slitless spectroscope that is often employed in astronomy to determine the spectra of individual stars in a star cluster but had not been applied to atmospheric particles. Under excitation, most commonly by either a 405 nm diode laser or a UV light-emitting diode (LED), fluorescence emission spectra of many individual particles can be determined simultaneously. The instrument can also acquire elastic scattering spectra from particles illuminated by a white-light source. The technique also provides the ability to detect and rapidly estimate the number fraction of fluorescent particles that could contaminate a collection of non-fluorescent material, even without analyzing full spectra. Advantages and disadvantages of using black-and-white cameras compared to color cameras are given. The primary motivation for this work has been to develop an inexpensive technique to characterize fluorescent biological aerosol particles, especially particles such as pollen and mold spores that can cause allergies. An example of an iPhone-enabled device is also shown as a means for collecting data on biological aerosols at lower cost or by utilizing citizen scientists for expanded data collection.

  17. Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Aerosolized Conductive Flake Powders and Flake Suspensions having a Zero-Truncated Poisson Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle was used to disseminate all materials into a stirred 190 m 3 cylindrical aerosol chamber. After dispersion by the... nozzle and thorough chamber mixing with a low speed fan, spectral aerosol transmittance and concentration were simultaneously measured to obtain spectral...varying concentrations were prepared by stirring and sonicating the powders in ethanol. A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle , consisting of a jet of the

  18. Changing of optical absorption and scattering coefficients in nonlinear-optical crystal lithium triborate before and after interaction with UV-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, Artem S.; Nikitin, Dmitriy G.; Ryabushkin, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    In current work optical properties of LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with ultraviolet (UV) (λ= 266 nm) induced volume macroscopic defect (track) are investigated using novel piezoelectric resonance laser calorimetry technique. Pulsed laser radiation of 10 W average power at 532 nm wavelength, is consecutively focused into spatial regions with and without optical defect. For these cases exponential fitting of crystal temperature kinetics measured during its irradiation gives different optical absorption coefficients α1 = 8.1 • 10-4 cm-1 (region with defect) and α =3.9ṡ10-4 cm-1 (non-defected region). Optical scattering coefficient is determined as the difference between optical absorption coefficients measured for opaque and transparent lateral facets of the crystal respectively. Measurements reveal that scattering coefficient of LBO in the region with defect is three times higher than the optical absorption coefficient.

  19. [Aerosol Optical Properties in the Northern Suburb of Nanjing During Haze Days in January 2013].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-peng; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Fen-ping; Zhou, Yao-yao

    2016-03-15

    In January 2013 large-scale, continuous and severe haze occurred in Nanjing. Three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) was used for real-time, online and situ measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients in the northern suburb of Nanjing during January 2013. The results indicated that the average aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were (83.20 ± 35.24) Mm⁻¹ and (670.16 ± 136.44) Mm⁻¹ during haze days, which were 3.85 and 3.45 times higher than those on clean days, respectively. The diurnal variation of absorption and scattering coefficients showed a bimodal distribution. The mean single scattering albedo and scattering Angstrom exponent were (0.89 ± 0.04) and (1.30 ± 0.27) respectively, indicating the predominance of scattering fine particles during haze days in Nanjing. Aerosols could be significantly removed by precipitation. The absorption and scattering coefficients showed negative correlations with surface wind speed, and the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent showed positive correlations with wind speed. Aerosol scattering coefficient was highest under southeasterly wind, whereas the absorption coefficient was highest under the southwesterly wind. In the three haze pollution events, Haze 1 and Haze 2 were mainly affected by long-range transportation of pollutants. Haze 1 was mainly affected by aging air mass from north Nanjing, Haze 2 was mainly affected by biomass burning air mass from southwest Nanjing, while Haze 3 was mainly caused by the high sulfate.

  20. Influence of daylight and noise current on cloud and aerosol observations by spaceborne elastic scattering lidar.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T Y; Imai, T; Uchino, O; Nagai, T

    1999-08-20

    The influence of daylight and noise current on cloud and aerosol observations by realistic spaceborne lidar was examined by computer simulations. The reflected solar radiations, which contaminate the daytime return signals of lidar operations, were strictly and explicitly estimated by accurate radiative transfer calculations. It was found that the model multilayer cirrus clouds and the boundary layer aerosols could be observed during the daytime and the nighttime with only a few laser shots. However, high background noise and noise current make it difficult to observe volcanic aerosols in middle and upper atmospheric layers. Optimal combinations of the laser power and receiver field of view are proposed to compensate for the negative influence that is due to these noises. For the computer simulations, we used a realistic set of lidar parameters similar to the Experimental Lidar in-Space Equipment of the National Space Development Agency of Japan.

  1. Determination of the scattering coefficient of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of the anisotropy factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, has a strong influence on the calculation of the scattering coefficient μ s in inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulations. It has been reported that g has the wavelength and absorption dependence; however, few attempts have been made to calculate μ s using g values by taking the wavelength and absorption dependence into account. In this study, the angular distributions of scattered light for biological tissue phantoms containing hemoglobin as a light absorber were measured by a goniometric optical setup at strongly (405 nm) and weakly (664 nm) absorbing wavelengths to obtain g. Subsequently, the optical properties were calculated with the measured values of g by integrating sphere measurements and an iMC simulation, and compared with the results obtained with a conventional g value of 0.9. The μ s values with measured g were overestimated at the strongly absorbing wavelength, but underestimated at the weakly absorbing wavelength if 0.9 was used in the iMC simulation.

  2. Determination of scattering coefficient considering wavelength and absorption dependence of anisotropy factor measured by polarized beam for biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, D.; Ishii, K.; Awazu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, is the most important parameter to accurately determine scattering coefficient μs in the inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulation. It has been reported that g has wavelength and absorption dependence, however, there are few attempts in order to calculate μs of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of g. In this study, the scattering angular distributions of biological tissue phantoms were measured in order to determine g by using goniometric measurements with three polarization conditions at strongly and weakly absorbing wavelengths of hemoglobin. Then, optical properties, especially, μs were measured by integrating sphere measurements and iMC simulation in order to confirm the influence of measured g on optical properties in comparison of with general value of g (0.9) for soft biological tissue. Consequently, it was found that μs was overestimated at strongly absorbing wavelength, however, μs was underestimated at weakly absorbing wavelength if the g was not considered its wavelength and absorption dependence.

  3. In-Situ Light Scattering Techniques for Determining Aerosol Size Distributions and Optical Constants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-29

    FORM 1. REPORT NUMBER 2 GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED In-situ Light...DATEP esie -’ "e June 29, 1983 STriane Roy , .13. NUMBER OF PAGES k Trianele f;: k78 ’ 4 . MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If different from Controlllng...experiments. The compounds tested, and examples of the - 4 - CCNTROL J -i VALVE AIR POLAR NEPHELOMETER PUMP AEROSOL GENERATOR AEROSOL L. (TSI MODEL 3050

  4. Characterization and source apportionment of aerosol light extinction with a coupled model of CMB-IMPROVE in Hangzhou, Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Yu-fen; Feng, Yin-chang; Zheng, Xian-jue; Jiao, Li; Hong, Sheng-mao; Shen, Jian-dong; Zhu, Tan; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics and sources of aerosol light extinction in the Yangtze River Delta of China, a campaign was carried out in Hangzhou from December 2013 to November 2014. Hourly data for air pollutants including PM2.5, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO, and aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficient and aerosol absorbing coefficient was obtained in the environmental air quality automatic monitoring station. Meteorological parameters were measured synchronously in the automated meteorology monitoring station. Additionally, around seven sets of ambient PM2.5 samples per month were collected and analyzed during the campaign. The annual mean aerosol scattering coefficient, aerosol absorbing coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo measured in this study was 514 ± 284 Mm- 1, 35 ± 20 Mm- 1 and 94% respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient reconstructed using the modified IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment) formula was compared to the measured extinction coefficient. Better correlations could be found between the measured and reconstructed extinction coefficient when RH was under 90%. A coupled model of CMB (chemical mass balance) and modified IMPROVE was used to apportion the sources of aerosol light extinction in Hangzhou. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate were identified as the most significant sources for aerosol light extinction, accounted for 30.2%, 24.1% and 15.8% respectively.

  5. Aerosol absorption coefficient and Equivalent Black Carbon by parallel operation of AE31 and AE33 aethalometers at the Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Kalogridis, Athina-Cerise; Vratolis, Sterios; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing carbon in atmospheric aerosol plays a critical role in radiative forcing and climate change. Despite the long term measurements across the Arctic, comparing data obtained by a variety of methods across stations requires caution. A method for extracting the aerosol absorption coefficient from data obtained over the decades by filter based instrument is still under development. An IASOA Aerosol working group has been initiated to address this and other cross-site aerosol comparison opportunities. Continuous ambient measurements of EBC/light attenuation by means of a Magee Sci. AE-31 aethalometer operating at the Zeppelinfjellet station (474 m asl; 78°54'N, 11°53'E), Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, have been available since 2001 (Eleftheriadis et al, 2009), while a new aethalometer model (AE33, Drinovec et al, 2014) has been installed to operate in parallel from the same inlet since June 2015. Measurements are recorded by a Labview routine collecting all available parameters reported by the two instrument via RS232 protocol. Data are reported at 1 and 10 minute intervals as averages for EBC (μg m-3) and aerosol absorption coefficients (Mm-1) by means of routine designed to report Near Real Time NRT data at the EBAS WDCA database (ebas.nilu.no) Results for the first 6 month period are reported here in an attempt to evaluate comparative performance of the two instruments in terms of their response with respect to the variable aerosol load of light absorbing carbon during the warm and cold seasons found in the high arctic. The application of available conversion schemes for obtaining the absorption coefficient by the two instruments is found to demonstrate a marked difference in their output. During clean periods of low aerosol load (EBC < 30 ng m-3), the two instruments display a better agreement with regression slope for the 880 nm signal between the two at ~ 0.9 compared to a slope at ~ 0.6 during the period of higher absorbing carbon loads (400< EBC<30 ng m

  6. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  7. Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties at Four North American Surface Monitoring Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delene, David J.; Ogren, John A.

    2002-03-01

    Aerosol optical properties measured over several years at surface monitoring stations located at Bondville, Illinois (BND); Lamont, Oklahoma (SGP); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (WSA); and Barrow, Alaska (BRW), have been analyzed to determine the importance of the variability in aerosol optical properties to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The amount of aerosol present is of primary importance and the aerosol optical properties are of secondary importance to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The mean aerosol light absorption coefficient (ap) is 10 times larger and the mean aerosol scattering coefficient (sp) is 5 times larger at the anthropogenically influenced site at BND than at BRW. The aerosol optical properties of single scattering albedo (o) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) have variability of approximately ±3% and ±8%, respectively, in mean values among the four stations. To assess the importance of the variability in o and b on top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing calculations, the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (F/) is calculated. The F/ is defined as the aerosol forcing (F) per unit optical depth () and does not depend explicitly on the amount of aerosol present. Based on measurements at four North American stations, radiative transfer calculations that assume fixed aerosol properties can have errors of 1%-6% in the annual average forcing at the top of the atmosphere due to variations in average single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction among the sites studied. The errors increase when shorter-term variations in aerosol properties are considered; for monthly and hourly timescales, errors are expected to be greater than 8% and 15%, respectively, approximately one-third of the time. Systematic relationships exist between various aerosol optical properties [ap, o, b, F/, and Ångström exponent (å)] and the amount of aerosol present (measured by sp) that are qualitatively similar but quantitatively

  8. Collection efficiency of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol particles explored via light-scattering single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas; Donahue, Neil M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the collection efficiency and effective ionization efficiency for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles made from α-pinene + O3 using the single-particle capabilities of the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). The mean count-based collection efficiency (CEp) for SOA across these experiments is 0.30 (±0.04 SD), ranging from 0.25 to 0.40. The mean mass-based collection efficiency (CEm) is 0.49 (±0.07 SD). This sub-unit collection efficiency and delayed vaporization is attributable to particle bounce in the vaporization region. Using the coupled optical and chemical detection of the light-scattering single-particle (LSSP) module of the AMS, we provide clear evidence that delayed vaporization is somewhat of a misnomer for these particles: SOA particles measured as a part of the AMS mass distribution do not vaporize at a slow rate; rather, they flash-vaporize, albeit often not on the initial impact with the vaporizer but instead upon a subsequent impact with a hot surface in the vaporization region. We also find that the effective ionization efficiency (defined as ions per particle, IPP) decreases with delayed arrival time. CEp is not a function of particle size (for the mobility diameter range investigated, 170-460 nm), but we did see a decrease in CEp with thermodenuder temperature, implying that oxidation state and/or volatility can affect CEp for SOA. By measuring the mean ions per particle produced for monodisperse particles as a function of signal delay time, we can separately determine CEp and CEm and thus more accurately measure the relative ionization efficiency (compared to ammonium nitrate) of different particle types.

  9. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  10. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  11. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Robert Y.; Laamanen, Curtis McDonald, Nancy; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients μ{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the θ = 6° scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of μ{sub s}[x(E, θ)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of μ{sup ¯}{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}(x)=ν{sub 1}μ{sub s1}(x)+ν{sub 2}μ{sub s2}(x)+ν{sub 3}μ{sub s3}(x), where ν{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the μ{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known μ{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup −1}. The μ{sup ¯}{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to

  12. North Atlantic Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos: TARFOX and ACE-2 Results and Their Relation to Radiative Effects Derived from Satellite Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Rood, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Bergstrom and Russell estimated direct solar radiative flux changes caused by atmospheric aerosols over the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean under cloud-free and cloudy conditions. They excluded African dust aerosols, primarily by restricting calculations to latitudes 25-60 N. As inputs they used midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps derived from AVHRR satellite measurements and aerosol intensive properties determined primarily in the 1996 IGAC Troposheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). Those aerosol intensive properties, which included optical depth wavelength dependence and spectra of single scattering albedo (SSA) and scattering asymmetry parameter, were also checked against initial properties from the 1997 North Atlantic Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 2). Bergstrom and Russell investigated the sensitivity of their derived flux changes to assumed input parameters, including midvisible AOD, SSA, and scattering asymmetry parameter. Although the sensitivity of net flux change at the tropopause to SSA was moderate over the ocean (e.g., a SSA uncertainty of 0.07 produced a flux-change uncertainty of 21%), the sensitivity over common land surfaces can be much larger. Also, flux changes within and below the aerosol layer, which affect atmospheric stability, heating rates, and cloud formation and persistence, are quite sensitive to aerosol SSA. Therefore, this paper focuses on the question: "What have we learned from TARFOX and ACE 2 regarding aerosol single scattering albedo?" Three techniques were used in TARFOX to determine midvisible SSA. One of these derived SSA as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from aerosol properties. Another technique combined airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption by nephelometer and absorption photometer. A third technique obtained SSA from best-fit complex refractive indices derived by comparing

  13. Background Southeast United States Aerosol Optical Properties and Their Dependence Upon Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlyszyn, C.; West, M.; Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects on SE U.S. radiation budget are highly-seasonal. Aerosol loading is much higher in summer, due largely to high levels of biogenic secondary organic aerosol and sulfates. Aerosol loading is lowest in winter. Aerosol optical properties relevant to radiative forcing have been measured continuously at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research facility (AppalAIR) since the summer of 2009. AppalAIR is the only site in the eastern US to house co-located NOAA ESRL and NASA AeroNET instrumentation and is located in the mountains of Boone, NC. Lower tropospheric sub-micron (PM1) light scattering and absorption coefficients measured over seven summers and six winters are presented here, in addition to PM1 organic and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations measured during summers 2012-2013 as well as winter 2013. The objective is to determine the influence of aerosol sources and meteorology along the air mass back-trajectories on aerosol loading and composition. PM1 aerosol mass was dominated by organic aerosol and sulfate during the periods measured. Aerosol light scattering and organic aerosol concentrations were positively correlated during summer with temperature and solar flux along the parcel back-trajectory and negatively-correlated with rainfall along the back-trajectory. Wet deposition was a major factor in the difference between the upper and lower scattering coefficient quartiles for both summer and winter. Summer PM1 light scattering coefficient declined by approximately 30-40% since 2009, with smaller decreases during winter months. Long-term studies of aerosol optical properties from the regionally-representative AppalAIR site are necessary to determine the relationships between changing SE U.S. air quality and aerosol effects on regional climate and weather.

  14. Electron back-scattering coefficient below 5 keV: Analytical expressions and surface-barrier effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazaux, J.

    2012-10-01

    Simple analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient, η, are established from published data obtained in the ˜0.4-5 keV range for 21 elements ranging from Be to Au. They take into account the decline in η with a decrease in energy E° for high-Z elements and the reverse behavior for low-Z elements. The proposed expressions for η (E°) lead to crossing energies situated in the 0.4-1 keV range and they may be reasonably extended to any of the other elements—via an interpolation procedure—to metallic alloys and probably to compounds. The influence of the surface barrier on the escape probability of the back-scattered electrons is next evaluated. This evaluation provides a theoretical basis to explain the observed deviation between various published data as a consequence of surface contamination or oxidation. Various practical applications and strategies are deduced for the η-measurements in dedicated instruments as well for the image interpretation in low voltage scanning electron microscopy based on the backscattered electron detection. In this microscopy, the present investigation allows to generalize the scarce contrast changes and contrast reversals previously observed on multi elemental samples and it suggests the possibility of a new type of contrast: the work function contrast.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  16. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  17. Decoupling scattering and absorption of turbid samples using a simple empirical relation between coefficients of the Kubelka-Munk and radiative transfer theories.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Harshavardhan Ashok; Kumar, Dinesh; Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Roy, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    Efforts are underway to better understand the absorption properties of micro- and nano-sized particles due to their potential in various photonic applications. However, most of these particles exhibit strong scattering in the spectral regions of interest in addition to absorption. Due to strong interference from scattering, the absorption of these turbid samples cannot be directly measured using conventional spectroscopy techniques. The optical properties of these particles are also different from that of the bulk due to quantum confinement and plasmon resonance effects and cannot be inferred from their bulk properties. By measuring the total transmittance and total reflectance (diffuse and collimated) of turbid samples and using an empirical relation between the coefficients of the Kubelka-Munk and radiative transfer theories, we have demonstrated a method to calculate the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This method is capable of extracting the absorption coefficient of turbid samples with an error of 2%. Using this method, we have decoupled the specific absorption and specific reduced scattering coefficients of commercially available micro-sized iron oxide particles. The current method can be used to measure the optical properties of irregularly shaped particle dispersions, which are otherwise difficult to estimate theoretically.

  18. Statistics of Ku-band microwave response of the United States with a satellite borne radiometer/scatterometer. [scattering coefficient and brightness temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K. (Principal Investigator); Ulaby, F. T.; Sobti, A.; Burton, T.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Skylab S-193 radiometer/scatterometer collected thousands of measurements of scattering coefficient and brightness temperature over various parts of the United States during the summer of 1973 at angles of incidence between vertical and about 45 deg. These measurements have been combined to produce histograms of the response at each of several angles within this range, and to establish average scattering coefficient vs angle curves with 10% and 90% exceedance levels as well. The variation of the radiometric measurements is primarily in the region from 255 K to 285 K, with very few measurements giving higher values, but a significant, though small, number giving values down to and even below 200 K. The scattering coefficient varies, for the mean, from about 0 db at 1 deg off vertical to a low in the neighborhood of -10 db at 45 deg. The variability of the scattering coefficient measurements with this coarse resolution sensor is surprisingly small. The number of distinguishable levels is slightly more for the scatterometer than for the radiometer, but the amount of variation in brightness temperature caused by the physical temperature of the ground is enough so that the scatterometer can be used to distinguish significantly more meaningful levels than the radiometer.

  19. Decadal changes in aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo estimated from ground-based broadband radiometers: A case study in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Sakami, Tomonori; Ijima, Osamu

    2011-02-01

    A method to estimate aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from broadband direct and diffuse irradiances was developed. Using irradiances simulated with and without errors, the accuracies of estimated optical thickness from 0.7 to 0.8 μm and single scattering albedo in the visible wavelength region were determined to be about 0.02 and 0.05, respectively. Resulting time variations in optical thickness and single scattering albedo by broadband radiometers agreed well with sky radiometer retrievals. Long-term variations in optical thickness and single scattering albedo from 1975 to 2008 at Tsukuba, Japan, were estimated by the method described. Optical thickness increased until the mid-1980s, then decreased until the late 1990s, and was almost constant in the 2000s. The single scattering albedo was about 0.8 until the late 1980s, gradually increased, and has remained at approximately 0.9 since the mid-1990s. The surface global irradiance under clear sky conditions calculated from estimated aerosol optical properties showed an apparent transition from dimming to brightening around the mid-1980s. The magnitude of the brightening was about 12.7 W m-2; of this, 8.3 W m-2 was due to a decrease in optical thickness, and the remaining 4.4 W m-2 was due to an increase of single scattering albedo. On the other hand, the surface global irradiance measured under cloudy conditions increased by 2.6 W m-2. The dimming and brightening by aerosols were weakened by the changes in clouds. The method described could be useful in evaluating aerosol influences on long-term changes in the surface solar radiation at many sites around the world.

  20. Effects of aggregation on scattering and radiative properties of soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2005-06-01

    The superposition T-matrix method is used to compute the scattering matrix elements and optical cross sections for a wide variety of fractal-like soot aggregates in random orientation at a visible wavelength 0.628 μm. The effects of the fractal dimension and prefactor, the monomer radius, the number of monomers in the aggregate, and the refractive index on light scattering and absorption by aggregated soot particles are analyzed. It is shown that the configuration of the monomers can have a substantial effect and that aggregation can result in a significant enhancement of extinction and scattering relative to those computed from the Lorenz-Mie theory, assuming that there are no electromagnetic interactions between the monomers. Thus one must take the effects of soot agglomeration and cluster morphology into account in radiative transfer modeling and remote sensing applications.

  1. Evidence for two different structuring and scattering mechanisms and the associated role of aerosols in the polar summer mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulwick, J. C.; Kelley, M. C.; Alcala, C.; Blix, T. A.; Thrane, E. V.

    1993-10-01

    A Super Arcas rocket, MISTI B, was launched as part of the Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) salvo to measure electron density irregularities using rf and dc probes. Large and small scale structures in the electron density were measured on rocket ascent and descent at the altitudes of 86.5 and 88.5 +/- .5 km. Since the rocket apogee was 89 km, the rocket was in the height range 88.5 +/- .5 km for 30 seconds giving us an unusual measurement of horizontal structure over a distance of 5.5 km. A power spectrum of the fluctuations for the upper layer gives further evidence that turbulent mixing is an important process in PMSE. The power spectrum of the lower layer, however, gives evidence that this layer is characterized by a form of partial or Fresnel scattering. Both spectra are in excellent agreement with similar analysis of electron fluctuation spectra measured in the same layers on the TURBO-B rocket flown 12 minutes later and the analysis of Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) data by Cho et al., 1993A. Thus two different structuring and scattering mechanisms exist at altitudes only 1 km apart. Using the simultaneous dc and rf probe measurements of electron depletions and sharp gradients in the lower layer, we speculate on the role of aerosols in creating these depletions and gradients.

  2. Fluid dynamic studies on scattering aerosol and its generation for application as tracer particles in supersonic flow measurements utilizing laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Hoyle, B. D.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental study on the particle-fluid interactions of scattering aerosols was performed using monodisperse aerosols of different particle sizes for the application of laser Doppler velocimeters in subsonic turbulence measurements. Particle response was measured by subjecting the particles to an acoustically excited oscillatory fluid velocity field and by comparing the ratio of particle velocity amplitude to the fluid velocity amplitude as a function of particle size and the frequency of oscillation. Particle velocity was measured by using a differential laser Doppler velocimeter. The test aerosols were fairly monodisperse with a mean diameter that could be controlled over the size range from 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Experimental results on the generation of a fairly monodisperse aerosol of solid particles and liquid droplets and on the aerosol response in the frequency range 100 Hz to 100 kHz are presented. It is indicated that a unit density spherical scatterer of 0.3 micron-diameter would be an optimum choice as tracer particles for subsonic air turbulence measurements.

  3. Light scattering computation model for nonspherical aerosol particles based on multi-resolution time-domain scheme: model development and validation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Li, Hao; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Ming; Liu, Lei

    2017-01-23

    Due to the inadequate understanding of the scattering properties of nonspherical aerosols, considerable uncertainties still exist in the radiative transfer numerical simulation. To this end, a new scattering model for nonspherical aerosols is established based on Multi-Resolution Time-Domain (MRTD) scheme. The model is comprised of three modules: near field calculation module, near-to-far transformation module and scattering parameters computation module, in which, the near electromagnetic field is calculated by MRTD technique, the near-to-far transformation scheme is performed by volume integral method, and the calculation models for extinction and absorption cross section are directly derived from Maxwell's curl equations in the frequency domain. To achieve higher computational efficiency, the model is further parallelized by MPI non-blocking repeated communication technique. The accuracy of the scattering model is validated against Lorenz-Mie, Aden-Kerker and T-matrix theories for spherical particles, particles with inclusions and nonspherical particles. At last, the parallel computational efficiency of the MRTD scattering model is quantitatively discussed as well. The results obtained by parallel MRTD scattering model show an excellent agreement with those of the well-tested scattering theories, where the relative simulation errors of the phase function are less than 5% for most scattering angles. In backward directions, the simulation errors are much larger than that in forward scattering directions due to the stair approximation in particle construction. The computational accuracy of the integral scattering parameters like extinction and absorption efficiencies is higher than phase matrix, where the simulation errors of extinction and absorption efficiencies for the particle with a size parameter of 10 achieve -0.4891% and -1.6933%, respectively.

  4. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  5. Influences of relative humidity on aerosol optical properties and aerosol radiative forcing during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung

    In situ measurements at Gosan, South Korea, and onboard C-130 aircraft during ACE-Asia were analyzed to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. The temporal variation of aerosol chemical composition at the Gosan super-site was highly dependent on the air mass transport pathways and source region. RH in the springtime over East Asia were distributed with very high spatial and temporal variation. The RH profile onboard C-130 aircraft measurements exhibits a mixed layer height of about 2 km. Aerosol scattering coefficient ( σsp) under ambient RH was greatly enhanced as compared with that at dry RH (RH<40%). From the aerosol optical and radiative transfer modeling studies, we found that the extinction and scattering coefficients are greatly enhanced with RH. Single scattering albedo with RH is also sensitively changed in the longer wavelength. Asymmetry parameter ( g) is gradually increased with RH although g decreases with wavelength at a given RH. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and RH of 50% increased to factors 1.24, 1.51, 2.16, and 3.20 at different RH levels 70, 80, 90, and 95%, respectively. Diurnal-averaged aerosol radiative forcings for surface, TOA, and atmosphere were increased with RH because AOD was increased with RH due to hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. This result implies that the hygroscopic growth due to water-soluble or hydrophilic particles in the lower troposphere may significantly modify the magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing both at the surface and TOA. However, the diurnal-averaged radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface, TOA, and atmosphere were decreased with increasing RH. The decrease of the forcing efficiency with RH results from the fact that increasing rate of aerosol optical depth with RH is greater than the increasing rate of aerosol radiative forcing with RH.

  6. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 2; Derivation of Aerosol Real Refractive Index, Single-Scattering Albedo, and Humidification Factor using Raman Lidar and Aircraft Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Poellot, M.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site during two nights in April 1994 are discussed. These profiles are shown to be consistent with the simultaneous aerosol size distribution measurements made by a PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe) optical particle counter flown on the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. We describe a technique which uses both lidar and PCASP measurements to derive the dependence of particle size on relative humidity, the aerosol real refractive index n, and estimate the effective single-scattering albedo Omega(sub 0). Values of n ranged between 1.4-1.5 (dry) and 1.37-1.47 (wet); Omega(sub 0) varied between 0.7 and 1.0. The single-scattering albedo derived from this technique is sensitive to the manner in which absorbing particles are represented in the aerosol mixture; representing the absorbing particles as an internal mixture rather than the external mixture assumed here results in generally higher values of Omega(sub 0). The lidar measurements indicate that the change in particle size with relative humidity as measured by the PCASP can be represented in the form discussed by Hattel with the exponent gamma = 0.3 + or - 0.05. The variations in aerosol optical and physical characteristics captured in the lidar and aircraft size distribution measurements are discussed in the context of the meteorological conditions observed during the experiment.

  7. Single-Particle Measurements of Midlatitude Black Carbon and Light-Scattering Aerosols from the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Thomson, D. S.; Watts, L. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Darbeheshti, M.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Kok, G. L.; Chung, S. H.; Schulz, M.; Hendricks, J.; Lauer, A.; Kaercher, B.; Slowik, J. G.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Thompson, T. L.; Langford, A. O.; Loewenstein, M.; Aikin, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, Texas. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to detect individual black carbon (BC) particles in an air sample in the mass range of approx.3-300 fg (approx.0.15-0.7 microns volume equivalent diameter). Scattered light is used to size the remaining non-BC aerosols in the range of approx.0.17-0.7 microns diameter. We present profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere from two midlatitude flights. Results for total aerosol amounts in the size range detected by the SP2 are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. All ambient incandescing particles were identified as BC because their incandescence properties matched those of laboratory-generated BC aerosol. Approximately 40% of these BC particles showed evidence of internal mixing (e.g., coating). Throughout profiles between 5 and 18.7 km, BC particles were less than a few percent of total aerosol number, and black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass mixing ratio showed a constant gradient with altitude above 5 km. SP2 data was compared to results from the ECHAM4/MADE and LmDzT-INCA global aerosol models. The comparison will help resolve the important systematic differences in model aerosol processes that determine BCA loadings. Further intercomparisons of models and measurements as presented here will improve the accuracy of the radiative forcing contribution from BCA.

  8. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical Property Measurements Made During the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period and Their Effects on Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Hallar, A. G.; Arnott, W. P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ogren, J.; Schmid, B.; Luu, A.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult to measure aerosol properties. One of the main purposes of the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) flown in May, 2003 was to assess our ability to measure absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of aerosol optical properties made during the IOP. Measurements of aerosol absorption coefficient were made by Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter (U. Washington) and on the DOE Cessna 172 (NOAA-C,MDL). Aerosol absorption coefficient was also measured by a photoacoustic instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the IOP. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-AkC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Measurements of absorption coefficient from all of these instruments during appropriate periods are compared. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model.

  9. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  10. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  11. An Algorithm to retrieve aerosol properties from analysis of multiple scattering influences on both Ground-Based and Space-Borne Lidar Returns.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yuesong; Zhang, Xuguo; Lu, Xiaoxia; He, Yuntao

    2009-05-25

    A new method is proposed to analyze the effects of multiple scattering on simultaneously detected lidar returns for ground-based and space-borne lidars, and it is applied to a Monte Carlo-based simulation to test the feasibility of the new method. The experimental evidence of multiple scattering influences on both ground-based and space-borne lidar returns is presented. Monte Carlo-based evaluations of the multiple scattering parameters for the counter-looking lidar returns are separately obtained in order to correct the effective values of backscattering and extinction coefficients. Results show that for the typical cirrus cloud, the presence of the multiple scattering can lead to an underestimation of the extinction coefficient by as large as 70%, and the backscattering coefficient is overestimated by nearly 10%, which are retrieved by the Counter-propagating Elastic Signals Combination (CESC) technique in which the multiple scattering influences are neglected. Nevertheless, by the new method in which the multiple scattering effects are considered differently for the ground-based and space-borne lidar returns the extinction and backscattering coefficients can be more accurately obtained.

  12. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  13. Influence of size, proportion, and absorption coefficient of spherical scatterers on the degree of light polarization and the grain size of speckle pattern.

    PubMed

    Nader, Christelle Abou; Nassif, Rana; Pellen, Fabrice; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2015-12-10

    In this paper, we present the evolution of speckle pattern polarimetric parameters in response to controlled changes in scatterer sizes, proportions, and the absorption coefficient in media. The experimental study was performed on mixtures of polystyrene microspheres with dye in order to ensure biological medium-like properties. The speckle grain sizes and degrees of polarization for linear and circular light were monitored. We observed helicity flipping in the degree of circular polarization for small scatterer proportion around 25%. Furthermore, linear depolarization decreased slightly for media containing more small particles. Good agreement was shown with numerical results computed using a Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light taking into account our experimental configuration. Speckle grain size also evolves with the increase of small scatterers as well as the media absorption coefficient. Such variations of properties are encountered during fruit maturation, in tissues in precancerous stages, and any transformation that causes a modification in particle proportions and absorption coefficient in biological media. The computed parameters proved to be sensitive to these changes.

  14. Self-intermediate scattering function of strongly interacting three-dimensional lattice gases: time- and wave-vector-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Skarpalezos, Loukas; Argyrakis, Panos; Vikhrenko, Vyacheslav S

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the self-intermediate scattering function (SISF) in a three-dimensional (3D) cubic lattice fluid (interacting lattice gas) with attractive nearest-neighbor interparticle interactions at a temperature slightly above the critical one by means of Monte Carlo simulations. A special representation of SISF as an exponent of the mean tracer diffusion coefficient multiplied by the geometrical factor and time is considered to highlight memory effects that are included in time and wave-vector dependence of the diffusion coefficient. An analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient is suggested to reproduce the simulation data. It is shown that the particles' mean-square displacement is equal to the time integral of the diffusion coefficient. We make a comparison with the previously considered 2D system on a square lattice. The main difference with the two-dimensional case is that the time dependence of particular characteristics of the tracer diffusion coefficient in the 3D case cannot be described by exponentially decreasing functions, but requires using stretched exponentials with rather small values of exponents, of the order of 0.2. The hydrodynamic values of the tracer diffusion coefficient (in the limit of large times and small wave vectors) defined through SIFS simulation results agree well with the results of its direct determination by the mean-square displacement of the particles in the entire range of concentrations and temperatures.

  15. The surface aerosol optical properties in the urban area of Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Chen, Pulong; Hu, Qiduo; Yang, Xiu-qun; Fu, Congbin; Zhu, Jialei

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies of aerosol optical properties are useful for reducing uncertainties in estimations of aerosol radiative forcing and forecasting visibility. In this study, the observed near-surface aerosol optical properties in urban Nanjing are analysed from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show that near-surface urban aerosols in Nanjing are mainly from local emissions and the surrounding regions. They have lower loadings but are more scattering than aerosols in most cities in China. The annual mean aerosol extinction coefficient (EC), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP) at 550 nm are 381.96 Mm-1, 0.9 and 0.57, respectively. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than its scattering coefficient (SC). However, the absorbing aerosol has a larger Ångström exponent (AAE) value, 1.58 at 470/660 nm, about 0.2 larger than the scattering aerosols (SAE). All the aerosol optical properties follow a near-unimodal pattern, and their values are mostly concentrated around their averages, accounting for more than 60 % of the total samplings. Additionally, they have substantial seasonality and diurnal variations. High levels of SC and AAC all appear in winter due to higher aerosol and trace gas emissions. AAE (ASP) is the smallest (largest) in summer, possibly because of high relative humidity (RH) which also causes considerably larger SC and smaller SAE, although intensive gas-to-particle transformation could produce a large number of finer scattering aerosols in this season. Seasonality of EC is different from the columnar aerosol optical depth. Larger AACs appear during the rush hours of the day while SC and back-scattering coefficient (Bsp) only peak in the early morning. Aerosols are fresher in the daytime than at night-time, leading to their larger Ångström exponent and smaller ASP. Different temporal variations between AAC and SC cause the aerosols to be more absorbing (smaller SSA) in autumn

  16. Use of a laser beam with an oblique angle of incidence to measure the reduced scattering coefficient of a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong; Jacques, Steven L.

    1995-05-01

    A simple and quick approach is used to measure the reduced scattering coefficient ( mu s `) of a semi-infinite turbid medium having a much smaller absorption coefficient than mu s`. A laser beam with an oblique angle of incidence to the medium causes the center of the diffuse reflectance that is several transport mean-free paths away from the incident point to shift away from the point of incidence by an amount Delta x. This amount is used to compute mu s` by mu s` = sin( alpha i)/(n Delta x), where n is the refractive index of the turbid medium divided by that of the incident medium and alpha i is the angle of incidence measured from the surface normal. For a turbid medium having an absorption coefficient comparable with mu s `, a revision to the above formula is made. This method is tested theoretically by Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally by a video reflectometer.

  17. Comparison of hyperspectral measurements of the attenuation and scattering coefficients spectra with modeling results in the north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipelgas, Liis; Raudsepp, Urmas

    2015-11-01

    The spectral variations in the attenuation and scattering coefficients measured with a hyperspectral ac-spectra (Wetlabs) instrument were analyzed from a dataset collected in the vicinity of commercial harbors on the Estonian coast of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. In total, the measured TSM concentration varied from 0.4 to 30 mg L-1 and the concentration of Chl a varied from values below the detection limit (0.05) to 23 mg m-3. The reliability of the power law describing the particle attenuation cp (λ) and scattering bp(λ) coefficients was evaluated by means of a determination coefficient (R2). The power law described the particle attenuation spectra with high accuracy (R2 > 0.67), giving the dataset an average cp (λ) slope of 1.3. In the case of particle scattering coefficients, the power law did not represent the whole dataset. Depending on a particular spectrum, the R2 varied from 0 to 1.0 and the slope varied from 1.15 to -0.56. Decomposition of bp(λ) into dominant modes using principal component analyses resulted in the first principal mode accounting for the power law dependence of bp(λ), i.e. the "mineral-type" spectrum, and the second and third mode representing the characteristic bp(λ) of dominant algal particles, i.e. the "algae-type" spectrum. From our dataset we estimated that if Chl a concentration is above 10 mg m-3 or below 5 mg m-3 then most likely the "algae-type" or the "mineral-type" spectrum is dominant, respectively. There was strong linear relationship (R2 > 0.92) between TSM concentration and cp(555) and bp(555),irrespective of the dominant shape of the particle scattering spectra. The estimated TSM-specific attenuation and scattering coefficients at 555 nm were 0.8 m2 g-1 and 0.68 m2 g-1, respectively. Corresponding values for water samples with a dominant "mineral-type" spectrum were 0.85 m2 g-1 and 0.73 m2 g-1, respectively and for water samples with a dominant "algae-type" spectrum were 0.64 m2 g-1 and 0.52 m2 g-1, respectively.

  18. Dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry for simultaneous measurements of droplet-size and velocity distributions of aerosols from commonly used nebulizers

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, R.H.; Ishii, I.; Montaser, A. ); Meyer, G.A. )

    1990-02-15

    Dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry is introduced for simultaneous measurement of droplet-size and droplet-velocity distributions. The technique was tested in the characterization of tertiary aerosols produced by five nebulization systems (a pneumatic, an ultrasonic, and three frit-type nebulizers) used in inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. In general, the Sauter mean diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of tertiary aerosol produced by frit-type nebulizer was smaller than those of ultrasonic and pneumatic nebulizers. At higher injector gas flow, D{sub 3,2} was reduced for the pneumatic nebulizer but was increased for the ultrasonic nebulizer. At the same injector gas flow rate, droplets move slightly faster if helium is used as injector gas instead of argon. For all practical purposes, the D{sub 3,2} values measured for tertiary aerosol with dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry are comparable to the same data obtained by laser Fraunhofer diffraction. Compared to laser Fraunhofer diffraction, the proposed technique possesses two unique advantages. First, droplet velocity distribution can be measured. Second, spatially resolved information on droplet-size and velocity distributions may be obtained directly and rapidly.

  19. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    fraction. SSA, b, and AAE are also sensitive to changes in scattering coefficient (σsp)-a proxy for aerosol loading. AAE values well below 1 are consistent with enhanced absorption due to BC cores coated with sulfate and OA. Initial results from an aerosol classification scheme based on systematic relationships are also presented.

  20. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  1. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH+ → C+ + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH+, in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH+ in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e-. In this work, we address the destruction process of CH+ by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH+. The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  2. Molar mass, radius of gyration and second virial coefficient from new static light scattering equations for dilute solutions: application to 21 (macro)molecules.

    PubMed

    Illien, Bertrand; Ying, Ruifeng

    2009-05-11

    New static light scattering (SLS) equations for dilute binary solutions are derived. Contrarily to the usual SLS equations [Carr-Zimm (CZ)], the new equations have no need for the experimental absolute Rayleigh ratio of a reference liquid and solely rely on the ratio of scattered intensities of solutions and solvent. The new equations, which are based on polarizability equations, take into account the usual refractive index increment partial differential n/partial differential rho(2) complemented by the solvent specific polarizability and a term proportional to the slope of the solution density rho versus the solute mass concentration rho(2) (density increment). Then all the equations are applied to 21 (macro)molecules with a wide range of molar mass (0.2500 kg mol(-1)), for which the scattered intensity is no longer independent of the scattering angle, the new equations give the same value of the radius of gyration as the CZ equation and consistent values of the second virial coefficient.

  3. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Koju, Vijay; John, Dwayne O

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  4. On-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of a natural polysaccharide using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Girod, S; Baldet-Dupy, P; Maillols, H; Devoisselle, J M

    2002-01-11

    By combining a size-exclusion chromatographic (SEC) separation and an on-line multi-angle light scattering (MALLS) analysis, we have elaborated an original methodology permitting on-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of molar mass fractions of polydisperse polysaccharides. By assimilating the SEC-MALLS data to a batch mode acquisition, we have obtained on-line the complete Zimm plot of the eluted fractions, leading to knowledge of their weight-average molar mass Mw, radius of gyration r(g) and second virial coefficient A2. Our methodology was successfully applied to a iota carrageenan sample in LiCl 100 mM, EDTA 1 g/l.

  5. Determination of true optical absorption and scattering coefficient of wooden cell wall substance by time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Ryunosuke; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2016-02-22

    The true absorption coefficient (μa) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ´s) of the cell wall substance in Douglas fir were determined using time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy. Samples were saturated with hexane, toluene or quinolone to minimize the multiple reflections of light on the boundary between pore-cell wall substance in wood. μ´s exhibited its minimum value when the wood was saturated with toluene because the refractive index of toluene is close to that of the wood cell wall substance. The optical parameters of the wood cell wall substance calculated were μa = 0.030 mm(-1) and μ´s= 18.4 mm(-1). Monte Carlo simulations using these values were in good agreement with the measured time-resolved transmittance profiles.

  6. Sign change of the Soret coefficient of poly(ethylene oxide) in water/ethanol mixtures observed by thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Kita, Rio; Wiegand, Simone; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2004-08-22

    Soret coefficients of the ternary system of poly(ethylene oxide) in mixed water/ethanol solvent were measured over a wide solvent composition range by means of thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering. The Soret coefficient S(T) of the polymer was found to change sign as the water content of the solvent increases with the sign change taking place at a water mass fraction of 0.83 at a temperature of 22 degrees C. For high water concentrations, the value of S(T) of poly(ethylene oxide) is positive, i.e., the polymer migrates to the cooler regions of the fluid, as is typical for polymers in good solvents. For low water content, on the other hand, the Soret coefficient of the polymer is negative, i.e., the polymer migrates to the warmer regions of the fluid. Measurements for two different polymer concentrations showed a larger magnitude of the Soret coefficient for the smaller polymer concentration. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient was investigated for water-rich polymer solutions and revealed a sign change from negative to positive as the temperature is increased. Thermodiffusion experiments were also performed on the binary mixture water/ethanol. For the binary mixtures, the Soret coefficient of water was observed to change sign at a water mass fraction of 0.71. This is in agreement with experimental results from the literature. Our results show that specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between solvent molecules and between polymer and solvent molecules play an important role in thermodiffusion for this system.

  7. Scattering by Atmospheric Particles: From Aerosols to Clouds with the Point-Spread Function ... using Water, Milk, Plastic Cups, and a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres are made primarily of molecules, and their optical properties are well known. They scatter sunlight across the spectrum, but far more potently at shorter wavelengths. Consequently, they redden the Sun as it sets and, at the same time, endow the daytime sky with its characteristic blue hue. There are also microscopic atmospheric particulates that are equally omnipresent because small enough (up to ~10s of microns) to remain lofted for long periods of time. However, in contrast with molecules of the major gases, their concentrations are highly variable in space and time. Their optical properties are also far more interesting. These airborne particles are either solid---hence the word "aerosols"---or liquid, most notably in the form of cloud droplets. Needless to say that both aerosols and clouds have major impacts on the balance of the Earth's climate system. Harder to understand, but nonetheless true, is that their climate impacts are much harder to assess by Earth system modelers than those of greenhouse gases such as CO2. That makes them prime targets of study by multiple approaches, including ground- and space-based remote sensing. To characterize aerosols and clouds quantitatively by optical remote sensing methods, either passive (sunlight-based) or active (laser-based), we need predictive capability for the signals recorded by sensors, whether ground-based, airborne, or carried by satellites. This in turn draws on the physical theory of "radiative transfer" that describes how the light propagates and scatters in the molecular-and-particulate atmosphere. This is a challenge for remote sensing scientists. I will show why by simulating with simple means the point spread function or "PSF" of scattering particulate atmospheres with varying opacity, thus covering tabletop analogs of the pristine air, the background aerosol, all the way to optically thick cloudy airmasses. I will also show PSF measurements of real clouds over New Mexico and

  8. Aircraft measurements of biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.; Osborne, S. R.; Haywood, J. M.; Harrison, M. A. J.

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the properties of biomass burning aerosols over West Africa using data from the UK FAAM aircraft during the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX). Aged biomass burning aerosols were widespread across the region, often at altitudes up to 4 km. Fresh biomass burning aerosols were observed at low altitudes by flying through smoke plumes from agricultural fires. The aircraft measured aerosol size distributions, optical properties, and vertical distributions. Single scattering albedo varied from 0.73 to 0.93 (at 0.55 μm) in aerosol layers dominated by biomass burning aerosol. We attribute much of this variation to the variable proportion of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol. We estimate the single scattering albedo of aged biomass burning aerosol to be around 0.81 with an instrumental uncertainty of ±0.05. External mixing, and possibly internal mixing, between the biomass burning aerosol and mineral dust presents an additional source of uncertainty in this estimate. The size distributions of biomass burning aerosols were dominated by particles with radii smaller than 0.35 μm. A 20% increase of count mean radius was observed when contrasting fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols, accompanied by changes in the shape of the size distribution. These changes suggest growth by coagulation and condensation. Extinction coefficients, asymmetry parameters, and Angstrom exponents are calculated from Mie theory, using the lognormal fits to the measured size distributions and assumed refractive indices.

  9. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  10. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  11. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Canagaratna, Manjula; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, Joel; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Davidovits, Paul

    2009-10-01

    To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.

  12. Aerosol measurements at the south pole during 1987. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Bodhaine, B.A.; Harris, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates an atmospheric monitoring observatory at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The aerosol measurement program consists of the continuous measurement of condensation nuclei (CN) concentration and aerosol scattering extinction coefficient. During 1987, a special aerosol experiment was conducted that included filter samples for subsequent analysis by the proton induced x-ray emission technique, diffusion battery measurements for size information in the sub-0.1 micrometer size range, and aerosol absorption measurements using an aethalometer. Surface and upper air meteorological data were also available. The purpose of the report is to present all of the aerosol data obtained during 1987.

  13. Investigating vertical distributions of ozone and of the aerosol extinction coefficient in the middle atmosphere with the MKS-M and SFN-4 instruments on board Salyut-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaev, V. V.; Grechko, G. M.; Elanskii, N. F.; Kan, V.; Plotkin, M. E.

    1989-04-01

    The technical characteristics of the multichannel spectrometer (MKS-M) system combined with a camera containing a spectrophotography attachment (SFN-4) are discussed together with results obtained by this system on distributions of ozone and aerosol in the middle atmosphere. It is demonstrated that this system is capable of retrieving the fine structure of vertical ozone and aerosol extinction distributions in the lower stratosphere. Results show that, in the ozonosphere, the contents of ozone and of aerosol exhibit a negative correlation.

  14. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  15. Extension of the Inverse Adding-Doubling Method to the Measurement of Wavelength-Dependent Absorption and Scattering Coefficients of Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Allegood, Marcus S

    2008-01-01

    Light interaction with biological tissue can be described using three parameters: the scattering and absorption coefficients (us and ua), as well as the anisotropy (g) which describes the directional dependence of the scattered photons. Accurately determining these optical properties for different tissue types at specific wavelengths, and simultaneously, would be beneficial for a variety of different biomedical applications. The goal of this project was to take a user-defined g-value and determine the remaining two parameters for a specified wavelength range for an integrating sphere with a collimated white light input source system. A fully automated computer program and process was developed to collect data for all wavelengths in a timely and accurate manner. LabVIEW was used to write programs to automate: raw intensity data collection from a spectrometer equipped integrating sphere, conversion of the data into a format for analysis via Scott Prahl's Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) C code execution, and computation of the optical properties based on the output from the IAD code. To allow data to be passed efficiently between LabVIEW and C code program modules, the two were combined into a single program (OPT 3.1). OPT 3.1 was tested using tissue mimicking phantoms and determination of the absorption and scattering coefficients showed excellent agreement with theory for wavelengths were the user inputted single g-value was sufficiently precise. Future improvements entail providing for multi-wavelength g-value entry to extend the accuracy of results to encompass the complete system multispectral range. Ultimately, the data collection process and algorithms developed through this effort will be used to study actual biological tissues for the purpose of deriving and refining models for light-tissue interactions.

  16. Magnetooptic coupling coefficients for one- and two-magnon Raman scattering in rutile-structure antiferromagnets FeF2, MnF2, CoF2, and NiF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, D. J.; Cottam, M. G.

    2012-07-01

    Inelastic light scattering intensities in response to magnetic excitations are governed by magnetooptic coupling coefficients, which have been previously evaluated, for instance, for the ferrimagnetic Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) and the metamagnetic FeCl2 and FeBr2. However, by far the most detailed studies to date were performed on the classic rutile-structure antiferromagnets, and here we summarize the results obtained from the many experimental and theoretical investigations of these compounds for both one-magnon and two-magnon excitations. A comparison of the magnitudes of the various coupling coefficients for MnF2, FeF2, CoF2, and NiF2 reveals a surprising similarity in many coefficients. In one-magnon Raman scattering the in-phase linear magnetooptic coefficient dominates, and the main differences between MnF2, FeF2, and NiF2 lie in the relative significance of the in-phase quadratic magnetooptic coefficient. Thus, the quadratic coefficients now appear to be of particular importance in determining the strength of one-magnon scattering in a variety of magnetic insulators. In two-magnon Raman scattering one magnetooptic coefficient is dominant for all of these antiferromagnets. However, the other six coefficients are in general remarkably similar in magnitude and not negligible in most cases, indicating some similarity in the way light interacts with the pairs of magnons of opposite and equal wave vectors in rutile structure antiferromagnets.

  17. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  18. CU AMAX-DOAS applications in cloud-free and cloudy atmospheres: innovative Scattered Sun Light observations of trace gases and aerosol extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Oetjen, H.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Atmospeclab

    2011-12-01

    An innovative airborne scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument has been developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The instrument collects scattered sunlight spectra in a sequence of discrete viewing angles, and employs the DOAS method (inherently calibrated, and selective) to simultaneously retrieve multiple trace gases, e.g., nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HONO), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), chlorine dioxide (OClO), water vapor (H2O), and oxygen dimers (O4, at 360nm, 477nm, and 632nm) differential slant column densities (dSCD). Vertical profiles of these gases and multi-spectral aerosol extinction are inferred by combining Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Modelling (RTM) and optimal estimation techniques to construct a model atmosphere that can in principle represent 3D clouds and aerosols. The atmospheric state of this model atmosphere is constrained by observations of O4 dSCDs, Raman Scattering Probability (RSP), and intensity ratios, i.e., quantities that depend solely on relative intensity changes, without need for a direct sun view, or absolute radiance calibration. We show results from ongoing validation efforts (NOAA TwinOtter aircraft during CalNex and CARES), and demonstrate vertical profile retrievals (NSF/NCAR GV over the tropical Pacific Ocean) in both cloud-free and cloudy atmospheres.

  19. Emissions of trace elements during the 2012-2013 effusive eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: enrichment factors, partition coefficients and aerosol contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, M.; Malik, N.; Taran, Yu.

    2014-09-01

    Gases and aerosols from the 2012-13 effusive eruption of Tolbachik basaltic volcano, Kamchatka, were sampled in February and May, 2013, from a lava tube window located 300 m from the eruptive crater; temperature at the sampling point was 1060-1070 °C. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the sampled gases (92.4% H2O, 3.5% CO2, 2.3% SO2 on average; δD from - 25.0 to - 38.6‰) correspond to a typical volcanic arc gas without dilution by meteoric or hydrothermal water. Halogen contents in the gases (1.37% HCl, 0.5% HF) were higher than average arc values. The total amount of analyzed metallic and metalloid (trace) elements in the gas exceeded 665 ppm. Six most abundant trace elements, K (250 ppm), Na (220 ppm), Si (74 ppm), Br (48 ppm), Cu (21 ppm) and Fe (12 ppm), accounted for 95% of the total content of trace elements in the gas. The gases contained 24 ppb Re, 12 ppb Ag, 4.9 ppb Au and 0.45 ppb Pt. Refractory rock-forming elements (Mg, Al, Ca) and some other elements such as Ba and Th were transported mainly in the form of silicate microspheres and altered rock particles. The concentrations of metals in the eruptive Tolbachik gases are higher than the corresponding concentrations in high-temperature fumaroles worldwide, although the mutual ratios of the elements are approximately the same. The gas/magma partition coefficients of eleven elements exceed unity, including the non-metals F, S, Cl, Br, As, Se and Te and the rare metals Cd, Re, Tl and Bi. Despite the relatively low concentrations of trace elements in the volcanic gases at the highest temperatures, superficial magma degassing provides information on the sources and sinks of metals.

  20. Scattering Effect of Iron Metallic Particles on the Extinction Coefficient of CaO-SiO2-B2O3-Na2O-Fe2O3-CaF2 Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dae-Woo; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-10-01

    The extinction coefficient of the CaO-SiO2-B2O3-Na2O-Fe2O3-CaF2 glasses has been studied using a FT-IR and a UV-visible spectrometer in the range of 0.5-5 μm to investigate thermal radiation through glassy flux film during continuous casting of steels. In present investigations, iron oxide has been reduced to metallic iron droplets by reaction with graphite crucible during melting, which brings considerable increase of the extinction coefficient due to the scattering. To analyze the scattering effect of these droplets on the extinction coefficient, the number density and size parameter of metallic particles have been measured using an automated scanning electron microscope. The number of metallic particles is intensively proportional to boron contents due to the transition of molar structure, BO4 to BO3, with increasing boron oxide. It is found that calculated scattering coefficients based on Mie scattering theory are in good agreement with measured ones. As the increased scattering coefficient of glassy film would not cause any serious side effects on casting operations, utilization of scattering effects is believed to be significantly essential for the future design of commercial mold fluxes.

  1. 3D aerosol climatology over East Asia derived from CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongbo; Sun, Xuejin; Zhang, Chuanliang; Zhang, Riwei; Li, Yan; Li, Haoran

    2017-03-01

    The seasonal mean extinction coefficient profile (ECP), single scattering albedo (SSA), and scattering phase function (SPF) derived from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) version 3 Level 2 5-km aerosol profile product (2011-2014) were compiled into a three-dimensional (3D) aerosol climatology for East Asia. The SSA and SPF were calculated as the weighted averages of the scattering properties of the CALIOP aerosol subtypes. The weights were set to the occurrence frequencies of the subtypes. The single scattering properties of each subtype were extrapolated from the volume-based size distribution and complex refractive indexes based on Mie calculations. For the high-loading episodes (aerosol optical depth ≥ 0.6), the exponential ECP structures were most frequently observed over the farmland and desert areas, along with the uplifted ECP structures over the marine and coastal areas. Besides the desert areas, high-loading episodes also occurred over areas with frequent agricultural and industry activities. Unlike the conventional half-3D aerosol climatology (vertically constant SSA and SPF), this newly generated climatology specified SSA and SPF in the full-3D space (full-3D aerosol climatology). Errors on the shortwave radiative heating rate (SW RHR) due to the half-3D aerosol climatology approximation were quantified. The SW RHR errors were around ±1 K/day, implying that the half-3D aerosol climatology should be used with caution in climate modeling. This study is among the first to generate a full-3D aerosol climatology from the CALIOP data. This full-3D aerosol climatology is potentially useful for aerosol remote sensing and climate modeling.

  2. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.6±23.2 Mm-1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.8±2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Ångström exponent (å) (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.4±2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles (å = 1.0±0.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas

  3. Analysis of aerosol optical and microphysical properties observed during the DC3 field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Schuster, G. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) consisted of 18 research flights from Salina, KS. During cloud inflow and outflow surveys, various aged aerosol layers and plumes, including biomass burning, were sampled by the NASA DC-8 aircraft which was equipped with a broad suite of instruments for aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties. As a result, the DC3 dataset includes detailed aerosol number size distribution, bulk aerosol mass concentration, black carbon mass concentration, and mass size distribution for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organics, together with scattering and absorption coefficients. We use this comprehensive dataset to perform a detailed closure analysis to examine the consistency between the observed aerosol properties and the literature reported aerosol refractive index values. In this context, we report aerosol observations, and comparisons between the aerosol mass and number size distribution for various aerosol layers. Closure tests will also be presented in terms of the impact of the aerosol composition and size distribution on the scattering and absorption.

  4. Constraining Aerosol Properties Using H2O Retrievals from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Sander, S. P.; Wennberg, P. O.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    H2O has absorption features across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the ultraviolet to the infrared. The California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on the top of Mt Wilson, California, offers continuous high-resolution spectral measurements from 4000 to 8000 cm-1. We retrieve H2O slant column densities (SCDs) at different wavelengths using CLARS data. In particular, we compare retrievals from the spectralon, which is above the planetary boundary layer and relatively immune to aerosol scattering, with those from West Pasadena, a location in the Los Angeles basin that is influenced by aerosol scattering. SCD retrievals for West Pasadena show significantly larger variance across different wavelengths. The retrieval error in West Pasadena is much larger than can be attributed to spectroscopic uncertainties, and reflects the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering. Using a two-stream enhanced single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model, we simulated the effect of aerosol scattering on H2O SCD retrievals at different wavelengths. We found the effects are sensitive to the surface albedo, aerosol phase function and single scattering albedo. Using an empirical relationship derived from the radiative transfer model simulations, we relate the H2O retrieval variance to the aerosol optical depth Angstrom coefficient and compare the results with AERONET observations. The additional information gained from H2O retrieval variance within a large range of wavelengths could be used to improve OCO-2 type CO2 retrievals in the presence of aerosols.

  5. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  6. Measurements of Stratospheric Pinatubo Aerosol Extinction Profiles by a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo, Makoto; Nagasawa, Chikao

    1992-01-01

    The Raman lidar has been used for remote measurements of water vapor, ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower troposphere because the Raman cross section is three orders smaller than the Rayleigh cross section. We estimated the extinction coefficients of the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere using a Raman lidar. If the precise aerosol extinction coefficients are derived, the backscatter coefficient of a Mie scattering lidar will be more accurately estimated. The Raman lidar has performed to measure density profiles of some species using Raman scattering. Here we used a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for transmitter and received nitrogen vibrational Q-branch Raman scattering signal. Ansmann et al. (1990) derived tropospherical aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar. We think that this method can apply to dense stratospheric aerosols such as Pinatubo volcanic aerosols. As dense aerosols are now accumulated in the stratosphere by Pinatubo volcanic eruption, the error of Ramen lidar signal regarding the fluctuation of air density can be ignored.

  7. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating aerosol properties has implications for the formation of Arctic clouds, resulting in impacts on cloud lifetime, precipitation processes, and radiative forcing. There are many remaining uncertainties and large discrepancies regarding modeled and observed Arctic aerosol properties, illustrating the need for more detailed observations to improve simulations of Arctic aerosol and more generally, projections of the components of the aerosol-driven processes that impact sea ice loss/gain. In particular, the sources and climatic effects of Arctic aerosol particles are severely understudied. Here, we present a comprehensive, long-term record of aerosol observations from the North Slope of Alaska baseline site at Barrow. These measurements include sub- and supermicron (up to 10 μm) total mass and number concentrations, sub- and supermicron soluble inorganic and organic ion concentrations, submicron metal concentrations, submicron particle size distributions, and sub- and supermicron absorption and scattering properties. Aerosol extinction and number concentration measurements extend back to 1976, while the remaining measurements were implemented since. Corroboration between the chemical, physical, and optical property measurements is evident during periods of overlapping observations, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. During the Arctic Haze in the winter/spring, high concentrations of long-range transported submicron sea salt, mineral dust, industrial metals, pollution (non-sea salt sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), and biomass burning species are observed concurrent with higher concentrations of particles with sizes that span the submicron range, enhanced absorption and scattering coefficients, and largest Ångström exponents. The summer is characterized by high concentrations of small biogenic aerosols (< 100 nm) and low extinction coefficients. Fall is characterized by clean conditions, with supermicron sea salt representing the dominant aerosol

  8. Comparative measurements of stratospheric particulate content by aircraft and ground-based lidar. [aerosol sampling and scattering data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Russell, P. B.; Hake, R. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The matching method of lidar data analysis is explained, and the results from two flights studying the stratospheric aerosol using lidar techniques are summarized and interpreted. Support is lent to the matching method of lidar data analysis by the results, but it is not yet apparent that the analysis technique leads to acceptable results on all nights in all seasons.

  9. Aerosol scattering and absorption Angström exponents as indicators of dust and dust-free days over Granada (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the assessment of atmospheric aerosol optical properties at the surface and in atmospheric column during both desert dust and dust-free conditions over Granada, South-eastern Iberian Peninsula. Indeed, the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption and scattering properties is analyzed in detail. The analyzed period ranges from June 2008 to December 2010. On dusty days, the mean scattering Angström exponent value obtained in the atmospheric column (SAEcol) (0.5 ± 0.3) was lower than the observed at the surface level (SAEis) (1.3 ± 0.6), indicating higher contribution of coarse particles at high atmospheric level than at ground level during the analyzed dust events. In addition, it is noticed that the absorption Angström exponent in the atmospheric column (AAEcol) with mean value of 1.5 ± 0.2 and at the surface (AAEis) with mean value of 1.3 ± 0.2 obtained during dusty situations are indicative of mixture of desert dust and black carbon particles as dominant absorbers both in the atmospheric column and at the surface during dust intrusions over Granada. On the other hand, a non-parametric test (Kolmogorov-Smirnov) revealed that no significant statistical difference was found for AAEis between desert dust and free-dust conditions. This result may be due to the important contribution of urban absorbing aerosol (e.g. Black carbon) at ground level in the study location. Therefore, these parameters (AAEcol and AAEis) are not very useful to detect desert dust events without the use of other information (e.g., aerosol size) over urban area like Granada. A dust extreme event was analyzed in order to retrieve optical parameters during situation dominated by desert dust. The values of SAEcol and SAEis obtained during this extreme event were in agreement with the values showed above for the period 2008-2010, although the differences between dust-free and dust conditions are more noticeable in this special event.

  10. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean basin: large variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo and influence on the direct shortwave radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola; Doppler, Lionel; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Ancellet, Gerard; Attié, Jean-Luc; Bucci, Silvia; Dubuisson, Philippe; Fierli, Federico; Mallet, Marc; Ravetta, François

    2016-08-01

    Pollution aerosols strongly influence the composition of the Western Mediterranean basin, but at present little is known on their optical properties. We report in this study in situ observations of the single scattering albedo (ω) of pollution aerosol plumes measured over the Western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) airborne campaign in summer 2012. Cases of pollution export from different source regions around the basin and at different altitudes between ˜ 160 and 3500 m above sea level were sampled during the flights. Data from this study show a large variability of ω, with values between 0.84-0.98 at 370 nm and 0.70-0.99 at 950 nm. The single scattering albedo generally decreases with the wavelength, with some exception associated to the mixing of pollution with sea spray or dust particles over the sea surface. The lowest values of ω (0.84-0.70 between 370 and 950 nm) are measured in correspondence of a fresh plume possibly linked to ship emissions over the basin. The range of variability of ω observed in this study seems to be independent of the source region around the basin, as well as of the altitude and aging time of the plumes. The observed variability of ω reflects in a large variability for the complex refractive index of pollution aerosols, which is estimated to span in the large range 1.41-1.77 and 0.002-0.097 for the real and the imaginary parts, respectively, between 370 and 950 nm. Radiative calculations in clear-sky conditions were performed with the GAME radiative transfer model to test the sensitivity of the aerosol shortwave Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) to the variability of ω as observed in this study. Results from the calculations suggest up to a 50 and 30 % change of the forcing efficiency (FE), i.e. the DRE per unit of optical depth, at the surface (-160/-235 W m-2 τ-1 at 60° solar zenith angle) and at the Top-Of-Atmosphere (-137/-92 W m-2 τ-1) for ω varying between its maximum and minimum value

  11. [Two Data Inversion Algorithms of Aerosol Horizontal Distributiol Detected by MPL and Error Analysis].

    PubMed

    Lü, Li-hui; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Tian-shu; Lu, Yi-huai; Dong, Yun-sheng; Chen, Zhen-yi; Fan, Guang-qiang; Qi, Shao-shuai

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have important impacts on human health, the environment and the climate system. Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is a new effective tool for detecting atmosphere aerosol horizontal distribution. And the extinction coefficient inversion and error analysis are important aspects of data processing. In order to detect the horizontal distribution of atmospheric aerosol near the ground, slope and Fernald algorithms were both used to invert horizontal MPL data and then the results were compared. The error analysis showed that the error of the slope algorithm and Fernald algorithm were mainly from theoretical model and some assumptions respectively. Though there still some problems exist in those two horizontal extinction coefficient inversions, they can present the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol particles accurately, and the correlations with the forward-scattering visibility sensor are both high with the value of 95%. Furthermore relatively speaking, Fernald algorithm is more suitable for the inversion of horizontal extinction coefficient.

  12. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  13. A review of atmospheric aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurry, Peter H.

    Recent developments in atmospheric aerosol measurements are reviewed. The topics included complement those covered in the recent review by Chow (JAWMA 45: 320-382, 1995) which focuses on regulatory compliance measurements and filter measurements of particulate composition. This review focuses on measurements of aerosol integral properties (total number concentration, CCN concentration, optical coefficients, etc.), aerosol physical chemical properties (density, refractive index, equilibrium water content, etc.), measurements of aerosol size distributions, and measurements of size-resolved aerosol composition. Such measurements play an essential role in studies of secondary aerosol formation by atmospheric chemical transformations and enable one to quantify the contributions of various species to effects including light scattering/absorption, health effects, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol measurement evolved from an art to a science in the 1970s following the development of instrumentation to generate monodisperse calibration aerosols of known size, composition, and concentration. While such calibration tools permit precise assessments of instrument responses to known laboratory-generated aerosols, unquantifiable uncertainties remain even when carefully calibrated instruments are used for atmospheric measurements. This is because instrument responses typically depend on aerosol properties including composition, shape, density, etc., which, for atmospheric aerosols, may vary from particle-to-particle and are often unknown. More effort needs to be made to quantify measurement accuracies that can be achieved for realistic atmospheric sampling scenarios. The measurement of organic species in atmospheric particles requires substantial development. Atmospheric aerosols typically include hundreds of organic compounds, and only a small fraction (˜10%) of these can be identified by state-of-the-art analytical methodologies. Even the measurement of the total particulate organic

  14. Atmospheric Optical Properties and Spectral Analysis of Desert Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvgeni, D.; Karnieli, A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Maenhaut, W.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific background Aerosols can interact directly with solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering as well as absorption. In addition, they can indirectly alter the planetary albedo by modifying the properties of clouds. Objectives Investigations have been devoted to two main areas: (1) Aerosol climatology situation in the Negev desert, investigations of physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols, and study of the local and long-range transport trajectory of polluted air masses over the Negev desert; and (2) An estimation of the optical properties throughout the atmospheric column by surface measurements via performance of spectral and statistical analysis of the data received from two measurement systems. Results and conclusions Analyzed data from the Sede Boker site, in the Negev Desert of Israel, shows an increase in aerosol optical depth during the summer seasons and a decrease during winter. One of the possible reasons for this characteristic is an increase of the precipitable water (reaches 3.0-3.5 cm) due to a constant wind stream from the Mediterranean Sea in same time. The highest probability distribution of the aerosol optical depth is in the range of 0.15-0.20; and of the Angstrom parameter is in range of 0.83 - 1.07. During dust storm events, the scattering coefficient range at 670 nm and 440 nm wavelengths were inverted. It was discovered that the dust particles in this case had non-spherical character. Comparison between optical depth, measured through all atmospheric column, and scattering coefficient from surface measurements provides correlation coefficient (r) equal to 0.64. The Angstrom parameter, calculated via optical depth and via scattering coefficient, provides a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Thus we can obtain an estimate of the influence of the surface aerosol situation on column optical properties. The combined analysis of dust cloud altitude and optical depth as a function of the time indicates long-term transport and

  15. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  16. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  17. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument – Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; ...

    2016-08-23

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ∼ 0.19, and that over oceans is ∼ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations tomore » show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3  <  AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), −0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), −0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD − MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  18. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  19. Radar scattering from the summer polar mesosphere: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, John Yungdo Nagamichi

    1993-12-01

    The anomalously large radar reflectivities observed in the summer polar mesosphere have eluded satisfactory explanation until now. We propose that the following chain of causality is responsible for the so-called polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE): The uniquely low temperatures in the summer mesopause produce ice aerosols. Because the aerosols exist in a plasma, they become electrically charged. The ambient electrons become coupled to the aerosols through electric fields and their effective diffusivity is retarded due to the large size of the aerosols. The reduction in diffusivity allows electron density inhomogeneities to be maintained at the radar Bragg scales. The radar waves are then scattered by the inhomogeneities. We support the above concept by developing a quantitative theory of ambipolar diffusion in the mesosphere. We then apply the results to isotropic turbulence and Fresnel radar scatter to show that the observed radar reflectivities can be explained by the theory. We show that the presence of realistic charged aerosols are sufficient to explain PMSE. We also show that dressed aerosol radar scatter, proposed by others as a generation mechanism for PMSE, can only apply to echoes detected by UHF radars. We present data taken with the Sondrestrom 1.29-GHz radar and attribute it to dressed aerosol scatter. In the summer of 1991, we used the Cornell University portable radar interferometer (CUPRI) to observe the mesosphere while rockets carrying in situ sensors were flown through two PMSE occurrences and a noctilucent cloud/PMSE event. We present a selection of first results from this campaign (NLC-91). The first simultaneous height comparison between noctilucent clouds and PMSE show that the radar scattering region was near or slightly above the visible cloud layer. We also infer from aspect sensitivity measurements and Doppler spectrograms that there were two distinct types of PMSE: enhanced turbulent scatter and partial (Fresnel) reflection from steep

  20. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-05

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  1. Impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the direct aerosol radiative effect in summer on North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Tao, J. C.; Bian, Y. X.; Ma, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, relative humidity (RH) profiles and their impacts on the vertical variations of aerosol optical properties and the direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) have been investigated based on surface measurements from the Haze in China campaign and sounding data from the North China Plain. Among the profiles obtained from July to September in 2008, about half have RHs greater than 80% within the mixed layer. The vertical variations in the aerosol optical properties at ambient RH, including the extinction coefficient (σext), single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g), are remarkably different from the variations in the dry aerosols and are highly dependent on the RH profiles. Increases of the aerosol optical depth and column-averaged SSA and g due to aerosol water uptake can reach up to 64%, 0.052 and 0.079, respectively. The fractional contribution to the instantaneous DARE at the top of the atmosphere due to aerosol hygroscopic growth reaches 60% in high RH profiles. DARE estimates can be significantly biased if the RH dependence of SSA or g is not considered. We suggest that if their vertical profiles or column-averaged values are absent, then the ambient values of SSA and g at the surface should be used rather than the values of SSA and g obtained from dry aerosols when estimating DAREs.

  2. Individual second virial coefficient determination of monomer and oligomers in heat-stressed protein samples using size-exclusion chromatography-light scattering.

    PubMed

    Printz, Miriam; Kalonia, Devendra S; Friess, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the second virial coefficient (B(22)) of monomer and oligomer protein species in heat-stressed samples individually and simultaneously. A high-performance size-exclusion chromatography equipped with a flow-mode detector system enabling measurement of light scattering (LS) and ultraviolet transmission in the same cell was used to separate and analyze different species. The folded/unfolded nature of the protein was analyzed by extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy using 4,4'-Bis(1-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulfonate). The B(22) of each species was calculated from the concentration and LS data as described in an earlier publication. Upon heat exposure, monomer and formed oligomers yielded more negative B(22) values, reflecting stronger attractive forces as compared with those for the initial monomer. The increased attractive forces are attributed to partial unfolding of the protein species, and were reflected in the extent of aggregation. On the basis of the B(22) values, the monomer appeared to be the most reactive species after heat stress. In summary, the presented B(22) determination technique can be used to analyze and follow the nature of intermolecular interactions for all present protein species (monomer and oligomers) and provide further understanding of the mechanism of protein aggregation and growth of aggregates.

  3. Fission-fragment attachment to aerosols and their transport through capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Alvarez, J.L.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of radioactive aerosols was studied using equipment, collectively called the Helium jet, that has been constructed to provide basic nuclear physics data on fission product nuclides. The transport of the fission products in the system depends on their attachment to aerosol particles. The system consists of 1) a tube furnace which generates aerosols by the sublimation or evaporation of source material, 2) a helium stream used to transport the aerosols, 3) a 25 m settling tube to eliminate the larger aerosols and smaller aerosols that would deposit in the capillary, 4) a Californium-252 self-fissioning source of fission product nuclides, and 5) a small capillary to carry the radioactive aerosols from the hot cell to the laboratory. Different source materials were aerosolized but NaCl is generally used because it yielded the highest transport efficiencies through the capillary. Particle size measurments were made with NaCl aerosols by using a cascade impactor, an optical light scattering device, and the capillary itself as a diffusion battery by performing radiation measurements and/or electrical conductivity measurements. Both radioactive and nonradioactive aerosols were measured in order to investigate the possibility of a preferential size range for fission product attachment. The measured size distributions were then used to calculate attachment coefficients and finally an attachment time.

  4. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  5. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function and the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (two elements of the phase matrix). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178°. (In some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). The PI-Neph measurement of phase function and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) retrievals have already been compared in some cases when the aircraft spiraled over AERONET sites, for example at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, on October 18 2011, as shown in Figure 1. The differences between the PI-Neph and the AERONET retrievals can be attributed to differences between the ambient size distribution and the one sampled inside the aircraft. The data that is resolved with respect to scattering angle is used to compute the volume scattering coefficient. The above mentioned October 18 flight data showed good agreement between the PI-Neph measurements of volume scattering coefficient and the parallel TSI integrating nephelometer measurements. On average the TSI measurements were 1.02 times the PI

  6. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  7. Retrieving the height of smoke and dust aerosols by synergistic use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    This study extends the application of the previously developed Aerosol Single-scattering albedo and layer Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm, which was originally applied to smoke aerosols only, to both smoke and dust aerosols by including nonspherical dust properties in the retrieval process. The main purpose of the algorithm is to derive aerosol height information over wide areas using aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors simultaneously: aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), UV aerosol index from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), and total backscatter coefficient profile from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The case studies suggest that the ASHE algorithm performs well for both smoke and dust aerosols, showing root-mean-square error of the retrieved aerosol height as compared to CALIOP observations from 0.58 to 1.31 km and mean bias from -0.70 to 1.13 km. In addition, the algorithm shows the ability to retrieve single-scattering albedo to within 0.03 of Aerosol Robotic Network inversion data for moderate to thick aerosol loadings (AOD of ~1.0). For typical single-layered aerosol cases, the estimated uncertainty in the retrieved height ranges from 1.20 to 1.80 km over land and from 1.15 to 1.58 km over ocean when favorable conditions are met. Larger errors are observed for multilayered aerosol events, due to the limited sensitivities of the passive sensors to such cases.

  8. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  9. Long-term Observation of Aerosol Optical Properties at the SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yicheng; Ding, Aijun; Virkkula, Aki; Wang, Jiaping; Chi, Xuguang; Qi, Ximeng; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Longfei; Xie, Yuning

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence the earth's radiation budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and contribute substantial uncertainty in the estimation of climate forcing. Thorough and comprehensive measurements on different parameters including absorption and scattering coefficient, wavelength dependence and angular dependence along with their daily and seasonal variation help to understand the influence of aerosol on radiation. 2-years continuous measurement of aerosol optical properties has been conducted from June 2013 to May 2015 at the Station for Observing Regional Process of Earth System (SORPES) station, which is a regional background station located in downwind direction of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) urban agglomeration in China. A 7-wavelenths aethalometer and a 3-wavelenths nephelometer were used to measure absorption and scattering coefficient, and also other parameters like single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption angstrom Exponent (AAE), scattering angstrom exponent (SAE) and back-scattering refraction. In addtion, simultaneous measurements on chemical composition and particle size distribution were performed so as to investigate the dependencies of aerosol optical properties on chemical composition and size distribution. To get further insight on the influencing factors, Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM) was employed for source identification in this study. The averages of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and SSA are 26.0±18.7 Mm-1, 426±327 Mm-1 , 0.936±0.3 at 520nm respectively for whole period. SAE between 450 and 635nm is 1.299±0.34 and have strong negative correlation with particle Surface Mean Diameter (SMD). AAE between 370 and 950nm is 1.043±0.15 for whole period but growth to more than 1.6 in all identified Biomass Burning (BB) events.

  10. Optical properties and CCN activity of aerosols in a high-altitude Himalayan environment: Results from RAWEX-GVAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Jayachandran, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Satheesh, S. K.; Naja, Manish; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2015-03-01

    The seasonality and mutual dependence of aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity under varying meteorological conditions at the high-altitude Nainital site (~2 km) in the Indo-Gangetic Plains were examined using nearly year-round measurements (June 2011 to March 2012) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement mobile facility as part of the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment-Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment of the Indian Space Research Organization and the U.S. Department of Energy. The results from collocated measurements provided enhanced aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, CCN concentrations, and total condensation nuclei concentrations during the dry autumn and winter months. The CCN concentration (at a supersaturation of 0.46) was higher during the periods of high aerosol absorption (single scattering albedo (SSA) < 0.80) than during the periods of high aerosol scattering (SSA > 0.85), indicating that the aerosol composition seasonally changes and influences the CCN activity. The monthly mean CCN activation ratio (at a supersaturation of 0.46) was highest (>0.7) in late autumn (November); this finding is attributed to the contribution of biomass-burning aerosols to CCN formation at high supersaturation conditions.

  11. Retrieval of UV Aerosol Index using backscattered monochromatic radiance measured by GOSAT CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Park, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    UV Aerosol Index(AI) using backscattered radiance at a single channel has been retrieved. In the current UV AI algorithm, two UV channels are used to contrast the absorbing aerosol loaded atmosphere to Rayleigh scattering condition. There have been needs to retrieve information of absorbing aerosol from a single UV channel, such as GOSAT CAI. 30-day minimum composite method, however, makes the process possible to construct the condition with the use of only single UV channel. Also, absorption by aerosol changes with respect to AOD and wavelength for different aerosol types. Therefore, single channel aerosol index(SAI) can detect absorbing aerosol qualitatively. Correlation coefficient of SAI to current UV AI indicate significant value, showing possibility of detecting highly absorbing aerosols. The application of a cloud screening makes the presence of absorbing aerosols even more clear. Radiative transfer calculations using VLIDORT were performed to test the sensitivity of SAI and UV AI to aerosol optical properties, showing that highly absorbing aerosol results in meaningful SAI. Results from dust case study in East Asia show reasonable performance of SAI for the region with single scattering albedo below 0.90. This study concludes with a comparison of SAI from GOSAT lv.1b data to OMI UVAI data, where reasonable agreement and low false detection was found for dust cases in East Asia. The SAI value of -0.2 to 0.0 from GOSAT-CAI was comparable to OMI dust threshold value of 0.7. These findings corroborate the suitability of SAI as a for detecting absorbing aerosols for satellite instrument with a single UV channel.

  12. Analyzing powers and proton spin transfer coefficients in the elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an L-type polarized deuteron target at small momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    Analyzing powers and spin transfer coefficients which describe the elastic scattering of polarized protons from a polarized deuteron target have been measured. The energy of the proton beam was 800 MeV and data were taken at laboratory scattering angles of 7, 11, 14, and 16.5 degrees. One analyzing power was also measured at 180 degrees. Three linearly independent orientations of the beam polarization were used and the target was polarized parallel and antiparallel to the direction of the beam momentum. The data were taken with the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (experiment 685). The results are compared with multiple scattering predictions based on Dirac representations of the nucleon-nucleon scattering matrices. 27 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  14. Accuracy Remote-Sensing of Aerosol Spatial Distribution in the Lower Troposphere by Twin Scanning Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Hua, D.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the lower troposphere play an important role in the absorption and scattering of atmospheric radiation, the forming of precipitation and the circulation of chemistry. Due to the influence of solar heating at the surface, the aerosol distribution is inhomogeneous and variation with time. Lidar is proven to be a powerful tool in the application of remote sensing of atmospheric properties (Klett 1981). However, the existing of overlap function in lidar equation limits the fine detection of aerosol optical properties in the lower troposphere by vertical measurement, either by Raman lidar (Whiteman 2003) or by high spectral resolution lidar (Imaki 2005). Although the multi-angle method can succeed the aerosol measurement from the ground, the homogeneous atmospheric is needed (Pahlow 2004). Aiming to detect the inhomogeneous aerosols in the lower troposphere and to retrieve the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients in the lidar equation, a novel method for accuracy remote-sensing of aerosol properties based on twin scanning lidars has been proposed. In order to realize the fine detection of the aerosol spatial distribution from the ground to the height of interest of atmosphere, the scanning lidar is utilized as the remote sensing tool combined with the cross scanning by the twin systems, which makes the exact solutions of those two unknown parameters retrievable. Figure shows the detection method for aerosol spatial distribution using twin scanning lidars. As two lidar equations are provided simultaneously, the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are retrievable. Moreover, by selecting the transmitting laser wavelength, the presented method can realize the fine detection of aerosol at any spectrum, even the theoretical and technical analysis of the aerosol characteristics by applying multi-spectra.

  15. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300/Mm with an estimated precision of 0.1/Mm for 1550 nm light and 0.2/Mm for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  16. Measurement of size-dependent single scattering albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols using the extinction-minus-scattering technique with a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujeeta; Fiddler, Marc N.; Bililign, Solomon

    2016-11-01

    Biomass burning (BB) aerosols have a significant effect on regional climate, and represent a significant uncertainty in our understanding of climate change. Using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry, the single scattering albedo (SSA) and Ångstrom absorption exponent (AAE) were measured for several North American biomass fuels. This was done for several particle diameters for the smoldering and flaming stage of white pine, red oak, and cedar combustion. Measurements were done over a wider wavelength range than any previous direct measurement of BB particles. While the offline sampling system used in this work shows promise, some changes in particle size distribution were observed, and a thorough evaluation of this method is required. The uncertainty of SSA was 6 %, with the truncation angle correction of the nephelometer being the largest contributor to error. While scattering and extinction did show wavelength dependence, SSA did not. SSA values ranged from 0.46 to 0.74, and were not uniformly greater for the smoldering stage than the flaming stage. SSA values changed with particle size, and not systematically so, suggesting the proportion of tar balls to fractal black carbon change with fuel type/state and particle size. SSA differences of 0.15-0.4 or greater can be attributed to fuel type or fuel state for fresh soot. AAE values were quite high (1.59-5.57), despite SSA being lower than is typically observed in wildfires. The SSA and AAE values in this work do not fit well with current schemes that relate these factors to the modified combustion efficiency of a burn. Combustion stage, particle size, fuel type, and fuel condition were found to have the most significant effects on the intrinsic optical properties of fresh soot, though additional factors influence aged soot.

  17. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  18. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  19. Long term measurements of aerosol optical properties at a primary forest site in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Paixão, M.; Cirino, G. G.; Arana, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Fors, E. O.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Leal, L. S. M.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-03-01

    A long term experiment was conducted in a primary forest area in Amazonia, with continuous in-situ measurements of aerosol optical properties between February 2008 and April 2011, comprising, to our knowledge, the longest database ever in the Amazon Basin. Two major classes of aerosol particles, with significantly different optical properties were identified: coarse mode predominant biogenic aerosols in the wet season (January-June), naturally released by the forest metabolism, and fine mode dominated biomass burning aerosols in the dry season (July-December), transported from regional fires. Dry particle median scattering coefficients at the wavelength of 550 nm increased from 6.3 Mm-1 to 22 Mm-1, whereas absorption at 637 nm increased from 0.5 Mm-1 to 2.8 Mm-1 from wet to dry season. Most of the scattering in the dry season was attributed to the predominance of fine mode (PM2) particles (40-80% of PM10 mass), while the enhanced absorption coefficients are attributed to the presence of light absorbing aerosols from biomass burning. As both scattering and absorption increased in the dry season, the single scattering albedo (SSA) did not show a significant seasonal variability, in average 0.86 ± 0.08 at 637 nm for dry aerosols. Measured particle optical properties were used to estimate the aerosol forcing efficiency at the top of the atmosphere. Results indicate that in this primary forest site the radiative balance was dominated by the cloud cover, particularly in the wet season. Due to the high cloud fractions, the aerosol forcing efficiency absolute values were below -3.5 W m-2 in 70% of the wet season days and in 46% of the dry season days. Besides the seasonal variation, the influence of out-of-Basin aerosol sources was observed occasionally. Periods of influence of the Manaus urban plume were detected, characterized by a consistent increase on particle scattering (factor 2.5) and absorption coefficients (factor 5). Episodes of biomass burning and mineral dust

  20. Long term measurements of aerosol optical properties at a pristine forest site in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Paixão, M.; Cirino, G. G.; Arana, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Fors, E. O.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Leal, L. S. M.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-09-01

    A long term experiment was conducted in a pristine area in the Amazon forest, with continuous in situ measurements of aerosol optical properties between February 2008 and April 2011, comprising, to our knowledge, the longest database ever in Amazonia. Two types of aerosol particles, with significantly different optical properties were identified: coarse mode predominant biogenic aerosols in the wet season (January-June), naturally released by the forest metabolism, and fine mode dominated biomass burning aerosols in the dry season (July-December), transported from regional fires. Dry particle median scattering coefficients at the wavelength of 550 nm increased from 6.3 Mm-1 to 22 Mm-1, whereas absorption at 637 nm increased from 0.5 Mm-1 to 2.8 Mm-1 from wet to dry season. Most of the scattering in the dry season was attributed to the predominance of fine mode particles (40-80% of PM10 mass), while the enhanced absorption coefficients are attributed to the presence of light absorbing aerosols from biomass burning. As both scattering and absorption increased in the dry season, the single scattering albedo (SSA) did not show a significant seasonal variability, in average 0.86 ± 0.08 at 637 nm for dry particles. Measured particle optical properties were used to estimate the aerosol forcing efficiency at the top of the atmosphere. Results indicate that in this pristine forest site the radiative balance was dominated by the cloud cover, or, in other words, the aerosol indirect effect predominated over the direct effect, particularly in the wet season. Due to the high cloud fractions, the aerosol forcing efficiency was below -3.5 W m-2 in 70% of the wet season days and in 46% of the dry season days. These values are lower than the ones reported in the literature, which are based on remote sensing data. Besides the seasonal variation, the influence of external aerosol sources was observed occasionally. Periods of influence of the Manaus urban plume were detected

  1. Analysis of the vertical structure and size distribution of dust aerosols over the semi-arid region of the Loess Plateau in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Li, X.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2012-02-01

    Using measurements of dual-wavelength polarisation lidar, particle sizer, and nephelometer from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL), the properties of dust aerosol extinction coefficient, optical depth, depolarisation ratio, colour ratio, size distribution, and concentration over the semi-arid region of the Loess Plateau in north-western China are analysed in a case study of dust storms from 16-18 March 2010. The results show that dust aerosols are distributed mostly within the lower layer (below 3.0 km), with the dust aerosol extinction coefficient ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 km-1. The average optical depth and depolarisation ratio are near 0.6 and 0.3, respectively, while the colour ratio ranges from 0.8 to 1.0. The mass size distribution of dust aerosols has two peaks at 0.7 μm and 5.0 μm, respectively, while the number size distribution of dust aerosols is log-normal with a maximum near 0.8 μm. Particles in the fine mode (r ≤ 2.5 μm) are predominant in the dust storm. Their number concentration decreases while those of particles in the moderate (2.5 μm < r ≤ 10.0 μm) and coarse (10.0 μm < r ≤ 20.0 μm) modes increase. Based on Mie theory and the number size distribution of the aerosol, the dust aerosol scattering coefficient and its variation with particle size are calculated and analysed. A fairly close correlation is found with that measured by the nephelometer, for which the correlation coefficients are 0.89 and 0.94, respectively, at 520 and 700 nm. It shows a Gaussian distribution of dust aerosol scattering coefficient against effective diameter, with a fitting coefficient of 0.96 and centre diameter of 5.5 μm. The contribution percentages of aerosol within fine, moderate, and coarse modes to dust aerosol scattering coefficient are 20.95%, 62.93%, and 16.12%, respectively, meaning that PM10 is a dominant factor in the dust aerosol scattering properties.

  2. A method for retrieving vertical distribution of aerosol mass concentration in atmosphere from results of lidar sensing at Nd:YAG laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2011-03-01

    A method for retrieving the vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol concentration from the results of lidar sensing at Ng:YAG laser wavelengths is developed based on the found multiple regressions between the optical location characteristics of aerosol at wavelengths of 0.355, 0.532, and 1.064 nm, as well as between the aerosol backscattering coefficient at these wavelengths and the concentration of aerosol particles. The method does not require solving ill-posed inverse problems and minimizes the use of a priori information. The reliability and generality of regressions obtained are confirmed by their good agreement with the AERO-NET data. The method efficiency is demonstrated by numerical experiments on retrieving profiles of back-scattering coefficients and concentration that corresponds to different optical models of aerosol.

  3. Aerosol Characterization and New Instrumentation for Better Understanding Snow Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Snow albedo is determined by snowpack thickness and grain size, but also affected by contamination with light-absorbing, microscopic (e.g., mineral dust, combustion aerosols, bio-aerosols) and macroscopic (e.g., microalgae, plant debris, sand, organisms) compounds. Most currently available instruments for measuring snow albedo utilize the natural, downward flux of solar radiation and the reflected upward flux. This reliance on solar radiation (and, thus, large zenith angles and clear-sky conditions) leads to severe constraints, preventing characterization of detailed diurnal snow albedo cycles. Here, we describe instrumentation and methodologies to address these limitations with the development and deployment of new snow radiation sensors for measuring surface spectral and in-snow radiative properties. This novel instrumentation will be tested at the CRREL/UCSB Eastern Sierra (CUES) Snow Study Site at Mammoth Mountain, which is extensively instrumented for characterizing snow properties including snow albedo and surface morphology. However, it has been lacking instrumentation for the characterization of aerosols that can be deposited on the snow surface through dry and wet deposition. Currently, we are installing aerosol instrumentation at the CUES site, which are also described. This includes instruments for the multi-wavelength measurement of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and for the characterization of aerosol size distribution. Knowledge of aerosol concentration and physical and optical properties will allow for the study of aerosol deposition and modification of snow albedo and for establishing an aerosol climatology for the CUES site.

  4. Light Absorption of Stratospheric Aerosols: Long-Term Trend and Contribution by Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel , R. F.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol light-absorption coefficients are useful for studies of radiative transfer and heating rates. Ogren appears to have published the first light- absorption coefficients in the stratosphere in 1981, followed by Clarke in 1983 and Pueschel in 1992. Because most stratospheric soot appears to be due to aircraft operations, application of an aircraft soot aerosol emission index to projected fuel consumption suggests a threefold increase of soot loading and light absorption by 2025. Together, those four data sets indicate an increase in mid-visible light extinction at a rate of 6 % per year. This trend is similar to the increase per year of sulfuric acid aerosol and of commercial fleet size. The proportionality between stepped-up aircraft operations above the tropopause and increases in stratospheric soot and sulfuric acid aerosol implicate aircraft as a source of stratospheric pollution. Because the strongly light-absorbing soot and the predominantly light-scattering sulfuric acid aerosol increase at similar rates, however, the mid-visible stratospheric aerosol single scatter albedo is expected to remain constant and not approach a critical value of 0.98 at which stratospheric cooling could change to warming.

  5. Hygroscopic Measurements of Aerosol Particles in Colorado during the Discover AQ Campaign 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, D.; Delgado, R.; Espinosa, R.; Martins, J. V.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground observations with other optical aerosol measurements such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. In the summer of 2014, the DISCOVER-AQ campaign was held in Colorado, where systematic and concurrent observations of column- integrated surface, and vertically-resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases relevant to air quality and their evolution during the day were observed. Aerosol optical properties were measured in the UMBC trailer at the city of Golden using a TSI-3563 nephelometer and an in-situ Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-NEPH) designed and built by the LACO group at UMBC. The PI-NEPH measures aerosol phase matrix components in high angular range between 2 and 178 degrees scattering angle at three wavelengths (λ=473, 532 and 671nm). The two measured elements of the phase matrix, intensity (P11) and linear polarization (P12) provide extensive characterization of the scattering properties of the studied aerosol. The scattering coefficient, P11 and P12 were measured under different humidity conditions to obtain the enhancement factor f(RH) and the dependence of P11 and P12 to RH using a humidifier dryer system covering a RH range from 20 to 90%. The ratio between scattering coefficients at high and low humidity in Golden Colorado showed relatively low hygroscopic growth in the aerosol particles f(RH=80%) was 1.27±0.19 for the first three weeks of sampling. According to speciated measurements performed at the UMBC trailer, the predominance of dust and organic aerosols over more hygroscopic nitrate and sulfate in the

  6. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  7. The effect of organic aerosol material on aerosol reactivity towards ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, Anneke; Gaston, Cassandra; Thornton, Joel; Virtanen, Annele

    2015-04-01

    After aerosol particles are formed or emitted into the atmosphere, heterogeneous reactions with gaseous oxidants cause them to 'age'. Aging can change aerosol properties, such as the hygroscopicity, which is an important parameter in how the particles scatter radiation and form clouds. Conversely, heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles play a significant role in the cycles of various atmospheric trace gases. Organic compounds, a large part of the total global aerosol matter, can exist in liquid or amorphous (semi)solid physical phases. Different groups have shown that reactions with ozone (O3) can be limited by bulk diffusion in organic aerosol, particularly in viscous, (semi)solid materials, and that organic coatings alter the surface interactions between gas and aerosol particles. We aim to better understand and quantify how the viscosity and phase of organic aerosol matter affect gas-particle interactions. We have chosen the reaction of O3 with particles composed of a potassium iodide (KI) core and a variable organic coating as a model system. The reaction is studied in an aerosol flow reactor that consists of a laminar flow tube and a movable, axial injector for the injection of O3. The aerosol-containing air is inserted at the tube's top. The interaction length (and therefore time), between the particles and the O3 can be varied by moving the injector. Alternatively, the production of aerosol particles can be modulated. The remaining O3 concentration is monitored from the bottom of the tube and particle concentrations are measured simultaneously, which allows us to calculate the reactive uptake coefficient γ. We performed exploratory experiments with internally mixed KI and polyethylene glycol (PEG) particles at the University of Washington (UW) in a setup with a residence time around 50 s. Aerosol particles were generated in an atomizer from solutions with varying concentrations of KI and PEG and inserted into the flow tube after they were diluted and

  8. Some optical properties of smoke aerosol in Indonesia and tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, J. L.; Jensen, J. B.; Okada, K.; Ikegami, M.; Zaizen, Y.; Makino, Y.

    Aerosol light-scattering coefficient at 530 nm and its hygroscopic growth were determined in biomass-burning smoke in the lower atmosphere over Kalimantan and northern Australia during the 1997 dry-season fires. Both in and away from plumes, light-scattering was considerably greater in the Indonesian region and hygroscopic growth in scattering was also consistently greater. The relative increase in scattering, from 20% to 80% relative humidity, was typically 1.37 in northern Australian and 1.65 in Kalimantan. Limited aerosol light absorption data indicate relatively small absorption in the Indonesian smoke. In part these differences can be explained by different combustion phases, mixed flaming and smoldering in the Australian savanna fires compared with predominantly smoldering in Indonesia, although these and other concurrent measurements suggest that underground peat combustion may have made a significant contribution to the Indonesian smoke.

  9. Lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosols at Bandung, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Itabe, Toshikasu; Yasui, Motoaki; Aoki, Tetsuo; Nagai, Tomohiro; Fujimoto, Toshifumi; Hirota, Masao; Uchino, Osamu; Nuryanto, Agus; Kaloka Prabotosari, Sri; Hamdi, Saipul

    1998-08-01

    We installed a lidar system for observations of the stratospheric aerosols at Bandung, Indonesia on November 1996. The system employed the second harmonic wavelength (532 nm) of Nd:YAG laser. We can measure scattering ratio and depolarization of 532 nm, and Raman scattering of N2 (607 nm). The system works well and the stratospheric aerosols were detected between 18 km and about 35 km. Cirrus clouds are always observed between 10 km and tropopause and area around tropopause is clear except for cloud-like structures. Integrated backscattering coefficient (IBC) of the stratospheric aerosols in 1997 is about 6 X 10-5sr-1 level and smaller than the value observed in mid-latitude, corresponding to the higher tropopause in the equatorial region. Variation of IBC at Bandung seems to be small. It is yet not clear whether current aerosol load is background level or not. We need more long period observations to discuss about seasonal, QBO, and long term variation of aerosol load.

  10. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 2: Consideration of phase separation effects by an X-UNIFAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Elsa I.; Pankow, James F.

    A thermodynamic model is presented for predicting the formation of particulate matter (PM) within an aerosol that contains organic compounds, inorganic salts, and water. Neutral components are allowed to partition from the gas phase to the PM, with the latter potentially composed of both a primarily aqueous ( α) liquid phase and a primarily organic ( β) liquid phase. Partitioning is allowed to occur without any artificial restraints: when both α and β PM phases are present, ionic constituents are allowed to partition to both. X-UNIFAC.2, an extended UNIFAC method based on Yan et al. (1999. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria in mixed-solvent electrolyte systems using the group contribution concept. Fluid Phase Equilibria 162, 97-113), was developed for activity coefficient estimation. X-UNIFAC.2 utilizes the standard UNIFAC terms, a Debye-Hückel term, and a virial equation term that represents the middle-range (MR) contribution to activity coefficient effects. A large number (234) of MR parameters are already available from Yan et al. (1999). Six additional MR parameters were optimized here to enable X-UNIFAC.2 to account for interactions between the carboxylic acid group and Na +, Cl -, and Ca 2+. Predictions of PM formation were made for a hypothetical sabinene/O 3 system with varying amounts of NaCl in the PM. Predictions were also made for the chamber experiments with α-pinene/O 3 (and CaCl 2 seed) carried out by Cocker et al. (2001. The effect of water on gas-particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol. Part I. α-pinene/ozone system. Atmospheric Environment 35, 6049-6072); good agreement between the predicted and chamber-measured PM mass concentrations was achieved.

  11. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  12. Absorbing aerosols at high relative humidity: linking hygroscopic growth to optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. Michel; Bar-Or, R. Z.; Bluvshtein, N.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Kostinski, A.; Borrmann, S.; Koren, I.; Koren, I.; Rudich, Y.

    2012-06-01

    One of the major uncertainties in the understanding of Earth's climate system is the interaction between solar radiation and aerosols in the atmosphere. Aerosols exposed to high humidity will change their chemical, physical, and optical properties due to their increased water content. To model hydrated aerosols, atmospheric chemistry and climate models often use the volume weighted mixing rule to predict the complex refractive index (RI) of aerosols when they interact with high relative humidity, and, in general, assume homogeneous mixing. This study explores the validity of these assumptions. A humidified cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS) and a tandem hygroscopic DMA (differential mobility analyzer) are used to measure the extinction coefficient and hygroscopic growth factors of humidified aerosols, respectively. The measurements are performed at 80% and 90%RH at wavelengths of 532 nm and 355 nm using size-selected aerosols with different degrees of absorption; from purely scattering to highly absorbing particles. The ratio of the humidified to the dry extinction coefficients (fRHext(%RH, Dry)) is measured and compared to theoretical calculations based on Mie theory. Using the measured hygroscopic growth factors and assuming homogeneous mixing, the expected RIs using the volume weighted mixing rule are compared to the RIs derived from the extinction measurements. We found a weak linear dependence or no dependence of fRH(%RH, Dry) with size for hydrated absorbing aerosols in contrast to the non-monotonically decreasing behavior with size for purely scattering aerosols. No discernible difference could be made between the two wavelengths used. Less than 7% differences were found between the real parts of the complex refractive indices derived and those calculated using the volume weighted mixing rule, and the imaginary parts had up to a 20% difference. However, for substances with growth factor less than 1.15 the volume weighted mixing rule assumption

  13. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-07

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment.

  14. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie-Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-06-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October-May) and lower in the wet season (June-September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand.

  15. Development of a high-spectral-resolution lidar for continuous observation of aerosols in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Ristori, Pablo; Papandrea, Sebastian; Otero, Lidia; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of aerosol profiles using lidar is helpful for a quasi-real-time indication of aerosol concentration. For instance, volcanic ash concentration and its height distribution are essential information for plane flights. Depolarization ratio and multi-wavelength measurements are useful for characterizing aerosol types such as volcanic ash, smoke, dust, sea-salt, and air pollution aerosols. High spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and Raman scattering lidar can contribute to such aerosol characterization significantly since extinction coefficients can be measured independently from backscattering coefficients. In particular, HSRL can measure aerosol extinction during daytime and nighttime with a high sensitivity. We developed an HSRL with the iodine filter method for continuous observation of aerosols at 532nm in the northern region of Argentina in the framework of the South American Environmental Atmospheric Risk Management Network (SAVER.Net)/SATREPS project. The laser wavelength of the HSRL was controlled by a feedback system to tune the laser wavelength to the center of an iodine absorption line. The stability of the laser wavelength with the system satisfied the requirement showing very small systematic errors in the retrieval of extinction and backscatter.

  16. Modeling of optical wireless scattering communication channels over broad spectra.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao; Zou, Difan; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The air molecules and suspended aerosols help to build non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical scattering communication links using carriers from near infrared to visible light and ultraviolet bands. This paper proposes channel models over such broad spectra. Wavelength dependent Rayleigh and Mie scattering and absorption coefficients of particles are analytically obtained first. They are applied to the ray tracing based Monte Carlo method, which models the photon scattering angle from the scatterer and propagation distance between two consecutive scatterers. Communication link path loss is studied under different operation conditions, including visibility, particle density, wavelength, and communication range. It is observed that optimum communication performances exist across the wavelength under specific atmospheric conditions. Infrared, visible light and ultraviolet bands show their respective features as conditions vary.

  17. Improvement of aerosol optical depth retrieval from MODIS spectral reflectance over the global ocean using new aerosol models archived from AERONET inversion data and tri-axial ellipsoidal dust database data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yang, P.

    2011-12-01

    New over-ocean aerosol models are developed by integrating extensive AERONET inversion data and a database of the optical properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal dust particles. These models allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for high AOD cases. Spectral AOD, single scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function, which are used to calculate a lookup table (LUT), are archived by combining inversion data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometers and single-scattering properties from the tri-axial ellipsoidal dust database. The aerosol models are categorized from the AERONET data using the fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm and the SSA at 440 nm to resolve a variety of aerosol types throughout the globe. For each aerosol model, the changes in aerosol optical properties (AOP) are included as functions of AOD. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the new aerosol models improve correlation compared to the MODIS Collection 5 products with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85, respectively, for the MODIS operational algorithm. Moreover, use of the new algorithms increases the percentage of data within an expected error of ± (0.03 + 0.05 × AOD) from 62 to 64% overall and from 39 to 51% for high AOD cases (AOD > 0.3). Errors in the retrieved AOD are characterized further with respect to the Ångström exponent (AE), scattering angle (Θ), and air mass factor (AMF). Overall, the new aerosol models reduce systematic errors in AOD retrieval compared with the Collection 5 data due to realistic AOP assumptions. In particular, the scattering angle dependence of the retrieved AOD for dust cases is significantly mitigated due to improved treatment of the nonsphericity of dust particles by the new algorithm.

  18. Variability of aerosol optical depth and aerosol radiative forcing over Northwest Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Shaik Darga; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, D.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the aerosol loading in India is increasing that has significant impact on the weather/climatic conditions. The present study discusses the analysis of temporal (monthly and seasonal) variation of aerosol optical depth(AOD) by the ground based observations from sun photometer and estimate the aerosol radiative forcing and heating rate over selected station Dehradun in North western Himalayas, India during 2015. The in-situ measurements data illustrate that the maximum seasonal average AOD observed during summer season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.59+/-0.27 with an average angstrom exponent, α ≍0.86 while minimum during winter season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.33+/-0.10 with angstrom exponent, α ≍1.18. The MODIS and MISR derived AOD was also compared with the ground measured values and are good to be in good agreement. Analysis of air mass back trajectories using HYSPLIT model reveal that the transportation of desert dust during summer months. The Optical Properties of Aerosols and clouds (OPAC) model was used to compute the aerosol optical properties like single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom coefficient (α) and Asymmetry(g) parameter for each day of measurement and they are incorporated in a Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model, i.e Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) to estimate the direct short-wave (0.25 to 4 μm) Aerosol Radiative forcing at the Surface (SUR), the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and Atmosphere (ATM). The maximum Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) was observed during summer months at SUR ≍ -56.42 w/m2, at TOA ≍-21.62 w/m2 whereas in ATM ≍+34.79 w/m2 with corresponding to heating rate 1.24°C/day with in lower atmosphere.

  19. Atmospheric Teleconnection over Eurasia Induced by Aerosol Radiative Forcing During Boreal Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, K. M.; Chin, Mian; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, Greg K.

    2005-01-01

    The direct effects of aerosols on global and regional climate during boreal spring are investigated based on simulations using the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM) with Microphyics of clouds in Relaxed Arakawa Schubert Scheme (McRAS). The aerosol loading are prescribed from three-dimensional monthly distribution of tropospheric aerosols viz., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt from output of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor are computed as wavelength-dependent radiative forcing in the radiative transfer scheme of the fvGCM, and as a function of the aerosol loading and ambient relative humidity. We find that anomalous atmospheric heat sources induced by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) excites a planetary scale teleconnection pattern in sea level pressure, temperature and geopotential height spanning North Africa through Eurasia to the North Pacific. Surface cooling due to direct effects of aerosols is found in the vicinity and downstream of the aerosol source regions, i.e., South Asia, East Asia, and northern and western Africa. Additionally, atmospheric heating is found in regions with large loading of dust (over Northern Africa, and Middle East), and black carbon (over South-East Asia). Paradoxically, the most pronounced feature in aerosol-induced surface temperature is an east-west dipole anomaly with strong cooling over the Caspian Sea, and warming over central and northeastern Asia, where aerosol concentration are low. Analyses of circulation anomalies show that the dipole anomaly is a part of an atmospheric teleconnection driven by atmospheric heating anomalies induced by absorbing aerosols in the source regions, but the influence was conveyed globally through barotropic energy dispersion and sustained by feedback processes

  20. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes During Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, K. M.; Chin, Mian

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  1. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes during Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Chin, Mian; Kim, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and.black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  2. Influence of aerosols on propagation of intensive pulses of a CO2-laser of microsecond duration in the near-surface atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.

    2002-02-01

    The results of the field experiments on propagation of intensive pulses of CO2- laser on the near surface atmospheric path have been discussed. The data are given on non-linear aerosol scattering, luminescence of aerosol particles and plasma in a light beam and their influence on the beam characteristics. The field experiments have shown that the optical breakdown and thermal luminescence of aerosol particles are possible under the effect of the CO2-laser pulses. The heating aerosol particle up to the temperature, when the developed evaporation is occurred, yet does not guarantee the appearance of the plasma initiation core, which is capable to evolve in the regime of light detonation. At the thermal mechanism of development of equilibrium plasma the luminescence intensity maxims in different ranges of the spectrum coincide in time and occur after a maximum of an effecting pulse. The intensity fluctuations in the beam at the beginning of the pulse do not result in the luminescence fluctuations, which arise only to the end of a pulse. It testifies to an essential role of energy of a line-transmitted spectrum of the luminescence core, i.e., not too high temperatures (T approximately 103 K) and the pressures achievable at absorption by particles of energy of the initiating pulse. The thermal blooming of luminescent particles are new radiation sources with dimensions, exceeding the size of aerosol particles by two orders that results in the 104 increase of the scattering radiation. The essential part of the laser energy scattered on these blooming, as well as on shock waves, will be concentrated in a narrow angle in a forward direction, as their dielectric constant is less, than it is for aerosol particles. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient is higher than the calculated linear coefficient by one order. It is shown, that the overcondensation at explosive destruction of a water aerosol by fragments can also result in the considerable increase of scattering for

  3. Evaluation of ultraviolet radiation, ozone and aerosol interactions in the troposphere using automatic differentiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, G.R.; Potra, F.

    1998-10-06

    A major goal of this research was to quantify the interactions between UVR, ozone and aerosols. One method of quantification was to calculate sensitivity coefficients. A novel aspect of this work was the use of Automatic Differentiation software to calculate the sensitivities. The authors demonstrated the use of ADIFOR for the first time in a dimensional framework. Automatic Differentiation was used to calculate such quantities as: sensitivities of UV-B fluxes to changes in ozone and aerosols in the stratosphere and the troposphere; changes in ozone production/destruction rates to changes in UV-B flux; aerosol properties including loading, scattering properties (including relative humidity effects), and composition (mineral dust, soot, and sulfate aerosol, etc.). The combined radiation/chemistry model offers an important test of the utility of Automatic Differentiation as a tool in atmospheric modeling.

  4. Physical and chemical properties of aerosols at a coastal site Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Chand, D.; Wood, R.; Wallace, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Shaw, G. E.; Krejci, R.; Fochesatto, G. J.; Gallardo, L.

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) Regional Experiment (REx) and associated modeling program is an improved understanding of aerosol indirect effects over the southeast Pacific (SEP). Details on the program are available online at www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/. To this end, detailed aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made during REx at a coastal land site at Paposo (25o 0.4' S, 70o 27.011' W, 690 masl) in northern Chile, a site ideally positioned for studying continental aerosol sources advecting over the SEP. We present initial analysis of data from Paposo. Detailed measurements of aerosol properties were made from mid October to mid November 2008. Observations from optical particle counters (OPC), nephelometers, aethalometer, scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the chemical analysis of the submicron aerosols samples collected on teflon filters are being used in this study. Large variations in aerosols parameters were observed which corresponded with changes in meteorology, as determined using trajectory analysis. Ion Chromatograph (IC) analysis of submicron aerosol samples shows that about 41% of submicron mass is sulfate. The light scattering coefficient shows a strong non-linear correlation with aerosol size observed using an OPC. Detailed results will be presented in the AGU meeting.

  5. Long-Term Measurements of Carbon Monoxide and Aerosols at the ZOTTO tall tower, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Birmili, W.; Chi, X.; Heimann, M.; Heintzenberg, J.; Mikhailov, E.; Panov, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), operated by the Max Planck Institutes for Biogeochemistry and Chemistry and the Institute of Forest (Krasnoyarsk), is located at 89.35°E, 60.80°N, 114 m asl. at a very remote continental site in Siberia, Russia. It centers on a 300-m tower designed for scientific measurements of chemical (trace gases, aerosol) and physical (meteorological) properties. The instrumentation at the observatory includes a CO Monitor, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) for determining the aerosol absorption coefficient, a nephelometer for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient, and a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) to measure the aerosol number size distribution. We present measurements made from October 2006 until March 2011, with some interruptions due to technical reasons. An annual cycle of the background CO mixing rations was observed with summer minima around 90 ppb and winter maxima of about 175 ppb. Amplitude and phase of the annual cycle were generally similar to that reported by NOAA-ESRL for latitude 61°N, but showed an earlier onset of the elevated winter values. Episodes of elevated CO and aerosol concentrations, typically lasting for several days, are superimposed on the background seasonal cycle. During winter, these pollution episodes are usually associated with air masses that have passed over the central Siberian region around Omsk and Novosibirsk - a heavily industrialized area. During spring and summer, elevated levels of CO and aerosols are often caused by agricultural fires in southern Siberia and Kazakhstan or by forest fires in boreal Siberia. The optical properties of the aerosol showed more pronounced seasonal variability than the aerosol mass and number concentrations. Wintertime aerosols were highly absorbing, with single scattering albedos (SSA) around 0.85, consistent with a dominant fossil fuel combustion source. In contrast, summertime aerosols had very low absorption

  6. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  7. Hygroscopic Measurements of Aerosol Particles in the San Joaquin Valley California during the DRAGON and Discover AQ Campaign 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, D.; Delgado, R.; Hoff, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the ambient atmosphere, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH). Wet aerosols particles are larger than their dry equivalents, therefore they scatter more light. Quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient on aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth. The DISCOVER-AQ campaign is focused in improving the interpretation and relation between satellite observations and surface conditions related to air quality. In the winter of 2013, this campaign was held in the San Joaquin Valley, California, where systematic and concurrent observations of column integrated surface, and vertically resolved distributions of aerosols and trace gases relevant to air quality and their evolution during the day were observed. Different instruments such as particulate samplers, lidars, meteorological stations and airborne passive and active monitoring were coordinated to measure the aerosol structure of the San Joaquin Valley in a simultaneous fashion. A novel humidifier-dryer system for a TSI 3563 Nephelometer was implemented in the Penn State University NATIVE trailer located in Porterville California in order to measure the scattering coefficient σsp(λ) at three different wavelengths (λ=440, 550 and 700nm) in a RH range from 30 to 95%. The system was assembled by combining Nafion tubes to humidify and dry the aerosols and stepping motor valves to control the flow and the amount of humidity entering to the Nephelometer. Measurements in Porterville California reached dry scattering coefficient readings greater than 300Mm-1 at 550nm indicating the presence of a large amount of particles in the region. However, the ratio between scattering coefficients at high and low humidity, called the enhancement factor f

  8. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH{sup +} → C{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Stoecklin, Thierry; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH{sup +}, in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH{sup +} in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H{sub 2}, and e{sup −}. In this work, we address the destruction process of CH{sup +} by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH{sup +}. The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K–800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  9. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 1: Study of physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisok, J.; Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Makuch, P.; Petelski, T.; Chilinski, M.; Kaminski, J. W.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Rozwadowska, A.; Jefimow, M.; Markuszewski, P.; Neuber, R.; Pakszys, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Struzewska, J.; Zielinski, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties during iAREA2014 campaign that took place on Svalbard between 15th of Mar and 4th of May 2014. With respect to field area, the experiment consisted of two sites: Ny-Ålesund (78°55‧N, 11°56‧E) and Longyearbyen (78°13‧N, 15°33‧E) with further integration of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station in Hornsund (77°00‧N, 15°33‧E). The subject of this study is to investigate the in-situ, passive and active remote sensing observations as well as numerical simulations to describe the temporal variability of aerosol single-scattering properties during spring season on Spitsbergen. The retrieval of the data indicates several event days with enhanced single-scattering properties due to the existence of sulphate and additional sea-salt load in the atmosphere which is possibly caused by relatively high wind speed. Optical results were confirmed by numerical simulations made by the GEM-AQ model and by chemical observations that indicated up to 45% contribution of the sea-salt to a PM10 total aerosol mass concentration. An agreement between the in-situ optical and microphysical properties was found, namely: the positive correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient measured by the nephelometer and effective radius obtained from laser aerosol spectrometer as well as negative correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent indicated that slightly larger particles dominated during special events. The in-situ surface observations do not show any significant enhancement of the absorption coefficient as well as the black carbon concentration which might occur during spring. All of extensive single-scattering properties indicate a diurnal cycle in Longyearbyen, where 21:00-5:00 data stays at the background level, however increasing during the day by the factor of 3-4. It is considered to be highly connected with local emissions originating

  10. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval from MODIS Spectral Reflectance over the Global Ocean Using New Aerosol Models Archived from AERONET Inversion Data and Tri-axial Ellipsoidal Dust Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yang, P.; Hsu, N. C.

    2012-01-01

    New over-ocean aerosol models are developed by integrating the inversion data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun/sky radiometers with a database for the optical properties of tri-axial ellipsoid particles. The new aerosol models allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in the case of high AOD (AOD greater than 0.3). The aerosol models are categorized by using the fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm and the singlescattering albedo (SSA) at 440 nm from the AERONET inversion data to include a variety of aerosol types found around the globe. For each aerosol model, the changes in the aerosol optical properties (AOPs) as functions of AOD are considered to better represent aerosol characteristics. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the use of the new aerosol models enhances the AOD accuracy with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85 calculated using the MODIS Collection 5 data. Moreover, the percentage of data within an expected error of +/-(0.03 + 0.05xAOD) is increased from 62 percent to 64 percent for overall data and from 39 percent to 51 percent for AOD greater than 0.3. Errors in the retrieved AOD are further characterized with respect to the Angstrom exponent (AE), scattering angle, SSA, and air mass factor (AMF). Due to more realistic AOPs assumptions, the new algorithm generally reduces systematic errors in the retrieved AODs compared with the current operational algorithm. In particular, the underestimation of fine-dominated AOD and the scattering angle dependence of dust-dominated AOD are significantly mitigated as results of the new algorithm's improved treatment of aerosol size distribution and dust particle nonsphericity.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  12. Long-term measurements of aerosol optical parameters in Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskevopoulou, Despoina; Liakakou, Eleni; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol chemical composition was studied in conjunction with its optical properties in the area of Athens Greece. For this purpose, sampling of fine aerosol fraction (PM2,5) took place on a daily basis from August 2010 to April 2013 at an urban background location. The samples are subsequently analyzed for their content in organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), major ions and trace metals, resulting in the exercise of chemical mass closure. In parallel, the optical properties of aerosols are recorded using a nephelometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP), leading to the calculation of scattering (σscat) and absorption (σabs) coefficients, respectively; while single scattering albedo (SSA) and mass scattering and absorption efficiencies are thereinafter calculated. Daily σscat values provide an average of 30.1±3.9 Μm-1 while, the average of σabs is 5.2±1.4 Μm-1. The seasonal cycle of σscat presents maximum during summer and in November, due to long-range transport of aerosol from continental Europe and dust transfer from Africa, respectively. The estimated mass absorption efficiency of EC is estimated to be 8.3±0.2 m2 g-1 for the whole studied period, while the corresponding estimated mass scattering efficiency of PM2.5 is 1.7±0.1 m2 g-1 and does not affected by the presence of dust. The average SSA equals to 0.87±0.11 for the three-year period. On a seasonal basis, SSA presents maximum values during summer that is consistent with the reduction of EC - the main absorbing specie. Finally, the reconstruction of scattering coefficients was performed taking into consideration the measured chemistry of fine aerosol.

  13. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of tar balls observed during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. L.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, A.; Day, D.; Lee, T.; Wang, C.; Carrico, C.; Carrillo, J.; Cowin, J. P.; Collett, J.; Iedema, M. J.

    2005-11-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western United States and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field-collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or "tar balls," were present in samples collected during episodes of high particle light scattering coefficients that occurred during the peak of a smoke/haze event. The highest concentrations of light-absorbing carbon from a dual-wavelength aethalometer (λ = 370 and 880 nm) occurred during periods when the particles were predominantly tar balls, indicating they do absorb light in the UV and near-IR range of the solar spectrum. Closure experiments of mass concentrations and light scattering coefficients during periods dominated by tar balls did not require any distinct assumptions of organic carbon molecular weight correction factors, density, or refractive index compared to periods dominated by other types of organic carbon aerosols. Measurements of the hygroscopic behavior of tar balls using an environmental SEM indicate that tar balls do not exhibit deliquescence but do uptake some water at high (˜83%) relative humidity. The ability of tar balls to efficiently scatter and absorb light and to absorb water has important implications for their role in regional haze and climate forcing.

  14. Impact of North American intense fires on aerosol optical properties measured over the European Arctic in July 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Pakszys, P.; Ritter, C.; Zielinski, T.; Udisti, R.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Shiobara, M.; Xian, P.; Zawadzka, O.; Lisok, J.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Karasiński, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper impact of intensive biomass burning (BB) in North America in July 2015, on aerosol optical and microphysical properties measured in the European Arctic, is discussed. This study was made within the framework of the Impact of Absorbing aerosols on Radiating forcing in the European Arctic project. During the BB event aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm exceeded 1.2 in Spitsbergen and 0.7 in Andenes (Norway). Angstrom exponent exceeded 1.4, while the absorbing Angstrom exponent varied between 1 and 1.25. BB aerosols were observed in humid atmosphere with a total water vapor column between 2 and 2.5 cm. In such conditions aerosols are activated and may produce clouds at different altitudes. Vertical structure of aerosol plumes over Svalbard, obtained from ceilometers and lidars, shows variability of range-corrected signal between surface and middle and upper troposphere. Aerosol backscattering coefficients show values up to 10-5 m-1 sr-1 at 532 nm. Aerosol surface observations indicate chemical composition typical for biomass burning particles and very high single scattering properties. Scattering and absorption coefficients at 530 nm were up to 130 and 15 Mm-1, respectively. Single scattering albedo at the surface varied from 0.9 to 0.94. The averaged values over the entire atmospheric column ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. Preliminary statistics of model and Sun photometer data as well as previous studies indicate that this event, in the Arctic region, must be considered extreme (such AOD was not observed in Svalbard since 2005) with a significant impact on energy budget.

  15. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  16. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  17. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  18. Determination of second virial coefficient of proteins using a dual-detector cell for simultaneous measurement of scattered light intensity and concentration in SEC-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Harminder; Sharma, Vikas K; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2004-12-01

    A method is proposed for the measurement of the B22 value of proteins in aqueous solutions in flow-mode that utilizes a novel fabricated dual-detector cell, which simultaneously measures protein concentration and the corresponding scattered light intensity at 90 degrees , after the protein elutes from a size-exclusion column. Each data point on the chromatograms obtained from the light scattering detector and the concentration (ultraviolet) detector is converted to Rayleigh's ratio, Rtheta, and concentration, c, respectively. The B22 value is calculated from the slope of the Debye plot (Kc/Rtheta versus c) generated from a range of concentrations obtained from these chromatograms for a single protein injection. It is shown that this method provides reliable determination of the B22 values for such proteins as lysozyme, chymotrypsinogen, and chymotrypsin in various solution conditions that agree well with those reported in literature.

  19. Multiwavelength Comparison of Modeled and Measured Remote Tropospheric Aerosol Backscatter Over Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol concentrations and size distributions in the middle and upper troposphere over the remote Pacific Ocean were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. The FSSP size channels were recalibrated based on refractive index estimates from flight-level aerosol volatility measurements with a collocated laser optical particle counter (LOPC). The recalibrated FSSP size distributions were averaged over 100-s intervals, fitted with lo-normal distributions and used to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients at selected wavelengths. The FSSP-derived backscatter estimates were averaged over 300-s intervals to reduce large random fluctuations. The smoothed FSSP aerosol backscatter coefficients were then compared with LOPC-derived backscatter values and with backscatter measured at or near flight level from four lidar systems operating at 0.53, 1.06, 9.11, 9.25, and 10.59 micrometers. Agreement between FSSP-derived and lidar-measured backscatter was generally best at flight level in homogeneous aerosol fields and at high backscatter values. FSSP data often underestimated low backscatter values especially at the longer wavelengths due to poor counting statistics for larger particles (greater than 0.8 micrometers diameter) that usually dominate aerosol backscatter at these wavelengths. FSSP data also underestimated backscatter at shorter wavelengths when particles smaller than the FSSP lower cutoff diameter (0.35 micrometers) made significant contributions to the total backscatter.

  20. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  1. Seasonal variability of optical properties of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrekoussis, M.; Liakakou, E.; Koçak, M.; Kubilay, N.; Oikonomou, K.; Sciare, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    The aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients) were investigated at two remote locations in the Eastern Mediterranean in conjunction with aerosol ion composition measurements: Finokalia in the Crete Island in Greece (March 2001-June 2002) and Erdemli in Turkey (July 1999-June 2000). Ambient light-scattering coefficient ( σsp-532 nm ) at Finokalia had a mean value of 50±23 Mm -1 while at Erdemli this value was 90±160 Mm -1, due to a severe dust event that occurred from 17 to 19 April 2000. Scattering coefficients up to 5000 Mm -1 were encountered during the transition periods (spring and autumn) and were associated with dust storm events. During these events significant correlations were observed between dust and σsp and mass scattering efficiencies of 0.21 and 0.96 m 2g -1 were calculated for dust for Finokalia and Erdemli, respectively. Significant correlations were also observed at both locations between non-sea-salt sulphate (nss-SO 42-); σsp and mass scattering efficiencies of 5.9±1.8 and 5.7±1.4 m 2g -1 were calculated for the nss-SO 42- at Finokalia and Erdemli, respectively. At Finokalia absorption measurements were also performed at the same time and the mean absorption coefficient ( σap-565 nm ) was found to be 5.6±3.6 Mm -1. Maxima of absorption coefficient were associated with two distinct meteorological situations indicative of pollution transported from northern Europe and Saharan dust events. Saharan dust can therefore significantly contribute to both scattering and absorption of solar radiation, the latter due to its hematite content. Based on scattering and absorption measurements, an annual mean single-scattering albedo ( ω) adjusted at 550 nm of 0.89±0.04 was calculated for Finokalia. Finally, radiative forcing efficiency (RFE) over the sea at 550 nm induced by aerosols has been calculated for Finokalia. RFE follows a clear seasonal variation, with the lowest mean values during summer (-73W m -2) and the highest

  2. Effect of Wind Speed on Aerosol Optical Depth over Remote Oceans, Based on Data from the Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hsu, N. C.; Sakerin, S. M.; Macke, A.; Nelson, N. B.; Courcoux, Y.; Smyth, T. J.; Croot, P.; Quinn, P. K.; Sciare, J.; Gulev, S. K.; Piketh, S.; Losno, R.; Kinne, S.; Radionov, V. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. The MAN archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we investigate correlations between ship-borne aerosol optical depth (AOD) and near-surface wind speed, either measured (onboard or from satellite) or modeled (NCEP). According to our analysis, wind speed influences columnar aerosol optical depth, although the slope of the linear regression between AOD and wind speed is not steep (approx. 0.004 - 0.005), even for strong winds over 10m/s. The relationships show significant scatter (correlation coefficients typically in the range 0.3 - 0.5); the majority of this scatter can be explained by the uncertainty on the input data. The various wind speed sources considered yield similar patterns. Results are in good agreement with the majority of previously published relationships between surface wind speed and ship-based or satellite-based AOD measurements. The basic relationships are similar for all the wind speed sources considered; however, the gradient of the relationship varies by around a factor of two depending on the wind data used

  3. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    ) two well-characterized source of soot particles and (b) a flow reactor for controlled OH and/or O3 oxidation of relevant gas phase species to produce well-characterized SOA particles. After formation, the aerosol particles are subjected to physical and chemical processes that simulate aerosol growth and aging. A suite of instruments in our laboratory is used to characterize the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles before and after processing. The Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ToF-AMS) together with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measures particle mass, volume, density, composition (including black carbon content), dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. The–ToF-AMS was developed at ARI with Boston College participation. About 120 AMS instruments are now in service (including 5 built for DOE laboratories) performing field and laboratory studies world-wide. Other major instruments include a thermal denuder, two Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA), a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCN), a Thermal desorption Aerosol GC/MS (TAG) and the new Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). Optical instrumentation required for the studies have been brought to our laboratory as part of ongoing and planned collaborative projects with colleagues from DOE, NOAA and university laboratories. Optical instruments that will be utilized include a Photoacoustic Spectrometer (PAS), a Cavity Ring Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD-AES), a Photo Thermal Interferometer (PTI), a new 7-wavelength Aethalometer and a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Extinction Monitor (CAPS). These instruments are providing aerosol absorption, extinction and scattering coefficients at a range of atmospherically relevant wavelengths. During the past two years our work has continued along the lines of our original proposal. We report on 12 completed and/or continuing projects conducted during the period 08/14 to 0814/2015. These projects are described in

  4. EXTENSION OF THE INVERSE ADDING-DOUBLING METHOD TO THE MEASUREMENT OF WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING COEFFICIENTS OF BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allegood, M.S.; Baba, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Light interaction with biological tissue can be described using three parameters: the scattering and absorption coeffi cients (μs and μa), as well as the anisotropy (g) which describes the directional dependence of the scattered photons. Accurately determining these optical properties for different tissue types at specifi c wavelengths simultaneously would be benefi cial for a variety of different biomedical applications. The goal of this project was to take a user defi ned g-value and determine the remaining two parameters for a specifi ed wavelength range. A fully automated computer program and process was developed to collect data for all wavelengths in a timely and accurate manner. LabVIEW® was used to write programs to automate raw intensity data collection from a spectrometer equipped integrating sphere, conversion of the data into a format for analysis via Scott Prahl’s Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) C code execution, and fi nally computation of the optical properties based on the output from the IAD code. To allow data to be passed effi ciently between LabVIEW® and C code program modules, the two were combined into a single program (OPT 3.1). OPT 3.1 was tested using tissue mimicking phantoms. Determination of the absorption and scattering coeffi cients showed excellent agreement with theory for wavelengths where the user inputted single g-value was suffi ciently precise. Future improvements entail providing for multi-wavelength g-value entry to extend the accuracy of results to encompass the complete multispectral range. Ultimately, the data collection process and algorithms developed through this effort will be used to examine actual biological tissues for the purpose of building and refi ning models for light-tissue interactions.

  5. Determination of the broadband optical properties of biomass burning aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    The direct and semi-direct effects of atmospheric aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are still the two of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of anthropogenic radiative forcing. In this study we developed a new approach for determining high sensitivity broadband UV-Vis spectrum (300-650 nm) of extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo and the complex refractive index for continuous, spectral and time dependent, monitoring of polydisperse aerosols population. This new approach was applied in a study of biomass burning aerosol. Extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients (αext, αsca, αabs, respectively) were continually monitored using photoacoustic spectrometer coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer (PA-CRD-AS) at 404 nm, a dual-channel Broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer (BBCES) at 315-345 nm and 390-420 nm and a three channel integrating nephelometer (IN) centered at 457, 525 and 637 nm. During the biomass burning event, the measured aerosol number concentration increased by more than an order of magnitude relative to other week nights and the mode of the aerosols size distribution increased from 40-50 nm to 110nm diameter. αext and αsca increased by a factor of about 5.5 and 4.5, respectively. The αabs increased by a factor over 20, indicating a significant change in the aerosol overall chemical composition. The imaginary part of the complex RI at 404nm increased from its background level at about 0.02 to a peak of about 0.08 and the SSA decreased from 0.9 to about 0.6. Significant change of the absorption spectral dependence indicates formation of visible-light absorbing compounds. The mass absorption cross section of the water soluble organic aerosol (MACWSOA) reached up to about 12% of the corresponding value for black carbon (BC) at 450 nm and up to 30% at 300 nm. These results demonstrate the importance of biomass burning in understanding global and regional radiative forcing.

  6. Radar Scattering from the Summer Polar Mesosphere: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, John Yungdo Nagamichi

    The anomalously large radar reflectivities observed in the summer polar mesosphere have eluded satisfactory explanation until now. We propose that the following chain of causality is responsible for the so-called polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE): The uniquely low temperatures in the summer mesopause produce ice aerosols. Because the aerosols exist in a plasma, they become electrically charged. The ambient electrons become coupled to the aerosols through electric fields and their effective diffusivity is retarded due to the large size of the aerosols. The reduction in diffusivity allows electron density inhomogeneities to be maintained at the radar Bragg scales. The radar waves are then scattered by the inhomogeneities. We support the above concept by developing a quantitative theory of ambipolar diffusion in the mesosphere. We then apply the results to isotropic turbulence and Fresnel radar scatter to show that the observed radar reflectivities can be explained by the theory. We show that the presence of realistic charged aerosols are sufficient to explain PMSE. We also show that dressed aerosol radar scatter, proposed by others as a generation mechanism for PMSE, can only apply to echoes detected by UHF radars. We present data taken with the Sondrestrom 1.29-GHz radar, which we believe to be the first PMSE event observed above one gigahertz, and attribute it to dressed aerosol scatter. In the summer of 1991, we used the Cornell University portable radar interferometer (CUPRI) to observe the mesosphere while rockets carrying in situ sensors were flown through two PMSE occurrences and a noctilucent cloud/PMSE event. We present a selection of first results from this campaign (NLC-91). The first simultaneous height comparison between noctilucent clouds and PMSE show that the radar scattering region was near or slightly above the visible cloud layer. We also infer from aspect sensitivity measurements and Doppler spectrograms that there were two distinct types of

  7. Scattering of a CO2 laser beam at 10.6 microns by bare soils: Experimental study of the polarized bidirectional scattering coefficient - Model and comparison with directional emissivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerry, Francoise; Stoll, Marc P.; Kologo, Noaga

    1991-09-01

    The bistatic polarized scattering by bare soil samples of a CO2 laser beam at 10.6 microns has been experimentally studied. Large differences between HH and VV curves are usually observed, particularly in the forward plane. A simple phenomenological parameterization is proposed, based on the assumption of totally incoherent scattering by a rough medium. The normalized function F(theta)/F(0) accounting for slope distribution and shadowing is found from angular backscatter to be of the form cos super m(theta), with m = 5.24 for all samples. This result is generalized to account for the bistatic case. The index of refraction of the medium is obtained from the ratio of HH and VV curves in the forward plane. Good agreement is found between experimental and calculated curves in the case of sand. The directional reflectivity and emissivity are calculated and compare well with experimental data.

  8. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  9. Systematic aerosol characterization by combining GOME-2 UV Aerosol Indices with trace gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Stammes, P.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    The task of determining aerosol type using passive remote sensing instruments is a daunting one. First, because the variety in aerosol (optical) properties is very large; and second, because the effect of aerosols on the detected top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectrum is smooth and mostly featureless. In addition, spectrometers like GOME-2 have a coarse spatial resolution, which makes aerosol characterization even more difficult due to interferences with clouds. On account of these problems, we do not attempt to derive aerosol properties from single measurements: instead, we combine time series of UV Aerosol Index and trace gas concentrations to derive the dominating aerosol type for each season. Aside from the Index values and trace gas concentrations themselves, the correlation between UV Aerosol Indices (which are indicative of aerosol absorption) with NO2, HCHO, and CHOCHO columns - or absence of it - provides clues to the (main) source of the aerosols in the investigated region and time range. For example: a high correlation of HCHO and Absorbing Aerosol Index points to aerosols from biomass burning, highly correlated CHOCHO, HCHO, and SCattering Index indicate biogenic secondary organic aerosols, and coinciding high NO2 concentrations with high SCattering Index values are associated with industrial and urban aerosols. We here present case studies for several regions to demonstrate the suitability of our approach. Then, we introduce a method to systematically derive the dominating aerosol type on a global scale on time scales varying from monthly to yearly.

  10. Second virial coefficient of one dimensional gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, M.

    1982-08-01

    The second virial coefficient of a one dimensional gas is calculated using the expressions for the scattering amplitude. The scattering amplitude is chosen in the form of rational function of wave vector.

  11. Source attribution of climatically important aerosol properties measured at Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Wood, R.; Shaw, G. E.; Wallace, D.; Covert, D. S.

    2010-11-01

    Measurements of submicron aerosol composition, light scattering, and size distribution were made from 17 October to 15 November 2008 at the elevated Paposo site (25° 0.4' S, 70° 27.01' W, 690 m a.s.l.) on the Chilean coast as part of the VOCALS* Regional Experiment (REx). Based on the chemical composition measurements, a receptor modeling analysis using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was carried out, yielding four broad source categories of the aerosol mass, light scattering coefficient, and a proxy for cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration at 0.4% supersaturation derived from the size distribution measurements assuming an observed soluble mass fraction of 0.53. The sources resolved were biomass burning, marine, an urban-biofuels mix and a somewhat ambiguous mix of smelter emissions and mineral dust. The urban-biofuels mix is the most dominant aerosol mass component (52%) followed by biomass burning (25%), smelter/soil dust (12%) and marine (9%) sources. The average (mean±std) submicron aerosol mass concentration, aerosol light scattering coefficient and proxy CCN concentration were, 8.77±5.40 μg m-3, 21.9±11.0 Mm-1 and 548±210 cm-3, respectively. Sulfate is the dominant identified submicron species constituting roughly 40% of the dry mass (3.64±2.30 μg m-3), although the indentified soluble species constitute only 53% of the mass. Much of the unidentified mass is likely organic in nature. The relative importance of each aerosol source category is different depending upon whether mass, light scattering, or CCN concentration is being considered, indicating that the mean size of aerosols associated with each source are different. Marine aerosols do not appear to contribute to more than 10% to either mass, light scattering, or CCN concentration at this site. Back trajectory cluster analysis proved consistent with the PMF source attribution. *VOCALS: VAMOS** Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS) **VAMOS: Variability of American Monsoon

  12. Source attribution of climatically important aerosol properties measured at Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Wood, R.; Shaw, G. E.; Wallace, D.; Covert, D. S.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements of submicron aerosol composition, light scattering, and size distribution were made from 17 October to 15 November 2008 at the elevated Paposo site (25° 0.4' S, 70°27.01' W, 690 m a.s.l.) on the Chilean coast as part of the VOCALS1 Regional Experiment (REx). Based on the chemical composition measurements, a receptor modeling analysis using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was carried out, yielding four broad source categories of the aerosol mass, light scattering coefficient, and a proxy for cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration at 0.4% supersaturation derived from the size distribution measurements assuming an observed soluble mass fraction of 0.53. The sources resolved were biomass burning, marine, an urban-biofuels mix and a somewhat ambiguous mix of smelter emissions and mineral dust. The urban-biofuels mix is the most dominant aerosol mass component (52%) followed by biomass burning (25%), smelter/soil dust (12%) and marine (9%) sources. The average (mean±std) submicron aerosol mass concentration, aerosol light scattering coefficient and proxy CCN concentration were, 8.77±5.40 μg m-3, 21.9±11.0 Mm-1 and 548±210 cm-3, respectively. Sulfate is the dominant identified submicron species constituting roughly 40% of the dry mass (3.64±2.30 μg m-3, although the indentified soluble species constitute only 53% of the mass. Much of the unidentified mass is likely organic in nature. The relative importance of each aerosol source category is different depending upon whether mass, light scattering, or CCN concentration is being considered, indicating that the mean size of aerosols associated with each source are different. Marine aerosols do not appear to contribute to more than 10% to either mass, light scattering, or CCN concentration at this site. Back trajectory cluster analysis proved consistent with the PMF source attribution. 1 VOCALS: VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS)VAMOS: Variability of American Monsoon System

  13. A Preliminary Report on X-Ray Photoabsorption Coefficients andAtomic Scattering Factors for 92 Elements in the 10-10,000 eVRegion

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, B.L.; Davis, J.C.; Gullikson, E.M.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1988-11-01

    Based on currently available photoabsorption measurements and recent theoretical calculations by Doolen and Liberman (Physica Scripta 36, 77 (1987)), a revised (from ADNDT 27, 1 (1982)) best-fit determination of the photoabsorption cross sections is presented here for the elements Z=1 to Z=92 in the 10-10,000 eV range. The photoabsorption data used include those described in the Lockheed and DOE listings of research abstracts for the past ten years and those which have been recently added to the comprehensive NBS Measured Data Base (NBSIR 86-3461, Hubbell et al.). The best-fit curves are compared with both the compilation of measurements and the calculations by Doolen and Liberman. Using the photoabsorption curves, the atomic scattering factors have been calculated for the energy range 50-10,000 eV and are also presented in this report.

  14. Binary diffusion coefficients for mixtures of ionic liquids [EMIM][N(CN)2], [EMIM][NTf2], and [HMIM][NTf2] with acetone and ethanol by dynamic light scattering (DLS).

    PubMed

    Rausch, Michael H; Hopf, Lisa; Heller, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred; Fröba, Andreas P

    2013-02-28

    Mutual diffusivities for binary mixtures of the ionic liquids (ILs) [EMIM][N(CN)2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanimide), [EMIM][NTf2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide), and [HMIM][NTf2] (1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) with acetone and ethanol were studied in dependence on composition in the temperature range from 283.15 to 323.15 K, applying dynamic light scattering (DLS). The influence of experimental parameters on the achievable uncertainties was analyzed to ensure the acquisition of accurate data in adequate measurement times. For all probed systems, increasing binary diffusion coefficients were found for increasing temperatures. The systematic variation of anion and cation of the investigated ILs as well as a comparison with the literature data demonstrates the considerable influence of different ions on the resulting binary diffusion coefficients. Mutual diffusivities were found to be lower for the mixtures with ethanol than for those with acetone, which could be related to the formation of hydrogen bonds between ethanol and the ions. Most of the investigated IL solvent mixtures show increasing binary diffusion coefficients with increasing solvent concentration. For the mixtures of [EMIM][NTf2] with ethanol, however, a minimum of the mutual diffusivities was found in the ethanol mole fraction range from 0.7 to 0.8, which may hint at the vicinity of a critical demixing point. The viscosity of the pure ILs turned out to be no reliable indicator for the mutual diffusivity in mixtures with the same solvent.

  15. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    , accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged